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mation obtained. At daylight the next morning the brigade of cavalry under command of
Colonel Zahm, supported by a brigade of infantry from General T. J. Wood's division, com-
manded by Colonel C. G. Harker, attacked Morgan's camp, near Gallatin, and succeeded in cap-
turing his camp equipage and a large number of prisoners. Morgan hastily retreated across the
Cumberland to Lebanon, Tennessee.

Here, for the first time during an active campaign of seven months' duration, the second
and third battalions of the Third Cavalry met the first battalion under novel circumstances.
Colonel Zahm, who was not aware that the first battalion of his regiment was in the vicinity, on
approaching Gallatin from the north with his command, was attacked by a cavalry force, which
proved to be his own first battalion. This unfortunate mistake was probably the cause of Mor-
gan's escape at that time, and the failure of the expedition, he being apprised by the rapid firing
of the approach of the National forces.

From Gallatin the regiment moved to Hartsville, Tennessee, where it went into camp. At
this place the first and second battalions of the regiment were, for a portion of the time, placed
on duty guarding the fords of the Cumberland River. A detachment, under command of Cap-
tain E. M. Culver, under orders from Colonel Zahm, went up the Cumberland River to Car-
thage to intercept a large drove of mules and Rebel stores which were being removed by Rebel
Quartermasters, and accompanied by an escort from John Morgan's forces. After a chase of
twenty-six miles, fording the Cumberland River four times, they succeeded in capturing the



Third Ohio Cavalry. 767

entire Rebel train and a drove off one hundred and forty-six mules, routing the escort to the
train, killing three, and capturing seventeen prisoners, among whom were two Rebel Quarter-
masters and a Paymaster.

During the time the regiment was in camp at Hartsville it was almost daily engaged in
skirmishing with John Morgan's forces, whose head-quarters were at Lebanon, Tennessee.

In December this portion of the Third Cavalry moved from camp at Hartsville to a camp
near Nashville, Tennessee, and was incorporated into the Second Brigade of Cavalry, First Cav-
alry Corps, Army of the Cumberland, under General D. S. Stanley. Under this reorganization
of all the cavalry, the first battalion of the Third Cavalry rejoined its regiment.

On the 21st of December a reconnoissance in force was made by the Second Brigade to
Franklin, Tennessee, for the purpose of developing the strength and position of General Bragg's
forces. The Third Cavalry, supported by the Fourth and First, drove the Rebels from Frank-
lin, and, after capturing some prisoners, returned to Nashville. In this affair the notorious
Rebel guerrilla, Dick McCann, was relieved of his anticipated Christmas dinner by some of the
boys of the Third Cavalry.

On the 26th of December the regiment moved up with its brigade and took position on the
extreme right of General Rosecrans's army, near Franklin. On the 27th a second attack was
made on Franklin, which resulted in completely routing a straggling force of the enemy still
remaining in that place. The regiment then fell back across the river and moved toward Tri-
une, a portion of the command engaging the enemy that night near Triune. On the 28th the
enemy M r as again engaged by the brigade on the Wilkerson Turnpike, beyond Triune, and was
driven, with severe loss in killed and wounded. The brigade lost a few prisoners.

On December 29th a reconnoissance in force was made by the brigade to develop the position
and strength of the left wing of the Rebel forces under Bragg. After skirmishing during the day,
on the evening of the 30th the regiment was assigned position on the extreme right of General
Rosecrans's position. At two o'clock on the morning of the 31st the first battalion of the regi-
ment, being on picket-duty, apprised Colonel Zahm of the advance of the Rebel forces. Colonel
Zahm immediately placed his brigade in line of battle, and dispatched couriers to the head-
quarters of General McCook, then commanding the right wing. He then threw out a heavy line
of skirmishers, couqiosed of the first battalion of the Third Cavalry, and awaited the attack.

At four o'clock in the morning the skirmish-line was driven in, and the brigade attacked by
Wheeler's Rebel cavalry. The Third in this engagement was under the command of Lieuten-
ant-Colonel D. A. Murray. After two hours' fighting, through superiority of numbers the Rebel
forces forced the main portion of the brigade from the field, the regiment and brigade suffering
severely, both in officers and men. During the morning of the 31st the enemy captured General
McCook's corps ammunition-train, and was removing it from the field. The second and third
battalions of the Third Cavalry, who had withstood the shock and remained at their posts, made
a clash at the enemy and recaptured the train, taking one hundred and forty prisoners, and kill-
ing a number of Rebels and horses. During the afternoon of the 31st the regiment lost, in sus-
taining a charge made by the Rebels, thirteen men killed and a large number wounded.

At noon of January 1, 1SG3, the Third Cavalry left the field, under orders from General
Rosecrans, to escort a train of four thousand wagons for Nashville after supplies. The train
was attacked at Stewart's Creek by "Wheeler's Rebel cavalry, and the regiment, supported by
the Tenth Ohio Infantry, repulsed the Rebels with severe loss. Later in the day the train was
attacked by the same force. A portion of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, eight hundred
strong, being the rear-guard, was attacked and completely routed by the Rebels. The Third
Cavalry, in the rear, came up and met the enemy. A sharp fight ensued, lasting till after night-
fall, in which the Rebels were repulsed. The train was safely taken through to Nashville, laden
with supplies, and returned to Murfreesboro'.

After the battle of Stone River the Third Cavalry was sent in pursuit of the enemy, and
near Middleton, Tennessee, attacked his rear-guard and captured one of his trains. The regi-
ment returned and went into camp at Murfreesboro'. The second battalion, while in camp at



768 Ohio in the War.

Murfreesboro', was detached, under command of Major Seidel, and reported to Colonel W. B.
Hazen, the brigade commander, at Readyville. While stationed here the battalion was engaged
in picket-duty, and in skirmishing with General Morgan's Rebel guerrillas. In one of tbese
skirmishes, near Woodbury, a portion of the detachment, under command of Lieutenant Edwin
Clark, lost severely in killed, wounded, and prisoners. Lieutenant Hansey, of company H, was
among the prisoners. Lieutenant Clark had two horses shot under him.

While the regiment was in camp at Murfreesboro' a detachment of the third battalion, under
command of Lieutenant F. Brenard, while on a scout, was attacked and completely surrounded
by the enemy, and a demand was made for surrender, and refused. Lieutenant Brenard then
ordered a saber charge, and cut his way through the enemy's lines with slight loss, taking a num-
ber of the Rebels prisoners.

While in camp at Murfreesboro' the regiment was engaged in the affairs of Milton, Liberty,
Readyville, Franklin, Auburn, Manchester, and McMinnville, in which it suffered in men killed
and wounded and loss of horses.

On the general advance of Rosecrans's army from Murfreesboro', in July, 1863, the Third
Cavalry moved with General Crittenden's corps, on the left flank of the army, under command
of Lieutenant-Colonel Charles D. Seidel ; Colonel Zahm and Lieutenant-Colonel Paramore hav-
ing resigned their commissions and returned home. On this advance, though skirmishing with
the enemy almost daily, the only severe fight it had was at the crossing of Elk River, where it
charged across the river, under Colonel Eli Long, commanding brigade, and routed the Rebels,
punishing them severely. Reaching the Sequatchie Valley, the enemy was again encountered,
and a running light of three days' duration ensued, extending to the north bank of the Tennessee
River, above Chattanooga.

About this time the Third Ohio Cavalry made several raids into North Carolina, and suc-
ceeded in opening communication between the National forces near Chattanooga and General
Burnside at Knoxville.

During the battle of Chickamauga the regiment occupied a position at Lafayette, on the
extreme left of the National lines. It was attacked by the Rebels and forced back to Charleston,
Tennessee. After the battle the Third Cavalry moved as the advance of General Crook's forces,
in pursuit of the Rebel General Wheeler's cavalry through Tennessee, engaging them at
McMinnville and Farmington. The Farmington engagement was a handsome and successful
cavalry fight. Wheeler's forces were completely routed and demoralized, large numbers of the
Rebels being killed and captured. In this engagement the Third Cavalry lost two men killed
and twenty-three captured.

In November, 1863, a portion of the regiment, under Colonel Seidel, scouted through the
mountains of East Tennessee. During this time another detachment of the regiment, under
Captain Richard D. AVood, was engaged at and beyond Dalton, Georgia, in which Captain Wood
was killed.

In the January following (1864), at Pulaski, Tennessee, the Third Cavalry re-enlisted. Of
the original number of thirteen hundred, only four hundred effective men were left at this date.
On the 4th of February it left Nashville for Ohio, and reached the camp (at Monroeville) from
whence it started for the field, having been absent two years. It met with a cordial reception
from the citizens of Monroeville and vicinity.

On the expiration of the thirty days' furlough, 2d of March, 1864, the Third re-assembled
at Monroeville. Through the efforts of Major Charles W. Skinner and Captain E. M. Colver
nearly one thousand recruits were enlisted, and on its return to the front at Nashville, it num-
bered over fifteen hundred strong. At Nashville it was re-ecpiipped, armed, and mounted, and
went into camp at Columbia, Tennessee having supervision of the line of road from Nashville
to Huntsville.

About the 1st of May the Third, under command of Colonel Seidel, attached to Colonel Eli
Long's Second Brigade of Cavalry, moved from Columbia, Tennessee, to Decatur, Alabama, and
acted as the advance-guard of General Frank Blair's Seventeenth Army Corps, from Decatur to



Third Ohio Cavaley. 769

Rome, Georgia. The regiment was engaged at Courtland, Alabama, with the Rebel General
Roddy's command. The Rebels were routed, with the loss of a Lieutenant-Colonel, Major, and
upward of thirty men killed and wounded. At Moulton, Alabama, the regiment was attacked by
the same force in camp before daylight. Although partially surprised, it rallied, drove the
enemy from the field, and pursued them. Reaching Rome, the Third Cavalry was assigned to a
position on the left flank of Sherman's army, and participated in the engagements at Etowah,
Kenesaw Mountain, Noonday Creek, and at the crossing of the Chattahoochie River. It was sent
to Roswell, Georgia, to destroy the Rebel stores and factories at that place. In this affair four
hundred factory-girls were captured and sent through the lines by General Sherman.

At McAfee Bridge (or Sliakerack), on the 9th of July, four companies of the Third Cav-
alry, under command of Captain E. M. Colver, engaged a superior force of Rebel Texan cavalry,
killing a Lieutenant and seven men, and capturing a large number of prisoners and horses.

After crossing the Chattahoochie River the regiment was engaged in the battles of Peach-
tree Creek and Decatur, and in the raids to Covington and Stone Mountain. In the Kilpatrick
raid the Third Cavalry was with the brigade in the advance to the rear of Atlanta, and destroyed
a portion of the railroad from Atlanta to West Point. It was also engaged in the Stoneman raid
under General Kenner Garrard. In each of these raids the regiment suffered severely.

In the flanking movement on Jonesboro' the regiment was in General Garrard's division of
cavalry, and was the first to attack the enemy's forces at Lovejoy's Station, taking possession of
the railroad. After the occupation of Atlanta it went into camp near Decatur, Georgia. "When
General Hood's dash was made it was sent as far up as Kingston in pursuit. It then followed up
Hood's forces, harassing his rear, through Rome, Cartersville, and Decatur, to Columbia, Ten-
nessee.

In the first battle of Franklin, the Third Cavalry occupied a position on the left of General
Thomas's forces, and was engaged with the Rebel cavalry. It was engaged in the battle before
Nashville. After Hood's defeat it followed his retreating army across the Tennessee River into
Alabama. It was then engaged in the Wilson raid through Alabama and Georgia, and in the
battles of Selnia and Montgomery, Alabama, and Macon and Griffin, Georgia. It was also
engaged in the chase after Jeff. Davis, in Wilson's command. In the pursuit a detachment of
the Third went through to the Gulf. In the engagement at Selma, Alabama, the regiment lost
heavily in killed and wounded. Lieutenant D. C. Lewis and a number of other officers were
taken prisoners. Lieutenant Lewis was afterward paroled, and while on his way home was killed
in the explosion of the steamer Sultana, near Memphis. While on post-duty at Macon, Georgia,
Captain J. S. Clock, commanding the provost-guard, while in the discharge of his duty, was
murdered by one of the Fourth United States Cavalry.

Under orders from General Thomas the Third turned over its horses and arms at Macon,
and was ordered to report at Nashville, Tennessee, for muster-out. Proceeding to Louisville,
and thence to Camp Chase, Ohio, the regiment was there paid off and discharged on the 14th of
August, 18G5, having served four years, lacking twenty days.

Vol. II.— 49.



770



Ohio in the War.



4th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Do

Do

Lit. Colonel

Do

Do

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chapliiin

Captain



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do. '

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



DATE OF KANK.



JOHN KENNETT

ELI LONG

OLIVER P. 110BIE

Henry \V. Burdsall

John L. Pugh

Oliver P. Kobie

George W. Dobbs

James Thompson

John L. Pugh

James E. Dresbach

Henky C. Rogers

Conduce G. McGrew

Oliver P. Robie

Peter Matthews _

Robert E. Rogers

George W. Dobbs

James Thompson

Wm. W. Shoemaker

Lucien A. James

Orestes G. Field

Thomas McMillkn.

J. R. Wf.ist

H. B. Noble

H. H. Ford

Orestes G. Fikld

Cyrus V. H. Briggs

Laban C. Cheney

Hiram Stotts

Conduce G. McGrew

Robert E. Rogers

lohn W. King

Peter Matthews

George A. Gotwald

Oliver P. Robie

Henry C. Rogers

Franz Zimmerman

lesse P. Wilson

Wellington B. Straight

Philip H. Warner

James R. Johnson

George W. Dobbs

Richard P. Refenberick

Henry B. Teter

George A. Boss

Carl Adae

Henry H. Hamilton

Milton 0. Chainberlin

lames Thompson

Joseph A. Harris

Wm. E. Crane

Ambrose McGrew

W. Cross

Wm. W. Shoemaker

Wm. Willshem

Norman P. White

John C. Stewart

Charles D. Henry

Alegho Morrellos

Osborn Smith

Wm. B. Richardson

Green leaf Cilk-y

Frank Robie

Thomas H. Osborn

Joseph A. Goddard

George W. Leonard

Isaac W. Moore

Justice Dun-ell

John N. Hedricks

John Reif

Wm. H. Smucker

George A. Boss

Philip II. Warner

James R. Johnson

Thomas D. Hastings

lames Ritty

lohn Hohn

George W. Dobbs

Richard P. Refenberick

Wellington B. Straight

August Recherer

Henry B. Teter

Marcus Symington

Adam Kuhns

Wm. Welehear

Carl Adae



Vug.
Jan.
Nov.
Aug.
Nov.
Feb.
Nov.
July
Sept.

lune
Sept.
Nov.
Dec.
Feb.
March
Nov.
Fuly
Sept.
Oct.
Sept.
July
Vug.
Dec.
Starch
Nov.
Oct.
Aug.

Sept.



Oct.

Dec.
June
March
Aug.
Sept.
June
ept.

Nov.
Feb.



Aug.
Sept.
Jan.

March

Mine

Dec.



1861

1863
1864
1861

1863
1864

1865
1861



1863

186-1
I860
1861

1864
, 1861
IS62

1864
186]



Feb.
Aug.



iept.



Dec.
Sept.
Jan.



COM. ISSUED.



Aug.
Feb.

Nov.
Aug.
Dec.



March 4,
Nov. 26,
July 5,

Sept. 5,



June
Sept.
Dec.
Feb.
March

Nov.

July
Sept.
Oct.
Sept.
July
Sept.
Dec.



16,
»,

3,

4,
31,
26,
in,

5,
25,
15,
22,
16,

1,



March 19, 1864



Nov.
Oct.

Sept.



Nov.

Dec.

June
Aug.
Sept.



Dec.



96,

9, 1

6,

2,
14,

5,

3,
I-',
in,
W,

6,
27,
24,



16,

16,



3,

Jan. 13,
Feb. 12,
March 4,

4,
April



Sept.
Jan.



26,

8,
10,
29,
29,

March 1"),

June 14,

Dec. 9,

" 9,



Feb.
Sept.



Oct.
Sept.



Dec.
Jan.



1865
1861



remarks.



Resigned January 23, 1863.

Appointed Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

Mustered out November 30, 1864.

Resigned November 22, 1862.

Resigned February 25, 1863.

Promoted to Colonel.

Killed April 2, 1865.

Mustered out as Major July 15, 1865.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Resigned June 4, 1S63.

Resigned March 5, 1863.

Resigned March 2, 1863.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out.

Resigned April 19, 1864.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment as Captain.

Mustered out at expiration of term.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned July 8, 1862.

Resigned December 6, 1S62.

Declined ; commission returned.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Detailed with colored troops.

Dismissed July 17, 1862.

Discharged September 17, 1862.

Promoted to Major.

Promoted to Major.

Mustered out November 23, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned September 10, 1861.

Promoted to Major.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned September 5, 1S64.

Killed near Camp Jackson, Tenn., March 2, '62.

Revoked.

Resigned September 24, 1864.

Resigned February 26, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned February 3, 1864.

Mustered out November 20, 1864.

Resigned September 3, 1863.

Resigned September 19, 1863.

Honorably disc barged August 27, 1863.

Resigned March 16, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Dismissed March 21, '64 ; reinstated April 30, 64.

Mustered out December 30, 1864.

Mustered out November 20, 1864.

Resigned August 27, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Declined; commission returned.

Mustered out November 21, 1864.

Deceased November 22, 1864.

Commission returned.

Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant Dec. 20, 1864.

Declined ; commissic:: returned.

Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Killed April 2, 1665.

Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Mustered out July 15, 1865.
Mustered out July 15, 1865.
Mustered out July 15, 1865.
Mustered out July 15, 1865.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Out of service.
Discharged April 1, 1S62.
Resigned July 1, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Discharged September 12, 1862.
Resigned August 4,_ 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Out of service.
Resigned January 3, 1863.
Out of service.
Promoted to Captain.






Fourth Ohio Cavalry.



771



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



James Thompson

Milton 15. Chamberlin

Richard Neff

Thomas C. Burdsall

W. Cross

Wm. K. Crane

Henry H. Hamilton

Joseph A. Harris

Wm. A. Wellshem

Norman I*. White

Wm. W. Shoemaker

Milton C. Chamberlin

Charles D. Henry

Ambrose McGrew

John C. Stewart

Cvrus H. Pierce

Wm. S. White

Alegho Morrellos

Osborn Smith

Lester L. Taylor

Alvin M. Miller ,

Wm. B. Richardson

Greenlief CiUey

Frank Robie

Thomas H. Osborn

Edward S. Wood

Samuel Wells

Christian Troacher

Wm. Miller

J. N. Wood

Joseph A. Goddard

John N. Hedricks

John Reif.

Wm. H. Stnucker

Charles P. Bonsall

Hamilton K. Williams

Samuel Anderson

Thomas McClure

Solomon D. Args

Francis J. Gardner

John F. Boggis

Henry Deering

Wm. V. Neely

Jacob E. Wentzell

Hugh McAlur

Edward L. Quinton

John Shade

Wm. W. Shoemaker

George Fritz

Henrv H. Hamilton

Henrv B. Teter

Wm. E. Crane

Joseph A. Harris

Milton C. Chamberlin

Andreas Kepling

George Crist

Edwin W. Mitchell

Wm. S. White

Joseph Hay den

Silas H. Bascom

Edward S. Wood

Ambrose McGrew

Charles D. Henry

Lester L. Taylor

John C. Stewart

Alegho Morrellos

Cyrus H. Pierce

Samuel Wells

Christian Troacher

Alvin M. Miller

Wm. B. Richardson

Wm. Miller

Flank Kobie

J. N. Wood

Joseph A. Goddard

Frederick W. Bashon ,

0. B. Sweet

Wm. Mellin

Greenlief Cilley

Thomas H. Osborn

Frank Hathaway

Anthony Brenard

Andrew J. Jeffries

George W. Leonard ,

Isaac W. Moore

Justice Durrell

John N. Hedricks

John Rief.

Win. H. Smacker

Hamilton II. Porter

Thomas Harvey

John B. Kirman

John Given

Joseph Richards

John W. Parkinson

.loli n Zehner

Win. A.O Brien

Lewis S. Stevens ,



DATE OF RANK.



Jan.
June

Sept.



Aug.

Sept.

June

Oct.

Aug.

March

Sept.

Nov.

Feb.



A us.
Sept.
Dec.
M arch



Sept.
Dec.



23,
23,

23,



March
Aug.

Sept.



Aug.
Sept.
Oct.



Dec.
Jan.
.lune
Feb.
Julv
Aug.
Sept.



Nov.
Aug.

June
Nov.

Sept.
Feb.

Jan.
Feb.



3.

5.
17,
12,
11,
12,

I,

1,
20,
Ify
16,

ti,
20,



1, 1863
1. "
1, "
1, "



March
Dec.



March
June



Sept.

July



COM. ISSU£D.



Jan.
June
Sept.



Jan.

Feb.



12,

12,
March 4,
April 28,

28,
Sept. 8,
Jan. 10,
Feb. 3,
March 15,

15,

15,
June 14,

14,
Sept. 8,
Dec. 9.



23,
23,
23,



Sept.
Oct.



Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Aurr.

Dec.

Sept.



Nov.
Dec.

July

Feb.
.1 a n .
Feb.



16,
6.
S,

3,

13,
13,
12,

24, 1
3,
12,



April 9,

Jan. 21,

Feb. 4,

" fi .

17,

March 15,

June 14,

14,

14,

Sept. 8,

July 8,



I'inmoted to Captain.

Revoked.

Killed September 20, lgfi3.

Discharged September 16, 1862

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February 21, 1S65.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mastered out May 15, 1865.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February 5, 1864.

Mustered out November 21, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned June 20, 1865.

Detached at own request.

Resigned August 7, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out November 21, 1864.

Commission returned.

Dismissed as 2d Lieutenant July 16, 1864.

Mustered out November 21, 1864.

Declined.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Mustered out Julv 15, 1865.

Dismissed April 20. I860.

Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Mustered out July 15, I860.

Mustered out Mav 15, I860.

Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Mustered out Julv 15, 1865.

Mustered out Julv 15, I860. [W.D. Feb. 21, '67.

Dis. Dec. 26, '62; rev'd; hon. dis. Dec.26,'62,S.O.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant July 1, 1862.

Resigned June 12, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Resigned Julv I, 1862.

Resigned July 12, l.s62.

Mustered out June ">, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned January 31, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted ; resigned September 17, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



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