Copyright
Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

. (page 117 of 165)
Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 117 of 165)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


1, "
*, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10. "

io; "

10, "

1, "

16, '*
18, "
20, "
22, "

24, "
1, "
4, "

10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
14, "
1. "
16, "
18, "
22, "
1. "
4, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
14, "


Aug. 11, 1863

10, "
" 11, "

11, "
Jan. 10, "
Aug. 11, "
Nov. 2, "
Aug. 11, "

11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "

11, "

11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "

11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "
" 11, "
" It, "
" 11, "

11, "

11, "

" 11, "

" 11, "

Dec. 26, "

Aug. 10, "

10, "
" 10, "

10, "
" 10, "
" 10, "
" 10, "
" 10, "
" 10, "
" 10, "
" 10, "
" 10, "
Dec. 26, "


Mustered out with regiment.
















Resigned October 31, 1j*3.


Do


Mustered out with regiment.
















Mustered out with regiment.


Do


Do




Do






Do




Mustered out witli regiment.


Do


Oliver S. Miller


Do






Do






Do






Do




Do




Do












Do.
Do.


Andrew Davis.


Promoted to Captain August 10, 1863.


Do.






Do.






Do,






Do.






Do.


Henry T. Ford




Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.




Mustered out with regiment.


Do.






Do.






Do.

Sd Lieutenant

Do.




Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.


Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.


George W. Barnett


.Mustered out with ivgiment.


Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.


George H. Bowers


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.













129th OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment was organized at Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, Ohio, August 10, 1863.
and was mustered in for the term of six months. It was composed of material from
different parts of the State. The process of raising it was very slow, the difficulties of
recruiting at that time being almost insurmountable, notwithstanding the term of service was for
but six months. Some of the companies lay in camp from June until August, causing dissatis-
faction and disgust. Nearly all the officers and a large portion of the men had seen considerable
service, so that on their organization comparatively little trouble was experienced in preparing
the regiment for the field, and for immediate service. On the same day the regiment was organ-
ized it started for Camp Nelson, Kentucky, via Cincinnati and Covington, stopping a few days at
the latter place. At Camp Nelson the One Hundred and Twenty-Ninth was brigaded with
the Eighty-Sixth Ohio, another six months' regiment (which had preceded the One Hundred
and Twenty-Ninth a few days), the Twenty-Second Ohio Battery, and a regiment of Tennes-
see Mounted Infantry, and placed under the command of Colonel De Courcy of the Sixteenth
Ohio. The brigade thus formed was incorporated into the Ninth Army Corps, which was then
concentrating at Camp Nelson, having just arrived from the siege of Vicksburg. On the 20th
of August the brigade left Camp Nelson, as it finally proved, for Cumberland Gap. Cumberland

Vol. II.— 42.



658 Ohio in the War.

Gap was approached by passing through the towns of Lancaster, Crab Orchard, Mount Vernon,
London, Barboursville, etc., the brigade appearing before the Gap on the morning of the 8th of
September. The place was thus completely invested, General Burnside having simultaneously
appeared with a force on the south-eastern side.

Cumberland Gap is one of the strongest places by nature in the country, and had been so
fortified as to seem absolutely impregnable. The Rebels had spent an immense amount of labor
upon it. Inside the fortifications was a force, under the command of the Rebel General Frazier,
numbering nearly three thousand men. As our force appeared before the main fort in regular line
of battle the Rebels saluted them with three shells, hut without damage. This was all the resist-
ance made to the National advance, excepting from the pickets as they were driven into the
intrenchments. A formal demand being made by the National commander for the unconditional
surrender of the post, General Frazier at once acceded, and the whole garrison fell into our
hands, with the exception of a small force of cavalry, which dashed off before being completely
hemmed in, and escaped. The fruits of this bloodless victory were over two thousand two hun-
dred prisoners, fourteen pieces of artillery, and a large amount of war material of all kinds.

General Burnside placed the brigade as a garrison at the Gap, and assigned Colonel Lemert
as its commander, Colonel De Courcy having incurred his displeasure by entering and taking
possession before lie, his superior officer, arrived on the ground.

The One Hundred and Twenty-Ninth Ohio remained at and about the Gap, engaged in vari-
ous duties, such as foraging, scouting, picket-duty, etc., until the morning of the 1st of December,
when it was ordered to move at daylight, receiving but two hours' notice. The regiment marched
through Tazewell, and in the direction of Clinch River, which was reached next day at the point
where the Knoxvitle road crosses that stream. At this point a sharp engagement was in progress
with a division of Longstreet's corps. The One Hundred and Twenty-Ninth was led into this
engagement and acquitted themselves in a creditable manner. From the 2d until the last of
December the regiment was kept constantly moving along the line of Clinch Biver, watching the
enemy and occasionally skirmishing with him. The winter was very severe. The terrible hard-
ships of this campaign can never be known except by those who participated in them. The men
and officers alike had left the Gap without any baggage whatever. The men were almost out of
clothes; many of them partially naked, and nearly all without shoes. Of rations they had
scarcely enough to sustain life, and that of the very poorest quality, which was obtained by foraging
off a country already gleaned over by the repeated passage of both armies to and fro. The
inhabitants themselves were on the verge of starvation.

About the last of December the regiment fell back to Tazewell, but their condition was not
bettered. The cold was intense and the enemy enterprising, so much so that foraging could not
be engaged in very far from camp. The regiment, isolated as it was, was in a far worse condition
than the main army, then at and about Knoxville, as Government made efforts, at least, to keep
them in supplies. The troops at Tazewell were left literally to rely on their own resources. The
graves which mark almost every hill-top and valley of that section of East Tennessee attest the
severity and sufferings of the men who passed the terrible winter of 1863 in those inhospitable
regions. The One Hundred and Twenty-Ninth, however, lost but few in comparison with other
regiments serving there, although exposed as much, if not more, than any other. The Eighty-
Sixth Ohio lost heavily. There were four Indiana regiments that suffered terribly. The men
of these regiments died by scores, in hospital, in houses by the roadside, in the woods, in fence-
corners — everywhere. The partial exemption of the One Hundred and Twenty-Ninth Ohio may
well be attributed to the untiring efforts of its commander, Colonel Howard D. John, and its
faithful Surgeon, James W. Smith, of Wellington, Ohio.

From Tazewell the One Hundred and Twenty-Ninth returned to the Gap, where it remained
until the beginning of February, when it started for Camp Nelson, one hundred and thirty mile*
distant. From there it was moved straight through to Cleveland, Ohio, where the regiment wai
mustered out by companies — C and D on the 5th of March, and the others as they were ready,
the last of them being discharged on the 11th of March, 1864.



One Hundred and Thirtieth Ohio Infantry. 659



130th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY— N. G.



ROSTER, ONE HUNDRED DAYS' SERVICE.*



Colonel

Lt. Colon -1....

Major

Buigeon

A Vt Surgeon

Adiutant

Quart' rmast r

Chaplain

Captain

Do! '.'.'.'.'.'.'".

])o

Do

Ho

)>o

J)o

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant
Do.



CHARLES B. PHILLIPS

John K \skins

E. 1$. Hall

Samuel S. Tiiok.n

Calvin II vthaway

Will B. D>. ks

Minoi' .1. Wilcox

James W. Alderman

Sylvester Brown

Dan. A. Coll lis _

Richard Waith

L. Jay Cirrel

Go gW. R-ynolts

L uis Ko ppel

W ai Ti-ii I). Moult)

Alva W. Howe

Siniuel Ley bourn

Will. S. Weill)

I'i esl "V Chamheiltn

Win. C. Cheney



May



31, 18M
14, "
14, "



u,



13,
13,

13,
13,
13,
H.
14,
31,
13,
13,



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
Id Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Win. B. Messenger

li. Q. Mason

Louis Kaiser

John C. Wu rl'el

Lyman W. HeixlricUson

Squire !j. Spencer

Henry Brown

George I*. Bristol

James (J. Meager

Kreleri. k In. 'old

John J. Barker

Frederick B. Mioemaker

Eim in M. Ken 'i'T

Georg" II. II. Blakr

Louis R -iger

Joseph Wnrreit

Jacob 15. FinthbHUgli

George Cursons

Henry Lange



mustered.



May



July
May
July



13, 18R4

13, "

13, "

13, "

13, "

14, "
14, "
31, "
13, "
13, "



II,

13,
13,



14,

31,



130th REGIMENT -NATIONAL GUARD.



HIS regiment, which was the First Ohio National Guard, was composed originally of
eight companies from Lucas County. Four of these companies and a part of the fifth
were from Toledo. The regiment reported promptly under the Governor's call for
thirty thousand "hundred days' men," with an aggregate of six hundred and fifty men. Three
companies came from Fulton County, to make a full regiment, and the eleven companies left
Toledo May 12, 1864, to report to Brigadier-General Hill at Sandusky for consolidation and mus-
ter-in. The regiment moved to Johnson's Island, and was engaged in guarding prisoners of war.
While the One Hundred and Thirtieth was on the Island the prisoners attempted to escape hy
tunnel'inn out, but their skillfully-devised plans were discovered and thwarted.

On the 4th of June orders were received to prepare for immediate removal, and in great glee
the men crossed the bay and took the cars for Washington City. At Bellair the arms and equip-
ment, State property, were turned in, and the regiment was supplied from those belonging to the
General Government. The regiment remained three days in Washington and then embarked on
the transport George Weems, and reported to General Butler, at Bermuda Hundred. It was
ordered to Point of Rocks, on the Appomattox, and for several days was under arms most of the
time, expecting an attack. The regiment returned and went into camp near Butler's Signal
Tower, at the left of the line of intrenchments. The time was occupied in drilling, digging rifle-
pits, and picketing the lines, until the 21st of June, when the regiment marched to Deep Bottom
anrl was again engaged in picketing and digging. The brigade consisted of the One Hundred
and Thirtieth, One Hundred and Thirty-Second, One Hundred and Thirty-Fourth, One Hundred
and Forty-Second, and One Hundred and Forty-Eighth Ohio, and was denominated the Second
Brigade, Third Division, Tenth Army Corps. On the 22d the regiment participated in a skirmish
with the Kebel pickets, with a loss of one man wounded.

On the 11th of August it marched to Bermuda Hundred and proceeded on transports to Fort

Powhatan, where it remained till it was ordered to be mustered out. The regiment embarked

September 7th on the transport Keyport, and steamed down the James. The boat encountered a

heavy storm and came near sinking; but Washington was finally reached, and from there the

regiment proceeded by rail to Toledo, where it was paid and discharged.

•The Rosters of the Ohio National Guard— some forty regiments— are given as they were when tho organizations
entered the service.



660



Ohio in the Wae.



131st REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY— N. G.



ROSTER, ONE HUNDRED DAYS' SERVICE.



BANK.


NAME.


MUSTEBED.


BANK.


NAME.


MUSTEBED.




JOHN G. LOWE


May 14, 1864


1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
M Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.


Wm. L. Winchell


May 14, 18fi«
" 14, "








Major




May H, 18fi4

14, "

" 14, "

" 14, "

" 14, "

»: "

14, "
" 14, "
" 14, "
" 14, "
" 14, "

14, "
" H, "

14, "
" 14, "

14, "

14, "




" 14, "






" 14, '"


Ass't Surgeon

Adjutant

Quart'rmast'r






" 14, "




Wm. G. Wells


" 14, "


Hf.nbt Stoudakd, jr




" 14, "




" 14, "








" 14, "


Do






" 14, "


Do.






" 14, "


Do




'Christian IS. Heckler

Bainuridge H. Miller


" 14, "


Do




" 14, "


Do.






" 14, "


Do






" 14, "


Do.


Ilenrv (! Hall




14, "


Do






" 14, "


Do




" 14, "






James F. Tavlor


" 14, "











131st REGIMENT— NATIONAL GUARD.



THE ONE HUNDEED AND THIETY-FIEST OHIO waa formed by the
consolidation of the First and Twelfth Battalions Ohio National Guard. They were
both raised in Montgomery County, and both went into Camp Lowe, near Dayton,
May 2, 1864. The men were furloughed until the 10th, when they re-assembled and proceeded
to Camp Chase. Here the work of consolidation began in earnest and was completed by the 14th,
when the regiment was mustered into the United States service by Captain Douglass.

On the next day the regiment proceeded to Baltimore, by way of the Central Ohio and Balti-
more and Ohio Railroads. It was delayed several days near North Mountain Virginia, by the
bridge over the Potomac at Harper's Ferry being washed away ; and during the time some anxiety
waa occasioned among the troops by rumors of the proximity of Eebel cavalry, there being no
ammunition in the command. A few rounds were obtained from Harper's Ferry, which rendered
everything secure. Upon arrival at Baltimore the regiment reported to Brigadier-General
Morris, commanding Second Separate Brigade, Eighth Army Corps, and was assigned to garri-
son-duty in Forts McHenry, Marshall, and Federal Hill. The One Hundred and Thirty-First
remained in charge of the forts during the exciting days in the early part of July, and on the
19th of August left for home via Harrisburg and Pittsburg. At the latter place a sumptuous
dinner waa provided for it by the citizens. The regiment arrived in Columbus August 21st, and
waa muatered out at Camp Chase on the 25th.

The regiment performed garrison-duty during the entire period of its enlistment ; yet but
few regiments not actually at the front have been able to see more clearly the value of their ser-
vice. Fort Federal Hill being the head-quarters of Camp Distribution, Baltimore, daily calls
were made on the garrison to guard detachments to Washington, Harper's Ferry, Fortress Mon-
roe, City Point, and to other places ; and it is worthy of remark that of four thousand thus
guarded a very small number effected their escape. The entire regiment shares in this honor,
for the companies were changed from post to post to equalize the labor and to divide the responsi-
bility. In addition to these duties, nightly details were made for patrol-duty in the city. The
men performed their labora with singular fidelity, and merited, as they secured, the hearty appro-
bation and gratitude of the entire loyal population of Baltimore.



One Hundred and Thirty-Second Ohio Infantry. 661



132d KEGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY— N. G.



EOSTEB, ONE HUNDRED DAYS' SERVICE.



MUSTEBED.



MUSTERED.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel....

Major

Surgeon

Ass't Surgeon
Do.

Adjutant

Cjuart'rmast'r

Chaplain

Captain

l)o

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant



JOEL HAINES

John J. Patton ,

Andrew P. Mkng... .,

Wm. J. Sullivan

liicHABD Edwards ...
Alrkut F. Matson...

Robert Dow

Albert C. Ramsey...

Aaron J. Stubbs

John J. Shirley

William B. Xiven

John H. Harrod

Jacob Bard

Joseph M. Black

J. J. Shriver

Henry B. Patterson...
Bern. F. H. Hankins

Robert B. Porter

<pencer W. Garwood.
Fielding S. Cable



May



15, 1864

15, "

15,

15,

15,

24,

15,

15,

15,

14,

M,

14,
14,

H,
14,
16,
15,
15,
14,



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Edward R. Chamberlin

John L. Clark

John L. Swallow

John W. Smith „..

Wm. H. Huston

Levi 31. Willetts

Eli H. Day

Wm. L. Brown

Enoch P. Williams

Peter Snook ,

John Seam:m

James A. Brown

Jeremiah Barnes ,

Peter Dow

Daniel W. Koch

John H. H. Gordon

Wm. Good

James Eaton

Arthur C. Humphrey...



May



14, 1864

14, "

14, "

14, "

14, '»

14, "
Iti, "

15, M

15, '*
14, '*
14, "
14, "
14, "
14, "
14, "

14, "

16, "

15, "
15, "



132d REGIMENT-NATIONAL GUARD.



jHIS regiment was formed by the consolidation of three companies of the Forty-Second
Battalion Ohio National Guard, from Paulding County, and one company of the
Twelfth Ohio National Guard, from Montgomery County, with the Thirty-Eighth Ohio
National Guard, from Logan County. The regiment was mustered in at Camp Chase, on the 14th
and 15th of Hay, 1S64, and for several days remained in camp, almost constantly engaged in
drill. On the 22d, at six o'clock A. M., the One Hundred and Thirty-Second marched to Colum-
bus and took the cars for Washington City, proceeding by way of the Central Ohio and Balti-
more and Ohio Railroads, arriving May 24th, and was ordered into camp near Fort Albany.
On the afternoon of the 30th it embarked at Alexandria on the steamer John Brooks, and pro-
ceeded to White House, reporting on arrival to General A. J. Smith. The regiment was assigned
to the Third Brigade, Third Division, Eighteenth Army Corps. It remained here, performing
very heavy fatigue and picket-duty, until June 11th, when it embarked on a small steamer and
proceeded to Beruiuda Hundred. Here again the regiment performed fatigue and picket-duty,
and suffered severely from sickness. On the 12th of August the regiment embarked for Norfolk,
where it enjoyed a period of comparative rest.

On the 27th of August the regiment embarked for Washington City, and proceeding from
there by way of Baltimore, Pittsburg, and Crestline, arrived at Columbus on the morning of the
50t£. The regiment was paid and mustered out at Camp Chase on the 10th of September.



662



Ohio in the War.



133d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY— N. G.



ROSTER, ONE HUNDRED DAYS' SERVICE.



Colonel

lit. Colonel....

Major

Burgeon

Ass't Surgeon
Do.

Adjutant

Quart'nnast r

Chaplain

Captain

1)0

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant



GUSTAVUS L. INNIS..

Wm. Kwing

Joseph M. Clark

C. P. Landon

David Rioenour

KoBKRT M. MctONNELL

Ukoiok W. Haydex

Cart. Bancroft

Jam is .Mitchell

Joseph Steely

Job. Wilson

Lnwrence L. Miacham ..

Il rani C. Tipton

Ellis U. Header

Lewis II. Webster

Kdward Fisher

Samuel W. Williams

Henry Piyinpton

l'liomas Lily

James WaltiUiere



MUSTERED.



May



6, 18fi4

•>. "

fi, "

7, "
21, "



S,
23,
ft,
6,
6,
6.
t>,
fi,
6,
6,
8,
6,
6.



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Sylvester W. Rainey..

Henry A. G-ntner

Henry L. Whitehead .

Jaob liomick

A. M. Bull

Ilobert S. Boyle

Charles II. Parsons....
Benjamin C. Strattoii

Oavid Robert;

Jetlersoii Darrah„

Oliver Marion

S. A. Ilutiheson

John M. Diokersou ....

Gteorge W. Laken

Win. S. Kideiiour

Win. II. Karnaugh

Win. H. Miller

James A. Stockton

W. S. iearu



MUSTERED.



May



6, ISM
6, "



133d REGIMENT— NATIONAL GUARD.



THIS regiment was formed by the consolidation of two companies of the Fifty-Eighth
and the Seventy-Sixth Battalions with the Third Ohio National Guard, making an
aggregate of nine hundred and seventeen men. The regiment was mustered in on the
6th of May, 1864, and was immediately ordered to Parkersburg, "West Virginia. It arrived
there May 8th, and as soon as transportation could be furnished moved on to New Creek. The
regiment first occupied Fort Fuller, but soon moved into quartets vacated by other troops, where
it remained until June 7th. The time was fully occupied by drills, and strong efforts were made
to fit the regiment for active field-service.

The regiment proceeded to Washington City June 7th, and was ordered to Bermuda Hun-
dred, where it arrived June 12th, and was assigned to the First Brigade, First Division, Tenth
Army Corps. On the 16th of June the First Division was ordered to destroy the Richmond and
Petersburg Railroad, in order to prevent the Rebels from sending re-enforcements from the
former to the latter place. The One Hundred and Thirty-Third was assigned to the support of a
battery, which opened a furious cannonade on the enemy, and, with other troops, succeeded in
holding the Rebels in check five hours, during which time the left of the division tore up about
four miles of railroad track. The division then retired in good order, though the First Brigade
was engaged in sharp skirmishing, in which the One Hundred and Thirty-Third lost two men
wounded. At ten o'clock at night the regiment was relieved, and was marched to its camp for
supper, having been without food during the day. On the 17th of July the regiment embarked
at Point of Rocks, and proceeded to Fort Powhatan on the James. Here it was employed in
work on the fortifications and in repairing a telegraph line from Fort Powhatan to Swan's Point.
In this latter duty encounters with the enemy were common, in one of which the Rebels killed
two men in the regiment, whom they shamelessly mutilated and left naked in the public road.
A detachment was sent out to avenge the outrage, and the leader of the Rebel gang was killed
and one of his comrades wounded. In addition to its other duties the regiment built a magazine,
and also a signal tower eighty feet high. Fort Powhatan proved so very sickly that over three
hundred of the One Hundred and Thirty-Third were on the sick list at one time. On the 10th
of August the regiment proceeded to Washington City and from thence to Camp Chase, where
it was mustered out August 20, 1864.



One Hundred and Thirty-Fourth Ohio Infantry. 663



134th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY— N. G.



BOSTEB. ONE HUNDRED DAYS' SEBVICE.



Colon 1

Lt. Colonel ....

Major

Surgeon

Ass t Surgepr

Adjutant ,

Qui rt'rmasft'i

Chaplain

Captain

Do



Ho.
Do.
l>o.
Do.

]»o.

Do.
Do.
Do.



JAMES B. ARMSTRONG.,

1>avid W. Ton

John C. Baker

James ¥. Spain

Benj. ¥. Baker

Samuel S. McMorin

Samuel D. Stisayeu

IjK.AN'DER H. Loxu

Matt Weaver

Mil's Wilson

Hora'io G. Johnson

Plnl.i liurnham i

Win. B. Cheney

John W~. Barley

Robert E. Robinson

Jacob Kr"H

Jr.lm V. Eiker

D. B. Klin hut



let Lieutenant Cyrus C. Barr



MUSTERED.



May fi, l.*6



1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
il Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



James M. McFarlanrl..

llenry C. Moon

Azio Smith

Samuel Bibbs

Nathaniel S. Johnson.

Lewis II. Miller

William Longaore

Marion C. Grafton

B. W. Maxwell

John W. Evans

James C. Reid

Ehenezer Roseberry ...

Win. II. Lovelace

Furgerson Bo wen

Win. R. Clariv

Isaac II. Evans

lames 0. Alexander...

James C. Grafton

E. S. Kilboru ,



MUSTERED.



May 6, 1S64

" fi, "

" 6, "

" 6, "

" 0, "

" 6, "

" 6, "

" 6, "

" 6, "

" 6, "

" ti, "



134th REGIMENT— NATIONAL GUARD.



|HIS regiment was composed of the Fourth Ohio National Guard from Champaign
County, which reported with seven hundred and fifty rank and file at the rendezvous,
companies A and B Ninety-Fourth Battalion, of Shelby County, and one company
from Hancock County. It was mustered into the service of the United States at Camp Chase, on
the 6th of May, 1864, and the next day moved for Cumberland, Virginia, by way of Parkersburg.

Here the regiment became well drilled, and on the 6th of June moved to Washington, where
it was supplied with one hundred and fifty rounds of ammunition to the man, and then it pro-
ceeded to White House, on the Paniunkey. The regiment did not disembark on arrival, but was
immediately ordered to City Point. Here it aided in pontooning the river and in building roads.
On the 17th of June the regiment was engaged with the enemy at Port Walthall, during the
assault on Petersburg, with a loss of two killed and three wounded. The men displayed great
coolness and bravery under fire. On the 22d of June the One Hundred and Thirty-Fourth



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 117 of 165)