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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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man killed, and one officer and four men wounded. It again advanced its line on the 5th, 6th,
and 7th, losing nine men wounded. The works of the enemy were occupied.

On July 28th the grand flanking movement to Jonesboro' was commenced. The One Hun-
dred and Twenty-First took the advance in this movement, acting as skirmishers for the Second
Division, leading the column of the Fourteenth Corps. It became hotly engaged with the enemy
immediately after passing through the earthworks of the Fourth Corps, and drove him five miles
across the Montgomery Railroad. In this affair one man was killed, and two officers and six
men were wounded.

The regiment, on the 30th, moved with the army in the direction of the Macon Railroad, and
on the 1st of September occupied a position one mile north of Jonesboro', to the right of the
Macon Railroad. At four P. M. a charge was made on the enemy's works, carrying them, and
capturing Govan's Rebel battery and many prisoners. This affair forced the enemy to retire
from Jonesboro', and it fell into the hands of the National army.

The Jonesboro' capture ended the Atlanta campaign. The Rebels having evacuated Atlanta
that city was occupied by the National forces on the 8th. The whole army went into camp
around Atlanta, and the official reports of the campaign were made. From Colonel Banning'a
report of the operations of the One Hundred and Twenty-First we copy the following: "I
started with four hundred and twenty-nine non-commissioned officers and men, and eighteen
commissioned officers. Four officers were killed, and eight wounded; twenty-two men were
killed upon the field, and two hundred and five wounded; one captured."

The regiment remained in camp about three weeks, resting the men and putting the regi-
mental affairs in proper shape.

For ability as a commander, and distinguished conduct on the Atlanta campaign, Colonel H.

B. Banning was, on the recommendation of General Jeff. C. Davis (approved by General George
H. Thomas), brevetted a Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

About the 29th of September the regiment was sent back to Chattanooga by rail, where, on
its arrival, it was attached to an expedition against Forrest's cavalry, then raiding on the Chatta-
nooga and Nashville Railroad. It followed the Rebel cavalry, and drove it across the Tennessee
River into Alabama. It then returned to Chattanooga, and took part in the chase after Hood's
army. Joining the forces under General Sherman at Rome, Georgia, the regiment marched with
the expedition to Savannah and the sea. At Rome, Georgia, Colonel PI. B. Banning reported to



One Hundred and Twenty-First Ohio Infantry. 623

General J. B. Steedman for orders, and the command of the regiment devolved upon Lieutenant-
Colonel A. B. Robinson, who led it to Savannah, and up to its final muster-out.

After the fall of Savannah the regiment joined the expedition through the Carolinas. At
Bentonville, where the National forces were engaged with the enemy, it took a prominent part,
and lost six men killed and twenty wounded. Captain Charles P. Caris was so severely wounded
in this affair that he died shortly after, in the hospital, at Goldsboro'. Captain Willoughby was
also wounded.

Reaching Goldsboro' the regiment went into camp near the town, and remained there about
ten days. This takes the history of the regiment up to the 10th of April, 1865, About that
time it moved to Raleigh, and at that place received the news of Lee's surrender, and the fall
of Richmond.

The regiment moved from Raleigh to Cape Fear River. In the meantime General John-
ston's Rebel army had surrendered to General Sherman. On April 22d it fell back to Holly
Springs, and went into camp. This ended the campaigns of the One Hundred and Twenty-First
Ohio. On the 1st of May it joined the march of the National forces through Richmond to
Washington, and participated in the grand review.

The regiment was then mustered out and sent home. It was paid off and discharged at
Columbus,' Ohio, June 12, 1865.

Colonel H. B. Banning, the commander of the regiment, was breveted a Major-General "for
gallant and meritorious services during the war."

I



624



Ohio in the War.



122d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTER, THKEE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon

Do.

Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

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Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do ,.

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Do

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Do

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1st Lieutenant

Do.

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Do.

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\VM. H. BALL

John M. Bishfield

-UOSF.S M. GliANGEH

Charles M. Cornyn

Moses M. Granger

Joseph Peach

Charles M. Cornyn

John W. Koss

I'haddeur A. Reams

Wm. M. Houston

Wm. M. Houston

Alva Richards

Wm. G. Bryant

Chas. C. McC'abe

Joseph Peach

Benj. S. Herring

George J. Henderson

Benj. F. Sells

Charles J. Gibeanfc

Charles SI. Cornyii

Orlando C. Farquhar

Daniel B. Garey

Charies M. Cordon

John W. Boss

Henry S. Harding

James T. CusUiug

Thomas S. Black

Wm. Glenn

Joseph Works

Wm. M. Wilson

Gilbert H. Barger

Alexander A. Taylor

I. Parker Dudrovv

John H. Neimcyer,

Andrew P. stultz

Judson S. Paul

t'homas S. Armstrong

Koss \Y . Anderson

Wm. 11. Mcllgor

Moses D. Wheeler

Charles J. Gibson

Benj. V. Powers

Win. Magruder

Isaac B. Heiidershott

John M. \\ illiams

Harrison D. Yariuitt

James T. Cashing

David H. Mortley

Henry S. Harding

J.J. Harris

Wm. Glenn

Joseph Works

Wm. Barton

Win. M. Wilson

Gilbert II. Barger

Thomas S. Black

Alex. A. Ta\lor

John C. Randall

J. Paiker Dudrow

John H. Neimeyer

Cyrus Scott

A-nilrew P. Stutts

Judson S. Paul

James M. Sells

Thomas S. Armstrong

Buss W. Anderson

Thomas Kilburn

Wm. H. Mcllger

James Hartley

Moses D. Wheeler

Charles J. Gibson

Benj. F. Powers

Wm. Magruder

Isaac B. Hendersliot;

Jefferson 0. Mr.Mill.-n

John M. Williams

Harrison I). Yarmitt

Joseph C. Houston

Dewitt C. Blondin

Edward R. Hilliard

Asbury W. Webster

James Johnson

Wm. Goraeline

John W. Johnson

David U. Danham



Oct.

-pt.
Mav
Dec.

Sept.

Mav

March

Feb.

Sept.

Ian.

Sept.

Jan.

April

Oct.

Aug.



DATE OF RANK



IS'13

ISM

ia«3



Oct.

Mav
Dec.
Oct.
May



.March 2rt

Feb.

Oct.

Ian.

Oct.

Ian.

April

O.t.



Sept.

April

Dee.

June

March



Inly

Sept.
Nov.



15,

26, 1

26,
26,
2h,
2'',
27,
27.
27,
30,

3',
3,
3,
3,



Feb.

March

sept.
Aug.



10,
19,

1",
It'..
16.
Ill,
16,
16,
16,
16.



Oct.
April

May

Dec.
March



Aug.
Oct.
Nov.



Feb.
March



26,
26,
26,



27,
27,
27,
29,

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3,
3,
3,
3,
3,

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COM. ISSUED.



tune Id,
March 26,
Ian.
March



Inly
Sept.

Xov.



1 sf.:



lSfi2 Resigned February 3, 1865.

designed Slay I, 1863.
1863 Resigned December 10, 1864.
1S..4 Mustered out with regiment.
18' 2 Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
1863 Discharged February 23, IsM.
18ii| Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel
lrtfifi Mustered out with re«iment.
10, I.Si-2 Resigned January 5, 186:i.
2", 18 3 Mu-tered out with regiment.
10, 1862 Promoted to Surgeon.

Promoted to Surgeon 126th O. V. I.

Promoted to Surgeon 197th 0. V. 1.

Resigned January 8, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned April 2, 1863.

Resieued February .% 1S64.

Discharged February 13, 1863.

Killed June 15. 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Discharged February 13, 1864.

Honorably discharged December 7, 1863.

Resigned February 5, 1>64.

Promoted to Major. i received in action.

1863 Honorably discharged.Oct. 24, 'i>4, for wouuda

1864 Declined.
18, " Honorably discharged December 19, 1S64.
2ii, " designed as 1st Lieutenant Sept. 21, 1864.

Killed at Wilderness May 6, 1864

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned October 26, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

designed September 20, 1804.

Declined.

I onimission returned.

Revoked and commission returned.

Revoked and commission returned.

Revoked and commission returned.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Must, red out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

.Mustered out with regiment.
Feb. 10. 1865 Mustered out with regiment.
March 6, " Mustered out with regiment.
Oct. 10, 1S62 Resigned September 15.1S64.

Honorably discharged December 8, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned May 16, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned April 14, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned September 17, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged March 24, 1864.

Declined promotion.
IS64, Mustered out May 15, 1S65.
' Declined.

Mustered out with regiment.

Honovablv discharged April 8, 1865.

Killed October 19, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Killed June 3. 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Deceased.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.
" Clustered out with regiment.
" ^Mustered out with regiment.
" Died of wounds.
" Mustered ont with regiment.
" Mustered out with regiment.
1865'Feb. 10, 1W."> Mustered out with regiment.
March 6, " Mustered out with regiment.
" 6, " Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.



Aug.


29,


Oct.


12


Xov.


3



One Hundred and Twenty-Second Ohio Infantry. 625



2d Lipntenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
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Do.



John H. Neimeyer

Cyrus Scott

Judson S. Paul

James M. Sells

J. Parker Dudrow

Saniord M. Boling

Jolin Anderson

Thomas S. Armstrong

Wm. T. Meloy

Iioss W. Andeison

Thomas Kilburn

Wm. H. Mcllger

James Hartley

Josiah Norman

Moses D. Wheeler

Charles J. Gibson

Andrew F. Linn

John M.Williams

Harrison D. Yarmitt..

Benj. F. Parr ,

Joseph C.Houston

Dewitt C. Klondin

EdwardB. Hilliard

Asbury W. Webster ...

James Johnson

Joseph K. Taker

George \V. McMillan ..

Arthur Devor

Frank Spencer

James E. Bradrield



DATE OF RANK



Shg. 16, 1862



Sept.

May

Jan.
April
Mav
Dec.

net.
June



July



I8fi3

1864
1863



COM. ISSUED.



in,

10,
June 23,
Jan. 7,
June 10,
Aug. 10,
Jan. W,
March 25,
June 27,



Aug.
March



July



Aug.

March



Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Honorably discharged January 4, 1865.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Honorablv discharged December 30, 1364.
Resigned May s, |8A3.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Honorably discharged December 15, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Deceased.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Deceased .

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Commission returned.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.



122d OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTEY.



|HE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SECOND OHIO was recruited in
the counties of Muskingum, Morgan, Coshocton, and Guernsey. Companies A, B, D, E,
and H were mustered into the United States service at Camp Zanesville, on the 30th
of September, 1862 ; company C, on October 3d ; G, on October 5th ; F, on October 6th, and
companies I and K, and the field and staff-officers, on October 8th.

On the 23d of October the regiment left Camp Zanesville, with an aggregate of nine hundred
and twenty-seven men, embarked at Zanesville on the steamers Powell and Patton, descended the
Muskingum, and encamped at Parkersburg, Virginia. It moved by railroad to Clarksburg, and
became a part of the Second Brigade, of Milroy's division ; the brigade being composed of the
One Hundred and Tenth, One Hundred and Sixteenth, One Hundred and Twenty-Second, and
One Hundred and Twenty-Third Ohio Regiments, Carlin's Virginia Battery, and one or two
Virginia Companies of Cavalry, and being commanded by Colonel Washburne, of the One Hun-
dred and Sixteenth Ohio. On the loth of November the regiment moved by railroad to New
Creek, and on the 5th of December was temporarily assigned to the First Brigade of Milroy's
division, Brigadier-General Cluseret commanding.

The brigade was ordered on an expedition up the valley of the South Branch of the Poto-
mac, and, in a blinding snow-storm, the regiment began its first march. The column advanced
by way of Petersburg, in Hardy County, and Wardensville, and struck the Valley Pike at Stras-
burg. The train accompanying the expedition was guarded by a detachment from the One Hun-
dred and Twenty-Second, and was attacked by McNeil's guerrillas at Wardensville, but they
were repulsed with some loss. The regiment was ordered to Wardensville to keep open commu-
nications; but lest it might be overpowered by the combined forces of Jones, Imboden, and
McNeil, it was ordered to Moorefield, and moved from there, with Milroy's command, toward
Eomney. McNeil attacked the train just north of the ford of the South Branch, and captured
the teams and teamsters of eleven wagons and four men of company A of the One Hundred and
Twenty-Second, who were guarding that portion of the train. Passing through Romney the reg-
iment entered Winchester on the 1st of January, 1S63, and, with the One Hundred and Tenth
Ohio, constituted for a time the garrison of the place.

Vol. II.— 40.



626 Ohio in the War.

On the 14th of March Milroy's division became the Second Division, Eighth Army Corps,
and the four Ohio regiments which had composed the Second Brigade of the old Division, were
organized into the First Brigade of the new division, in connection with Carlin's battery and
some cavalry, under the command of Brigadier-General Elliott. The regiment was on scouts
and expeditions, either as a whole or in detachments, to Newton, Front Royal, Summit Point,
White Post, Cedar Creek, Millwood, and the Blue Ridge. During General Hooker's Chancellors-
ville campaign the One Hundred and Twenty-Second, with other regiments, was sent up the
Shenandoah Valley to capture ,the town of Staunton. The expedition moved on the 4th of May,
and advanced to New Market, when it was ordered back to Winchester by General Schenck.

On the 13th of June companies A and F, of the One Hundred and Twenty-Second, met the
advance of J. E. B. Stewart's raid on the Strasburg road, and after a brisk skirmish retired to Win-
chester. The next day the entire regiment was engaged, and at night it, with other troops, forced
a way through the Rebel lines and marched to Harper's Ferry. The regiment lost several officers
and men captured, some of whom were not exchanged until April, 1865. It spent one night on
Bolivar Heights, and then crossed the Potomac and became a part of the garrison of Maryland
Heights. Upon the evacuation of Maryland Heights it accompanied the heavy guns and public
stores to Georgetown, District of Columbia, moved through Washington Cily, and thence by rail
to Frederick, where it was assigned to the Second Brigade, Third Division, Third Army Corps.
The brigade at once marched against Lee, crossed the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, passed Loudon
Heights by the road around their northern base ; marched southward along the eastern slope of
the Blue Ridge, passed through Manassas Gap, and on the afternoon of July 23d marched in line
of battle, as Ewell fell back from Wapping Heights. The next day it returned, passing through
the Gap and through Warrenton, encamped about the 1st of August near the Rappahannock.

On account of the New York riots the regiment was ordered to that city, and was distributed
by detachments through the disturbed quarters. In September it rejoined the brigade, in camp
on the Rappahannock, and marched to Culpepper C. II. During the fight at Winchester in June,
about one hundred officers and men of the One Hundred and Twenty-Second became separated
from the regiment, and moved with the One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio to Cumberland, and
thence to Bloody Run. They were attached to the command of Major-General Couch, and fol-
lowing his movements through the Cumberland Valley, formed a part of the garrison at Martins-
burg. This detachment joined the regiment at Culpepper in the latter part of September.

The One Hundred and Twenty-Second moved from Culpepper to Centerville in October, and
held its election for Governor and State officers while in line of battle, on the afternoon that
Warren so roughly handled A. P. Hill, at Bristow Station. Returning toward the Rappahan-
nock it crossed the river November 8th, and took part in the skirmish at Brandy Station. On
the 26th it was again on the march, crossed the Rapidan, and fought at Locust Grove. It returned
to Brandy Station December 3d, and occupied ground on the farm of J. Minor Botts, and con-
structed winter-quarters. In March, 1864, the Third Division of the Third Corps became the
Third Division of the Sixth Corps.

On the 4th of May winter-quarters were abandoned. The next day the brigade guarded the
road leading up the south bank of the Rapidan until noon, when it marched to the front in the
battle of the Wilderness. The regiment maintained itself well through the fight, losing on the
first day over one hundred and twenty men. During the subsequent movements to Spottsylvania,
to Guinea Depot, to the North Anna, and across the Pamunkey, the regiment performed its full
share of picket and skirmish- duty, being under fire almost every day. Arriving at Tolopotamy
Creek, May 30th, it was placed on the skirmish-line, and on the 31st aided in capturing a rifle-pit
from the enemy. The regiment moved to Coal Harbor, and was engaged in a general assault on
the Rebel works, taking and holding those in its front. On the 3d of June it again advanced
and occupied a new position. The regiment moved forward by regular approaches, being contin-
ually under fire, and sustaining considerable loss, until June 12th, when it marched to Jones's
Bridge, on the Chickahominy, and thence via Charles City C. H. to Wilcox Landing on the
James, ascended the river, and reported to General Butler at Bermuda Hundred.



One Hundred and Twenty -Second Ohio Infantry. 627

Here a detachment of eighty conscripts and substitutes joined the regiment, and on the 10th
it crossed the Appomattox and marched to the lines in front of Petersburg. After a few days'
rest it went into position on the extreme left, and after heavy skirmishing on the 22d and 23d,
obtained possession of the Weldon Railroad. It was held until a portion of it was destroyed,
when the Rebels, having received re-enforcements, regained it. On the 29th the regiment
marched to Ream's Station, fortified, destroyed a mile or two of railroad, and returned to Peters-
burg July 1st. On the same day between fifty and sixty conscripts and substitutes joined the
regiment, and on the 6th it moved with the division, on steamers, via Fortress Monroe and the
Chesapeake, to Baltimore. The One Hundred and Twenty-Second was divided, and, owing to an
accident, one-half of it did not arrive in the Patapsco until July 9th, when it, with the Sixth
Maryland and Sixty-Seventh Pennsylvania, started by railway for Frederick.

On that day the other half of the regiment, with the remainder of the division, fought the
battle of Monocacy Junction. The troops on the cars arrived in time to cover the retreat, and
the Third Division marched to Ellicott's Mills, and moved thence by cars to Baltimore. The
Third Division proceeded to Washington, and from there, through Tenallytown, across the Poto-
mac, below the mouth of Goose Creek, and joined the corps near Leesburg.

The regiment followed Early through Snicker's Gap to near Berryville, and then returned to
Tenallytown. It soon after advanced via Rockville and Monocacy Junction to Harper's Ferry.
On the 30th of July the army recrossed the Potomac, and concentrated near the Junction, where
the regiment enjoyed a few days' rest, for the first time since the opening of the campaign. On the
7th of August the army moved to Halltown, and on the 10th marched via Clifton, Berryville, and
Newton, to the front of Early's works at Fisher's Hill. After various marches and skirmishes,
on the 19th of September Sheridan moved down to the crossing of the Opequan, between Berry-
ville and Winchester, drove in the Rebel pickets, and by ten o'clock A. M. the Sixrti Corps was
formed in order of battle, two and a half miles east of Winchester. In the battle which ensued
the regiment bore an important part, and in entering the town it came upon the old camp-
ground which it occupied in 1863, under Milroy.

Before daybreak next day the troops were again on the march, and soon after midday came
up with Early at Fisher's Hill. On the 22d five companies of the regiment, with other troops,
on the skirmish-line, drove the Rebel skirmishers into their main works, and occupied the hills
close to Early's intrenchments. As soon as Crook was known to have gained the enemy's flank,
the Second Brigade pushed over the breastworks, captured three guns, and assisted in driving the
Rebels from their position. The regiment pursued Early as far as Mount Crawford, and return-
ing to Strasburg, rested a short time, and then moved via Front Royal toward Alexandria.

When the head of the column was approaching the Shenandoah, opposite Ashley's Gap, it
was overtaken by an order to return to Cedar Creek, as " Early was coming down again ;" and on
the 14th of October the Sixth Corps was in position along the hills bordering Cedar Creek. On
the 19th the regiment was actively engaged, and assisted in driving Early across Cedar Creek.
Sheridan's army went into cantonments south of Kernstown, November 10th, and on the 3d of
December the Sixth Corps moved by cars to Washington, and thence by boat to City Point. A
few days rater the One Hundred and Twenty-Second was in the lines before Petersburg, holding
the curtain between Forts Keene and Wadsworth, just west of the Weldon Railroad.

In January, 1865, it moved with the corps to the left, when Grant extended his lines beyond
Hatcher's Run, and was placed in position near Fort Fisher. On the 25th of March, with the
brigade, it captured and held the Rebel picket-trenches.

At four o'clock A. M., April 2d, the Sixth Corps advanced against the enemy, and drove
them from their fortifications. Marching in pursuit, the corps struck Lee's flying army, with the
One Hundred and Twenty-Second on the skirmish-line, and broke the Rebel columns. It was
present at Lee's surrender, and afterward marched to Danville, Virginia. It returned to Wash-
ington City in June, and was reviewed by the President and members of the Cabinet.

It was mustered out on the 26th of July, with an aggregate of five hundred and eighty-five
men, and was paid and discharged at Columbus on the 30th of July, 1865.



628



Ohio in the War.



123d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM. ISSUED.


REMARKS.




WM T WILSON


Sept.

Dec.

Aug.

March

Dec.

^ept.

Dec.

Sept.

Oct.

March


26, 1862
2ti, "
14, 1864
22, 1.S62

6, 1863
30, 1864

4, 1862
12, 1864
16, 1S62

4, "
21, 1864


Oct.

Dec.

Oct.

March

Dec.

Oct.

Dec.

July

March


14, 1862
14, "
14, 1864
14, 1S62
30, 1863
30, 18154
14, 1*2
12, 1864
29, 1S62
29, "
21, 1864




Lt. Colonel
Do


Hf.nry B. Hunter


Honorably discharged December 8, 1864.








Do. .






Do. .












Do.


Wm B. Hyatt




Ass't Surgeon
Do.


I. H. Williams








Do.


Napoleon B. Brisbine


Mustered out with regiment.




Aug.

Oct.
Jan.


12, 1862
16, "
16, "
16, "
16, "
22, "
22, "
22, "

22, "
16, "
31, 1863

3, "

12, "
12, 1862

5, 1863

6, "
31, "

y, 1864
9, "
9, "
6, 1865
6, "

23, "
23, "

20, "
3, "

19', 1862
i, "
12, "
16, "
16, "
16, "
16, "
22, "
22, "
22, "

22, "
16, "
12, 1863
12, "

6, "

2,' 1S62

12, 1863

£ "

15, 1S64

21, "
9, "
9, "
9, "
9, "

11, 1865
6, "

23, "
23, "

2, "

3, "
3, "
3, "

12, 1862



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 111 of 165)