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Vanderhoef, Rome, Georgia, August 20, 1864 ; Samuel Black, Vicksburg, Mississippi, April 4,
1864; Corporal Robinson Supernick, Bolivar, Tennessee, August 31, 1862; Peter Leigh, Jan-
uary 17, 1863, at Moscow, Tennessee; John Stevens, Newton J. Burnet, Jacob- Baroett, Samuel
Butz, September 5, 1863; Marcus Burnet, April 2, 1863; Levi Brandebury, August 25, 1863;
Nathan Dawson, Corinth, Mississippi, July 16, 1862; George Evans, October 31, 1862* Michael
Fitzpatrick, August 17, 1863; Solomon Foutz, October 16, 1863; Oliver Hunt, Corinth, Missis-
sippi, May 10, 1862; Joseph Hooser, June 22, 1862; Benj. Hackthorn, September 1, 1863; Les-
ter Kern, April 10, 1862 ; Wm. Koonse, January 17, 1863 ; Alfred Loutzenheiser, October 8,
1863 ; John May, August 15, 1863 ; Nicholas Mouse, at Corinth ; George Morse, October 10,
1863; John McDougall, September 26, 1863; Gustavus Pepin, June 27, 1S62; Joseph Rhoadls,
December 15, 1863; Fred. Reinhart; B*nj. Riggle, June 14, 1862; John Siege, August 29, 1863-
Wm. Speakman, September 17, 1863; William Troxell, June 6, 1862; John Troxell, Reuben
Thomas, June 2, 1862; Wm. Wickard, October 8, 1863; George Zollars, October 26, 1863.

Captain Williams left the service November 11, 1864, at the expiration of hia commission.
The men of his command presented him a fine gold-mounted saber, belt, and sash.

Vol. II.— 53.



834



Ohio in the War.



4th OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Captain

Do

Do

2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Lewis Hoffman

George Frcehlich....

Louis Zimmerer

George Froihlich ...

Lewis Piderett

Louis Zimmerer

Herman Blume

Lewis Piderett

Max. Frank

Louis Zimmerer

George Hugo Hang
George Hurat



DATE OF BANK.



Aug. 17

Jnne 2s

Dec. 30

Aug. 17

Dec. U

Feb. 17

March 10

Aug. 17



IS61

1864
lShl



Dec.
Feb.



1?,



lsii3
1864



COM. ISSUED.



Aug. 17, 1861

25, 1863

Dec. 3(1, 1864

Aug. 17, 1861

March 20, 1862

Feb. 17, 1864

March 18, 1865

Aug. 17, 1861

27, "

March 20. 1862

" 31, "

18, "



Resigned June 28, 1863.
Resigned September 26, 1864.

i
Promoted to Captain.
Died October 5, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned February 24, 1864.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned August 25, 1864.
Killed at Jouesboro' September 1, 1864.



FOURTH OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



THE FOURTH OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY was organized at Cin-
cinnati, August 2, 1861, by Captain Lewis Hoffman, and mustered into the United
States service August 17, 1861. Under orders, it left Cincinnati on the 18th, and
reported at St. Louis, Missouri, on the 21st of August. While in camp near the city the battery
was supplied with a complete equipment of James's rifled guns, caissons, horses, etc.

September 30th it went by railroad to Jefferson City; thence to Sedalia; and on the 13th of
October marched with General SigeFs division, and was with that division in all its wanderings
up to Springfield, passing through Warsaw and over the Osage River. Springfield was occupied
on the morning of the 13th of February, 1862, Price's forces having evacuated the place during
the night. The battery joined in the pursuit of the enemy, and continued it until the 20fch of
February, having repeated engagements with the Rebel rear-guard. The Rebels having escaped
over the Boston Mountains, near Bentonville, Arkansas, the pursuit was abandoned, and the
battery commenced its return-march. While passing through Bentonville the rear-guard of the
National forces was attacked. The battery was ordered to take position in an open field, so as to
control the main road, over which the troops were passing. This duty was so efficiently per-
formed as to compel the enemy to abandon his design and uncover the road. The column then
marched in good order to Sugar Creek. March 7th the battery was ordered to advance with
Colonel Osterhaus's division on the Leetown Road, the enemy having, during the night, formed a
strong line across the Telegraph Road, cutting off the line of retreat ; and being brought into
position, opened vigorously on the enemy. The battle raged from ten o'clock A. M. until neat
dark, when the enemy fell back and concentrated his entire force against the right wing of the
National forces. Again the battle commenced, but the enemy, being placed under a cross-fire of
all the batteries of the division, he was compelled to give up the contest and retreat. The
Fourth Ohio Battery, during this terrible fight, was in an exposed position, and received the fire



Fourth Ohio Independent Battery. 835

of all the enemy's batteries. It lost four men and one caisson by capture, three men wounded,
and one horse killed. Thus was fought the battle of Pea Ridge, one of the fiercest engage-
ments of the war.

Tbe National forces, under General Curtis, including the Fourth Ohio Battery, took up the
line of march for Helena, Arkansas, on the Mississippi River. This march was a most arduous
one, made, as it was, over the most wretched roads, obstructed by the enemy in every possible
way. The march was commenced on the 12th of March, and ended at Helena, July 14, 1862.
The weather was excessively hot, and water so scarce as not to be found, sometimes for an
entire day.

On August 16th the battery accompanied an expedition down the Mississippi River on
transports, under command of Colonel C. R. Woods. It landed at Milliken's Bend and captured
the Rebel steamer Fair Play, filled with arms and ammunition, and bound for Little Rock,
Arkansas, as supplies for Price's army. August 21st, at the same place, the camp of the Thirty-
First Louisiana Rebel Infantry was surprised and its entire equipment captured. Pursuing the
flying Rebels a short distance inland, a railroad depot and several cars, filled with supplies,
were destroyed.

The battery returned to Helena on the 27th of August, and remained in camp during all of
September. October 7th it was brought up the river to St. Genevieve, Missouri ; was at Pilot
Knob on the 17th, where it remained in camp until November 11th. It then returned to St.
Genevieve and embarked on steamers for Helena. Landing opposite that place, November 23d,
it was taken to Camp Steele, Mississippi, and remained there until December 19th, when it joined
General Sherman's expedition against Vicksburg, and took a prominent part in the assault on
the enemy's works at Chickasaw Bayou. The battery was also engaged in the attack and cap-
ture of Arkansas Post, January 11, 1863. It was in a very exposed position, and had one of its
guns disabled by a solid shot from one of the enemy's siege guns.

On January 29th the battery was in position at Perkins's Plantation, Louisiana, guarding
the Mississippi River against transports passing up to Vicksburg. The high water drove it
further down (to Ballard's Farm), where it remained performing duty up to April 2d. It was
then taken to Greenville, where it took care of the enemy until April 26th. On that day it
embarked on steamers, and arrived at Milliken's Bend the next day. May 2d the battery, under
Lieutenant George Froehlich, left the Bend, marched to a point opposite Grand Gulf, and, crossing
the river, bivouacked in that place for the night.

On May 8th the battery left Grand Gulf with the National army, and took part in all the
engagements of the march to the rear of Vicksburg. It was also very efficient in the siege of
Vicksburg, and remained in its position until the surrender of that place to General Grant,
July 4, 1863.

On July 5th the battery was sent, with other troops, to look after General Johnston's Rebel
forces at Jackson, Mississippi. It took position before that place, eight hundred and fifty yards
from the enemy's rifle-pits, and fired four hundred and fifty-one rounds at the doomed place. Jack-
eon was evacuated on the night of July 16th. September 22d found the battery again in Vicks-
burg. September 28th it was at Memphis, Tennessee. While marching up the levee a caisson
exploded, killing privates Henry Eggemayer, George Schaub, and Nicholas Markowitz.

On October 1st the battery left Memphis for Corinth, arriving there the same night. Octo-
ber 9th it went to Iuka, and on the 20th was in the engagement at that place. It was also in
several other sharp fights about this date. October 30th it marched to Chickasaw, on the Ten-
nessee River, arriving there on the night of the 31st. It crossed the river November 2d, and,
passing through Florence, Pulaski, Fayetteville, New Market, Maysville, Woodville, Larkina-
ville, and Bellefonte, reached Bridgeport, November 20th. It marched to Shellmound on the
21st, and to Whitesides on the 22d. Chattanooga was reached on the afternoon of the 23d, where
it joined the balance of the Fifteenth Army Corps.

On November 24th the division to which the battery belonged (General Osterhaus's) was
ordered to join General Hooker in his operations against Lookout Mountain. In this affair the



836 Ohio in the War.

battery performed efficient service. Immediately after the battle it crossed Lookout Mountain,
and advanced toward Mission Ridge, which was occupied during the day, and camped there
until December 3d. While here, by order of General Grant, two of the six-pound James rifled
guns were exchanged for four twelve-pound field guns of the celebrated " Ferguson Battery,"
captured from the enemy at Mission Ridge.

After marching to arid fro during the month of December the battery went into camp at
Larkinsville, Alabama, and remained there during the rest of the year.

The battery was moved from Larkinsville to Woodville, Alabama, the latter part of Decem-
ber, 1863, and arrived at Woodville January 1, 1864. It remained in camp at this place until
April 30, 1864.

It is proper to remark here that Captain Lewis Hoffman had been in command of the bat-
tery since May 2, 1863, the date of the resignation of Captain George Froehlich.

On May 1, 1864, the battery, in company with the First Division of the Fifteenth Army
Corps, left Woodville for Atlanta, and by the 13th was bf fore Resaca. All of its guns were
placed in position and used on the enemy's works. In this affair two men (Jacobs and Nagel)
were wounded, the latter mortally. The enemy having evacuated Resaca, the battery marched
to Dallas, arriving at that place May 25th. On that day the enemy made a desperate charge,
coming within fifty yards of the battery and within fifteen yards of the National rifle-pits. The
battery repulsed the Rebels with heavy loss. Colonel Taylor, Chief of Artillery, was wounded
in this affair

On June 4th the battery was at New Hope Church, where, during the night, it fired one
hundred and thirty-six rounds. Passing through Acworth, and over Lost Mountain, it was, on
the 12th of June, in position before Kenesaw Mountain, and for some days bombarded the
enemy's position. June 27th General Sherman ordered a charge on the enemy's works, which
resulted in heavy loss to both parties, and caused the Rebels to evacuate the mountain.

The battery then marched to Marietta, Georgia, and went into camp. July 4th it was
ordered to take position on the right flank of the army, and by the night of July 8th was behind
intrenchments near Atlanta. During the night of the 9th the enemy left this position and
crossed the Chattahoochie River. The battery was then taken back to Marietta, arriving there
July 12, and by the 14th was at Rossville, on the bank of the Chattahoochie River, where it
rebuilt a bridge burnt by the Rebels.

On July 22d, near Decatur, the enemy made a determined charge on the Fifteenth Army
Corps. Two men of the battery (Burkhard and Helwig) were wounded, and four twenty-pound
Parrott guns, of De Gray's Illinois Battery, fell into the hands of the enemy. The Fourth Ohio
Battery immediately changed position, killed the horses of the battery captured by the Rebels,
and compelled them to abandon the guns of the Illinois Battery and fall back in disorder, leav-
ing many of their number dead upon the field.

On July 24th, the battery destroyed five miles of railroad from Decatur to Atlanta, and on
the 27th was in position at the outposts on the right flank of the National army. During the
memorable battle on the 28th of July, near Atlanta, in which the Rebel army made a charge in
mass, the battery was for some time in a critical position, but, by determined fighting, was extri-
cated without loss. Fighting was continued up to August 12, 1864, the battery being under fire
for the most part of the time.

The three-years' term of service for which the battery enlisted having expired, it was
relieved on the battle-ground, August 14th, by infantry, and by the 23d of August had reached
Cincinnati, where (on the 29th) it was mustered out of the service, and the remaining recruits,
whose term of service had not expired, consolidated with the Tenth Ohio Battery.



Fifth Ohio Independent Battery.



837



5th OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



BEMAHKS.



Captain ....

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Andrew Hickenlooper

Theophilus Kates

Charles J. Marsh

John H. Hollenshade..
Anthony B. Burtun ...

Lewis C. Sawyer

Bellamy S. Matson

Charles J. Marsh

.lohn D. Bruner

Charles J. Marsh

Theophilus Kates

J. Henry Stegeman

Walter J. Trotter

Le« is C. Sawyer

Julius i". Blackburn...

Win. C. Broadwell

Bellamy S. Matson

Charles J. Marsh

.lohn D. Bruner ,

Theophilus Kates

Walter J. Trotter ,

J. Henry Stegeman

Ozro L. Edwards ,

Alex. Temple „



Aug. 31,
S.-pt. 30,
Oct. 19,
Aug. 31,
31,



March


18,


June


12,


Jan.


13,


"


13,


July


3",


"


311,


Sept.


so,


April


8,


Aug.


31,


"


31


March


1>.


June


1,



Jan.
July



Sept.
April



Oct.
Sept.
Oct.



April

June

Feb.

April

July

Sept.
April
Oct.

April
June

Feb.

July

Sept.
April



Promoted by President to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out May 13, 1665.

Discharged November 30, 1864.

Resigned March 18, 1862.

Resigned March 23, 1864.

Resigned June 12, 1864.

Resigned January 13, 1863.

Declined promotion.

Resigned May 9, 186*.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with battery.

Mustered out with battery.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Resigned June 12, 18>-2.

Resigned June 1, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out with battery.

Mustered out with battery.



FIFTH OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



THIS battery of light artillery, which afterward became the Fifth Ohio, was recruited
by authority of Major-General Fremont, then in command in Missouri. Three weeks
of active recruiting, principally in Hamilton, Wayne, Mercer, and Jackson Counties
filled the battery to a maximum of one hundred and seventy men, who had been forwarded to
St. Louis as fast as enlisted. Some delay occurring in the receipt of commissions from General
Fremont, whose authority to issue them was somewhat doubtful, the officers were at length com-
missioned by the Governor of Ohio ; and on the 22d of September, 1861, the battery was organ-
ized as the "Fifth Independent Ohio Battery of Volunteer Light Artillery."

Before armament, clothing, or other essentials could be procured General Fremont and his
forces had started on the march, which terminated at Springfield with the removal of the Gen-
eral from command; arid on the 11th of October the company was ordered to Jefferson City. "A
period of three months now elapsed, passed by the men in doing garrison-duty, working on forti-
fications, and drilling with some old iron guns found at the post, and by the Captain in vain
efforts to procure guns and equipments. At last, upon his personal application to the Governor
of Ohio, a full battery, with all necessary adjuncts, was furnished. It arrived January 17, 1S62.
The six pieces consisted of four six-pounder James rifles and two six-pounder smooth-bores. On
March 7, 1862, the battery shipped on a steamer at Jefferson City and proceeded direct to Savan-
nah, Tennessee, and thence to Pittsburg Landing, disembarking at the latter point on the 19th.
On the 5th of April it joined the command of General Prentiss (Sixth Division, Army of the
Tennessee), camped about two and a half miles from the river, and not far from Shiloh Church.



838 Ohio in the War.

On the following morning, while the men were at breakfast, a section (two pieces) was ordered
out by General Prentiss, and as soon as possible was placed in position, by the General in person,
a few hundred yards in advance of the camp. The Captain, anticipating an order to that effect,
bad the rest of the battery prepared, and in a few minutes joined the first section. The infantry
support had scarcely been placed in position when the enemy appeared in force. To the right
of the battery their line was in advance of the rest, and General Prentiss ordered the battery to
change front to the right. This was done, but it exposed the left flank to a. close fire of the
enemy, which killed many horses and rendered it difficult to manage the rest. The infantry
support melted swiftly away, and two pieces were unavoidably left in the hands of the enemy.
The others retired through the woods slowly, firing as they fell back, and fighting for some time
almost literally without any support. The battery was then ordered further back, and was for a
short time out of the line of battle. Soon after noon it took a position further to the right,
under General Sherman, and was actively engaged through the remainder of that hard-fought
day. The next day, not being in condition to pursue the enemy, from lack of horses to replace
those killed, etc., it was not engaged. The battery lost in this, its first battle, one man killed
and twenty wounded (including Lieutenant Burton), two pieces, four caissons, sixty-five horses,
and all camp and garrison equipage.

On the 14th of April Captain Hickenlooper was appointed Chief of Artillery on the staff"
of Brigadier-General McKean. Subsequently filling different positions of enlarged usefulness,
he was never again in command of the battery.

About the middle of September the battery, with its division, marched to Iuka, but was not
in position to take part in the action. Having returned to Corinth, the division moved out a
short distance, on the 3d of October, to meet the advance of the Rebel forces, then approaching
under Van Dorn and Price, and the same night returned to the line of works around Corinth,
when the battery took up position immediately on the left of the earthwork known as Fort Phil-
lips. The next day the battery was actively engaged. It suffered no loss, however, from the
fact that the main attack of the enemy on that part of the line was directed against Forts Phil-
lips and Robinett, on its right, which they assaulted repeatedly with great fury. The next morn-
ing the battery moved, with the rest of General Roseeranste army, in pursuit, as far as Ripley,
when, Corinth being threatened by Rebel forces from the east side, the army returned there.

General Grant now organized a force to move down into Mississippi by land, to operate
against Vicksburg; and in a few days the entire army at Corinth, except sufficient to garrison the
place, moved westward, the Sixth Division stopping for the time at Grand Junction, Tennessee.

In the meantime Lieutenant Burton, having partially recovered from the wound received at
Pittsburg Landing, had recruited forty men for the battery at Cincinnati, and was about to start
with them for the command, when the advance of Kirby Smith began to threaten the city. The
Lieutenant tendered the services of himself and men to General Lew. Wallace, commanding,
and was assigned to the service of the guns at Fort Mitchel, an earthwork, two and a half miles
south of Covington, Kentucky. The heavy guns in the fort were soon mounted and a short sup-
ply of ammunition procured for them, after some search, in Cincinnati.

On the 24th of September Lieutenant Burton was ordered to organize a light battery with
his own recruits and sixty-five of the Ninth Ohio Battery, under Lieutenant Rundell, who were
ordered to report to him. Four light twelve-pounder guns, with everything necessary, were
drawn, and the battery, when complete, was assigned to the division of General G. Clay Smith.
Shortly afterward all available troops started from Covington toward Lexington, under command
of General A. J. Smith, too late, however, to take part in any of the fighting in Central Ken-
tucky, or to come up with Humphrey Marshall, then retreating westward. The march to Lex-
ington was made by a wide circuit to the west, and was very fatiguing. At Lexington Lieuten-
ant Burton was ordered to turn the guns and all other property of the temporary battery (the
emergency having passed which caused its organization) >ver to the Ninth Ohio, which had
arrived there, and to proceed with his men to his own battery in Mississippi. On the 11th of
November he joined and took command of the Fifth at Grand Junction, Tennessee.



Fifth Ohio Independent Batteky. 839

Two twelve-pounder howitzers were now added to the battery, making six pieces in all once
more; and soon after it was transferred from McArthur's (sixth) to McKean's (fourth) division,
Army of the Tennessee, part of the command of General McPherson, then at La Grange, Ten-
nessee. On the next day it started on the march, with the rest of General Grant's army, south-
ward into Mississippi, and reached Holly Springs on the 29th. From there slow progress was
made, owing to so large a body of troops moving on one narrow road, and to the fact that the
cavalry was constantly skirmishing with the enemy in the advance. On the 12th of December
the battery went into camp on Yocana Creek, eleven miles south of Oxford, which was the turn-
ing point of its march, though the cavalry went some distance further. The surrender of Holly
Springs, and the loss of an immense quantity of commissary and other stores there, compelled
the army to fall back, and the men were at once put on three-quarter, and soon on half rations.
Christinas found the battery camped a short distance above the Tallahatchie River, the men
entirely out of regular rations, and depending on the country for meat, and on the few mills of
the neighborhood, which were being operated by our troops, for a scanty supply of corn-meal.

On the 5th of January, 1863, the division marched to Holly Springs, and remained until the
10th, forming the rear-guard of the army. During the entire march, both going south and
returning, the destruction of property by fire was immense. Everything that would burn was
consumed — houses, barns, cotton-presses, negro-quarters, and fences were all destroyed, except-
ing dwellings (hat were occupied. Occasionally the battery was obliged to turn off into fields to
avoid the burning fences, which fell in the road, and rendered it unadvisable to drive over them
with chests of ammunition; but the climax was reached at Holly Springs the night before the
last troops left it on the return. Notwithstanding the efforts of officers and of the provost-
guard, the largest portion of the town was destroyed, and it must have been a night of terror to
the women and children in the place.

From Holly Springs the division, commanded by General J. G. Lauman, marched to Mos-
cow, Tennessee, and the battery remained at that place, assisting in guarding the Memphis and
Charleston Railroad, until March 8th, when it proceeded to Memphis. Two months of inaction
occurred here, which were used to good advantage in drilling; and when orders were received,
on the 17th of May, to embark for Vicksburg, the battery was in the best possible condition, the
men in excellent health, and thoroughly drilled ; horses looking well, and appointments complete.

On the passage down the river the fleet of transports was fired into at Friar's Point by guer-
rillas, with artillery, on the Mississippi shore, and a number of soldiers were killed and wounded.
In retaliation, the troops landed and burned the village of Greenville.

The division disembarked at Haines's Bluff, on Yazoo River, and took position on the
heights to meet an expected attack from General Jos. Johnston's forces, which, however, was not
made. After remaining here for some days the division was ordered to the extreme left of the



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