Copyright
Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

. (page 138 of 165)
Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 138 of 165)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


regiment being detailed to escort four hundred prisoners captured in the engagements. During
the march to the James, it being excessively hot weather, several of the prisoners were sun-struck,
notwithstanding that the regiment dismounted several times during the march and allowed them
to ride.



Sixth Ohio Cavaley. 793

On the 24th of June the division (Gregg's) was fiercely attacked by the whole force of Rebel
cavalry, which had followed to and from Trevillian Station, and a hard-fought battle occurred,
in which the Sixth suffered severely. As the division was 'finally driven, in some confusion, from
the field, the regiment was ordered to form the rear-guard, in which duty it was probably excelled
by no regiment in the army. Several charges of the enemy were met and repulsed. One squad-
ron, under Captain James H. Leeman, was particularly noticed, from the manner in which it
fought after every other squadron had been broken, but for which nearly the whole regiment
would have been captured. Adjutant Henry M. Baldwin was left dead on the field, and several
men were killed and wounded.

Crossing the James with Grant's army the Sixth found no time to rest, but pushed around
our left to Eeam's Station, in the hope of assisting Wilson, who was being badly handled. Find-
ing it too late to assist him, the regiment soon after went into camp, near Prince George C. H.,
where several days were allowed it to recruit. It was then ordered to cross the James, where it
soon became engaged, fighting the cavalry battle of Malvern Hill, in which Lieutenant-Colonel
Barrett was wounded. It then recrossed the river, and made a rapid march around to the left,
where our troops were fighting for the Weldon Bailroad. The regiment was again engaged here.
Our hold being firmly established on this important line of the enemy, the cavalry was allowed
to encamp in rear of our works around Petersburg, and for some weeks only light picket-duty
was required. Soon our lines need extending, and again the regiment crosses the James, fighting,
skirmishing, and picketing, and finally returns to its camp, only to be called out, to have the
same fighting done again, as our line on the left becomes lengthened, reaching to Hutchins's
Bun. Here, on the 27th of October, another severe battle is fought, in which its loss is severe —
most severe of all in the loss of Captain E. S. Austin, whose coolness and perception in battle
could not be surpassed. Only a few days previous to his death he had, while in command of an
advance-guard, which was moving at night over an unfrequented road, captured the Adjutant-
General of the Eebel brigade commander, whose brigade was moving over the same road, utterly
unsuspicious of danger. Hearing the advancing columns he took position as sentinel, and wait-
ing until they were within hearing distance, called out : " Halt ! Who comes there ?" " Friends,"
was the prompt answer. " Advance one with the countersign,' ,J said Captain Austin. One did
advance, and as he proved to be a Captain and Adjutant-General of a Eebel brigade of cavalry,
his surrender was requested and given. All was so quietly done that his command had no inti-
mation of what was transpiring until a volley from the carbines of our advance-guard sent them
scattering toward their own lines.

Eeturning to camp after this battle, the regiment went into winter-quarters, although cam-
paigning did not end here, for on the 9th of December it again moved out on the left, with the
usual amount of fighting. In all these movements there was one special place which the Sixth
was destined to fill — that of advance-guard. Any point which they failed to carry while in this
position was not designated for any other regiment (either cavalry or infantry) to attack.

This movement ended the fighting in the campaign of 1864; but that of 1865 was inaugu-
rated February 3d, by still another march to our left, over the old beaten and bloody track, end-
ing in a severe fight at Hatcher's Eun, in which its loss was considerable. On the opening of the
spring campaign the regiment was engaged in the battle of Dinwiddie C. H., where Smith's bri-
gade, of Crook's division, in which the regiment was serving, held their lines until one-third of
the whole force were killed or wounded, during which time support had come up. The next day
the Sixth participated in the battle of Five Forks, where the fate of Bichmond was sealed. Dur-
ing the pursuit of Lee the regiment did its full share of the fighting and marching, having severe
engagements at Sailor's Creek and again at Farmville. At the battle of Appomattox C. H., on
April 9th, this regiment had the honor of opening the engagement, it having marched during
the night to a position across the only road left for the retreat of the Eebel army. Soon after
daylight on that memorable morning an attack was made on our line, which had been fortified
with a rail breastwork, and after a spirited resistance the regiment fell back, only to show to
pursuing Bebels our strong lines of infantry, who had come up during the early morning. The



79i Ohio in the War.

attack had ended, d. white flag was flying along the Kebel front, and the work for which they
had fought so long and so well was accomplished.

The next day .the regiment was detailed to escort General Grant from Appomattox to Burks-
ville Station. Soon after it marched back to Petersburg, where it encamped until again sum-
moned to the field. It marched through Virginia to North Carolina. When Johnston's sur-
render was announced it returned to Petersburg, and was soon after sent in detachments to differ-
ent counties composing the " Sub-district of the Appomattox," Brevet Brigadier-General C. H.
Smith, First Maine Cavalry, commanding. In August the regiment was ordered to Cleveland.
Ohio, where it was mustered out of service.

During the last six months of its campaigning it w^s under command of a Captain, as it
had not a field officer with it, nor in its organization. Nearly all of its veteran officers were
mustered out of service in November, 1864, and not a sufficient number of men were on the rolls
to have them replaced ; but in a regiment composed of material like this it made little difference
whether they were commanded by a Captain or a Brevet-Brigadier. As a newspaper regiment it
has not much history. Its record shows best in the rolls of the killed and wounded, and the long
list of its honorable engagements.



Seventh Ohio Cavalry.



795



7th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

I.t. Colonel....
Major



Do.

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Ass t burgeon
Do.
Do.

Captain

Do



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Ut Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.



ISRAEL GARRARD..

George G. Miser

Wm. Reany

Augustus Norton

James McIntyre ,

Wm. T. Simpson

John Leaper

Solomon L. Green

Isaac Train ,

R. H. Tullis

P. G. Barrett

John Kraps

James McIntyre

Wm. T. Simpson ,

A. D. Eells ,

John Leaper

Allen S. Brownfield

John 1). Kinney

Augustus Norton

Joel P. Higley

Wm. H. Lewis

James C. Campbell

Solomon L. Green

Eben Lindsay

John A. Ashbury

Nehemiah Warren

Lester G. Muore

Joseph R. Copelanil

Richard C. Rankin

James C. Shaw

Theodore E. Allen

Albert A. Carr

Win. R. Jackson

Joseph B. Santniyer

Andrew Hall

John McColgin

Wm. D. Ketterman

(.diver H. Eylar

Martin Shuler

George D. Womeldorff .

Alfred N. Rich

Wm. T Burton

Theodore E. Allen

John McColgin

Wm. R. Jackson

Lester G. Moore

James C. Shaw

Itoswell C. Nichols

Wm. L. Tripp

Joseph R. Copeland

Nehemiah Warren

John Greyer

Albert A. Carr

Richard C. Rankin

Daniel Sayer

Joseph B. Santmyer

Andrew Hall

Peter Lone

Samuel D. Murphy

Martin Shuler

Oliver H. Eylar

Wm. D. Ketterman

John J. Smith

George D. Womeldorff.,

Alfred N. Rich ,

Wm. T. Burton

Benj. Trago

David W. Fisher

Samuel Dryden

Charles E. Smith

Charles D. Mitchell

Eugene Little

John V. Srofe ,

Andrew J. Hardy ,

Thomas J. Williams

Benj. E. Powers

Wm. Boggs

Philip Blazer

Wm. T. Archer ,

W. W. Manning

Benj. F. Derstine

Newton McLeod

Martin Shuler

Samuel B. Johnston

Samuel D. Murphy ,



Sept.



Dec.

July

March

July

Oct.

Nov.

June
Jan.
Aug.



Sept.



Nov.
Dec.
May
June

Jan.
April



May
Oct.



June

July
Aug.
Oct.
Sept.
Aug.

Sept.



May

June



Jan.
April



May
Oct.



May
June
Aug.



13, 1S62
13, "
20,
23,

1, 1363
23. 1.S64
13, "
12, "
9, 1862
fi, "
9, 1863

4, 1865
25, 1862
25, "
27, jj

2S, "

1, "

2, "

3, "

5, "

12, "
20, "

1, "

13, "
25, 1363



Oct.

March
July
Oct.
Dec.

June
Ian.
Dec.



1,

2, 1S64

2, "
2,
2,

2!

25,

12,

12,

12,

16, 1865

16, "

5.

23, 186?
13,
15,
25,
27,

1,

2,

2,

3,
12,
15,
25,

1,

1,
25, 1363

3, "
23, "

3, "
1, 1864



2, "

2, "

2, "

2, "

2, "

19, "

19, "

19, "

25, "

12, "

12, "

12, "

12, "

18, 1365

18, "

16, "

16, "

25, 1S62

25, "

25, "



Oct.
April



ipril



Ma7

Oct.



May



4,

16,

15,

15,

15,

15,

15,

15,

15,

IS,

15,

15,

15,

15,

10, 1

10,

3,

2, 1

2,

2,

2,



May

Oct.



June 16, 1865



July
Dec.



15,
15,

15,
15,

15,
June lo,

23,

Oct. 3,

3,



Mustered out with regiment.

On detached duty.

Mustered out July 4, 1S65.

Resigned January 30. 1864.

Resigned March 26, 1864.

Resigned August 26, 1864. [Dept. May 5 '65.

Disch. as Capt. Oct. 25, '64 ; reinstated by War

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Died at Marietta, Georgia.
1863 Honorably discharged October 26, 1864.
1865 Mustered out with regiment.
1862 Promoted to Major.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned June 28, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned June 3, 1863.

Resigned December 13, 1S62.

Promoted to Major.

Killed at Blue Springs, September 10, 1863.

Honorably discharged August 17, 1863.
Resigned January 27, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned December 25, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned July 20, 1864.

Resigned as 1st. Lieut. June 3, 1863.

Honorably discharged May 15, 1865.

Mustered out July 4, 1S65.

Mustered out with regiment. [Col. U. S V.

Must, out July 4, '65; brv't. Maj., Lt. Col. and

Resigned August 26, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Died March 22, 1865.

Lost on steamer Sultana.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment. [R. Q. M.

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Lieut, and

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Lieut.

Prumoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February 23, 1864.

Resigned December 25, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned November 28, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned June 28, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned January 30, 1864.

Died July 16, 1S64.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned as 2d Lieut. October 20, 1S63.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as R. C. S.

Discharged July 14, 1S65.

Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined to accept.

Killed, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as 2d Lieut.

Mirstered out with regiment as 2d Lieut.

Mustered out with regiment as 2d Lieut.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned February 29, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



796



Ohio in the War



DATE OF RANK



COM. ISSUED.



2d Lieutei

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Bo.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do*

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



George D. Womeldorff..

John J. Smith

Peter Loug

Allied N. lticli

Thomas Bunker

Oliver II. Kvlar

Wm. T. Burton

Wm. Ketterman

Bon j . Tr.igo

Hosmer Chase

DavidW. fc'iauer

Samuel Dryden

Cii:is. F. Smith

Andrew .1. Hardy

Win. McKnteht

Thoma? J. Williams

Benj. F. Powers

Wni. Bosfgs

Philip Blazer

Wm. S. Archer

W. W. Manning

Benj. W. Derstine

Newton McLead

Homer E. Ware

Wilson Barber

James MeGee

Samuel C. Tappan

Wm. H. Vane

Grassen M. Cole

Thomas H. Xutt



Aug.

Sept.



May
June



April



15,

1,
25,
3, 1863
3, "
2S, "
19, 18(54
19, "



19,



19,



Sept.

March



1^, IS65

18, "



18,



luly

luilB

>ct.

Vpril



Sept.

March



16,



19, 1864

19, "

19, "

19, "

19, "

19, "

19, "

19, "

26, "

IS, 1865

18, "

15, "
18, "
is, "

16, "
16, "
16, "



Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned October 20, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned June 23, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Li BU tenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned January 20, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Killed at < vnthiana June, 1S64.

mastered out with regiment.

Promoted to 1st Lieutrnant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Sergeant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Sergeant.

Mustered out with regiment as l>t Sergeant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Sergeant.

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Sergeant.



SEVENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALRY.



TH E summer campaign of 18G2, proved, in the main, disastrous to the National arms.
In the West, the National army, under Buell, had been flanked and out-marched, and
Bragg's Rebel hosts were almost at our doors. The light of the Rebel soldiers' torch
had been reflected from the placid waters of our own Ohio, and the blood of both National and
Rebel soldiers had been shed within cannon range of the Southern boundary of our State. In
this condition of affairs, Governor Tod, on the 25th of August, ordered the Seventh Cavalry (af-
terward known as the River Regiment) to be recruited. Officers were appointed and ordered to
enlist men from the following counties : Hamilton, three hundred men ; Clermont, one hundred ;
Brown, one hundred ; Adams, one hundred ; Scioto, one hundred ; Gallia, two hundred ; Athens,
one hundred ; Meigs, one hundred ; Washington, one hundred. Recruiting was commenced on
the 25th of August. 2nd in six days sixteen hundred men were enrolled, four hundred more than
could be retained. Major Malcolm McDowell, United States Army, was appointed Colonel, and
Israel Garrard, of Ciscinnati, Lieutenant-Colonel, and the regiment was ordered to rendezvous at
Ripley, in Brown County.

Before the men were mustered into the United States service an attack on Cincinnati was
threatened by the enemy, under Kirby Smith, and Colonel McDowell was ordered to report to
Major-General Wright, to assist in the defense of Cincinnati. Whereupon Governor Tod promoted
Lieutenant-Colonel Garrard to Colonel, and appointed Major George G. Miner, Second Cavalry,
to be Lieutenant-Colonel in the Seventh. With these field officers the organization of the regi-
ment was completed, and it rendezvoused at Ripley, October 3, 1862.

While at Ripley, and before the men were all mustered into the United States service, a de-
tachment of three or four hundred of the enemy, under command of Colonel Basil Duke and
Major Clarence Prentice, appeared at the town of Augusta, Kentucky, on the Ohio River, a few
miles below Ripley. They took possession of the place, set fire to several houses, and before the
flames could be subdued nearly the whole town was reduced to ashes. Company E, of the Sev-



Seventh Ohio Cavalry. 797

enth, numbering at that time about one hundred and twenty-five men, procured at Ripley a num-
ber of muskets and other small arms, crossed the river, drove the enemy from Augusta, and pur-
sued him several miles into the interior, killing, wounding, and capturing a number, and returned
to Ripley without the loss of a man.

Soon after this the enemy, under Bragg, commenced the retreat from Kentucky, and four
companies, A, B, C, and D, were sent out from Ripley, by direction of General Wright, with
orders to scout from Maysville, Kentucky, learn, if possible, the whereabouts of Humphrey Mar-
shall, and join the main body of the National troops advancing from Covington, at or near Fal-
mouth. Under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Miner, these companies scouted as ordered, ex-
tending their search well into Eastern Kentucky, and as far west as Falmouth. It was learned
that Colonel Garfield had fallen back from his advanced position on the Big Sandy, and that
Marshall had occupied that region, being then safe within the mountain fastnesses. The party
returned to Ripley, bringing with them twenty-five fine mules (which an enterprising stock-
grower, living near Maysville, had sold to the Confederacy for gold), which the scouts cap-
tured while they were being driven South.

On November 22d Major Reany's battalion having been fully armed, mounted, and equipped
was sent to the field, reporting to Major-General Gordon Granger at Lexington, Kentucky ;
where it remained till Rosecrans being prepared to give battle to the enemy under Bragg, near
Murfreesboro', Tennessee, it was desired that the railroad extending through East Tennessee and
South- Western Virginia (which was the only direct route of communication between Bragg and
the capital of the Confederacy) should be broken, to prevent the passage of any force from the
East to the support of Bragg in the West. Accordingly, on the 21st of December, the companies
A, B, C, and D, of the Seventh, being fully equipped for the campaign, left Winchester, Ken-
tucky, with eight days' rations, and after marching southward three days, joined the command
of General S. P. Carter, and started on what was afterward known as the First Raid into East
Tennessee. The troops marched (in the lightest possible order, having with them neither artil-
lery, ambulances, nor wagons) night and day, passing through South-Eastern Kentucky and
South- Western Virginia, to Jonesville, Virginia ; thence across the Cumberland and Clinch
Mountains, avoiding at all times the main roads. After nine days of almost continued marching
through snow and intense cold, over three mountain ranges, fording streams full of floating ice,
they reached the line of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, at Zollicoffer Station, where
the railroad crosses the Holston River, on the 30th of December. They found the place garri-
soned by a North Carolina regiment, and captured the entire force without firing a gun. The
long railroad bridge at Zollicoffer was burned, and the block-houses were destroyed. From this
point companies A and D, under command of Captain Green, were ordered to proceed to Carter's
Station (six miles east on the line of railroad), capture the place with its garrison, and destroy the
railroad bridge over the Watauga River. When within four miles of the station the detachment
discovered a locomotive coming toward them on the railroad. An ambuscade was formed and the
locomotive, with its passengers, were captured. On this locomotive was Colonel Love, commander
of the garrison at Carter's Station, from whom they learned that the force he had just left num-
bered three hundred men with one piece of artillery. Captain Green had one hundred and thirty-
three men with which to capture this force. Nothing daunted, he moved on with his little band,
and having arrived near the station, dismounted his command, leaving thirty of them with the
horses, and, though neither officers nor men had ever been under fire, advanced steadily to the
attack with his one hundred and three men in line. A brief but spirited engagement ensued,
which resulted in the defeat of the enemy, two hundred and seventy-three of whom surrendered
to the National detachment, leaving six killed and eight wounded on the field, beside surrender-
ing their piece of artillery. The magnificent railroad bridge was burned and a train of cars
run into the river.

Having injured the railroad sufficiently to prevent the passage of trains for several weeks, the
raiders started northward, passing through East Tennessee, South-Wcstern Virginia - and Eastern
Kentucky, and arrived at Winchester, Kentucky, on the 9th of January, 18G3, wearied and worn,



798 Ohio in the War.

but gratified with success. On the return trip the troops suffered severely, nearly one-half the
horses died of exhaustion, and the men, barefooted or with their feet covered with pieces of
blankets, and without rations, walked for many miles over the frozen, snow-clad mountains and
ice-bound streams.

On the 20th of December the second battalion, being fully equipped, was sent to the field,
under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Minor, reporting to General Granger, at Lexington, who
ordered three companies to Danville, and one company to Harrodsburg. On December 31st the
third battalion, under command of Colonel Garrard, followed the other two, reporting to General
Granger, and was ordered to remain at Lexington, at " Camp Ella Bishop."

Reports having been received of the advance of the enemy from Cumberland Gap, via Lou-
don, the regiment started on the 22d of February, 1863, for Richmond, via Stanford and Lancaster.
Arriving at Richmond no enemy was found. It was then divided — one detachment going to
Hazel Green and the other to Mount Sterling. Both were fortunate in meeting the enemy, de-
feating him and finally driving him from the State, and the two commands united at Lexington,
where they remained only a few days, during which time company I, while on a scout, captured
the Rebel Colonel Alexander, whom they surprised while visiting his inamorata.

On March 20, 1863, the Rebel General Pegram crossed the Cumberland with three brigades
of cavalry, and started northward on a raid into the Blue-Grass region. He was met by the Na-
tional forces and his course checked at Danville. Failing in his raid, he started south again,
closely pursued by a force under command of General Q. A. Gillmore, of which force the River
Regiment formed a part, but was not brigaded, acting under direct orders from General Gillmore.
Pegram was pursued night and day, and on the morning of the 31st of March gave battle at
Dutton Hill, near Somerset, Kentucky, six miles north of the Cumberland River. The pursuing
force found the enemy in position on a range of hills, where they could be attacked only by ad-
vancing across open fields, exposed to their fire. The National forces were pushed well forward,
the Seventh supporting for some time a battery, till the enemy appearing to be somewhat discon-
certed, a gallant saber charge was made by companies G, I, K, L, and M, which decided the day,
and the enemy fled in the greatest confusion, leaving in the hands of the companies that charged
up the hill one hundred and thirty prisoners, and forty-nine dead and wounded on the field. The
troops had scarcely taken possession of the position held by the enemy when from their rear was
heard the Rebel yell, and two regiments of Rebel cavalry, that Pegram had early in the fight
dispatched to the rear of the National forces, charged at full speed down the valley. They were
met at once by a counter-charge, led by Captain Saunders, of General Gillmore's staff (afterward
General Saunders, killed at Knoxville) who charged with companies E, F, and H of the River
Regiment, routed and scattered the Rebel charging columns, capturing from them nearly two
hundred prisoners and two battle-flags. The pursuit was continued till dark, the enemy aban-
doning his train and two hundred and fifty beef cattle that he was attempting to drive South.

On May 1, 1863, Pegram having collected at Monticello a force of cavalry estimated to



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 138 of 165)