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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out with regiment.
Honorably discharged March 25, 1865.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out witli regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.
Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.



NINTH OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALRY.



ON the 3d day of October, 1862, Governor Tod received instructions from the President
to raise three regiments of cavalry, to be known as the Eighth, Ninth, and Tenth Ohio
Volunteer Cavalry. A short time previous to this Captain W. D. Hamilton of the
Thirty-Second Ohio Infantry, then stationed at Winchester, Virginia, had been ordered from the
field to recruit another company for that regiment. He had enlisted fifty men for that purpose,
when the regiment, with a number of others, was captured by "Stonewall" Jackson, September
15th, 1862. Captain Hamilton reported for instructions to the Governor, who assigned him the
duty of organizing a cavalry command, to be known as the Ninth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry.

The men recruited for the captured regiment formed the nucleus, and the remainder was
raised in the eastern portion of Ohio. They rendezvoused at Zanesville. On the 1st of De-
cember seven companies were ready for muster, but three of these companies were transferred to
complete the Tenth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, then organizing at Cleveland. The four remaining
companies were designated the First Battalion of the Ninth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and were
ordered to Camp Dennison. Here the battalion was equipped and remained under drill until
April 23d, when it was ordered to report for field-duty at Lexinton, Kentucky. It was then
ordered to Clay County to drive out a Rebel force and protect the country. The battalion, con-
sisting of three hundred effective men, moved forward, driving the enemy from the mountainous
regions, and established its camp at Manchester.

The command remained in this region, having frequent skirmishes with the enemy, until the
15th of June, when an expedition was planned to penetrate into East Tennessee, to ascertain
the true condition of the inhabitants, and to destroy some extensive factories below Knoxville.



810 Ohio in the Wab.

The whole force consisted of about two thousand mounted men, in which were two hundred of the
battalion. On the night of the 16th of June this force crossed the Cumberland River at Williams-
burg, and moved toward Big Creek Gap, a Rebel stronghold commanding one of the entrances
into East Tennessee, between Cumberland Gap and Knoxville. The main road to this point
crossed a spur of the Cumberland Mountains at Pine Mountain Gap, a strong pass which was
held by the enemy. By a strategic movement the Rebels were surprised, and nearly all captured
without firing a gun. Next morning the command moved toward Big Creek Gap, and when
within about twelve miles — the battalion being in the advance — the enemy was encountered, and
skirmishing was kept up until he was driven within his works at the gap. The enemy evacuated,
and without opposition the command accomplished its designs.

The battalion returned to London, Kentucky, where, on the evening of July 5th, an order
was received to report at Stanford, Kentucky. It traveled all night and arrived at Stanford—
a distance of fifty miles — at three o'clock the next day. It was then ordered to Danville to
check the progress of General Morgan. He having avoided Danville, the battalion was ordered
back to Wild Cat, near London, to watch and embarrass the progress of the Rebel General
Scott, who, it was reported, had entered with a cavalry force, by way of Cumberland Gap, to
support General Morgan. General Scott took a circuitous route to the right, and a force, hastily
organized at Camp Dick Robinson, was sent in pursuit. In the running fight of ten days the
battalion, part of the time, marched at the rate of fifty-seven miles in twenty-four hours — the
men living chiefly on blackberries, which they gathered by the road-side while the horses were
resting.

On the 1st of August the battalion proceeded from Stanford to Glasgow, Kentucky, a
distance of one hundred miles, where a cavalry brigade was organizing under orders of General
Burnside, which was destined to take the advance of his expedition into East Tennessee. On the
17th of August this brigade moved forward and crossed the Cumberland River near Burkes-
ville, where it was met by General Burnside in command of the infantry. The cavalry took the
advance across that portion of the Cumberland Mountains, supposed to present the fewest obsta-
cles to the passage of an army. During this march both men and horses were, sometimes, two
days without food. Knoxville was taken with but little opposition. Major Hamilton was
appointed Provost- Marshal of the city, and the battalion was assigned to patrol and guard-duty
around the suburbs.

During this time very strong efforts were made in the North to obtain recruits for the army.
An order had been issued to raise two more battalions to complete the Ninth, and Major T. P.
Cook, formerly of the Fiftieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was assigned by Governor Tod to take
charge of the recruits for the regiment at Camp Dennison. On the 6th of November the
second battalion for the regiment was organized. On the 16th of December the regiment was
completed by the organization of the third battalion. The two battalions, raised to their maxi-
mum number, together with one hundred recruits for the old battalion, were at once furnished
with horses, were armed and equipped with sabers and Smith carbines, and were carefully drilled
in camp until February 6th, 1864, when they were ordered to proceed by water to Nashville,
Tennessee.

They embarked at Cincinnati, upon seven steamboats, and proceeded as far as Louisville,
Kentucky, where, by reason of the reported presence of some guerrillas in that State, they dis-
embarked and marched through the country to Nashville. The march was made without opposi-
tion. The regiment was then attached to the left wing of the Sixteenth Army Corps, and ordered
to report for field-duty at Athens, Alabama. Here the two battalions were assigned the duty of
watching the movements of the enemy along the Tennessee River.

At this time Colonel Hamilton proceeded to Knoxville with orders for the first battalion to
join the regiment. The severe campaign, through which this part of the regiment had passed,
rendered an entire equipment necessary. For this purpose the men were sent by railway to Nash-
ville, whore, after much trouble and delay on account of the difficulty of procuring horses, this bat-
talion took the field and joined the others at Athens, Alabama. Four companies were ordered to



Ninth Ohio Cavalry. 811

the shoals of the Tennessee Hirer, twenty-five miles from Athens, to examine the islands in that
portion of the river, reported to have stock and provisions secreted there. This occupied nearly
a week. During this time company G was sent to the vicinity of Florence, Alabama, twenty-
five miles further down the river, to examine the country and collect stock.

On the night of the 13th of April an Alabama regiment surrounded a barn, in which the
men were sleeping, shot two of the sentinels, and, after a short struggle, succeeded in capturing
Captain Hetzler, Second Lieutenant Knapp, and thirty-nine men. The remainder of the com-
pany escaped and reported at head-quarters near the shoals, where they arrived the next evening.
The remaining three companies were pushed forward with all speed, but they failed to rescue the
prisoners. The non-commissioned officers and men were sent to Andersonville prison. Eight
months after the capture a report from Orderly-Sergeant Kennedy, showed that twenty-five of the
number had died. Captain Hetzler and Lieutenant Knapp were sent to Columbia, South Caro-
lina. Lieutenant Knapp, after two unsuccessful efforts to escape, in which he was retaken by the
aid of bloodhounds, finally succeeded in reaching Knoxvilie, Tennessee, after traveling three
weeks, principally at night, securing food and assistance from the negroes. At one time he
heard the hounds on his trail, and again would have been captured but for the generous assist-
ance of a negro, who, after giving him something to eat, said : " Now, bress de Lord, Massa
Yank, you jist trust to me, and we'll fool dcm dogs. You trot along fust, den I'll come too,
steppin' in your tracks. Go 'bout half a mile, den you come to some watah ; you take right
through dat, den I '11 keep on t' other way. See dem dogs is used to huntin' niggers, dey knows
de smell, and likes to follow de black man's foot." " But," said the Lieutenant, surprised at this
singular offer, "the dogs will catch you and probably tear you to pieces." "Oh, Massa," said he,
" let dis nigger alone for dat, I 'se fooled dem dogs afore for de Yanks ; and, bress de Lord, I '11
tfy it again. Now trot along, Massa, for I hear dem dogs a comin'." Shortly after crossing the
pond the Lieutenant heard the hounds howling in the direction taken by the negro, and he was no
longer disturbed by them. He afterward joined the regiment at Savannah, Georgia, in Jan-
uary, 1865. Captain Hetzler remained a prisoner until near the close of the war, when he was
exchanged.

Another battalion of the Ninth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry was sent out, in the vicinity of
Florence, to patrol the river and keep watch of the movements of the enemy. In this work the
regiment was engaged for about three weeks, living upon the country. The river was guarded
for a distance of fifty miles, and frequent skirmishes with the enemy took place. The regiment
was ordered to report at Decatur, Alabama, where it arrived on the 5th of May. On the
morning of the 8th the enemy made an attack on the place. The Ninth moved out to ascertain
the strength of the enemy upon the skirmish-line, a half a mile from the works. The country was
about equally divided between timber and level, open land. The Rebels formed on the open
ground, and, as the regiment swung around the timber, a battle took place, in which the Rebels
were driven back in confusion. The Ninth had one man killed and three severely wounded. For
weeks the enemy's pickets were posted within two miles of town, and cavalry skirmishes were of
daily occurrence. About the 1st of June the regiment was sent to Pulaski to re-enforce the Sev-
enth Illinois Infantry, which had been driven from Florence. After driving the enemy back
beyond Florence, and remaining a few days, it returned to Decatur.

When it became known that the Rebels received large supplies over the Atlanta and "West
Point Railroad, it was desirable to destroy it. Of the twenty-five hundred men chosen to effect
this, seven hundred were from the Ninth Cavalry. The command started as secretly as possible,
desiring to strike the road anywhere between the extreme point guarded by General Johnston's
troops, and Montgomery, Alabama. It left Decatur on the 10th of July. For three days
the command moved unmolested except by bushwhackers. In the evening of the third day the
command reached the Coosa River, and found a force of the enemy preparing to dispute its pass-
age. A contest ensued in which the enemy suffered severely. On the evenning of July 17th the
coinmand t reached the village of Sochapolka, upon the railroad thirty miles east of Montgomery,
ami about two hundred miles south of Decatur. It was almost exhausted, yet it went immediately



812 Ohio in the War.

to work to destroy the road. For a few days the command was engaged in this work, and was
attacked several times, in rear and front, hy the enemy.

This expedition traveled, on an average, twenty hours per day, effectually destroyed twenty
five miles of an important railroad, one hundred miles beyond the Rebel lines, and sustained,
comparatively, a small loss. That of the Ninth Cavalry amounted to twenty-six men, mostly
captured while foraging. Having accomplished its purpose it started, in a north-easterly direc-
tion, and reached General Sherman's lines, near Marietta, on the 22d of July.

Two days after arriving at Marietta the regiment was ordered to report to Brigadier-General
Edward McCook, who was starting upon a raid around the right and rear of Atlanta. Upon
arriving at the Chattahoochie River, thirty miles below the city, the horses of the regiment were
found to be too much jaded to attempt to make the raid. It remained, therefore, at the river,
guarding the pontoon bridge which had been brought to effect a crossing. The enemy sent a force
to destroy the bridge, but did not succeed. After defending it until the evening of the next day
the regiment lifted the bridge, and returned to the National lines.

After a week's rest at Viningo Station it was ordered to report to Colonel Garrard, com-
manding a cavalry division upon the extreme right of General Sherman's army in front of
Atlanta. Here it remained on duty until the fall of that city, one battalion doing service at the
battle of Jonesboro'. Four hundred and fifty men of the regiment, who had been dismounted
while with Colonel Garrard, were ordered to Nashville to procure horses. On the night of the
2d of September while the train, containing the men, was passing Big Shanty, Georgia, it was
thrown from the track, and six cars were demolished. The enemy, concealed beside the track,
opened fire on the wreck. The fire was returned and the cowards fled. One man was killed and
three were wounded by the accident, and two killed and five wounded by the enemy's fire.
Failing to procure horses in Nashville the regiment proceeded to Louisville, where it obtained
them and returned to Nashville, en route for the front.

About ten hours after arriving at Nashville this portion of the regiment formed a part of the
force sent out to check General Forrest, who was reported about twenty miles from the city.
After various encounters, during a period of ten days, the enemy was compelled to retire beyond
the Tennessee River, below Florence, Alabama.

The regiment proceeded to Chattanooga, en route for Atlanta. Here a dispatch was received,
that the Ninth had been designated as one of the regiments composing a new cavalry division in the
reorganization of the army under General Sherman, and that this portion of the regiment should
march to Marietta as rapidly as possible. On arriving at Marietta the regiment found the city
vacated and partly burned. Pushing on it arrived at Atlanta on the morning of November
17th, having passed over a distance of eighty miles in thirty-six hours. The city being evacu-
ated it proceeded to McDowell, seventeen miles southward, where it joined the other portion of
the Ninth. Although the regiment had suffered some severe losse? in killed, wounded, captured,
and sickness, yet its strength was sustained by recruits, and it was able to number seven hundred
men present for duty.

From this time the Ninth was identified with the cavalry division of General Sherman's
army to the Coast. It had almost daily encounters with the enemy. Its duty was to cover the
march of the infantry, make false marches to deceive the enemy, and at all times prevent him
from harrassing the columns. On the 20th of November, the third day of the march, skirmish-
ing commenced and continued, more or less, until December 4th, when a general engagement
took place at Waynesboro', in which the regiment made the second charge and broke the Rebel
lines. After driving the Rebels within their works around Savannah, and while the siege was pro-
gressing, the regiment, with part of the cavalry command, moved in a south-easterly direction on
the Savannah and Gulf Railroad, destro}*ed parts of it as far as the Alatamaha River, and suc-
ceeded in burning a portion of the extensive trestle-work and bridge across the swamp and river.
The expedition returned to Savannah, where the army remained until the latter part of January,
1865. At this time one hundred and fifty men of the Ninth, who had been attached to General
Thomas's army at the battles of Franklin and Nashville, ioined their resriment.



Ninth Ohio Cavalry. 813

On the night of the 3d of February the cavalry division crossed the Savannah River at
Sisters' Ferry, forty miles above the city, and commenced the decisive campaign of theCarolinas.
Most of the night was occupied in crossing a swamp seven miles wide. On the Gth the regiment,
having the advance, encountered the Rebels at a swamp near Barnwell. The men dismounted,
waded the swamp, under cover of the timber, and drove them from their position. From this
point, during the march, the enemy made several attempts to check the cavalry under General
Kilpatrick, and harass the infantry. The cavalry was ordered to cover the movements of the
army, by making a feint upon Augusta, Georgia. Striking the Augusta and Charleston Railroad
at Blackwell, February 9th, it tore up the track within five miles of Aiken, and twenty-five miles
from Augusta. At Aiken the regiment was engaged and assisted in driving the Rebels beyond
their lines. Orders came to fall back, and the Ninth guarded the rear and protected the ambu-
lances and artillery. During the march through the Carolinas, the frequent scarcity of grain, as
well as the number and character of the swamps encountered, rendered a large number of the
horses unfit for service, and as the enemy prevented the capture of others, many of the men were
dismounted. These were organized into a "dismounted command."

On the night of the 9th of March General Kilpatrick went into camp with the Third Brigade
and the dismounted men, about three miles in advance of the remainder of his command. The
Fourteenth Army Corps were about two miles on the right, and the Rebel cavalry, under General
Hampton, about the same distance on the left. On the 10th the Rebels dashed in upon the camp
and captured the wagons, artillery, and many of the officers and men before they had time to
dress themselves. The dismounted men rallied, returned, and opened a close and heavy fire upon
the Rebels, who were pillaging the camp. A rapid and irregular fight ensued, during which the
artillerists recovered their cannon and opened on the enemy. After a short contest, in which
twenty-five National and seventy-five Rebel soldiers were killed, all the stores were taken and
the Rebels held at bay until the arrival of the Second Brigade.

In the battle of Averysboro', on the 15th of March, which was fought by infantry and cav-
alry on both sides, the Ninth supported the right flank of the Twentieth Corps, and was hotly
engaged. At Bentonville, North Carolina, where the final battle was fought, General Kilpatrick's
entire division occupied the left flank. After the defeat the army moved forward to Goldsboro'
North Carolina, where it remained until the 10th of April. General Kilpatrick led the advance
upon Raleigh, skirmished a little, and on the 14th of April entered the capital with but little
opposition. On the morning of the 18th, a portion of the left wing of General Johnston's army
occupied the village of Chapel Hill. It was protected by a brigade of General Wheeler's cav-
alry, stationed at a swamp, through which the road passed. At daylight the regiment was ordered
to advance and, if possible, to effect a crossing. Upon arriving at the swamp the second bat-
talion was dismounted and moved forward through the water, under cover of the cypress timber
until the enemy was brought within range of the Spencer carbines. A spirited conflict ensued in
which the enemy was driven from his position, leaving a Captain and staff-officer of General
Wheeler and three men dead on the ground. Orders, in the meantime, had arrived from Gen-
eral Sherman suspending hostilities. After the surrender the command was ordered to Concord
North Carolina, where it remained on duty until the last of July.

The services of the cavalry being no longer necessary, the Ninth was ordered home. On
the 2d of August, 1865, the regimental colors and property were turned over at Columbus, and •
the regiment was mustered out of service.



814



Ohio in the War.



10th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALRY.



*<y •<&» -^*>



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

L>o

Lt. Colonel

l>o

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do. ..:

Surgeon

Do

Ass t Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do ,

Do

Do

Do

lBtLn :uteuau

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



'OATK. OF RANK., COM. I8SUED.



REMARKS.



1864
1863

4, 1862
7, "
23, "
10, 1863
15, "



CHARLES C. SMITH iFeb. 26; 1868 Feb.

THUS. W. SANDERSON.. Jan. 30, 1805 Jan.

Wm. E. Haynes 'Nov. 10, IsrtJ Feb.

Thos. W. Sanderson April 20, 1664, April

Wm. Thayer Jan. 30. i«65|Jan.

James D. Platt Feb. 10, " Feb.

Lyman C. Thayer Nov. in, 1862 "

WillaRD S. Hickox Jan. 14, 1863 "

Thos. VV. Sanderson " 1"', " "

Wm. Thayer Oct. 7, " Jan.

Abram F. McCurdy Feb. 1,1S61 Feb.

James D. Plait jAug. 2, " Aug.

Nat. W. Fti.KlN " 2, "

Daviu Strattos- Jan. 30, 1865 Jan.

James VV. Thompson l Uct. 22, 1862 Feb.

Michael Hawks 'Dec. 7, 1864 Dec.

Milion Valentine Feb. 14, lseii Feb.

Wm. Li. Hall | " I, " March

.Michael Dawes lOct. 28, " Oct.

James F. Gardner March 24, 1864 March

Seth G. Clark 'Feb. 23, 18(13 Feb.

Wm. Thayer Oct.

Abram F. McCurdy !Nov.

G-jorge E. Hutchinson..

lames D. Platt Jan.

Nat. W. Filkiu

Andrew V. I'. Day

David Stratton

Arthur G. Canedy

Byron F. Spellman

Allen B. Freeman

Edwin K. Brink

.lames H. Haliord

J. Madison Allen

John Paisl-y

Samuel E. Norton

Edward M. Hayes

Henry Brown ,

mlius B. Kilbourne....

V\in. H. Day

David L. Cockl-y

John W. Haynie

Edwin McGaughey

Newton lhayer

iClias C. Gregg

Edwin B. Campbell

J. H. M. Perry

D.C.Hill

J. B. Hill

nry Frissell

J. Madison Allen

John C. Sheets

\l ilton Valentine

lohn Paisley

Anios Mardis " 23,

Samuel E. Norton Jan. la, 186:

Ed«ard M. Hayes.
Abraham L. Junes

James H. Haliord " 15,

Henry Brown " 15,

I ulius B. Kilbourne " 15,

Win. H Day " 15,

Edwin K. Brink " 15,

Henry B. Adair |Juno 1, " June

David L. Cockley Jan. 27, " Feb.

lohn O. Parish , Feb.



Nov. in, "
.March 17, 1864



17, "

17, "

14, "

14, "

25, "

30, 186/

30, ••



Juue



July
Ian.



May



Oct.

Nov.
Oct.
Nov.



John W. Haynie.

Edwin McGaughey

eorge W. Boggs

James S. Morgan

Edwin B. Campbell

James L. Thayer

.lared S. Fuller

John P. McKay

J. H. M. Perry

D. 0. Hill

J. B. Hill

Daniel D. Hopper

Charles Saeltzer

Marcus N. Haynie

Newton Thayer

Klias C. Gregg

ile nry H. Crooks

Charles D. Clark

Matthew J. Borland...



May
March



July



II.
1,
17, 1864



Nov.
March



July
Jan.



May



14,
14,
14,
14,
25,
25,
25,

March 17,
17,
17,
17,
17,



June
.March



July



I
26, 1863 Honorably discharged January 13, 1S65.
30, IS65 Mustered out with regiment.
17, 1863 Resigned April 12, 1864.
I'n, 1864 Promoted to Colonel.
30, 181)5' Commission revoked.
In, " I Mustered out with regiment.
17, 1863 Honorably discharged October 6, 1863.
17, " Resigned October iu, 1863.
17, " Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
9, 1864 Mastered out with regiment.

13, " [Discharged May 30, 1864.

2, " Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

2, " Mustered out with regiment.
3o, 186") Mustered out with regiment.
17, 1863 Died November 25, 1864.

7, 1801 Mustered out with regiment.

14. 1865 Resigned October 8, 1863.
" Resigned September 12, 1863.
" Promoted to Surgeon.

1864 Resigned January 15, 18.65.

1863 .Mustered out with regiment.
17, " I Promoted to Major.
17, " Promoted to Major.
17, " Resigned September 8, 1S64.
17, " Promoted to Major.
17, " Promoted to Major.
17, " Resigned December 17, 1863.
17, " Promoted to Major.
17, " Resigned April 24, 1S64. ,

17, " Resigned May 31, 1864,
17, " Discharged June 23, 1863.
25, " Uesigned May '.), 18HS.
10, " Mustered out May 15, 1865.
17, 1864 Discharged as 1st Lieutenant April 23, 1864.



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