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leans, where it lay in camp until the 23d of March, 18G4, when it moved up to Baton Rouge.

The " Banks Expedition," as it was afterward named, began to assume proportion. Toward
the latter part of April the Thirteenth Army Corps was ordered to re-enforce General Banks, then
at Alexandria, and about to move on Shreveport, Louisiana. On the 1st of May the One Hun-
dred and Twentieth embarked on the City Belle, with orders to report to General McClernand,
who had recently assumed command of the Thirteenth Corps, at Alexandria. At four P. M.,
while the transport bearing the One Hundred and Twentieth was turning a bend on Red River, a
short distance above Snaggy Point, a body of the enemy, at least five thousand in number, sud-
denly rose from a concealed position behind the levee, on the south bank of the river, and poured
a murderous volley into the boat. The enemy's batteries also opened on the ill-fated boat, and it
was almost instantly rendered unmanageable by a shell. Colonel Spiegel, in command, deter-
mined to hold the boat until the arrival of the gunboat Monarch, which had convoyed the City
Belle from the mouth of Red River to Snaggy Point. But the odds were too great, and, after a



One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio Infantry. 617

gallant resistance for half an hour, the white flag was displayed. Two or three companies on the
lower deck, not seeing the emblem of surrender, kept on firing, which so incensed the enemy
that he also renewed the fire from both artillery and infantry. The boat, now totally unmanage-
able, floated to the opposite shore from the enemy, and a large portion of the regiment jumped
ashore and escaped over the levee. Others remained on the boat, prevented from ascending the
bank by the rapid firing of the enemy, covering the only spot at which the bank could be scaled.
To prevent further effusion of blood, the white flag was again displayed and a formal surrender
effected.

Colonel Spiegel, Surgeon Stanton, Assistant-Surgeon Gill, Captains J. R. Rummel, Miller,
Fraunfelder, and Jones, Lieutenants Applegate, Baer, and Rouch, and two hundred men fell into
the hands of the Rebels, beside the bodies of the killed. The gallant Colonel Marcus M. Spiegel
was mortally wounded, and died on the following morning. The prisoners were at once marched
off to Camp Ford, near Tyler, Texas.

After a terrible march, enduring the intense heat, the pangs of hunger, and heartless treat-
ment, the wretched captives reached Camp Ford on the 21st of May. In this miserable prison,
they remained over a year, and until the final cessation of hostilities in 1865.

Those who were fortunate enough to escape formed themselves into a battalion of three com-
panies, under Lieutenant-Colonel Slocum, coming together for that purpose about one mile from
the scene of disaster. Recognizing at once the folly of attempting to rescue their comrades from
captivity, the battalion resolved to husband the remaining ammunition and use it to defend them-
selves against the guerrilla bands infesting the country between them and Alexandria. A fatigu-
ing march of twenty-three hours brought them to Alexandria, where they reported to General
Banks, were kindly cared for by that General and his staff, and furnished with rations, clothing,
camp equipage, and comfortable quarters. This remnant of the One Hundred and Twentieth was
assigned to duty on the 12th of May in the division commanded by General Lawler.

On the 13th of May General Banks began his memorable retreat. The One Hundred and
Twentieth, having shared its hardships and privations, reached the Mississippi River on the 21st
of May, and went into camp at Morganza, Louisiana, where it remained until the 23d of August.
On that day it started with its division on an expedition into Eastern Louisiana, and after dis-
persing a Rebel force near Clinton, Louisiana, returned to Morganza.

On the 13th of September the One Hundred and Twentieth left Morganza again and pro-
ceeded up the Mississippi to the mouth of White River, thence up that river to St. Charles,
Arkansas. On the 21st of October General Slack's brigade, of General McGinnis's division, to
which the One Hundred and Twentieth now belonged, moved up to Duvall's Bluff, Arkansas,
and on the 27th returned to the mouth of White River. A second expedition was made to
Duvall's Bluff, returning to the mouth of White River on the 24th of November.

On the 25th of November an order was issued from the head-quarters of Nineteenth Army
Corps for a permanent consolidation of the One Hundred and Twentieth with the One Hundred
and Fourteenth Ohio, and carried into effect the next day, the One Hundred and Twentieth form-
ing five companies of the new organization. Lieutenant-Colonel Kelly, of the One Hundred and
Fourteenth Ohio, was made Colonel, and Major McKinley, of the One Hundred and Twentieth,
Lieutenant-Colonel of the consolidated regiment. The following named officers of the One Hun-
dred and Twentieth, rendered supernumerary by the consolidation, were honorably discharged :
Lieutenant-Colonel Slocum, Captains Au, Harvey, Taylor, and Jones, and Lieutenants Van
Osteren and Hughes.

This ended the career of the One Hundred and Twentieth as a regimental organization. It
entered the service in 1862 with nine hundred and forty-nine officers and men. About one hun-
dred and fifty recruits joined it in 1864, and when merged into the One Hundred and Fourteenth
Ohio, on the 27th day of November, 1864, but four hundred and forty of the whole number
remained. Up to this time the aggregate number of killed in action, died of wounds and dis-
ease, and discharged because of disability, was six hundred.



618



Ohio in the War.



121st REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTEH, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF SANK.



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

Do

Do

Lt. Colonel

Do

Do

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do! ;;;:.'...::

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



WM. P. REED ,

HENRY B. BANNING....,
AARON B. ROBINSON...

Wm. S. Irwin

Henry B. Banning ,

Marcus C. Lawrence ,

Aaron B. Robinson

Jacob M. Banning

Reason R. Henderson

John Yeager

David Lloyd

Aaron B. Robinson

David W. Henderson

Jacob M. Banning

Joshua Van Bremmer

T. B. Williams

H. M. Bassf.tt

S. S. SCOVILLE

Nathan S. Hill

T. Critchfield

George A. Haise

Lemuel F. Drake

Marcus 0. Lawrence

Wilson Martin.

Nelson W. Cone

Samuel Sharps

David Lloyd.

Harrison Stevens

John Yeager

Peter Cockerill

Aaron B. Robin6on

Benj. F. Odor ,

Marshall B. Clason

Silas Emerson

David W. Henderson ,

Joshua Van Bremmer

Jacob M. Banning

Ebenezer Peters ,

Lvman Spaulding

Theodore C. Fitch

Stephen B. Moorehouse

Wm. T. Barr

James A. Porter

Jefferson J. Irvine

Thomas C. Lewis

C. R. Van Houten

Charles P. Caris

Benj. Banker

James A. Moore

Miles II. Lewis

Robert Kerr

Otway Curry

Mahlon E. Willoughby

Daniel Gillson

James H. Ball

Orlando M. Scott

Henry B. Collins

John L. Porter

Benj. B. Smith

Dan. J. Matthews

Isaac D. Irwin

Miles L. Adams

Marshall B. Clason

Ebeuezer Peters

David W. Henderson

Chauncy L. Barlow

Joshua Van Bremmer

Joseph A. Sheble

Jacob M. Banning

Wm. McGaughey

John Denny

Eli Whitney

AnJrew Dockum „.

Silas Emerson

Lyman Spaulding

Theodore C. Fitch

Stephen B. Moorehouse

Wm. B. Dunbar

Wm. F. Barr

Linus A. Patrick

Thomas R. Marshall

Robert Flemming

James A. Porter

Elisha B. Cook

Thomas C. Lewis



Aug. 22,

Nov. 4,

May 18,

Aug. 18,

March 17,

Nov. 4,

Jan. 28,

May 18,

Sept. 10,

April 5,

July 15,

Aug. 29,

Jan. 28,

March 22,

May 18,

Sept. 1,

April 10,

Sept. 1,



May
April
Sept.
Aug.



30,

1,

19,

9,

11.

11,

12,

" 12,

" 13,

14,

" 15,

" 16,

Sept. 11,

Jan. 9,

Oct. 8,

March 26,

May 12,

April 5,

March 31,

31,

April



1862
1865
1862

1863
1864
1 862



Jan.

Nov.

May

Sept.

March

Nov.

Jan.

Mav

Sept.

May

July

Aug.

Jan.

March

May

Sept.

April

Sept.

Jan.

May

April

Sept.



July



Aug.



Jan.



April 20,
20,
20,
26,
22,
31,

April 26,
May 22,
31,
31,
31,
31,
15,
29,
15,
11,
11,
1,



May



Sept.
Aug.



May
Aug.

March

April

July

Aug.

Jan.
April

May

April
May

Sept.



Sept.
Aug.



Jan. 7
9
Oct. 8
Jan. 31
Nov. 11
March 1

26
May 4

21
April 5
March 31



1863

1862
1863

1862
1863



Jan.

April

May

Aug.

March



Resigned November 4, 1863.

Resigned January 21, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment as Lieut. Col.

Resigned March 17, 1S63.

Promoted to Colonel.

Resigned as Captain October 2, 1862.

Promoted to Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment as Major.

Resigned April 5, 1S63.

Killed June 27, 1864.

Killed August 27, 1864.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Honorably discharged as Captain Feb. 17, 1865.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Must'd out June 6, '65, for appointm't as C. S.

Resigned March 31, 1865. [of U. S. A.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned May 4, 1S63.

Promoted to Surgeon 52d O. V. I., Oct. 28, 1864.

Declined ; commission returned.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned as Captain October 2, 1864.

Resigned July 9, 1863.

Resigned May 2, 1863.

Resigned March 28, 1S64.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned September 7, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned December 26, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Killed October 8, 1862.

Killed June 27, 1864.

Died March 26 1S63.

Promoted to Major.

Promoted to Major.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned as 1st Lieutenant May 20, 1864.

Resigned July 30. 1864.

Resigned November 8, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Deelim-d ; commission returned.

Killed at Chickamauga.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned.

Died of wounds April 6, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined to accept.

Out of service.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant May 14, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as 2d Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.

Mustered out with regiment as Com. Sergt.

Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned January 7, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged March 1, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned May 3, 186:}.

Resigned January 31, 1863.

Deceased.

Resigned November 11, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned April 6, 1S64.

On detached duty.

Killed June 27, 1S64.

Resigned February 21, 1S64.

Revoked.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned September 17, 1S63.

Promoted to Captain.



One Hundred and Twenty- First Ohio Infantey. 619



DATE OF RANK



COM. ISSUED.



1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Jefferson J. Irvine

C. It. Van Houten

Charles P. Caris

Benj. Banker

James A. Moore

Milton D. Wells

Miles H. Lewis

Silas Long

Robert Kerr

John J. Miller

Otvay Curry

A. A. Corrello

Mahlon E. Willoughby..

Daniel Gillson

James H. Ball

Orlando M. Scott

George Shaffer

John J. Ramage

Ambrose R. Gage

Clark P. Dwinnell

Wm. J. White

John W. Jones

Charles W. Brown

Francis T. Arthur

Stephen B. Moorehouse..

Elisha B. Cook

Wm. B. Dunbar

Thomas B. Colton

Win. P. Barr

Joseph White

Joseph P. Glover ,

Robert F. Flemming

Linus A. Patrick

Wm. Lemon

Thomas C. Lewis.

C. R. Van Houten

Charles P. Caris

James A. Porter

Wm. C. Jewett

Benj. Banker

James A. Moore

Jefferson J. Irvine

Milton D. Wells

Andrew Stephens

Miles H. Lewis

Silas Long

(Jtway Curry ,

A. A. Corrello

Mahlon E. Willoughby..

Robert Kerr

John J. Miller

Daniel Gillson

James H. Ball

Oiiando M. Scott

Benj. B. Smith



Nov. 2,

March 31,

31,



April



Jan. 13,
March 31,



31,
April 12,



May
July



May
July



Aug.



Jan.
April



A up



Sept.
Aug.



Oct.



23,
13,

13,
4,
21,



Feb. 22,
March 17,
24,
2S,

Jan. 31,
March 26,
1,
April
May



5,



April

March

Nov.

April

May



16,
15,

",
II,
29,

Jan. 5,
April 20,
20,
20;



20,
22,

22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
26,

9, 1

9,

9.

6,

fi ,
15,

6,

15,

1,
1,
1,



Sept.



Dec.
April



May



March 31,
April 12,



Feb.
March 14,
June 6,
July 15,
Aug. 11,
April 26,



May



June
July
ttlij



April 26, 1S65



Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion.

Resigned.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged March 31, 1865.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned December 10, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed by guerrillas.

Musterad out with regiment.

Declined.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned March 24, 1S63.

Resigned March 2S, 1863.

Resigned April 23, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned February 22, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant,

Killed October 8, 1862.

Resigned March 17, 1863.

Killed in action.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned November 6, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned October ly, 1S63.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Died of wounds October 15, 1S63.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



620 Ohio in the Wa:



121st OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



rriHE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY -FIRST OHIO was organized at Camp
I Delaware, Ohio, in September, 1862, and was composed of recruits from Knox, Union,
M Delaware, Hardin, Logan, and Morrow Counties, the majority of whom were farmers,
and without a knowledge of even the first principles of military tactics.

On the 10th of September the regiment, nine hundred and eighty-five strong, left Camp Del-
aware for Cincinnati, where it was supplied with worthless Prussian muskets, and placed on
guard-duty about the city. It left Cincinnati on the 15th of September, crossed over the river to
Covington, Kentucky, and went into camp. Remaining here only five days, the regiment, under
orders, proceeded to Louisville, and was there assigned to Colonel Webster's brigade, of Jack-
son's division, and McCook's corps. Up to this date the men had not been drilled an hour, and,
of course, were totally unfit for service in the field. In this unprepared state the regiment was
joined to, and marched with, General Buell's forces, in pursuit of Bragg's Rebel army of vet-
eran soldiers.

The only stirring event of this march was the battle of Perryville, in which the regiment
participated at great disadvantage, and, of course, did not win for itself much reputation for mil-
itary efficiency. Captain B. F. Odor of company K, was killed in this battle.

The regiment was detailed to remain on the battle-field to look after the wounded, and bury
the dead. It remained in Kentucky, doing guard-duty, and looking after John Morgan's guer-
rillas, up to January, 1863, and was then taken in transports to Nashville, Tennessee, leaving
Louisville about the last of January. From Nashville it went to Franklin, arriving there in
February, where it performed service in watching and protecting the right flank of General
Rosecrans's army, then lying at Murfreesboro'.

On March 27th, on the application and petition of all the line and field officers of the regi-
ment, Lieutenant-Colonel Banning, of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth Ohio, was detailed by
General Gordon Granger, to take charge of the regiment, and drill and discipline it ; and it was
not long before it became one of the best regiments in the brigade to which it was attached. At
the request of General Rosecrans, Lieutenant-Colonel Banning was transferred, by order of the
War Department, to the command of the One Hundred and Twenty-First.

Nothing of moment occurred while the regiment lay at Franklin. When Rosecrans's army
moved forward from Stone River, the regiment moved with it, and was attached to the Reserve
Corps, under command of General Gordon Granger.

At Triune, on this march, the regiment was attacked by the Rebel General Forrest. After a
sharp fight Forrest was driven back. This affair infused confidence in the men, and taught them
the value of drill and discipline. From Triune the army moved forward, and on the 3d of July ,
the One Hundred and Twenty-First entered and occupied the town of Shelbyville, Tennessee,
remaining there about three weeks. While in this camp the men were drilled morning and
afternoon, notwithstanding the intensely warm weather.

About the 25th of August the regiment was ordered to occupy the town of Fayetteville, in
Lincoln County, Tennessee, a strong Rebel district, situated twenty-five miles from any other
post. Colonel Banning occupied the town, barricaded the public square, and went into camp,



One Hundred and Twenty-First Ohio Infantry. 621

notifying the citizens that in the event of being attacked he would burn the town. The place
was held for about ten days, all of which time was spent in drilling the men.

On September 5:h orders were received from General Steedman to proceed to Cowan, on the
Chattanooga Railroad, by the way of Winchester, where it joined the Reserve Corps, under Gen-
eral Gordon Granger, and proceeded to Chattanooga, and on the loth went into position at
Rossville, eight miles south of Chattanooga.

On the 17th the regiment, in company with the One Hundred and Thirteenth Ohio, under
command of General Steedman, made a reconnoissance to Ringgold, and reached that place in
time to witness the arrival of Rebel re-enforcements — Longstreet's corps. Next day at ten
o'clock A. M. it fell back to its old camp at Rossville, and at six P. M. moved to the relief of
Colonel Dan. McCook's brigade, which was engaged with the enemy near Rossville. During the
night, the enemy having withdrawn, the regiment again returned to Rossville, reaching its camp
on the morning of the 19th.

On the afternoon of the 19th the regiment was ordered to the support of General Whittaker,
on the Ringgold Road. It took up a position on the left of the road, and bivouacked for the night.
At ten o'clock A. M. on the 20th the regiment became fully engaged in the battle of Chickamauga,
forming the right of Steedman's division, of the Reserve Corps.

In the charge made by the regiment to save the only remaining road into Chattanooga, it per-
formed feats of bravery second to no other in the army, and won for itself an enduring name.
The battle-cry of the men of the One Hundred and Twenty-First was, "Wipe out Perry ville I"
and well did they do it. They met and vanquished the Twenty-Second Alabama Rebel Infantry,
capturing its colors and a majority of the regiment itself. The enemy was driven back, and the
road held; but not without severe loss. The officers killed were: Lieutenants Stewart, Fleming,
and Porter; and Captains David Lloyd and Aaron Robinson. Lieutenants Marshall, Stephens,
Moore, Mather, Patrick, Bryant, and Mitchell, were wounded. Privates killed, 14; wounded, 70;
missing, 3 — undoubtedly killed, as they never afterward were heard of.

In speaking of this battle, and of the conduct of the One Hundred and Twenty-First Ohio,
and its young commander, Colonel H. B. Banning, General Gordon Granger used the following
language: "To him (Colonel Banning), as much as to any other man, is owing the remarkable
obstinacy with which two brigades, one of which was largely composed of Ohio troops, for more
than seven hours held the key of the position on that battle-field, repulsing the repeated com-
bined attack of more than five times their number, and saving the Army of the Cumberland from
destruction." In acknowledging the receipt of the " battle-flag " of the Twenty-Second Alabama
Rebel Infantry, captured by the One Hundred and Twenty-First, in the battle of Chickamauga,
Governor David Tod said : " The battle-flag I am proud to receive and deposit in an appropriate
room, as a trophy of the heroic valor and patriotism of your gallant command. Please convey,
Colonel, to your brave officers and men my profound admiration for their glorious achievements
on that desperate field, and the heartfelt thanks of all Ohio's loyal people."

Falling back with the army behind the intrenchments at Chattanooga, the regiment took
position on the right, and in the reorganization of the army was assigned to the Second Brigade,
Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, and remained quietly in Chattanooga until the battles
of Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge, in which engagements it took a prominent part.

After these battles the regiment again occupied its old camp at Rossville, and recruited its
attenuated ranks. It remained in this camp until the 2d of May, 1SG4, when it moved witli the
army on the Atlanta campaign.

The first engagement on this campaign in which the regiment participated was that of Buz-
zard's Roost, on the 8th of May. It drove the enemy from an important position at the mouth
of the gap. At Resaca it covered the retreat of General Judah's brigade from the charge in
which it was repulsed. When the enemy retreated from Resaca the regiment formed a part of
General Jeff. C. Davis's division in its movement on, and capture of, Rome, Georgia. In this
affair the regiment was complimented by the brigade commander, for having been first inside
the city.



622 Ohio in the War.

On May 24th the regiment took position on what was known as the Dallas line, and was
constantly in the front, engaging the enemy, daily losing men, either killed or wounded. June
19th it reached and occupied a position at the foot of Kenesaw Mountain. The regiment suffered
severely, losing eleven men killed and wounded. On the evening of the 2Gth Colonel Durbin Ward
relieved the regiment from this position, which that officer named the "Valley of Hell." At ten

A. M. the day following the regiment formed part of the charging column of the Fourteenth
Corps upon Kenesaw Mountain, and in that disastrous affair lost one hundred and sixty-four
officers and men killed and wounded. It succeeded in making a lodgment close up under the
enemy's works, and held it, thereby securing the possession of the National dead and wounded;
but dearly did the regiment pay for its bravery. Among the commissioned officers the regiment
mourned the loss of Major John Yeager, a brave and gallant officer. Also, the accomplished
Captain Clason, the young and promising Patrick, and the brave and reliable Lloyd. There
were also eight officers wounded.

On the 28th a determined charge of the enemy in front of Kenesaw was repulsed. On July
9th the regiment was engaged at the railroad bridge over the Chattahoochie River, and lost five
killed and four wounded. It then went into position on the north bank of the Chattahoochie until
the 17th. It crossed the river on the morning of that day, and engaged the enemy at Peachtree
Creek on the 18th. On the 20th it crossed the creek, drove the enemy, and occupied his position.
On the 22d the regiment joined its brigade, and took position on the right of the National line,
three miles from Atlanta. It remained in this position until the 4th of August, when it moved
forward and occupied a position on the Sandtown Road. While constructing works it lost one



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