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made by the enemy.

In this affair the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth lost — of officers, Adjutant Smith, killed ;
Lieutenant Clark, of company H, wounded. Of privates, Mathias Calahan, company A ; Rich-
ard R. Lykins, company D ; Conrad Ling, company F ; George Beckwith, company H, killed ;



One Hundred and Twenty- Fifth Ohio Infantry. 645

and John Boner, F. J. Fobes, John D. Mahan, James B. Scott, Henry Graham, Cassius C. Birch,
and J. Couch, wounded. Lieutenant Smith was fatally shot in the head with a musket-ball.

Adopting the strategy of lighting many fires along the hill to deceive the enemy as to their
strengtli and intentions, the command commenced a retreat to Knoxville. At that place the One
Hundred and Twenty-Fifth was joined by companies K and I, lately recruited in Ohio through
the efforts of Lieutenant-Colonel Moore. The regiment passed through Knoxville to Loudon,
where it erected winter-quarters, and remained until the 21st of March. From this point it
moved to Sweetwater, April 18th; thence to Athens on the 19th; and, passing through Charles-
ton on the 20th, it arrived at Cleveland, Tennessee, on the 21st, where it again erected quarters.
This may be regarded as the close of the campaign of 1863.

General Sherman was busily concentrating the National army for his Atlanta campaign.
The Fourth Corps (and with it the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth Ohio) moved from camp,
near Cleveland, on the morning of the 3d of May. The regiment at this time belonged to the
Third Brigade, Second Division, Fourth Army Corps. The enemy had concentrated near Dal-
ton, Georgia, and that was the point to which the march was directed. No opposition was made
until the evening of May 7th, when the enemy's skirmishers appeared in force. The command
halted and bivouacked for the night, but at early dawn it was aroused to the opening struggle of
the campaign.

General O. O. Howard, commanding the corps, sent an order to Brigadier-General Harker to
take the best troops in his brigade and dislodge a portion of the enemy from a position on a high
and steep bluff, called Rocky Face Ridge. General Harker sent the order to Colonel Opdycke,
who at once put his own regiment in motion. A line of skirmishers was thrown out and a deter-
mined feint made of attacking the north end of the ridge, when, suddenly withdrawing his com-
mand, he formed it in division by echelon, and assailed the west side, advancing slowly and
tediously up the steep ascent. The command ascended from height to height along the only
road up the side of the mountain, which was so steep and precipitous that the field-officers were
obliged to dismount and lead their horses. The enemy showered down musket-balls, but to no
purpose. The crest was gained, a charge made, and the enemy driven from his works.

The enemy was driven along the crest of the mountain to within a few rods of a line of
Rebel works built across the south end of the ridge, where the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth
halted lor the night and threw up some works. During the night the remainder of the brigade
made its way up the mountain, bringing with it, by great labor, a piece of artillery. The loss of
the cegiment on the 8th was four killed and eighteen wounded. So well pleased was General
Howard with the result of this affair that he issued a special order, highly complimentary to
both Colonel Opdycke and the regiment. The second Rebel line was equally formidable as the
first. The position of the ground was such that an attack could be made only in front, as its
flanks were protected by steep sides, which no foot could scale. The plan of attack was arranged
by General Harker, who was in command of the brigade. The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth
was placed in position by Colonel Opdycke. Two companies of the regiment were placed to the
left of the crest on the skirmish-line, while the remainder supported the Sixty-Fourth Ohio,
which advanced along the narrow crest. At four P. M. the bugles sounded the charge, and the
strife commenced. The skirmish-line swept up to the works, or rather the cliffs — for so steep
were the rocks on the left side of the ridge that the enemy's flanks were sufficiently protected
from all assault. The assaulting column was obliged to move by the flank ; for so narrow was
the path that but four men could move abreast. Under a sweeping fire the column was pushed
to within a few feet of the works, when, so destructive became the volleys, that the regiment in
front of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth came rushing back through its ranks. To succeed
in pushing through the narrow gap in the face of such a fire, and with another regiment forcing
itself back, was impossible. The entire brigade fell back to the works erected the previous
night. The loss of the regiment was heavy in both killed and wounded.

During the night of the 12th of May the enemy evacuated the position before Dalton, and
at an early hour the National forces started in pursuit, and came up with them on the afternoon



646 Ohio in the War.

of the 14th at Resaca. Here again the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth was conspicuous for its
bravery. Its Colonel led it in a desperate charge, in which the brigade commander, General
Harker, was wounded. Colonel Opdycke then led the brigade up to the first line of works,
which had been captured, and, calling on his men to follow him, sprang over them upon his
horse. The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth responded witli a yell, and bounding over, charged .
upon the second line of works. The Colonel was struck by a ball, which passed through his
arm just above the elbow, and severely bruised his side. The regiment still held its position until
relieved at night. Thus it was with this gallant regiment in all the encounters of this extra-
ordinary campaign. At Lost Mountain it distinguished itself by a charge across a deep and
miry .stream, driving the enemy within his works in the face of a sweeping fire of artillery.

Kenesaw Mountain came next in importance. In this charge the regiment was under the
command of Lieutenant-Colonel Moore, Colonel Opdycke commanding the brigade. The charge
was ordered, and the regiment with a yell rushed upon the foe. The Rebel artillery and infantry
opened upon the advancing line, plowing up the ground and strewing it with dead and wounded.
Quicker than it can be told the line had rushed upon those rifle-pits, and when but a few feet
distant poured in a withering volley against the swarming Rebels, driving them in confusion back
to their works. The pits were gained and many of the Rebels captured. Then came the order:
"Forward to the works!" and the line again rushed into the dreadful storm of shot and shell.
The regiment advanced to the abattis, and a few of the men had penetrated it, when the column
in support wavered ; seeing which General Harker dashed ahead, and, waving his hat, cried :
"Forward and take those works !" when instantly he fell, mortally wounded. The column gave
way and fell back steadily to the line of rifle-pits. The One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth lost
heavily in this affair. Lieutenant Dilley fell dead upon the abattis ; Lieutenant Burnham fell
close by, pierced by four balls; Captain Moses was severely wounded.

After the fall of Atlanta the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth was one of the regiments sent
back against Hood, then menacing Nashville. In the battle of Franklin it won high honor.
The immediate command of the regiment was in the hands of Captain Bates, who led it gallantly
and well. The brigade, as usual, was led by Colonel Opdycke. This regiment was among the
first to reach the works at the onset, and its cheer was the harbinger of death to the enemy. Its
loss was severe, though in a measure protected, after the works were captured. It is sufficient
to say that after the battle was over General Thomas rode up and said : " Colonel Opdycke, your
brigade saved the army at Franklin, and saved Nashville." The regiment captured eighty pris-
oners and two battle-flags.

Part of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth was on the skirmish-line during the battle of
Nashville, and, under Lieutenant Hulse, did good execution. At seven o'clock A. M. the regi-
ment advanced with the line upon the enemy's works, and, after a sharp fight, carried them.
The enemy was pursued, and night closed the conflict. The next day (the 16th) the One Hun-
dred and Twenty-Fifth was again in motion at an early hour, and the fight resumed. At four
P. M. the regiment charged with the division upon the works which the enemy had hastily con-
structed, and, breaking the line, the Rebel army fled in confusion. Lieutenant-Colonel Bruflf was
in command of the regiment at this time. The pursuit of the enemy was continued with great
vigor until the command reached Huntsville, Alabama, on the 6th of January, 1865, where it
went into winter-quarters. During the stay at this point Colonel Opdycke was made Brigadier-
General of Volunteers. On the 28th of March the command took the cars for Knoxvilie, East
Tennessee, which was reached on the 30th, and from thence moved to Blue Springs. The regi-
ment remained at the last-mentioned place until the 19th of April, when it was taken to Nash-
ville by rail, reaching that city on the 30th of April. It lay in camp here until June, when it
was moved to New Orleans, Louisiana, camping near that city for some three weeks. It was
then taken by steamer to Texas, and was there mustered out of service on the 25th of September,
1865. Returning to Ohio, it was discharged October 17th, at Camp Chase. No particular field-
service was performed by the regiment during its stay in Louisiana and Texas.



One Hundred and Twenty- Sixth Ohio Infantry. 647



126th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



BOSTEH, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF BANK.



COM. ISSUED.



REMARKS.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel
Do.
Do.
Do.

Major

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon ....

Do

Do

Do

Ass't Surgeon

Do.

Do.

Do.

Chaplain

Captain .

Do. .



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



BENJ. F. SMITH

Wji. H. Harlan

Aaron W. Ebright

Henry C. Yontz

Thomas W. McKinnie .

Aaron W. Erright

George W. Vo*bes

Giorge W. Hoge

Wm. G. Williams

Wm. Estep

J. mkes Ely

Ithamar B. Weed

Alva Richards

J. Sykes Ely

James P. Alcorn

Ithamar B. Weed

Joshua Worley

John K. Andrews

George W. Vorhes

Wm. B. Kirk

Richard M. Lyons

Samuel Parsley

Wm. L. Dixon

Jacob Weyand

Oliver W. France

J. S. McCready

Henry C. Yontz

Reuben Lampton

Robert Martin

George W. Hoge

Thomas J. Hyatt

Henry Hixon

John E. McPeck

Lewis W. Southerland .

Jacob Lamb

Samuel C. Kerr

Thomas W. McKinnie..

Win. G. Williams

loseph C. Watson

; amu. 1 B. Petree

iohn W. Crooks

Albert J. Harrison

Wm. H. Smith

Abraham Kellev

James W. Moffatt

orydon E. Patterson...
Isaac 51. Knotts

nrge W. Hoge

Robert Martin

Thomas J. Hyatt

Henry Hixon

John H. Benfer

Alex. Patterson

lohn E. McPeck

Andrew J. Dingmau ....

Thomas H. Smith

L' wis W. Southerland .

Jacob Lamb

John M. Shaffer ,

Thomas W. McKinnie..,

Samuel C. Kir

Joseph C. Watson

Wm. G. Williams

Robrt Hiller

Samu 1 B. Petree

Jo 111 W. Crooks

Ambrose W. Moore

Albert J. Harrison

Win. H. Smith

Abraham Kelley

James W. Moffatt

Corydon E. Patterson...

Ru.'us Ricksc ker

Isaac M. Knotts

(i-urge T. Guiney

1 Ibas. C. Crawford

orge J. Henderson....

Elias Fonts ,

ison L. Smith

Benj. X. Waddle

David R. S. Wells

Thomas H. Whitmer....

Wm. II. Keplinger ,

John Scott

Barclay Cooper



-'4.



Sept
Oct.
Feb.
Oct.
Dec.
Sept. 27
March 3
Oct. 12
Dec. 24
Sept. 2
Feb. IS
June 27
D.-e. 12.
Nov. IS.



March 30,
June 27,
Oct.



July
Aug.



Sept.
Oct.



lSfi2
1864



24,
7,
9,
H,
M,
IS,



11,
11,

March 1,
June 25,
March 3,
3,



June



July
Oct.



Feb.
Aug.



ppt.

Oct.



27,
27,
27,
27,
27,
25,
12,
1-,
12,
1-',
!■»,
21,
24,
24,
23,

I','
13,
20,
21,
29,
31,



1,

11,

" 'I,

March 14,

" 1,

24,

Jan. 18,

June 20,

March 3,

3,

" 3.



(line



July



27,
27,
27,

27|
27,
27,
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
!•■
21,
24,
24,
23,



Sept.

Oct.

Feb.

Oct.

Dec.

Oct.

March

Oct.

Dec.

Oct.

Feb.

June

Dec.

Feb.

March

June

Nov.

Oct.



March

Aug.

March



July
Oct.



Feb.
Oct.



March 30, 1863

30,
Aug. 10,
April 29,
Aug. 10,

-March 3, 1



Tune



3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
II.
24,
24,
24,
23,



Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged February 16, 1S64.

Killed.

Revoked.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Honorably discharged as Captain, Sept. 22, '64.

Discharged to receive promotion, Nov. IS, '64.

Mustered out with regiment.
1S62 Honorably discharged February 16, 1S64.
1SG4 Resigned June 7, 1864.

Honorably discharged November 11, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.
1S62 Promoted to Surgeon.
1863 Declined ; commission returned.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned October 2, ls64.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned June 23, 1863. •

Kill id at " Wilderness," May 6, 1864.

Discharged.

Honorably discharged May 12, 1864.

Hon. dis. Sept. 23, 1864, on account of wounds.

Killed at battle of "Wilderness," May 6, 1864.

Died of wounds September 7, ls64.

Mustered out May 15, 186.1.

Killed at Spottsylvania, May 9, 1864.

Discharged November 3, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Killed September 19, 1864.

Killed June 6, l.su.

Honorably discharged as 1st Lieut. Dec. 8, '64.

Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant June 16, 1865.

Declined; commission returned.

Mustered out May 15, 1865.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Major.

Mustered out May 15, 1865.

Honorably discharged as 2d Lieut. April 21, '65.

Mustered out with r<-gim"nt.

Mustered out as 2d Lieut. December 17, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant June 25, 1S65.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned August 7, 1863.

Resigned March 24, 1S63.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged February 24, 1S64.

Resigned March 13, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined promotion.

Died January 18, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Died of wounds May 13, 1S64.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned as 2d Lieutenant July 30, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out May 15, 1865.

Mastered out with regiment

Discharged May 17, 1865;

Mustered out with regiment.

Revoked.

Discharged for disability May 3, 1865.
Discharged on account of wounds rec'd In bat.



648



Ohio in the Wae.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


REMARKS.






Jujy
Aug.

Sept.
Oct.

Nov.

March

Jan.
March

June
Nov.


23, 1865

24, lSi.2
7. "

11, "
14, "
18, "
20, "
31, "

5, "
11, "
11, "
28, "
27, "

1, 1S03

5, "
11, "
14, "
18, "

3, "

24, "

25, "
3, ISM
3, "
3, "
3, "
3, "
3, "
3, "
3, "


Feb.
Oct.

Dec.
March

April
June
Aug.

Nov.


23, 1865

10, 18(12

10, "

10, "

10, "

10, "

10, "

10, "

10, "

14, "

14, "

2(i, "

2fi, "

30, 1SC.3

30, "

30, "

30, "

29, "

10, "

10, "

10, "

3, 1864

3, "

3, "

3, "

3, "

3, "

3, "

3, "


Mustered out with regiment.




T. P. Williams


Do.


Robert Killer




Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.


David It. S. Wells


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Discharged February 20, 1865.


Do.




Do.


Wm. H. McCov


Honorably discharged March 14, 1864.


Do.




Do.




Discharged July 16, 1864.
Died July 30, 1863.


Do.




Do.


Wm. H. Smith


Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.




Promoted to lst.Lieutenaut.


Do.




Do.






Do.






Do.













126th OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment, which was recruited in the counties of Jefferson, Harrison, Tuscarawas,
Perry, and Fairfield, was organized at Camp Steubenville, in Jefferson County, mus-
ttred into the United States service on the 4th of September, 1862, and sent to Park-
ersburg, Virginia, on the 16th of the same month.

It remained at Parkersburg for a month, perfecting its drill and doing guard and garrison-
duty. About the middle of October it was taken by rail to Cumberland, Maryland, and remained
there some six weeks.

December 12th, under orders, it left for North Mountain, Virginia, on the line of the Balti-
more and Ohio Railroad, for the purpose of guarding that road from the incursions of the Rebel
guerrillas under Imboden. The regiment moved by companies down the road, guarding the
workmen as they repaired it. Martinsburg, Virginia, was reached on the 20th of December.
During this winter the regiment was sorely afflicted. Typhoid fever and small-pox made sad
havoc in its ranks, killing on an average six men out of every company. Many of the men who
partially recovered were rendered unlit for further service.

On April 15, 1863, the regiment left Martinsburg and went by rail to New Creek, Virginia,
to aid in looking after the Rebel General Imboden, who was on a raid through Western Virginia.
From New Creek the regiment, with other troops, marched, under General Kelly, to Greenland
Gap. Then commenced a series of marches and counter-marches, through that mountainous
region, looking after the guerrillas and blocking-up mountain passes. This service, although not
amounting to much, was very severe on the men.

Returning to New Creek, the regiment took the cars and went to Martinsburg, Virginia,
where it remained until the 14th of June, 1863. This regiment belonged to the Third Brigade,
Second Division, Eighth Army Corps, and the brigade was composed of the One Hundred and



One Hundred and Twenty -Sixth Ohio Infantry. 649

Sixth New York, One Hundred and Twenty-Sixth Ohio, and Captain Maltsby's West Virginia
Battery, commanded by B. F. Smith, Colonel of the One Hundred and Twenty-Sixth Ohio.

On the night of the 13th of June, while at Martinsburg, the brigade was attacked by the
advance-guard of Lee's Rebel army, under command of General Rhodes. The whole of that
night and the next day was consumed in brisk skirmishing. During the fight company I, while
guarding a point on the railroad, and while attempting to rejoin the regiment, was captured
entire by the enemy. At three o'clock P. M. of the 14th, orders were received to evacuate Mar-
tinsburg and retreat to Williamsport. This order could not be carried out, as the enemy, in over-
whelming numbers, occupied all the roads, except the Shepherdstown Road, on which our troops
were posted. Martinsburg was, by hard fighting, held until an hour before sundown, when the
enemy opened on the little band a terrible fire from fourteen pieces of artillery, which compelled
the evacuation of the position and a retreat toward Harper's Ferry. The enemy's cavalry fol-
lowed close in the rear, and picked up many of the regiment who were worn out with the fatigue
of the long-continued fight. Nightfall gave some relief from the enemy's cavalry, but the march
was continued all that night and until Harper's Ferry was reached, at ten o'clock next morning.
To attain this point the Potomac was forded at Shepherdstown, the water reaching the men's
armpits in many places.

At Harper's Ferry the One Hundred and Twenty-Sixth Ohio was joined to the Third Bri-
gade, Third Division, Third Army Corps, under General French. At the evacuation of Harper's
Ferry, in the latter part of June, 1863, the division to which the regiment belonged was detailed
to guard a fleet of canal-boats on the Ohio and Chesapeake Canal, conveying stores to Washing-
ton City.

Remaining in Washington City only two days, the regiment went by rail to Frederick City,
Maryland, and rejoined the Army of the Potomac. With the army it marched to Sharpsburg,
and from thence, after the Rebel army under Lee had crossed that river, it moved to Harper's
Ferry. From Harper's Ferry it moved to Upperville, in Loudon Valley, and thence to Manassas
Gap, where the Third Army Corps and Longstreet's corps had a brisk fight, in which a bayonet-
charge resulted in driving the Rebels from the heights, when our army took possession of them.

From Manassas Gap the regiment marched with the army to Rappahannock Station, where
it lay in camp until the 18th of August, 1863. From this place it went to New York to aid
in enforcing the draft in that city. Remaining there for about three weeks, it then returned to
Alexandria, Virginia, and marched thence to Rappahannock Station.

At Bristow Station, on the 11th of October, the regiment and its corps took part in a fight
with a portion of Lee's army, and for many days thereafter were engaged in skirmishing with
the enemy up to Centerville Heights. From Centerville Heights the One Hundred and Twenty-
Sixth Ohio returned, with the army, to Rappahannock Station. After participating in the taking
of an earthwork at Brandy Station, the regiment went into winter-quarters, occupying huts built
by the enemy.

In pursuance of orders from the War Department the Third Corps was broken up, and the
One Hundred and Twenty-Sixth Ohio assigned to the Third Brigade, Second Division, Sixth
Army Corps. About the 1st of April, 1864, the regiment left winter-quarters and went into
camp near Rixeyville, Virginia, where it remained until the opening of the grand campaign
under General Grant, in his march on Richmond.

At daylight on the morning of the 4th of May, it moved with the brigade toward the Rapi-
dan River, crossing at Germania Ford about sunset of the same day, and bivouacking for the
night on the bank. At eight o'clock next morning it moved on the Germania Ford Road, but
had not proceeded far when orders were received to return and resume the guard of the ford.
At eleven A. M. it again took the road in the direction of Orange C. H. Turnpike, and at one
P. M. moved to the right of the line (the brigade reporting to General H. G. Wright, command-
ing a division of the Sixth Army Corps), and took a position in the rear line, and on the extreme
right of the army



650 Ohio in the Wae.

At twelve o'clock on the 12th of May the regiment was detached and sent to the assistance
of General Wheaton's brigade of the Second Division, Sixth Army Corps. Marching to a posi-
tion beyond the front line, it was exposed to a fire from the enemy of about two hours. The loss
of the regiment in this well-contested fight, in which fifty rounds of ammunition were expended,
was sixteen men killed, and one officer and fifty-three men wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel A. W.
Ebright was in command of the regiment in this affair, and was wounded in the head. The reg-
iment took part in every engagement of the campaign, from the crossing of the Bapidan, on the
4th of May, to the crossing of the James Eiver, on the 17th of June, 1864.

In front of Cold Harbor it was in the assault of the Third Division on the enemy's works,
carrying and holding them under a heavy fire. During the succeeding night repeated efforts were
made by the enemy to retake these works, but his every effort was repulsed with heavy loss.

After crossing to the south side of the James the regiment participated in all the marches,
skirmishes, etc., of the Sixth Army Corps, up to the 2d of July, when it went into intrench ments
at the Williams House, five miles south of Petersburg.

On July 6, 1864, the regiment, with the division to which it belonged, marched to City Point,
and embarked for Baltimore, arriving there on the 8th. On the same morning it took cars and
moved to Monocacy Junction, where it arrived on the morning of the 9th, and took an important
part in the severe battle of Monocacy, in which it lost heavily.

The regiment retreated with the army to the vicinity of Baltimore, and subsequently rejoined
the two other divisions of the Sixth Corps at "Washington. It then marched in pursuit of Gen-
eral Early's army, and participated in engagements at Snicker's Gap, Charlestown, Halltown, and



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