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Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out June 14, 1S62. as supernumerary .

IV ited to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned Maich 12, 1SC2.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out June 13, 1862, as supernumerary.

Mustered out.

Lieutenant-Colonel 4th Kentucky Cavalry.

Mustered out.

Resigned January 28. 1S62.

Resigned June 16, 1862.

Resigned.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged October 1, 1862.

Discharged February 9, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged February 4, 1864.

Resigned August 9, 1863.

Resigned October 26, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Revoked.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned October I, 1864, as 2d Lieutenant.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out November 25, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged as 2d Lieutenant;

Mustered out November 25, 1864.

Declined; commission return, -1.

Mustered out at expiration of STvice.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out wilh regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out May 15, 1863, as 2d Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Sick in hospital at Macon, Georgia.

-Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.

Resigned June 28, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Died May 25, '65, from wounds rec'd. in action
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment as 2d Lieut.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned April 25, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned December 12, 1861.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned November 7, 1862.
Resigned February 9, 1S62.
Neweiied May 29, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned June 15, 1862.
Died May 2s, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant,
ted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned January I, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Kill il December 31, 1862.
Discharged December 20, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



First Ohio Cavalry.



747



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Henry C. Reppert

David A. Roush

Jonathan Chit

James Kirkendall

.Martin V. High

Win. La wrier

Allen F. Overly

Georsre W. Keycs

Heurv Ferguson

Edwin h. Hall

Carter Kiggs

Charles W. Florence

Jonas Thornton

Itobert 15. Rhodes

Marcus T. C. Williams.
Joseph A. 0. Youmau...

Joseph T. lievnohls

John W. Laughlin

Henry E. Hector

George P. Barnes, sr

Peter B. Coo!



DATE OF BANK. (01. ISSUED.



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Jan.
Dec.
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Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieut.; lion. dis. July 1, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Discharged September 11, ISM

Resigned June 18, i.si',4.

Resigned April 17, 18M.

Revoked.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



FIRST OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALRY.



TT1HIS regiment was organized during the latter part of the summer of 1861, under the

I first call of President Lincoln for the three-years' service. Its place of rendezvous was

I Camp Chase, near Columbus, Ohio. The officers were mustered into the service from

the 1st of August to the 1st of October, as occasion required, and the regiment, as a whole, on

the 5th of October, 1861.

It being the first organization of its class raised in the State, there was at once manifested a
great anxiety to join its ranks. This fact enabled the recruiting-officers and the. Surgeon of the
regiment to discriminate largely in the selection of men. It may well be doubted whether more
applicants were ever rejected from a similar organization in the service, or if a nobler band of
men in physical development could possibly have been selected from the yeomanry of Ohio.

The strictest military discipline Was at once inaugurated. Each company, as soon as settled
in quarters, was required to perform its regular routine of duty. The officers, many of whom
had never before seen a cavalry regiment, were placed under instruction, and required to drill
their men once a day. At night an officers' school was held, at which all officers were required
to appear, and progress was demanded of each.

About the middle of September, 1861, companies A and C, under command of Captain Rob-
inson, of company A, were ordered to Western Virginia, whence, after performing considerable
service in that department, they were ordered to the Shenandoah Valley, and attached to the
commands of Shields, Banks, and Kilpatrick. They participated in many of the sanguinary
engagements around the capital, and did not return to the regiment until January, 1865.

On the 1st of October company B was ordered to report to General Mitchel's head-quar-
ters, in Cincinnati, where it remained on duty for some weeks. While in Cincinnati it was fully
equipped and sent on an expedition into Kentucky, where it had a sharp skirmish with' a portion
of Colonel Humphrey Marshall's command at West Liberty. Lieutenant Fordyce and several
men were wounded. This company rejoined the regiment at Louisville, Kentucky, in December.

On the 9th of December the regiment broke camp and proceeded by rail and steamboat to
Louisville, where it arrived on the morning of the 11th, the first regiment of cavalry to enter
that department. This was the nucleus of that host of cavalry which, under the leadership of
Stanley, Crook, Mitchel, McCook, Kilpatrick, Garrard, Long, Minty, and Wilson, achieved such



748 Ohio in the Wae.

triumphs for the country and fame for themselves. The magnitude of such conflicts as Pittsburg
Landing, Stone River, Cliickamauga, Mission Ridge, and Atlanta, mostly fought by other arms
of the service, equally brave, but not superior, have so occupied the public mind that the achieve-
ments of the cavalry — its fearless rides, its daring raids, its bloody charges, its long nights of
weary marching, as it carried desolation and destruction into the very heart of treason — have
been almost overlooked. The story of the cavalry of the South-west is a record of heroic
achievements unsurpassed in the annals of that service.

The regiment remained at Louisville until the 16th of January, during which time Colonel
O. P. Ransom resigned his commission. Orders were received to join General Thomas at Som-
erset. After four days' marching a junction was effected at Lebanon, Kentucky, where the regi-
ment went into camp. The victory of Mill Springs had been achieved a few days before. While
in this camp the regiment was actively engaged in keeping the country clear of Rebel guerrillas,
who had infested that region for several months previous. Among other Rebel parties a detach-
ment of the notorious John Morgan guerrillas was encountered and severely handled.

On the 12th of February Lieutenant-Colonel T. C. H. Smith resigned his commission, and was
relieved by the former senior Major, now newly commissioned Colonel, Minor Millikin. On the
14th the regiment moved to Louisville; on the 28th embarked on transports for Nashville, Ten-
nessee, and arrived on the 6th of March, the city having been entered by the army from Bowling
Green, Kentucky, some days previous. The regiment lay in camp near Nashville until the 14th
of March, when it took the advance of the column moving toward Columbia, encountering and
putting to flight, near that place, the rear-guard of the enemy. The bridge over Duck River was
burned by the fleeing Rebels, thus retarding the column for some two weeks. A battalion of the
First Cavalry, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, forded the river and occupied the
town, situated on the south bank.

The regiment marched through to the Tennessee River with General Thomas's division,
arriving at Pittsburg Landing just after the battle of that name had ceased. It participated in
the advance upon Corinth, having frequent skirmishes with the enemy, and after the evacuation
it joined in pursuit of Beauregard's army, going as far as Booneville. During this pursuit it had
four sharp engagements with the enemy, with, however, but little loss.

On the 7th of June, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, the regiment made a
reconnoisance thirty miles into the interior, avoiding all bodies of troops, and gaining much val-
uable information. It returned to camp near Booneville on the same evening. This reconnois-
sancc closed the connection of Lieutenant-Colonel Smith with the regiment. He was, on the 10th
of June, detailed for duty on the staff of Major-General Pope, as Inspector-General.

On the 12th of June the First returned to Corinth, where it remained for about a week.
While lying at this camp several officers resigned. On the 17th the regiment moved eastward to
guard the line of the Mobile and Charleston Railroad; two companies (L and M) under com-
mand of Captain Patten, were stationed at Bear Creek, near Iuka; four companies (B, D, G, and
H), under Colonel Milliken, at Tuscumbia, the head-quarters of General Thomas; the remainder
of the regiment, under Captain Eggleston, proceeded twenty-five miles further east, to Court-
land. Company I, under Captain Writer, was sent to Decatur, the point at which the road crosses
the Tennessee River. In this way the regiment was constantly engaged in scouting, and keeping
the country clear of bushwhackers and guerrillas.

A detachment from Tuscumbia, under command of Captain Emery, had a severe engage-
ment, about the ltt of July, with Roddy's Rebel command, while on a scout near Russellville,
Alabama. Although successful the detachment suffered severely, losing among others, Captain
Emery, mortally wounded.

On the 15th of July Captain Writer, with thirteen men of company I, while on a scout with
Colonel Streight, Fifty-Seventh Indiana, some distance south of Decatur, and while detached
from the infantry, were attacked by a superior force of Rebel cavalry under General Anderson.
Two of the men were captured and four wounded. Through the sagacity and bravery of Ser-



First Ohio Cavalry. 749

geant (afterward Captain) Sullenberger the party succeeded in making its way back to Decatur.
Captain Writer was severely wounded.

On the 25th of July Courtland was attacked by a large force of Rebel cavalry under General
Anderson. Two companies of the Tenth Kentucky Infantry, and companies E and K of the
First Ohio Cavalry, commanded by Captain Eggleston, engaged the enemy and held out for a
considerable time, but were compelled to retire, the enemy having captured the infantry, Captain
Eggleston, and twenty-one of the cavalry. The remnants of the First Cavalry reached Decatur
on the 26th, whence, together with company I (stationed there), they were marched through to
Athens, Alabama, rejoining the regiment on the 30th of July.

On the lsfr of August the regiment started for Decherd, Tennessee, arriving there on the 5th.
On the 17th Colonel Millikin, with six companies, moved to McMinnville, while the other four,
under Captain Patten, were sent on a scout to Fayetteville, where, on the 19th, Lieutenant Rea,
of company I, and six men, were captured while on a reconnoissance. Captain Patten, on his
return, was assigned, with his battalion, to duty at General Crittenden's head-quarters, in which
capacity they made the march to Louisville, Kentucky, as a portion of Buell's army. Consider-
able skirmishing occurred on the way. Major Laughlin, with companies F and K, had joined
them at Bowling Green. Colonel Millikin, with the first battalion, marched through to Louis-
ville with Major-General Thomas's head-quarters, arriving some days in advance of the other
detachments. Colonel Millikin's battalion moved from Louisville on the 2d of October, in
advance of General Schoepf 's division, and on the 3d captured twenty-five prisoners in an engage-
ment near Shepherdstown, arriving at Springfield, fifty-five miles south of Louisville, on the 6th.
This battalion also took the advance on the Perryville road, carrying it with great gallantry.

On the day after the battle of Perryville the regiment was united, and remained so until its
final discharge, a period of three years.

Major Laughlin's detachment left Louisville on the 2d of October, taking the advance on the
Bardstown Pike, and marching directly on that place. At a point nine miles from Bardstown
the enemy was met. Sharp skirmishing was continued to within one mile of Bardstown, when
the enemy made a determined stand, and for a time repulsed our cavalry. An hour later they
rallied and charged into the town. The loss was twenty-five killed and wounded. That of the
Rebel cavalry was heavy, but not ascertained. In Bardstown a number of prisoners were cap-
tured with a large amount of army stores. This detachment also participated in the battle of
Perryville, with slight loss. The regiment pursued the enemy up to Crab Orchard, with brisk
skirmishing at Harrodsburg and Sanford.

The Rebel General Morgan and his band of guerrillas becoming troublesome, the First Ohio
Cavalry, in connection with the First Kentucky Cavalry, was sent northward from Crab Orchard
in pursuit, and followed him many miles through the center of the State. Reaching Bowling
Green in the early part of November it was thrown into a brigade composed of the First and
Third Ohio Cavalry, and Second and Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, commanded by Colonel Zahm, of
the Third Ohio. Moving southward, this brigade encountered Morgan's command of twenty-five
hundred men at Gallatin, Tennessee, routing it, and capturing seventy-five prisoners. Thence it
marched via Hartsville to Nashville, where it arrived about the middle of November and went
into camp.

The next service of the First Cavalry was in the advance of our forces under General Rose-
crans, on Murfree^boro', Tennessee. While the regiment lay in camp in the vicinity of Nashville
it was sent on several scouts and expeditions, frequently encountering the enemy, and with uni-
form success. When not engaged in these expeditions Colonel Millikin, its able commander,
filled up the time in perfecting the drill and discipline of the men, which, for the preceding ten
months, had necessarily been much neglected. When called upon to take its part in the Stone
River campaign the regiment was found to be in a condition to perform most effective and
valuable service.

In the advance on Murfreesboro' the regiment still formed a part of Colonel Zahm's brigade
in addition to the Third and Fourth Ohio, and Second Kentucky Cavalry, and moved out on the



750 Ohio in the War.

Franklin Pike, reaching that town in the afternoon, and routing the Rebel force stationed there.
On the 27th December it had a skirmish at Triune, and on the 29th, while moving toward Mur-
freesboro', encountered and defeated Wharton's brigade of Rebel cavalry. On the evening of the
same day the brigade and regiment took position upon the extreme right of the army, and held
it throughout the struggle. The 30th was spent in skirmishing. When the disaster of the 31st
occurred the brigade covered the retreat of our infantry, falling back slowly, contending for the
ground until near the Murfreesboro' and Nashville Pike. It was then perceived that to permit
the enemy to pass that point would prove ruinous. Colonel Millikin, having received no orders
from his brigade commander, took the responsibility of sending orderlies to the various regi-
mental commanders of the brigade, requesting them to support him in a saber-charge upon the
advancing foe. Seeing that instant action was necessary, and without waiting for a response,
Colonel Millikin wheeled his regiment into line and threw it with irresistible power upon the
enemy, driving those in his immediate front a distance of a quarter of a mile. Not receiving the
expected support, the enemy rallied and closed in on his rear, making his position one of extreme
peril. He was absolutely fighting the victorious left wing of the Rebel army with a force not
exceeding three hundred men. Perceiving that the safety of his men demanded t-heir immediate
extrication, the "about" was sounded, and the chivalrous little band cut its way through the
lines formed across its rear.

The First Cavalry fell back from the field of its glory, where it had made one of the most
heroic charges of the war, with saddened hearts, for, weltering in his life's blood, in the midst
of that carnage, lay its young and gallant commander, Colonel Minor Millikin. Justice never
lost a more faithful champion, nor his country a more promising genius or heroic son. Fame,
on the list of her favored ones, has few younger and no brighter names. Had Minor Millikin's
life been spared — but we dare not say it! He lived long enough to die for his country, and who
would or could ask a more glorious destiny? He was mourned by his comrades as the brave
mourn for the brave.

The regiment lost on this day, besides its Colonel, Major D. A. B. Moore and Lieutenant
Condit, killed; Adjutant Scott and Lieutenant Fordyce, wounded; and a long list of non-com-
missioned officers and privates — unnamed, but heroes of undying fame.

On the death of Colonel Millikin the command of the regiment devolved upon Major
Laughlin, under whom it continued to fight until the victory of Stone River was complete.

After the battle, and retreat of Bragg's army, the First Cavalry was moved back toward
Nashville ten miles, and went inlo camp at and near Lavergne, protecting the line of communi-
cation, until the middle of June, 1863, when it was ordered to Murfreesboro' to join its old
brigade (the Second Brigade, Second Division of Cavalry), now commanded by Colonel Eli
Long, of the Fourth Ohio Cavalry.

On the 24th of June the brigade moved on the extreme left of the army in its advance on
Tullahoma, and on the 1st of July it entered that place, under command of Major Patten, after
heavy skirmishing, in advance of General Steedman's brigade. From thence Colonel Long, with
his brigade, started on an expedition into Northern Alabama, making a detour of about one hun-
dred and fifty miles, through Huntsville, Athens, Pulaski, and Fayetteville. He returned to
Winchester on the 3d of August, having captured several hundred horses and mules, destroyed
large quantities of Rebel stores, and administered the oath to thousands of "repentant" Rebels.

On the 19th of August the regiment, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Cupp, in com-
pany with the brigade, commenced its march over the Cumberland Mountains, encamping, on
the 23d, on the banks of the Tennessee, near Stevenson, Alabama; and on the 29th, in company
with the Third Ohio and Second Kentucky Cavalry, forded the river, making a successful raid
upon Trenton, Georgia, capturing a number of prisoners and a large quantity of stores. On the
return the north side of the river was reached on the 31st of August. Recrossing to the south
side on the 2d of September it moved, under Major-General Stanley, across the Sand and Look-
out ranges, in the direction of Rome, Georgia, within twenty-eight miles of that place, in Broom-
town Valley. Long's advance brigade encountered a large force of the enemy, and after an



First Ohio Cavaley. 751

engagement of one hour drove the Rebels from their position. The loss was ten men killed and
wounded. By means of a reconnoissance toward Lafayette, Georgia, it was found that the Rebels
were in force near that place, and operations in that quarter, being impracticable, the cavalry
moved northward toward Chattanooga to take a part in the great struggle at Chickamauga.

On Sunday, September 19th, at ten A. M., the First Ohio Cavalrj arrived on the Chicka-
mauga battle-field, and was immediately led into the fight on the right, where it was occupied in
heavy skirmishing up to noon of that day. Through some misapprehension, at this hour, Lieu-
tenant-Colonel Cupp was ordered to charge the enemy's line, and with drawn sabers the little
band of not over two hundred and fifty men (four companies being temporarily detached to guard
a ford) were starting across the intervening space to precipitate themselves upon the foe, when
the mistake was discovered and the order countermanded. One moment more and scarcely a
man could have returned. The regiment was saved, but not without the loss of its brave and
dashing commander, and one-fifth of the rank and file, among the killed, wounded, and missing.
The loss of Lieutenant-Colonel Cupp was a severe blow to the regiment. He was universally
beloved, and was brave to a fault. The command now devolved upon Major T. J. Patten, under
whom the First Ohio fell back into Chattanooga, where it arrived on the 22d September, after a
narrow escape from being captured.

On the 26th of September General Crook's division, of which the First Cavalry formed a
part, was dispatched to guard the Tennessee River from Chattanooga to Washington, in East
Tennessee, a line of fifty miles in length. The First was stationed at "Washington. On the 1st
of October the Rebel General Wheeler, with eight thousand cavalry, broke through General
Crook's lines, necessarily weak from their great length. The Rebel advance was met by a bat-
talion of the First Cavalry, under Major James Scott, and a severe engagement followed, in
which Captain Conn of company B was wounded, and twenty-five men of the battalion were
wounded and captured. The overwhelming force of the Rebels compelled them to retire, after
bravely contesting the ground- The Rebels advanced rapidly over the mountains toward McMinn-
ville, with a view of capturing Murfreesboro'.

General Crook hastily gathered up his scattered command and made hot pursuit, and so
vigorous was the chase that the Rebels dared not tarry long enough in any one place to eflect any
damage. In this brilliant campaign the First Cavalry shared all its dangers, privations, and
triumphs.

On the 10th of October the Rebels succeeded, with but a remnant of the overwhelming force
that crossed the Tennessee River in triumph eight days before, in recrossing that stream at
Lamb's Ferry, near Florence, Alabama. They were weakened, disheartened, and demoralized ;
they had lost their artillery, and more than a thousand prisoners, and had been five times routed
by a force less than half their numbers.

From Florence the First Cavalry marched rid Pulaski, Fayetteville, and Winchester, to Paint
Rock Station, on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, twenty-five miles west of Stevenson,
Alabama, where it arrived on the 19th of October. Between the 24th of June and the above
date the regiment had marched about one thousand miles, hud been frequently engaged with the
enemy, and had subsisted to a great extent upon the country. It lay at this place, recruiting men
and horses, and guarding the railroad and river, until the 18th of November, when, with five
hundred men in its ranks, it moved toward Chattanooga, arriving there on the morning of the
22d of November. On the evening of the same day General Sherman, having already moved his



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 129 of 165)