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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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mustered out of the service.



634



Ohio in the War.



124th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



*u> ♦ «0> • -CK»~



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF HANK. COM. ISSUED.



K KM ARKS.



Colonel

Do

Lt. Colonel

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Ass't Surgeon

Do.

Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



OLIVER H. PAYNE..
JAMES PICKANPS....

Oliver H. Payne

James Pickands

George W. Lewis ,

James Pickands

James B. Hamkson

George W. Lewis

Iohn W. Bullock

Dewitt C. Patterson.,
Ih.witt C. Patterson. .

David A. Morse

T. S. BinwEi.L

SETS 1). BoWKKR

Win. Wilson

George \V. Lewis

belt Wallace

George W. Aumend

John W. Bullock

Horace E. Dakin

Wm. A. Powell

Eben. S Coe

James H. Frost

Daniel Stratton

Sherbourne B. Eaton....

Daniel Stratton

Hiram H. Manning

John B. Irwin

Cleveland Van Porn

J oli n Raidaie

J. V. McGinnis

Alvin S. Galbraitli

Chas. D. Hammer

Win. Hannon

Win. Treat

John C. Smith

Haskell Proctor

John Stevens

George Damn

Cleveland Van Dorn

Iohn Raidaie

Sherbourne B. Eaton....

Daniel St rat ton

Win. C. Travis

Thos. J. Carran

Andrew J. Moulton

.lames Brennan

Barrett W. Keri'oot

Anthony Caldwell

Albeit H. Lewis

Win. K. Waldo

John I!. Lamb

J. V. McGinnis

Hiram H. Manning

Alvin S. Galbraitli

John B. Irwin

Win. K. Waldo

Wm. Hannon

Chas. D. Hammer

Chas. M. Steeduian

Will. Treat

John C. Smith

Terrence Dempsey

Haskell Proctor

John Stevens

Samuel B. Payne

George Daum

John S. Simmons

Chas. E. Wyman

\lex. Casky

Chas. E. Warren

Samuel P. Fulton

John K. Batchelor

John K. Lemon

Herbert A. smith,

Alfred Wilson

Chas. D. Collin*

George Doubleday

Chas. M. Steedman

Oliver P. Mcllrath

J. F. McGinnis

Orrin Story

John O'Brien

John B. Irwin

Hiram M. Manning



I Jan.

June
Oct.
Jan.
June
Oct.
Jan.

June



1, 186fl
20, 1865
22, 1862

1, 1863
20, 1865
2:., 18162

1, 1863
18, 186
20, "



Jan.
June
Jan.

June

Jan.



June 20,



1

1

1S63

1S6S

I

1



Aug. 22,
March 11,
April 21,
Jan.



Julv
Aug.

Oct.



Dec.
Keb.
May

Nov.
Sept.
July



Jan.



87,



Jan. 14,

March 11,

April 21,
Feb.



Jan.



Feb.

June

Nov.
March

July



Feb.



18,

23,

23.
March 29,

29,
July 5,

25,
Aug. 23,
Oct. 1,



March 29,
29,



July

Jan.



Feb.
May

March



April

May

June

May

March

Sept.



Sept.



Oct.

Feb.



July



Feb.
June
April



1864
1863

istii



June
Aug.
June

March

Ian.

March

Oct.
Sept.



Oct.
Feb.



Aug.
Sept.



Oct.
Nov.
Dec.



Inly
Jan.



Resigned.

Mustered out with regiment as Lieut. Col.

Promoted to Colonel.

Promoted to Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment as Major.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Killed.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Honorably discharged August 12, 1S63.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned September 19, lSti3.

Discharged February IS, la65.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned May 20, 1S63.

Died.

Promoted to Major.

Discharged May 23, 1S63.

Resigned April 23, 1864.

Mustered out tor promotion March 25, 1S65.

Kill m! at Mission Ridge.

Commission returned.

Resigned November 3, 1864.

Resigned October IS, 1S63.

i in d niched service.

Died of wounds June 10, ISM.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined to accept.

Mustered out June 9, 1S65.

Declined to accept.

Mustered out with regiment.

-Mustered out June 9, lst>5.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment us lBt Lieutenant,

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned March 22, lsr.3.

Resigned January 10, 1S64.

Resigned March 2, 1663.

Resigned April 2s, 1868.

Resigned June 7, 1S63.

Resigned March 19, 1S63.

Resigned September 3, 1663.

Commission returned.

Resigned as 2d Lieutenant July 17, 18C3.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed.

Promoted to Captain.

.Mustered out June 9, 1S65.

Killed.

Declined promotion ; mustered out with reg't.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed December 19, 1S61.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed in action December 10, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out June 9, ls65.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out.



Mustered out with regiment.



Resigned June 13 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resign d January 27, 1M>3.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant,
Resigned August 1, 1S03.
Resigned March 19, 1.-63.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth Ohio Infantry. 635



2d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



Albert H. Lewis

Fred. Hogendobler

Fred. Hogendobler

John C. Smith

John K. Lamb

Denton J. Snider

Terrence Dempsey

Win. Ilannon

John Stevens

Haskell Proctor

Win. Treat

Samuel B. Payne

George Damn

John S. Ninimons

Chas. K. Wyman

Frank W. Smith



DATE OF RANK.



Dec.
Feb.
.May-
March
.May
Feb.
May
March
May
April
June

Nov.



iPhy
July



COM. ISSUKD.



2, 18fi2|Jan. 14, 1863 Resigned March 13, 1S63.
Commission returned.
Resigned March 9, lsii4.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned July 17, 1863.
Resigned September 9, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieut -nan:.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 'st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



Feb.
July
April

June
April
June



" July

" Aug.

" Dec.

" Feb.
IS64 May
1365 July



1864
1865



124th OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment was recruited in the northern counties of Ohio, with the exception of
one company from Cincinnati (company I, Captain J. H. Frost). It rendezvoused at
Camp Taylor, and on the 1st of January, 18G3, marched into Cleveland, seven hun-
dred and fifty strong, ready to take the cars for the field. It went via Cincinnati to Louisville,
and thence to Elizabethtown, Kentucky, where it made its first camp. Remaining at this camp
until March, it was ordered back to Louisville, when, after remaining a few days, it was embarked
on board transports, and in company with twenty thousand other troops, after a passage of ten
days, was landed in Nashville, Tennessee, reaching that city on the lOih of February.

From Nashville the regiment was sent to Franklin, Tennessee, where it went into camp and
remained until the 2d of June, occupying its time in building forts, perfecting its drill, and getting
itself into proper shape for the battle-field. The Rebel forces were in close proximity to
Franklin, and it required the strictest watch to keep them from gaining some advantage. Fre-
quent skirmishes were had with them — one in particular, on the 5th of March, which gave the
regiment a fine chance to exhibit its efficiency of movement in battle.

The One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth, with three other infantry regiments, a battery, and
some cavalry, under General Colburn, were ordered to make a reconnoissance down the Columbia
Pike. The enemy was met about four miles from Franklin, and after slight skirmishing driven
back. Somewhat elated at this seeming success, the National troops pushed on to Thompson's
Station, eight miles from Franklin. At this point the Rebels were encountered in much superior
force, strongly posted behind stone walls. A battle ensued, lasting two hours, the ground being
stubbornly contested. The fighting was continued until the majority of the command were either
killed or taken prisoners. General Colburn was captured, and only eleven members of one of
the regiments returned to camp. The One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth was fortunately not
actively engaged, but was detailed to guard the ammunition-train. The bold front it presented to
the enemy enabled the train and artillery to get safely off the field.

Nothing of interest occurred during the further stay of the regiment at Franklin, excepting
that it suffered severely from camp fevers, measles, diarrhea, and other diseases incident to camp
life. One company in particular, composed of sturdy, robust farmers and their sons, was liter-
ally decimated. Through all this suffering the regiment was compelled to stand in line of battle
one hour before daybreak each morning, an hour too early and too dark for the purposes of drill,
the inactivity of which chilled and weakened the bodies of the men.

The camp at Franklin was abandoned on the 2d of June, and after a day's march again



636 Ohio in the War.

pitched at Triune, Tennessee. Remaining in this camp a few days, the regiment was then
ordered to join General W. B. Hazen's brigade at Readyville. From this point the regiment and
brigade moved to Manchester, Tennessee, and made a reconnoissance to Elk River, where they
spent the 4th of July, 1864; after which they returned to Manchester and went into camp. While
here the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth was assigned to the Second Brigade, Second Division
of the Twenty-First Army Corps, with General Palmer as the division and General Crittenden
as corps commander.

The camp of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth, at Manchester, was one of great beauty
and was praised for its neatness and cleanliness. While the regiment remained in it the men
fared sumptuously off the luxuries of corn and fruit afforded by the farms and orchards around
them. Cooking utensils were procured and roast dinners became quite common. The health of
the men improved under this " home" treatment, and the sick list became almost obsolete. The
drill and discipline of the men were not, however, neglected, and the regiment became so profi-
cient in both that inspecting officers were forced to give it high praise. Its cleanliness of arms
and clothing was remarkable. This standing was held by the regiment until muster-out, and
was due to the untiring labors of the Colonel and Lieutenant-Colonel.

On the 16th of August the tents were struck at Manchester, and the line of march taken up
over the Cumberland Mountains. On the 21st Poe's Tavern was reached in the Sequatchie Val-
ley, and a camp formed. Here again the men were in luck, in being supplied with a plentiful
harvest of corn, fruit, potatoes, etc. This camp was occupied until the night of the 9th of Sep-
tember, when the regiment marched to the Tennessee River and forded that swift-running stream,
so deep as to reach the waists of the men ; by break of day the opposite bank was safely reached
and the march continued, passing through the town of Ringgold and going into camp at Lee &
Gordon's Mills, near the battle-ground of Chickamauga.

The next day the regiment made a reconnoissance into Chattanooga Valley and from there
to Pond Springs, returning on the night of the 18th of September. At three o'clock in the morn-
ing of the 19th it bivouacked two miles north of Lee & Gordon's Mills, in double column at half
distance. The Rebel army was then in motion and about to inaugurate the battle of Chicka-
mauga. In the morning at six o'clock the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth moved forward to
the State Road and stood to arms until eleven o'clock, expecting every moment to be engaged with
the enemy. Heavy firing had commenced to the left, and throwing out company B as flankers,
the regiment moved along the road in that direction. Gaining a position on the left, the regiment
came into line and the bugle sounded the advance. It had moved forward but a short distance
when firing commenced. The regiment was immediately deployed into line of battle under a
heavy fire from the enemy, which was promptly returned by volleys until the nien had expended
their stock of ammunition. Being relieved, the regiment fell back and replenished their car-
tridge-boxes, and again took position in the front, delivering, as before, a rapid and destructive
fire, which compelled the enemy to give ground. This was the first continued severe fire the reg-
iment had encountered and it stood up to the work well.

The regiment was now moved to the right and went into position on the left of the brigade,
but had barely got into line when the front line gave way before the enemy, and the One Hun-
dred and Twenty-Fourth, with other regiments, received the full force of a terrible fire from the
Rebel line. The fire was promptly returned. The regiment being unsupported was compelled
to fall back; but as it did so, stubbornly delivered several withering volleys, which, together with
the steady fire of two batteries massed on the left of the line, served to check the exultant Rebel
advance.

Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening heavy firing was heard on the left. The
regiment moved in that direction, and went into bivouac for the night in front of the Rebel Joe.
Johnston's division. This rest was grateful in the extreme, as the men had been on their feet
fighting since early morning, and had not tasted food during the day. They were also consumed
by an oppressive thirst, as it had been impossible to procure water during the battle. In sum-






One Hundred and Twenty -Fourth Ohio Infantry. 637

mjng up the losses of the day it was found that one hundred gallant men of the regiment were
either killed, wounded, or captured.

The morning of Sunday, 20th of September, dawned in splendor. "With the knowledge of
having gained ground from the enemy on the previous day, the regiment at once threw up a
slight breastwork of logs and rails, with a battery on the right for support. From behind this
breastwork the regiment poured into the enemy's ranks volley after volley, with great rapidity,
and repulsed several desperate attempts to drive them from the position and capture the battery.
At three o'clock P. M. the enemy retired, and the regiment was ordered to the right to the sup-
port of Harker's brigade, then hard pressed. In executing this movement it suffered a loss of
several killed and wounded, from having encountered a deadly fire of grape and canister. Get-
ting into position, the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth again drove the enemy from its front;
but they now appeared again on the right. The regiment again changed position and poured into
the Rebel ranks a deadly fire, by battalions, which caused them to retire. It was now twilight,
and the regiment was formed into a hollow square, and remained so until after dark, when a
retreat was ordered. Taking the Rossville road, it bivouacked that night in line of battle in
Rossville. Remaining there until eight o'clock next morning (21st), it moved to the front line,
went into position on Mission Ridge, and threw up a breastwork of rails and stone, under cover
of which it remained all day, the target for a Rebel battery in its front. That night the retreat
was continued, and the next day (22d) the regiment went into camp near Chattanooga.

The total loss of the regiment in this battle, of killed, wounded, and missing, was one hun-
dred and forty. Colonel Payne was anions the wounded.

At Chattanooga the regiment and army were immediately put to work building forts and
throwing up breastworks. The men and animals were necessarily put on half rations, with a
prospect of sheer starvation if relief was not soon afforded.

While at Chattanooga the army was reorganized, and the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth
was assigned to the Second Brigade, Third Division, of the Fourth Army Corps.

On the evening of October 26, 1863, orders were received to make preparations for a move
in light marching trim, with one hundred rounds of cartridges per man. The movement was to
be made with the greatest caution, as the importance of success was incalculable. About nine
o'clock in the evening the regiment, in company with a detachment of about seventeen hundred
men, carefully picked for the service, embarked on board pontoon-boats, and floated noiselessly
down the Tennessee River, passing Lookout Mountain, keeping close within the shadow of the
opposite shore, and succeeded in passing the enemy's pickets, stationed along the shore, without
discovery. Reaching a point a few hundred yards below Lookout Mountain, the boats pulled
quickly to shore, and the troops rushed tip the bank under a heavy fire from the enemy, who had
now become apprised of their approach. The Rebels were instantly driven from their position
and Raccoon Mountain secured. A portion of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth was
advanced as skirmishers, consisting of company I, Lieutenant Galbraith in command, and the
remainder employed in throwing up breastworks.

Daylight appeared, and the enemy made several desperate attempts to retake the position ;
but each time they were handsomely repulsed, and finally driven from that part of the Wahat-
chie Valley. A pontoon-bridge was then thrown across the river at Brown's Ferry, near where
the force had landed. This bridge enabled General Hooker's army to cross the river, and thus
reach Chattanooga and virtually raise the siege.

The One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth remained at Raccoon Mountain a few days, subsisting
on parched corn and boiled wheat, when it was relieved and supplied with rations by Hooker's
forces. It then returned to its old camp in the suburbs of Chattanooga.

On the afternoon of November 23d the regiment moved out and took position on the left of
the front line of battle, in the struggle for the occupation of Mission Ridge. It steadily
advanced, and carried the enemy's rifle-pits, on a range of hills midway between Fort Wood
and Mission Ridge. Still advancing, it took the Rebel works on the hill, where, exposed to a
heavy tire of artillery from the enemy's batteries on Mission Ridge, the men worked briskly



638 Ohio in the Wae.

until dark, tin-owing up breastworks. The saYne work was continued up to one o'clock next
morning, when the regiment was ordered on picket-duty for twenty-four hours. On the afternoon
of the 25th it was ordered on the skirmish-line, with instructions to advance at the signal of six
guns, and take possession of the enemy's works at the foot of Mission Ridge. A previous attempt
to take these works had failed, and the enemy was fully prepared to receive any further attempts
of the kind.

A clear space of six hundred yards had to be passed over in charging on the works. At the
appointed signal the regiment steadily advanced, and, firing rapidly, the enemy began to retreat.
With a cheer they gallantly charged and carried the works, immediately opening a heavy fire
upon the retreating Rebels. It was soon demonstrated that to remain in this position was impos-
sible, as they were exposed to a murderous fire from the Rebel batteries, on the right and left, from
the top of the ridge. No orders had been given to advance beyond the point taken, and the
regiment was in doubt as to its duty. All at once a simultaneous shout of forward went up from
the line, and the One Hundred and Twenty -Fourth, filled with confidence by the success of its
achievements, commenced to scale the mountain, scrambling up its rugged sides amid showers of
grape and canister thrown from Rebel batteries on the right and left, and bullets from Rebel mus-
ketry in front, which, in their destructive flight, plowed the earth and sent stones, dirt, and the
shingles from the roofs of the Rebel shanties, which lined the base of the mountain, flying
through the air, imparting a terrific appearance to the scene. The top of the mountain was
reached, and the Rebel guns were captured and turned upon the retreating foe. Thus, without
orders, this stronghold was carried by the indomitable bravery and enthusiasm of the soldiery.

The One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth captured seven pieces of artillery, two caissons, eighty
stand of arms, and a wagon-load of ammunition. Its loss was twenty-three killed, four wounded,
and nineteen missing. Among the killed was Captain James II. Frost, who was mortally
wounded while in the act of leaping upon the enemy's works on the top of the mountain.

On the evening of the 26th of November the regiment returned to camp, and was at once
ordered to prepare for a march to the relief of Knoxville. All things being in readiness, it
started with a portion of the army for that place on the morning of the 30th of November, 1863,
arriving opposite Knoxville December 10th. The Rebels, anticipating relief to the besieged
army, had made a furious assault on the garrison, but had been repulsed ; and on the day pre-
vious to the arrival of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth, and other re-enforcements, retired
from before that place.

The One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth, after remaining a few days at Knoxville, moved off
and went into camp at Clinch Mountain. The weather was intensely cold, and from the hasty
manner in which the regiment was compelled to march to the relief of Knoxville the men were
illy prepared to endure it. Their clothing was very scant, and with but few tents, it was a strug-
gle with them to keep from freezing. While lying in this dreary camp the only- and imperative
occupation of the men was that of cutting and transporting wood to the camp, in order that huge
fires might be kept up, both night and day.

From the Clinch Mountain camp the regiment made a reconnoissance, about the middle of
January, 1864, to Dandridge, where it commenced the erection of log houses for winter-quarters,
but the Rebels, discovering the intention, made an advance in superior force, compelling them to
evacuate the place.

During the time the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth remained in East Tennessee it was
almost constantly employed in reconnoissances, keeping it on the move, and preventing the men
from drawing the necessary clothing. As a consequence, they were ragged, dirty, and unseemly
in appearance. As an instance of the resources of a "Yankee" regiment in distress, an officer
of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth, noted for his industry and perseverance under difficul-
ties, finding his men without soap, went to work and manufactured a quantity, and astonished the
rest of the regiment by the cleanliness of the members of his company. It was drily remarked
by a wag, that from the visible preponderance of white blood in their faces, these men might pos-
sibly be allowed to vote at the next election, while their more unfortunate companions would



One Hundred and Twenty -Fourth Ohio Infantry. 639

from their dark complexions, naturally be refused until an exploration could be made with pick
and shovel. The men generally were without stockings; many were shoeless, and in their draw-
ers, and all in such condition as to bring shame on the Commissariat that had been so liberally
supplied by a generous people. Fortunately the regiment at this time received from the good
people of Green Springs, Ohio, many presents of necessary articles of clothing, contributed by
the Ladies' Soldiers' Aid Society of that place.

About the 15th of April, 1864, under an order from the War Department to concentrate the
army, preparatory to the spring campaign, the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth moved to
McDonald Station, about thirty miles east of Chattanooga, where it was thoroughly clothed and
equipped.

Resting in this camp some days, preparatory to starting on the Atlanta campaign, the regi-
ment then marched to Tunnel Hill Station, on the railroad, and thence to Rocky Face Rido-e.
At this point the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth was engaged with the enemy, and made a
charge against his works, in which it suffered severely. Marching and fighting it made its way
to Dalton, and from Dalton to Resaca, Cassville, and New Hope Church. Here, again it was
engaged in a charge, and lost many brave men and officers. Colonel Pickands was severely
wounded.

The One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth participated in the flanking movement to Jonesboro',
and consequent evacuation of Atlanta. Then back to Atlanta to reap the promised rest of thirty
days in camp.

They were not, however, permitted to remain long in their camps. There came a change in
the tactics of the Rebel army.



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 113 of 165)