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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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In following Hood's army the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth marched to Gaylesville and
Athens, Alabama ; thence to Pulaski and Columbia, passing through Franklin without partici-
pating in the battle of that name, and reaching Nashville in advance of the main forces, went
into camp behind the intrenchments of that place. In the battle of Nashville the regiment par-
ticipated, and at its close joined in the pursuit of the defeated and demoralized Rebel army.

In this pursuit the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth marched to Huntsville, Alabama,
where it gave up the chase and went into camp. From Huntsville it was ordered to Strawberry
Plains, in East Tennessee. Thence back through Greenville to Nashville, where, on the 9th of
July, 1865, the regiment was mustered out of the service. It was then sent home, and was paid
off and discharged at Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, the place from which it started two and a
half vears before.



640



Ohio in the War.



125th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

Do

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Do

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

D..

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



EMERSON OPDYCKE..

JOSEPH BRUEF

Emtrsov Opdycke

Henry B. Banning

David H. Moore

Joseph Bruff

Edward P. Bates

George L. Wood ,

David H. Mookk

Ioseph Brukf

Edward P. Bates

Daniel A. Stingkr

Henry McHknry ,

Wm. E. McKim

I AMES G. Buchanan

Porter Yates

John E. Darby

Wm. E. McKim

John W. Lewis

Joseph Bruff.

Albert Youmans

Edward P. Bates

Isaac D. Spaulding

Win. C. Bunts

Steen B. Parks

Calton C. Baugh

Anthony Val lander

Robert B. Stewart

Elmer Moses

Afiuila Conrad

Sterling Manchester

Edward G. Whitesides....

A. Bailes Carter

Daniel A. Stinger

Wm. W. (lushing

Ridgely C. Powers

Charles T. Clark

Alexander Dickson

Walden S. Williams

Nvrum Phillips

Balsfl C. Rice

Freeman Thomas

Charles C, Chapman

Hezekiah N. Steadman..

Charles Leimbaeh

Richard K Hulse

Ephraini P. Evans

Herman R. Harmon

Robert B. Stewart

Elmer Moses

Edward G. Whitesides....

A. Bailes Carter

Marshal W. Richards

Wm. W. dishing

David Humphrey

Daniel A. Stinger

Riley M. Merrill

Ridgley C. Powers

Ephraini P. Evans ,

Alexander Dickson

Charles T. Clark

Martin V. B. Ring

Horace Welch

Walden S. Williams

Samuel Heikes

My rum Phillips

Ralsa C. Rice

Freeman Thomas

A. C. Dilley

Charles C. Chapman

Rollin D. Barnes

Hezekiah N. Steadman..

Charles Leimbaeh

Richard K. Hulse

David Bly stone

Henry Donaldson

Josiah 11. Blackburn

Wm. H. Crowell

Alexander II. Postel

Thomas R. Mahan

Henry Glenville

Darius W. Paj ne

Rntus Wood

Benj. Gardner

Charles C. Coats



Ian.
Oct.

Jan.
Aug.
Jan.
Oct.
Nov.
May
Feb.

Oct.

lune
May
Oct.
Sept.



24,



1S63 Jan.
1865 Oct.



March 8,

Nov. 4,

Aug. 13,

Sept. 20,



Dec.
April
July

Sept.
Dec.

March
May

June
Inly



April
June
July

Oct.
July
Aug.

Sept.

Oct.



Dec.
April

Dec.
Oct.
July

Sept.
Dec.



Jan. 28,
March 3,



June
July
Aug.



Nov.


3


Feb.


111,


44


in


11


10


April


8


June


b



July



1862 Jan.


14, 1863


ls.-.:i


44


17, "


"


Aug.


19, "


1865


Jan.


2, 186S


44


Oct.


16, "


1RS2


Jan.


14, 1862


isi;:;


May


22, 1863


1864


Feb.


18, ISM


1865


44


28, 18KS


44


Oct.


16, "


1862


July


15, 1863


i»sfi5


June


8, 1865


1863


May


24, 1863


lSfV.'


Sept.


24, 1862


IK65


March


8, 1865


1863


Nov.


25, 1863


1862


Jan.


17, "

17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "


1863


44


17, "


"


July


10, "


..


Nov.


2, "
11, "


44


Dec.


4, "


44


Jan.


28, ism


1864


March


3, "


>.


May


9, "

9, "


44


June


27, "


..


July


25, "
25, "


1865


Feb.


10, 1865

10, 44


44


April


8, 4l




June


6, 44


;;


July


24, "
24, "
24, "


44


Oct.


16, 44


1864


Julv


1?., 1864


1862


Jan.


17, 1*63
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "


1868


April


29, "
20, "


44


Feb.


12, 1864





Nov.


2. 1863
2, "

11, "


44


Dec.


4, "


44


Jan.


28, 186-1


1864


44


28, "


■•


March


3, "

3, "


44


May


9, "
9, "
9, "
9, 4i


44


June


27, "


44


July


13, "


•<


Aug.


19, "
19, "


44


Nov.


3, 4l


186S


Feb.


10, 1865

10, •'
10, "


14


April


8, "


ii


June


6, "
6, "


44


July


24, "
24, "



Appointed Brigadier-General ; Bvt. Maj. Gen.

Mustered out as Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Colonel January 1, 1863.

Appointed Lieutenant-Colonel 121st reg't.

Resigned September 20, 1864.

Promoted to Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment as Captain.

Resigned April 20, 1863,

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment as Captain.

Mustered out June 1, 1805.

Mustered out as Assistant Surgeon.

Resigned January 25, 1865.

Resigned May 6, 1805.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Resigned January 20, 1865.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned June 7, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned April 6, 1S63.

Resigned January 18, ISM.

Resigned June 20, 1S64.

Mustered out July 31, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Killed.

Honorahlv discharged JaBuary 5, 1865.

Resigned May 9, 1864.

Killed.

Mustered out June 8, 1S65.

Resigned as 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned May 24, 1865.

Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned June 15, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

.Mustered out.

Resigned June 18, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Lieut.

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Lieut.

Killed.

Resigned April 16, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned June 19, 1S63.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned October 6, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned April 23, 1S63.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned May 7, 1864, as 2d Lieutenant.

Resigned February 6.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned as 2d Lieutenant.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed June 27, 1S64.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned August 23, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned April II, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out June 8, 1865.

Mustered out w ith regiment.

Mustered out June 8, 1865.

Mustered out. lune 8, 1865.

Mustered out with legiment.

Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.

Discharged.






One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth Ohio Infantry. 641



1st Lieutenant

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Sharon French

Charles M. Maltby

Alexander Dickson

Charles Harshman

Ridgely C. Powers

Ephraim P. Evans

Martin V. B. King

Charles T. Clark

Albert Barnes

Erancis Hendry

Horace Welch

Samuel Heikes

Nyrura Phillips

Charles C. Chapman

A. C. Dilley

Rollin D. Barnes

Ht-zekiah K. Steadnian .

Charles Leiinbach

Seabury A. Smith

Freeman Collins

Richard K. Hulse

David Blvstone

Ralsa C. Rice..._

Henry Donaldson

Henry N. Penrield ,

.losiah H. Blackburn ....

Thomas Burnham

Wm. H. Crowell

Alexander H. Postel

Thomas R. Mahan

Henry Glenville

Darius \V. Payne



DATE OF RANK. COM. ISSUED.



July
Sept.



Oct

Nov.
Dec.
Nov.
March



»,

1.
20,

20,
20,

22,

a,

30,
li.
12,

4. 1
23,

3,

3,



June
July



1865 July
Sept.



Sept.

March 3,
3,
3,

Jan. 28,

March 3,
3,

May 9,



14.
25,
26,
19,

iy.



May



June
July



April
Dec.
Jan.
March



3,
3,
24, 1863 Not. 11,



31 arch 3,



Jnn.
March



Aug. 19,



Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned April 28, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted ; resigned May 7, 1864.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Died of wounds October 2, 1862.
Resigned March 23, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant
Resigned April 2, ISM.
I Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted t" 1st Lieutenant.
Killed January, 1864.
Killed.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Discharged August 29, 1864.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Killed.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



125tli OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment was recruited under the call of President Lincoln in the fall of 1862,
and was organized by Colonel Emerson Opdycke, of Trumbull County, Ohio, who had
formerly been a Captain in the Forty-First Ohio. Companies A, B, C, D, G, and H,
were rapidly filled, and rendezvoused at Camp Taylor. By the 6th of October, 1862, eight full
companies had reported, and on the same day were mustered into the United States service by
Captain C. C. Goddard, United States Army.

Colonel Opdycke's experience in the field gave him great advantages, and he immediately
commenced the thorough drill of both men and officers, so that in a short time the regiment w«s
in fine state of discipline, and ready for the field.

The regiment left camp on the 3d of January, 1863, embarked in cars at the Cleveland
depot, and moved under orders for the south. At this time it numbered but six hundred and fifty-
seven men, companies I and K not having joined the ranks. Beaching Cincinnati, the regiment
embarked on board of steamers for Louisville, Kentucky, and on the 8th of January marched
through that city to a camp one mile beyond. The greater part of January was spent in this
camp, the time being profitably filled in drilling and inuring the men to field-service.

On the 28th it left Louisville on steamboats, and, in company with twenty thousand othei
troops, sailed for Nashville, Tennessee, where it landed on the 7th of February. Remaining in
Nashville only long enough to procure an outfit for a campaign, the regiment moved out of camp
with its brigade toward Franklin. On approaching that place the General commanding was
apprised that it was occupied by a force of the enemy, and preparations were accordingly made.
The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth was ordered from the rear of the brigade to the front, and
companies A and B placed on the skirmish-line. Rapidly advancing, the regiment drove the
enemy before it ; and, having forded the Harpeth, a deep and swift stream, in the face of the

Vol. II.— 41.



642 Ohio in the War.

Rebel fire, it entered the town (Colonel Opdycke leading) attacked the Rebels, and ejected them
from the place. This was the first time the regiment was ever under fire, and the bravery with
which it met the enemy was a sure harbinger of its future career. Colonel Opdycke was placed
in command of the post, and the regiment quartered in the town.

Smarting under their defeat, the Rebels made an effort (on the 9th of March) to retake the
place, but were again defeated by the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth. On the 10th of April
the Rebels again attempted the recapture of Franklin, but were a third time met and repulsed.
This time the Rebels were pursued by the regiment and other forces to Columbia, where, finding
pursuit fruitless, the force returned to Franklin. The regiment remained at this place up to
June 2d, drilling and constructing works of defense. While here several officers of the regi-
ment resigned by reason of ill health and other causes.

On the 21st of June it moved to Murfreesboro', where it joined the command to which it
had been attached, and on the 24th the corps marched toward Hillsboro'. This march will long
be remembered by all who participated in it as one of the most dreary and wretched they ever
made. With scarce an intermission the rain poured down for eight days, rendering the roads
almost impassable, even for infantry. Wading through seas of mud and swollen streams by day,
and at night bivouacking on the water-soaked ground, the exhausted troops reached Hillsboro'
on July 3d. Here they remained until August 6th, when the entire command broke camp and
moved in the direction of Chattanooga. Crossing the Cumberland Mountains, the One Hundred
and Twenty-Fifth reached the Sequatchie Valley in the night of the 19th of August. Remain-
ing in camp until September 1st, it moved in the direction of Shellmound ; and, crossing the
river on rafts and flats, reached the south side of the Tennessee River on the morning of the 4th.
The next day the command moved toward Chattanooga, meeting and skirmishing with the
enemy at the base of Lookout Mountain.

The regiment entered Chattanooga on the 9th of September, the place having been evacuated
by the Rebels, and at an early hour on the 10th again moved out toward Ringgold ten miles, and
went into line of battle. The next morning the brigade was ordered to fall back to Rossville
and then diverge toward Lee & Gordon s Mills. Severe skirmishing ensued, by which the enemy
was forced back across Chickamauga Creek. The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth was held in
reserve, and a section of artillery placed in command of Colonel Opdycke, to use as circumstances
should require. From this time until the 18th of September the regiment was engaged in almost
constant skirmishing until the opening of the battle of Chickamauga.

At one o'clock P. M. the division to which it was attached was ordered to support the left of
the National lines. It entered the field on the double-quick, and was soon actively engaged.
This was the first general engagement the regiment had participated in. Just as it entered the
battle Colonel Opdycke turned in his stirrups and said: "Men of the One Hundred and Twenty-
Fifth Ohio, if I or others fall, stand in the ranks until victory is ours." One of the officers, in
describing the battle, used the following language: "Side by side and shoulder to shoulder did
the men of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth contest that bloody field, aiming low, and
promptly obeying orders from their Colonel. Nine prisoners were taken, three of whom were
captured by the Colonel himself, and three by the Adjutant, E. G. Whitesides. The Rebels were
routed in confusion; and after dark we bivouacked on the field, without fire, without supper, and
many of bur men without blankets, while the cold north wind chilled our wearied limbs almost
to numbness. At two A. M. of the 20th we were again called to arms, and, having marched two
miles to a new position, we halted. A hasty breakfast was prepared and eaten, and we then took
our place as a reserve near the left of McCook's and at the right of Thomas's corps. The battle
opened on Thomas's left at eight A. M. so severely that the division was ordered to move on the
double-quick to support it. Through some misapprehension a gap was left in McCook's line
unprotected, through which the enemy poured, driving his corps almost completely from the
field, and exposing the troops in that vicinity to a murderous cross-fire."

At this moment Generals Thomas and Garfield rode up to the One Hundred and Twenty-
Fifth Ohio. The former said: "This point must be held;' - to which Colonel Opdycke replied;



One Hundred and Twenty- Fifth Ohio Infantry. 643

" We will hold this ground or go to heaven from it." Colonel Opdycke having commanded :
"Fix bayonets !" rode to the front of his regiment and said : "Men, I will lead you; follow me;"
and plunged into the midst of the foe, followed by the entire brigade. The One Hundred and
Twenty-Fifth kept well in front of the brigade. The whole Rebel line fled. The regiment
halted and lay down behind a fence, while other regiments came up and prolonged the line to
the right and left.

The enemy now advanced their second line. The ground was held until the enemy's fire
literally enfiladed the regiment, killing Lieutenant King, seriously wounding Captain Youmans
and Lieutenant Barnes, and laying many of the men in the dust. At this critical moment it was
imperative that the regiment should retire to its "brigade or perish. It slowly retired ; and as it
did so, a flying regiment passed in confusion, and on the run ; but such was the discipline of the
One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth that its lines remained intact. Colonel Harker immediately
rode up to Colonel Opdycke and complimented him on the splendid fighting of the men.

"This position must be held !" The fight went on with increasing fury. For two long hours
a sea of fire swept over the field, covering the ground with friend and foe. While the battle was
raging at its fiercest Colonel Opdycke rode along the ranks of his regiment, and, raising his
voice above the din, said: "Stand firm, my boys; I am willing to fight for my country, to die
for her, and I hope you are with me." His men responded with cheers. The Colonel was the
only officer in the division who did not dismount. A ball went through his blouse, bringing
blood from his side, and his horse was struck several times. The enemy was repulsed with great
slaughter.

At three o'clock in the afternoon the Forty-First Ohio came up and lay dow^n a couple of
yards in rear of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth, just as the enemy made his last assault.
The men of the Forty-First recognized Colonel Opdycke, who had formerly served in that regi-
ment as a Captain, and gave him three rousing cheers as he passed them on his horse, hat in
hand, amid the raging conflict.

The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth, with its division and brigade, remained at their posts
until all firing had ceased, and night had closed upon the bloody field. The National troops
then fell back slowly to Rossville, where General Thomas placed them in position, but a few
hours thereafter ordered their withdrawal to Chattanooga, where strong lines of defense were
built, and the army lay down in security behind them.

So prominent had been the bravery and the noble fighting of the regiment that General
Rosecrans gave it a personal compliment, and General Woods christened it " The Tiger Regi-
ment of Ohio."

The following named men were mentioned by Colonel Opdycke to the Governor of Ohio for
promotion, by reason of personal bravery during the battle : Sergeant Alson Dilley, company C ;
Sergeant Charles C. Chapman, company G; Sergeant Rollin D. Barnes, company B ; Commissary-
Sergeant H. N. Steadman — all of whom were duly commissioned as Lieutenants.

On the 25th of November the storm of battle again broke forth. The enemy was to be
driven from the front of Chattanooga. At two P. M. the regiment was placed in position in the
second line of battle, and at the sound of the signal-gun moved forward, charging across open
fields, through swamps and thickets, until it reached the first line of the enemy's works at the
base of Mission Ridge, which was carried and its occupants captured. In this charge across the
country for two miles much fatigue and danger were encountered. Scarcely had the line com-
menced to move when the ridge was crowned with a wreath of fire from the enemy's artillery
and the hissing shot and bursting shell plowed the ground in all directions.

Filled with enthusiasm, and halting only long enough to secure the prisoners captured in
the first line of works, the regiment toiled up the steep and rugged mountain, five hundred feet
in height, amid a deluge of grape, canister and musket-balls. The dense smoke of battle envel-
oped the crest, concealing both parties from view. A Rebel battery stationed near Bragg's head-
quarters annoyed the assailing force, and the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth were ordered to
capture it. The regiment at once went at the works, and had nearly reached them when the



644 Ohio in the War.

troops that protected its left, unable longer to withstand the destructive fire, gave wav, exposing
the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth to great peril from the enemy's cross-fire, which came from
all directions except the rear; yet not a man Avavered from the line; but, sheltering themselves
as best they might, they awaited the order for the final charge. When it came all sprang for-
ward, determined to succeed. The struggle was fierce. Colonel Opdycke's horse was shot as he
led the demi-brigade. Mounting another, he was again unhorsed by a ball which killed the
horse. Captain Bruff, of company A, was wounded, and the ranks of the regiment were being
rapidly thinned. A second charge was ordered and executed, and the guns were captured and
turned upon the flying Rebels.

An immediate pursuit was ordered and continued through the night, the One Hundred and
Twenty-Fifth being in the advance. On the morning of the 26th, just as the regiment was pre-
paring to continue the pursuit from Bird's Mills, it was ordered to return to Chattanooga, and
reached that place on the 27th. The loss of the regiment in this battle was heavy, especially in
wounded.

On the 28th of November the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth, with others of the Fourth
Corps, started to the relief of General Burnside's forces at Knoxville, Tennessee. The march
was very severe. The weather was cold and the mud deep, and the men illy prepared for a
forced march. Before reaching Knoxville, however, the enemy had been met and defeated by
the besieged forces, and their aid in that quarter was not required.

With other commands the regiment was sent from Knoxville toward Dandridge, where it
arrived December 16th, and was at once placed on the skirmish-line, as appearances indicated
the vicinity of a large force of Rebel cavalry. At two o'clock P. M. of the 17th of December
the enemy appeared in sight, firing occasional shots at the National cavalry videttes. From the
top of a commanding eminence a long column of Rebel cavalry could be plainly seen descending
a hill and forming in line of battle in the wooded valley.

The exposure of the left of the National line was soon discovered by the Rebels, and advan-
tage at once taken of it. A very heavy skirmish-line came surging back on the National lines.
The cavalry in front of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth retired after a few shots; and before
the regiment could change its line the Rebels were upon them. After several maneuvers on
both sides the Rebels attempted to surround and capture the entire regiment. The charge made
for that purpose was bravely met, as was also a second. The enemy then opened upon the regi-
ment with two pieces of artillery, with but little effect, as they shot too high. Again the Rebels
charged, and again were handsomely repulsed. Just at this time companies A and C, thrown
out as skirmishers to the right, charged with a yell and drove the Rebels from the ground to
their second line. Night had begun to close in, and the troops were too much exhausted to fol-
low up their advantage, or to even sustain another charge, should the Rebels attempt it.

Lieutenant-Colonel Moore (commanding the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth) learning that
the brigade to which he was attached had moved early in the day, and that there was no other
infantry in supporting distance, saw the danger to which his regiment was exposed, and took
immediate steps to find relief. Colonel Garrard, of the Seventh Ohio Cavalry, being the only
ranking officer near, was applied to and induced to send his own and the Michigan cavalry to
the succor of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth.

The regiment then retired over half a mile toward town, and were posted near a road on a
wooded hill. In about an hour's time the Rebels rallied and made another dash against the Na-
tional works, but were bravely met by the dismounted Ohio and Michigan cavalry ; but the
enemy's forces were too numerous, and they retired before them to the distance of a quarter of a
mile, where a rally was made and the Rebels were in turn driven. This was the last attempt



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 114 of 165)