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Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.






Do.


Russell H. True




Do.






Do.












Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do






Do.




Mustered out May 15, 1S65.


Do.




Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



826



Ohio in the "War



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


BEMABKS.






Nov.
Feb.

May


18, 1864
18, "
21, 18B')
21, "
18, "
18, "
IS, "
IS, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
18, "


Not.
Feb.
May


18, 1864

18, "
21, 1865
21, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
IS, "
18, "




Do.
Do.


Thomas Doughty


Resigned June 13, 1865.


Do.






Do.
Do.


John H. Clark

John II. Gaskill


Mustered out with regiment as 1st Sergeant.


Do.




Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.


Do.




Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.


Do.




Mustered out August IS, 1865.


Do.




Mustered out with regiment.


Do.
Do.
Do.


Richard Taggert

Josiah V. Morris

Robert B. Dailey


Mustered out with regiment as 1st Sergeant.
Mustered out with regiment as 1st Sergeant.









THIRTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALRY.



THE THIRTEENTH OHIO CAVALRY was formed by the consolidation of the
Fourth and Fifth Independent Battalions, and by recruits during the winter of 1863-4.
It was mustered into the service May 6, 1864, for three years. The regiment was
ordered from Camp Chase on the 11th, and it joined immediately the Ninth Army Corps, com-
posing a part of the Army of the Potomac, where, acting as infantry, it participated in the fol-
lowing battles : White House Landing, June 19th ; Charles City C. H., June 23d ; and in the
protracted siege and various heavy assaults on the Rebel works at Petersburg, Virginia. Dur-
ing the terrific assault at this place which occurred July 30th, the Thirteenth Ohio made for
itself a noble name by the courage and daring of both officers and men. The loss of the regi-
ment was nineteen killed, one hundred and three wounded, and fifty-nine captured.

The regiment also participated in the engagements at Weldon Railroad, August 19th, 20th,
and 21st; Ream's Station, August 25th ; Poplar Grove Church, September 30th ; Pegram's Farm,
October 2d, and Boydtown Plankroad, October 27th. In all these fights the officers and men sus-
tained their reputation for valor, and acquitted themselves in their usual brave manner.

For seven long months they had passed through the severe training of a soldier's life ; the
officers cheerful and kind ; the men dutiful and patient. On December 18th the regiment drew
cavalry arms, equipments, and horses, and reported to Major-General Gregg, commanding Second
Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac. Forming a part of this division, it partici-
pated with it in the battle at Hatcher's Run, February 6th, 1865. On the 28th of March, com-
manded by Lieutenant-Colonel Stephen R. Clark, and forming still a part of the Second Division,
it was ordered to report to Major-General Sheridan, and under his command aided in the rout,
destruction, and capture of the Rebel army under Lee. On the 31st of March the regiment
again distinguished itself for bravery and intrepidity near Dinwiddie C. H., Virginia, losing
two officers and several privates.

On the 5th of April, at Jetersville, the regiment made a splendid mounted charge, captur-
ing eight hundred and fifty prisoners and a stand of colors. The colors were captured by the
Sergeant-Major, James K. Piersall, for which he received a medal from the War Department and
a commission as First Lieutenant from the Governor of Ohio. At Sailor's Creek Colonel Clark was
ordered by Major-General Crook to charge and burn a train of wagons, forty in number, that was
on a road in the rear of the Rebel infantry, heavily guarded. The charge was made, the train
was entirely destroyed, and two hundred and eighty prisoners, one hundred and forty mules,
and twenty-eight horses were captured, with the loss of Captain Strahl and fifteen men taken



Thirteenth Ohio Cavaley. 827

prisoners. The regiment, immediately on its return, took part in a mounted charge, which
resulted in the capture of over five thousand men, including Brigadier-General M. D. Corse,
three of his staff, and six hundred and twenty-eight of his officers and men.

On the 7th of April it was the advance regiment, pressing and constantly fighting Lee's
rear-guard. About noon the regiment made a dash into Farmville, capturing three hundred and
eight prisoners. The command marched from Farmville to Prospect Station, on the Virginia
and East Tennessee Eailroad, and, at a point between Prospect Station and Appomattox C. H.,
in connection with the Sixth Ohio Cavalry, captured a train of railroad cars, bearing forage and
provisions for Lee's army.

Near Appomattox C. H, April 8th, after General Sheridan's command had gone into camp
for the night, the Thirteenth was placed on picket immediately to the left of the Court-House,
and in Lee's immediate front. In this position it stood all the night through ; everything quiet
until about daybreak, April 9th, when Lee's forces made an impetuous dash at the National
army, attempting to break the lines, but unsuccessfully. Here the regiment fought manfully,
holding its position over two hours, when it was charged by a division of Lee's infantry. Thi3
charge, fiercely made, was stubbornly resisted by the handful of men composing the regiment ;
but, on account of superior numbers, they were forced to fall back, which they did slowly and in
good order to the edge of a wood. In this engagement Lieutenant E. F. Cooper fell mortally
wounded. A most affecting spectacle was presented to the regiment in the rescue of this
wounded soldier, which will never be forgotten. When the young officer fell from his horse his
position was such that he must have fallen into the hands of the enemy. This danger caught
the quick eye of the Surgeon, Nathan S. Richardson, and he rode through the lines, exposing
himself to the fire of the enemy, reached the place where the Lieutenant lay bleeding, and,
assisted by his brave orderly, John Rush, took the dying young hero upon his saddle and carried
him off the field. A secure place was soon reached, and though everything was done which
skill and sympathy could suggest, he "breathed his life out sweetly there."

"When the Thirteenth reached the point to which it was ordered the crisis was reached
which was to determine the fate of the Rebel army. General Sheridan's entire cavalry force,
the Thirteenth in the front, charged the enemy's whole line, which resulted in the surrender of
Lee's army. Soon after, the regiment accompanied General Sheridan's command to re-enforce
General Sherman ; but when near Danville, Virginia, the intelligence was received that Gen-
eral Johnston had surrendered his entire army, and the whole command at once returned to
Petersburg, Virginia. The Thirteenth was afterward ordered to Amelia C. H., Virginia, and
was detailed as provost-guard for Amelia and Powhatan Counties, in which capacity it served
until August 10th.

At this time and place the regiment was mustered out of the United States service and
ordered to Columbus, where it received final discharge and pay, August 18th.

The entire loss of the Thirteenth during its term of service was sixty-eight killed, two hun-
dred and eighty-three wounded, and ninety-one captured. It took an active part in fonrteen
hard-fought battles, captured one General, one stand of colors, and two thousand and sixty-six
prisoners.



828



Ohio in the War.



1st OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



BOSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF BANK.


COM. ISSUED.


EEMAttKS.






July 31, 1861
Aug. 18, 1864
July 31, 1861
Aug. 9, 1862

9, "
Dec. 6, "
Aug. 18, 1864
Dec. 30, "
July 31, 1861
June 1, 1862
Aug. 9, "
Dec. 6, "
Aug. 18, 1864
Dec. 30, "


Aug. fi, 1861

IS, 1864
" 17, 1861

Sept. 6, 1862

rt 16, "
Dec. 24, "
Ang. 18, 1864
Dec. 30, 1864
Aug. 6. 1861
" 12, 1862
Sept. 9, "
Dec. 24, "
Aug. 18, 1864
Dec., 30, "




Do










Killed September 14, 1862.


Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.


Chas. H. Fee




Do.

2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.




Mustered out June 26, 1865.
Resigned July 11, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant


Do.
Do.
Do.


Dennis J. Ryan

John R. Hooker


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out June 26, 1865.
Mustered out June 26, 1865.



FIRST OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



THIS BATTERY was composed chiefly of recruits from the counties of Richland,
Huron, Crawford, Clermont, and Montgomery. It was organized and mustered into
the service at Camp Chase, OhiOj on the 6th of July, 1861, under Captain McMullen,
of Mansfield. Its first service was performed in Western Virginia, with General Cox, on the
Kanawha and Gauley Rivers.

Then it was transferred to the column under General Rosecrans' personal command, and
performed valuable service at Carnifex Ferry. Remaining in West Virginia, it served with the
Kanawha Brigade, and with it was transferred to the Armv of the Potomac, temporarily, to as-
sist in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam.

While on service in Western Virginia its complement of guns was incomplete. It had but
four guns, and was styled, in the army terms of that day, a " Jackass Battery ;" a class of artil-
lery very efficient in the wild mountain districts of that country, it being furnished with mules
instead of horses.

The battery returned with the Kanawha Brigade to Western Virginia, and was in the ardu-
ous expedition, under General Crook, to Newbern Bridge and Cloyd Mountain. At the last men-
tioned place the notorious Jenkins was killed. Returning from this movement the battery went
into camp at Lewisburg, Virginia.

It was ordered to Staunton, Virginia for the purpose of joining General Hunter's expedition
against Lynchburg. It moved out of Staunton with the National forces, and met the enemy at
Lexington, where a brisk fight was had, in which the First Ohio Battery took a prominent part.
It shelled the enemy vigorously, and was very efficient in dislodging the Rebel sharpshooters
from the Observatory of the Lexington Military Institute. The battery lost but one man killed
in this affair, private George Tank, of Dayton.



Fikst Ohio Independent Battery. 829

Moving with the army to Lynchburg, the battery shelled the Rebels in front of that place,
and aided in driving them into their works.

In the rapid and disastrous retreat of General Hunter's forces from Lynchburg, the First
Battery aided in guarding the rear of the National forces, and suffered, equally with the whole
army, for want of rations, rest, and transportation. History never will record the extent of the
privations and intense sufferings endured by the National army in this disastrous retreat. It is
computed that the First Battery marched at least one thousand miles in this expedition.

Beaching Parkersburg, it was placed on the cars and taken to Martinsburg, Virginia. Cap-
tain George P. Kirtland was in command of the battery at this time, and up to the end of the
service. From Parkersburg it marched, July 20, 1864, with General Averill's brigade, toward
Winchester, and at Stevenson's Depot, four miles out of Winchester, it had an engagement with
General Bamseur's North Carolina Bebel division, defeating it, and taking one hundred and fifty
prisoners and four pieces of artillery. Just before entering this engagement a sad accident
occurred. One of the caissons of the battery exploded, killing privates Samuel Miller, of
Galion, and Charles Ward, of Shiloh, Bichland County, and seriously injuring five others, the
most of whom were ever after unfitted for duty. General Little, a Bebel brigade commander,
was killed in this affair. The next morning, with its brigade, the battery entered Winchester,
after driving the Bebels out of the place.

On the 24th of July, the enemy, under General Early, made a furious attack on Winchester,
with overwhelming numbers. The National forces, under General Milroy, made a sturdy resist-
ance, but were compelled to evacuate the city, and make a rapid retreat in the direction of Har-
per's Ferry. In this retreat the First Battery was included. The Potomac Biver was crossed at
Williamsport, Maryland, at which place the battery went into camp. The battery material here
came under the eye of an Inspecting Officer, and was condemned as unfit for further service.
Turning over its dilapidated guns and accouterments to the proper authorities, it went to Mar-
tinsburg, Virginia, where, for six months, it performed guard-duty over the Government stores.
In the latter part of March, 1865, it was ordered down to Harper's Ferry. While there the news
of Lee's surrender and the fall of Bicliniond wa3 received. Immediately thereafter it was
ordered to report at Washington City, and reached that place the day before President Lincoln
was assassinated. It is mentioned with great satisfaction and pride by members of the battery
that as the men marched up Pennsylvania avenue, in Washington, Mr. Lincoln, coming down in
his carriage, stopped and held a short conversation with " the boys."

After performing duty at Forts Meigs and Washington, near the capital, on the 17th of June
the First Battery was ordered to Columbus, where it was paid off and mustered out of the ser-
vice June 26, 1865. The service of this battery was continued and arduous from the day of its
entrance into the field until its muster-out. A large number of its members were recruited in
and around the town of Plymouth, Bichland County, Ohio.



830



Ohio in the War.



2d OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Captain

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Thomas J. Carlin ....
Wm. B. Chapman...,

Newton J. Smith

Augustus Beach

Wm. B. Chapman....
Conrad Gansevoort..

Newton J. Smith

Orlando S. Huston..

Augustus Beach

Harvey Guthrie, jr..

Wm. fl. Harper

Samuel S. Eaton

Conrad Gansevoort..

Newton J. Smith

Orlando S. Huston..

Augustus Beach

Harvey Guthrie, jr..

Wm. H. Harper

John W. Wheaton...

Robert Calder

Samuel S. Eaton

Homer A. Andrews .
Thaddeus S. Young..



DATE OF BANK.



Aug.
June
Oct.

Aug.
Sept.
June

Oct.

April
Ian.
Aug.

Sept.

June



April
June
Jan.



6, 1861
19, 1862
11, "

8, 1863
6, 1861

9, "

13, 1862
19, "

1, "
11, "
25, 1864
28, 1865
6. 1S61
9, "
9, "
19, 1.S62
19, "
11, "
11, "
25, 1864

14, "
28, 1865
28 "



COM. ISSUED.



Sept.
July
Nov.
April
Sept.
July



Nov.

April
Jan.
Sept.
July



April
June
Jan.



Mi

It,
14,
13,
1.1,

25, :

14,
SB,

28,



Resigned June 19, 1862.
Resigned October 11, 1862.
Discharged August 28, 1862.
Mustered out August 10, 1865.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned June 19, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned October 1, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out as supernumerary.
Mustered out August 10, 1865.
Mustered out August 10, 1865.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out as supernumerary.
Commission returned.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out August 10, 1865.
Mustered out August 10, 1865.



SECOND OHIO DTDEPENDENT BATTERY.



r



rriHE SECOND OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY was organized and mus-

I tered into the service at Camp Chase, Ohio, on the 6th of August, 1861. It started

M on the 15th, under orders, to report to Major-General Fremont at St. Louis, Missouri.

On the 18th it was dispatched by rail for the relief of Colonel Mulligan, at Lexington, Missouri,

but was disembarked at Jefferson City, Mulligan having surrendered.

While at Jefferson City it received orders (October 4th) to march toward Springfield. After
four days' march through the most terrific roads, the battery was halted at Tipton, and rested
about one week. While lying at Tipton the Secretary of War, Simon Cameron, and Adjutant-
General L. Thomas, visited and reviewed Fremont's forces. The battery fired a salute in honor
of these dignitaries.

The march to Springfield was resumed and continued until Warsaw, on the Osage River,
was reached, where, by reason of a burned bridge, the whole army was delayed. While await-
ing the repair of the bridge Captain Carlin took twenty of his men, mounted them', crossed the
river, and struck out into the country for a scout. Seeing some corn standing in the shock he
halted his men for the purpose of feeding the horses. An old dilapidated log cabin stood near,
which, on examination, was found to be filled with corn-fodder. This feed was preferred for the
horses ; and, in throwing it out, the men discovered, secreted under the floor of the cabin, twenty-
two kegs of powder. A wagon was procured and the powder taken to head-quarters. Captain
Carlin received from General Fremont a note of thanks for this exploit.



Second Ohio Independent Batteky. 831

Springfield was reached on the 1st of November, but only to find that Price's army had fled.
The campaign was ended for the winter. The battery returned to Eolla and remained there
until the 24th of February, 1862. On that day it marched once more against Price's Eebel
army, and followed him up to Pea Bidge, where a battle was fought on the 6th and 7th of
March.

The battery was closely engaged in this battle, and lost one man killed and twelve wounded.
Lieutenant W. B. Chapman was badly wounded in this affair. It also lost seven horses killed,
and a caisson, but in turn captured a caisson from the enemy ; and, though closely pressed, drew
from off the field all of its pieces in safety. The battery thereafter marched, with General Cur-
tis's column, through Arkansas to Helena, on the Mississippi Eiver.

It lay at Helena until January 23, 1863, and then accompanied an expedition up White
Eiver to Duvall's Bluff. Not finding the enemy it returned to Helena.

March 20th the battery left Helena, and was taken by transports to the mouth of the Yazoo
River, where it joined Grant's army, then operating in the rear of Vicksburg. It took part in
the battles of Black Eiver Bridge, Eaymond, and Champion Hills, and was on duty until the
surrender of Vicksburg.

The battery was then ordered to report to General Banks, commanding the Department of
the Gulf, at New Orleans, and accompanied the disastrous expedition up Eed Eiver. Eeturning,
it was stationed at Plaquemine, Louisiana, on the Mississippi Eiver, where it remained, guarding
that point, up to February, 1864.

February 23d the battery re-enlisted and was thoroughly reorganized. It waa then ordered
to Ship Island, Mississippi, to guard Eebel prisoners, and remained there on that duty until July,
1865, when it was ordered to Columbus, Ohio, where it was mustered out of the United States
service on the 21st of July, 1865.



832



Ohio in the Wae.



3d OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



EOSTEE, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE Or RANK,



COM. ISSUED.



Captain

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Wm. S. Williams

John Sullivan

Wm. J. Mong

Francis J. Myers

John Sullivan

George Seit'ert

Thomas Bowen

Wm. S. Williams

Wm. G. Watson

Stephen Keith

Thomas J. Blackburn

John SuHivan

George Seifert

Charles H. Bartalott .
Franklin White



Jan.
Nov.
Jan.

July
Nov.



Feb.

June
Oct.
July

Nov.



20, 1802
26, 1864
211, 181,2
21), "
13, 1864
26, "
2f>, "

11, 1861

21, 1S62
21, "
30, "

12, "

13, 1864
26, "
26, "



Feb.
Nov.

Feb.

July
Nov.



Oct.
Jan.
July
Nov.



Resigned.

Mustered out July 31, 1865.
Resigned.

Resigned April 2, 1864.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out July 31, 1865.
Mustered out July 31, 1865.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned June 30, 1862.
Resigned October 12, 1862.
Resigned April 1, 1864.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out July 31 , 1865.
Mustered out July 31, 1865.



THIRD OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



THE THIRD OHIO (otherwise known as Williams's) Battery, was recruited and
organized by Captain W. S. Williams, of Canton, Stark County. It left that place in
February, 1862. The nucleus of this battery consisted of but one gun, which was taken
to the field in the spring of 1861 by Captain Williams, and attached to General J. D. Cox's
division, operating in Western Virginia. At Charleston, after the fight at Scarey Creek, it added
another gun by capture from the Rebels, and thereafter served throughout the three-months'
service. The exigencies of the service required it to serve an additional three months, and until
it could be relieved by other batteries.

In February, 1862, Captain Williams recruited his battery up to six guns and one hundred
and sixty-one men, and again entered the service in time to participate in the second day's fight-
ing at Pittsburg Landing. Following with the army, it took part in the siege and capture of
Corinth, where it remained and participated in the battles of Corinth and Iuka, under General
Rosecrans. In the battle of Corinth it lost one man (private Nicholas Mouse) killed and a num-
ber wounded.

In the fall of 1862 it moved with Grant's column on the Tallahatchie, toward Jackson, and
in the return to Memphis. In this campaign the men of the battery suffered from want of
rations, and were compelled to subsist for some days on parched corn and hominy.

The battery moved with Grant's army to the rear of Vicksburg. In this campaign it was a
part of Logan's division, and operated with it throughout the siege. On the march to Vicks-
burg it. took part in the battles of Raymond, Jackson, and Champion Hills, and was in position



Third Ohio Independent Battery. 833

in the rear of Vicksburg for forty-six day, where it lost a number of men from wounds and
exposure.

The battery remained at Vicksburg until the movement on Meridian was made. It accom-
panied General Sherman on that expedition, and had a heavy artillery fight at Clinton, Missis-
sippi. In this fight it lost two men killed and several wounded. At Meridian it lost two men
captured, who subsequently died in the prison-pen at Andersonville. Returning to Vicksburg
the battery performed duty in that place until the spring of 1864.

In April, 1864, the battery went on transports to Cairo, under orders to join General Sher-
man's army, then preparing for the Atlanta campaign. Passing up the Ohio and Cumberland
Rivers, it landed at a point on the last-named river, and marched across the country to Hunts-
ville, Alabama. Thence it went to Rome, Georgia, and joined Sherman's army at Big Shanty.
At this time it was in the Seventeenth Corps, then commanded by General Frank P. Blair, and
operated with it at Kenesaw Mountain and Nicojack Creek. On the 22d of July, at Leggett's
Bald Knob, it was engaged from eleven o'clock in the morning until sundown. In this affair it
lost one man killed, two wounded, and two captured. One of its guns was captured by the
Rebels, but was recaptured in fifteen minutes.

The next fight in which the battery was engaged was at Jonesboro'. The Rebels were
driven from that point and pursued to Lovejoy's Station. Atlanta having fallen, it returned to
that place, and remained there until the dash of Hood's army to the rear of the National lines.

The battery followed Hood's forces up to Nashville and aided in its defense. From Nash-
ville it was transferred to Fort Donelson. After remaining there some months it was ordered to
Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, for muster out, which was effected August 1, 1865.

During its service the battery lost the following named men : Sergeant Chalmer Peterson,
killed at Vicksburg, March 30, 1864 ; Corporal Jas. M. Whittaker, Clinton, Mississippi, March
26, 1864 ; Corporal Henry Wendling, Nashville, Tennessee, November 28, 1854 ; John Aker,
July 22, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia; Charles Allen, at New Garden, April 21, 1864; Abraham;
Best, August 4, 1864; Charles L. Davis, Mound City, May 17, 1864; Henry Gorby, Rome,
Georgia, August 31, 1864; Wm. Junkins, at Andersonville prison, Georgia, September 12, 18,64 ;
Joseph Keckley, Marietta, Georgia, August 25, 1864; Alex. Mcintosh, Atlanta, Georgia,. Sep-
tember 22, 1864; Adam Miller, Vicksburg, Mississippi, April 4, 1864; Joseph Neeley; Rome,
Georgia, August 19, 1864 ; Samuel Ness, on board steamer Emperor, December 1, 1864;- Jacob
Rea, Huntsville, Alabama ; Gilmore Rea, Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, March 20, 1864 ; Austin



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