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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned January 15, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned June 23, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned June 6, iS63.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Honorably discharged September 6, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned January 25, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieuteuant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Killed near Harper's Ferry August, 1864.

Died of wounds June 8, 1864.

Killed in action September, 1864 ; not must' rd.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to lBt Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. [June 1/65.

Comniis'd 1st Lt. but not mustered ; resigned

Resigned June 10, 1865.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. [out with reg.

Comniis'd 1st Lt. but not mustered; mustered

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned June 16, 1865.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Blustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.



Second Ohio Cavaley. 757



SECOND OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALRY.



THIS regiment was recruited and organized in the summer and autumn of 1861, under
the supervision of Hon. B. F. Wade and Hon. John Hutchins, who received special
authority from the War Office. The regiment rendezvoused at Camp Wade, near Cleve-
land, Ohio, and the last company was mustered in on the 10th of October, 1861. Being the first
cavalry regiment raised in the northern part of the State, it drew into its ranks a large propor-
tion of wealth, intelligence, capacity, and culture. Men and officers were almost wholly from
the district known as the Western Reserve, and represented every trade and profession. The
Second was uniformed, mounted, and partly drilled at Cleveland, and in the last of November
was ordered to Camp Dennison, where it received sabers, and continued drilling during the
month of December.

On December 20th a detachment of twenty men, commanded by Lieutenant Nettleton, was
ordered into Kentucky on scouting-duty, and remained there until the regiment received march-
ing orders. Early in January, 1862, under orders from the War Department, the Second pro-
ceeded by rail via Cincinnati, St. Louis, and St. Joseph to Platte City, Missouri. Beporting to
General Hunter, it was quartered in the town, and for the next three weeks it scouted the Missouri
border. On the 18th of February Doubleday's brigade, of which the Second was a part, was
ordered to march through the border counties of Missouri to Fort Scott, Kansas. On the 22d of
February and during the march, a scouting party of one hundred and twenty men of the Second
Ohio Cavalry was attacked in the streets of Independence, Missouri, by an equal force under the
command of the subsequently infamous Quantrill. As the results of the Second's "first fight,"
Quantrill was routed in fifteen minutes, losing five killed, four wounded, and five captured,
including one officer. The Second lost one killed and three wounded. The brigade reached Fort
Scott without further action, about the 1st of March, and camped in Sibley tents. At this time
the Second was armed with sabers, navy pistols, and Austrian carbines.

Early in April Minor's battalion marched to Carthage, Missouri, where it remained several
days breaking up guerrilla haunts, and then returned to Fort Scott. Two companies of this
battalion were sent soon after to garrison Iola, a small interior Kansas town. About the 15th of
April the Second made an expedition to Diamond Grove, on their return leaving six companies
at Carthage, where they remained until late in May. The army was concentrated at Fort Scott
in the latter part of May, and early in June it moved into the Indian Territory by various roads,
concentrating again at Spring River. During a halt at this place a cavalry and artillery force
moved on Cowskin Prairie, and drove the Indian Rebel Standwaitie from his camp. The entire
command soon moved to Baxter's Springs, Indian Territory, where three regiments of loyal
Indians, mounted on ponies and armed with squirrel-rifles, joined the command. Later in June
the column moved from Baxter's Springs southward, the animals living upon the grass only. On
this march the Second saw no enemy, and the sight of a burning prairie and the pow-wows of
their red-skinned companions alone relieved the monotony and dullness of the expedition.

On the 8th of July the column went into camp at Flat Rock Creek, Indian Territory, and
later in the month the Second formed part of a force which moved upon Fort Gibson and captur-
ing it, driving a small detachment of the enemy across the Arkansas. In the early part of
August the command moved for Fort Scott, where it arrived and went into camp about the 15th,
when it was found that there were less than two hundred and fifty serviceable horses in the



758 Ohio in the War.

Second Ohio, a large number of men were sick, and many had died on the march from the effects
of a peculiar brain fever, probably produced by the excessive heat to which they were exposed.

In the latter part of August the regiment shared in a forced march for ten days and nights,
in pursuit of a raiding Rebel party, skirmishing continually but without loss. About this time
one hundred and fifty men and two officers were detailed from the Second to man, temporarily, a
light battery. Six months later the detail was made a transfer by the War Department, and
constituted the Twenty-Fifth Ohio Battery. Early in September the mounted portion of the
regiment, with the battery above-mentioned, moved with the army of General Blunt into Mis-
souri and Arkansas, sharing in the active campaign, which ended in the victory of Prairie Grove,
Arkansas, December 3, 1862. In this autumn campaign the Second fought at Carthage and
Newtonia, Missouri, camped at Pea Ridge, and fought at Cow Hill, Wolf Creek, White River,
and Prairie Grove.

Later in September Captain August V. Kautz, Sixth United States Cavalry, was appointed
Colonel of the Second, and joined that portion lying at Fort Scott. In November an effort which
had been made to have the Second transferred to an Eastern army was successful, and the dis-
mounted portion moved at once by rail to Camp Chase, Ohio, to remount and refit for the field,
and the mounted portion, serving in Arkansas, followed in December. At Camp Chase the
Second received fresh horses, new arms and equipments, and sixty recruits, and during the winter
made great progress in drill and discipline. In February, 1863, the original twelve companies
were consolidated into eight, and a battalion of four companies, raised for the Eighth Ohio Vol-
unteer Cavalry, was added to the Second. This battalion was then serving in Kentucky, and
Major Purington was sent to assume command until it should join the regiment.

Early in April the Second left Camp Chase, and proceeded to Somerset, Kentucky, via Cin-
cinnati, Ohio, Maysville, Lexington, and Stanford, Kentucky. Near Lexington the new bat-
talion joined the regiment. With the exception of an occasional reconnoissance or raid the
Second remained in camp at Somerset, Kentucky, until the 27th of June. In May and June the
Second fought twice at Steubenville, twice at Monticello, and once at Columbia, Kentucky. In
the early part of June four companies of the Second formed part of a raiding force, under
General Saunders. They moved over the mountains into East Tennessee, attacked Knoxville,
destroyed a large amount of supplies and several railroad bridges, and returned in comparatively
good condition. Kautz's brigade, of which the Second was part, joined in the pursuit of John
Morgan on the first of July, followed the great raider twelve hundred miles, through three
States, marching twenty hours out of twenty-four, living wholly upon the gifts of the people for
twenty-seven days, and finally sharing in the capture at Buffington Island. After the raid the
Second re-assembled at Cincinnati, from which point nearly the whole regiment was furloughed
by General Burnside, in recognition of its endurance and gallantry.

The Second re-assembled and refitted at Stanford, Kentucky, and in August moved with the
army to East Tennessee. It was brigaded with the Second East Tennessee, Ninth Michigan, and
Seventh Ohio Cavalry, Colonel Carter, Second East Tennessee, commanding. Moving through
Big Creek Gap no resistance was made until they reached the Tennessee River at Loudon Bridge,
and here, after a light engagement, the enemy fell back. For a few days in September the regi-
ment was camped at Lenuir Station, and on the 5th and 6th made a forced march to Cumberland
Gap. After the surrender of the Rebel garrison the Second returned to Knoxville, and was
ordered up the valley. Marching along the Richmond Railroad, through Strawberry Plains,
Mossv Creek, and Greenville, it joined the army at Henderson Station, about the 25th of Sep-
tember. Immediately after arriving the Second received orders to report at once to General
Ros.ecrans, commanding Army of the Cumberland. The regiment marched thirty miles toward
Knoxville, and was suddenly ordered back to the front. On its return it found an engagement in
progress, in which it at once participated. The next morning the enemy fell back to Zollicoffer;
the Second, with its brigade, pursued, and one battalion of the regiment engaged the enemy.
After spending a few days at Watauga, the brigade retired to Jonesboro', then fell back to Hen-
derson, but being re-enforced it finally advanced and fought the battle of Blue Springs, the Second



Second Ohio Cavalry. 759

bearing an honorable part. The mounted force pushed on up the valley, defeating the Rebels at
Blountsville and Bristol. Late in October, as Longstreet advanced, the Second fell back with
the other cavalry to Russellville, and then to the vicinity of Cumberland Gap, and engaged
"Wheeler's cavalry. During the siege of Knoxville it operated on the enemy's flank, and after
the siege was raised joined in the pursuit. On the 2d of December it fought Longstreet's cavalry
at Morristown; on the 4th it formed the advance of a brigade, which attacked and fought eigh-
teen regiments for two hours at Russellville, losing forty men killed and wounded ; and on the
6th it was at the front five hours, in the battle of Bean Station, and for the next five days was
almost constantly under fire. After resting a few days at Blain's Cross Roads, the cavalry crossed
the Holston and moved to Mossy Creek. Here the time was spent in maneuvering and fighting
until January 1, 1864, when, out of four hundred and seventy men four hundred and twenty re-
enlisted, and were furloughed. They returned North via Knoxville, Chattanooga, Nashville,
Louisville, and Cincinnati to Camp Chase, and about the 16th of February disbanded for
thirty days.

On the 20th of March, 1864, the Second re-assembled at Cleveland, with one hundred and
thirty recruits, ready for the front. It was first ordered to Mount Sterling, Kentucky, but after-
ward to Annapolis, Maryland, where it arrived on the 29th of March, and on the 4th of April
camped on an arm of the Chesapeake. On the 13th of April it was reviewed by Lieutenant-
General Grant, Generals Burnside, Washburn, and Meigs. On the 22d the regiment moved to
Camp Stoneman, District of Columbia, and by the 30th was mounted, armed, and equipped. It
moved out of camp May 1st, eight hundred strong, marched through Pennsylvania Avenue, over
the Long Bridge, through Fairfax C. H. and Centerville, across the Plains of Manassas, and
reported to General Burnside, May 3d, at Warrenton Junction. With the Ninth Corps it moved
to Brandy Station, crossed the Rapidan, and went into line on the extreme right. On the 7th it
engaged Rosser's cavalry with slight loss; and from this time on, during the campaign of the
Wilderness, it was employed in covering the right flank of the infantry, almost constantly, either
on picket or skirmishing. On the 28th the regiment occupied Newtown, capturing commissary
stores and forage. By order of Lieutenant-General Grant the Second was transferred from the
Ninth Army Corps and permanently attached to Sheridan's Cavalry Corps, Army of the Poto-,
mac, and on the 29th it reported to Brigadier-General J. H. Wilson, commanding Third Cavalry
Division, on the Pamunkey, and was by him assigned to the First Brigade, commanded by Brig-
adier-General J. B. Mcintosh, then a Colonel.

The division crossed the Pamunkey on the 31st, and the First Brigade advanced on Hanover
C. H. After a desultory fight, the brigade formed, dismounted, for the charge. The Second
occupied the center and sustained the heaviest of the shock, driving the enemy from their front,
taking possession of and holding the crest and court-house. The next day a portion of the First
Brigade, including the Second Ohio Cavalry, proceeded to Ashland to attract the atteution of
the Rebels from a party engaged in destroying a railroad bridge over the South Anna. The force
had scarcely arrived in Ashland before it was surrounded by the enemy under Fitzhugh Lee, and
an action ensued which lasted until sundown, when our men withdrew, the Second covering the
retreat. From this time to the crossing of the James, the Second was engaged in picketing and
fighting on the right of the army from Hanover C. H. to Cold Harbor. It crossed the James on
the 17th of June, and the next day camped with the division on the Blackwater. On the 22d of
June the division moved on the raid to the Danville Railroad. The Second had an active share
in the expedition, fighting at Nottaway C. H., Stony Creek, and Ream Station, losing one hun-
dred men and five officers killed, wounded, and missing, and returning to the lines at Light
House Point on the 1st of July. Late in July it moved to the left of the army, and did picket-
duty on the left of Warren's (Fifth) corps, near the Wcldon Railroad. Early in August the
division withdrew from the front and went to Washington City, and on the 13th moved for Win-
chester, in the Shenandoah Valley, where it arrived on the 17th. The division was ordered to
act as rear-guard, and to hold the town till dark. At three o'clock P. M. Early made an attack,
and at sundown the division fell back. The second battalion and two companies of the third



760 Ohio in the War.

battalion of the Second Ohio Cavalry, acting as rear-guard for the whole command, fighting an
hour in dense darkness in the streets of Winchester, then joining the main column and falling
back to Summit Point. On the 19th Early again attacked, and after a sharp fight the division
retired to Charlestown, when again Early attacked on the 22d, and the Second was closely
engaged. From Charlestown the army retreated to a position inclosing Harper's Ferry, the right
resting on the Potomac and the left on the Shenandoah. The Second, with its division, went to
the right, and was twice engaged with the enemy. On the 26th of August the division was
ordered to Boonsboro'. The Second camped twenty-four hours on the South Mountain battle-
field, marched over Antietam, and recrossed the Potomac at Shepherdstown.

On the 30th of August the regiment marched to the vicinity of Berryville, Virginia, and
assisted in driving the enemy from the town. In the first part of September it was engaged with
the division in picket-duty on the left of Sheridan's army and in making reconnoissances, engag-
ing the enemy frequently. On the 13th of September Mcintosh's brigade, including the Second,
was ordered toward Winchester, where Early's head-quarters were established, to learn the
strength of the enemy. The brigade charged (Second Ohio in front), drove in the enemy's cav-
alry, and the Second Ohio, with the aid of the Third New Jersey, captured an entire regiment
of infantry, and took them to camp at Berryville. The Secretary of War made special mention
of the gallantry of the two regiments in this exploit.

At the battle of Opequan Mcintosh's brigade was ordered to capture a line of hills between
the Opequan and Winchester. By four hours' hard fighting, and by a bold charge, the brigade
won the prize, and at night, when Early's army was retreating, the Second was the last to leave
the pursuit on the Valley Pike. With its division, it moved out the Front Royal Pike, on the
20th, drove Wickham's cavalry through Front Royal, and marched and skirmished in Luray
Valley until the 25th, when it joined the army at New Market. It next moved to Staunton and
then ten miles east to Waynesboro', where, on the 29th, Fitzhugh Lee attacked the command at
.sundown. The Second fought, dismounted, till all had withdrawn, and then prepared to retire
as rear-guard, when it was found that retreat was cut off by a line of Rebel infantry. The regi-
ment charged through in column of fours, and continued as rear-guard until noon the next day,
when the command reached Bridgewater. Here General G. A. Custer assumed command of the
division. Rosser's cavalry attacked it at Bridgewater, and was repulsed, the Second sharing in
the action. During Sheridan's march down the valley Rosser annoyed the rear, and on the 9th
of October General Torbert, with the First and Third Divisions, engaged him, defeated him, and
captured eleven guns and eighty wagons. The Second fought from eight o'clock A. M. until
eleven, and pursued till three P. M. It then went to a position three miles west of Middletown,
and occupied, with its division, the right of Sheridan's line.

On the 19th the regiment shared in the battle of Cedar Creek, being in the saddle from day-
break until nine o'clock P. M. It occupied the center on the Valley Pike, to the rear of Middle-
town, while the infantry formed in rear of the cavalry, was present on the pike when Sheridan
came to the front on his immortal ride, assisted to raise the shout of welcome, and joined in the
subsequent charges which decided the victory, and at nine o'clock bivouacked, supperless, on the
field. After the battle the regiment performed picket-duty until the 1st of November, when it
fell back with the army to near Kernstown. On the 12th of November the regiment was attacked
while on picket by Rosser's division, and, of course, driven in. The fight lasted all day between
Custer and Rosser, resulting in the enemy being driven in confusion from the field. The Second
marched with the cavalry on the 20th to reconnoiter Early's force at New Market, and was hotly
engaged. Again, on the 10th of December, Custer's division marched to Moorefield, to intercept
Rosser, and returned in four days, only the advance of the Second having been engaged. On the
20th of December the division marched to Lacey's Springs, and while there Rosser attacked the
camp at daybreak with three brigades. The Second being formed for marching repulsed that
portion of the enemy which attacked the First Brigade. While returning to Kernstown it was
overtaken by a severe storm, and twenty-eight men were temporarily disabled by frozen feet.
The division moved to a position on the Romney Pike, one and a half miles from Winchester,






Second Ohio Cavaley. 761

on the 28th of December, and began the construction of winter-quarters. From this time until
February 27th, 1865, the Second did not move, as a regiment, from camp. Detachments fre-
quently went on scouts, and it furnished a regular detail for picket.

On the 27th of February the Second, with the cavalry under Sheridan, started on the last
raid of the war. Near the town of Waynesboro', on the 2d of March, Custer's division captured
the remainder of Early's army. In this engagement the Second captured five pieces of artillery
with caissons, thirteen ambulances and wagons, seventy horses and mules, thirty sets harness, six
hundred and fifty prisoners of war, and three hundred and fifty stand of small arms. For this
it received the thanks of General Custer on the field. It had the advance of the column in enter-
ing Charlotteville, where it captured more artillery. It continued to do its share until the forces
reached White House, on the 20th of March, when, after resting a week, Sheridan's cavalry
joined the Army of the Potomac, near Petersburg, and entered upon the campaign that closed
the war. From the 27th of March to the surrender of Lee, the Second captured and turned over
to the Provost-Marshal eighteen pieces of artillery, one hundred and eighty horses, seventy army
wagons, nine hundred prisoners, and quantities of small arms not counted. After the surrender
of Lee the regiment marched witli its division to Petersburg, and was ordered, with the rest of
the corps, to North Carolina ; but on reaching the Carolina line information of the capture of
Johnston was received, and the force returned to Petersburg. The division soon moved to the
vicinity of Washington City, and encamped two weeks. Immediately after the grand review the
Second was ordered to report to General Pope at St. Louis, where it arrived on the 7th of June,
and remained a month in Benton Barracks, when it was ordered to Springfield, Missouri, to relieve
State troops. The order for muster out was received about the 1st of September. The regiment
assembled at St. Louis, prepared its papers, proceeded to Camp Chase, Ohio, and on the 11th of
September, 1865, was paid and disbanded.

The Second fought under the following general officers: Buell, Wright, Hunter, Denver,
Sturgis, Blunt, Salomon, Curtis, Schofield, Burnside, Carter, Gillmore, Shackelford, Foster, Kautz,
Sedgwick, Wilson, Mcintosh, Torbert, Custer, Sheridan, Meade, and Grant. Its horses have
drank from, and its troopers have bathed in, the waters of the Arkansas, Kaw, Osage, Cygnes,
Missouri, Mississippi, Ohio, Scioto, Miami, Cumberland, Tennessee, Holston, Potomac, Shenan-
doah, Rappahannock, Eapidan, Bull Run, Mattapony, Pamunkey, Chickahominy, James, Appo-
mattox, Blackwater, Nottoway, and Chesapeake. It has campaigned through thirteen States and
a Territory: Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia,
Alabama, West Virginia, Maryland, Virginia, and Indian Territory. It has traveled, as a regi-
ment, on foot, horseback, by railroad and steamboat, on land, river, bay, and ocean. It has
marched an aggregate distance of twenty seven thousand miles ; has fought in ninety-seven battles
and engagements. It has served in five different armies: The Army of the Frontier, of the
Missouri, of the Potomac, of the Ohio, and of the Shenandoah — forming a continuous line of
armies from the head-waters of the Arkansas to the mouth of the James ; and its dead, sleeping



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 131 of 165)