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by General Herron's forces. It was then placed on the Hall's Ferry Road, and remained until
the surrender of the city.

On the evening of July 4th the battery marched with Sherman's command to Jackson, Mis-
sissippi, arriving there on the 7th. It took position in Lauman's division, on the extreme right,
and held it until the evacuation of the place.

On July 24th the battery returned to Vicksburg, and on August 12th was taken on trans-
ports to Natchez, Mississippi. Several reconnoissances were made from this place, and there
were some skirmishes with the enemy. It remained at Natchez until November 11th, and then
returned to Vicksburg.

On the 1st of December the battery was at Camp Heborn, near Black River Bridge, in the
rear of Vicksburg. In the latter part of January, 1864, it accompanied General Sherman on
his raid to Meridian. On this expedition the battery had several sharp encounters with the
enemy — at Baker's Creek, February 3d, and at Ricker's Run. It returned to its old camp at
Heborn, and shortly afterward was moved into Vicksburg.

Twenty-two men of the battery had re-enlisted on the 1st of January, and had been home
on furlough.

On May 7, 1S64, the battery had a fight with the enemy at Benton, Mississippi, losing Pher-
silius Austin, killed. In this fight the battery dismounted two of the enemy's guns and disabled
a third. Several of the enemy were killed.

On May 22d it reached Vicksburg, and from that time until January 3, 1S65, was attached
to the post and defenses of Vicksburg. On January 6, 1865, Captain S. A. Burnap and fifty-one
men were mustered out of the service by reason of expiration of term of enlistment.

On January 3, 1865, the guns of the battery and equipments were turned over, the men pro-
vided with muskets, and placed on duty as infantry at Jackson. On January 16th a Sergeant,
with a detail of ten men, \ven\ out on a scout to a point thirty-six miles from Jackson, and
captured a piece of artillery which had been hid in the woods by the Rebels. The men of the
battery also did infantry service at Hazlehurst, on the Jackson and New Orleans Railroad.
This duty was continued until July, 1865.

The battery then returned to Jackson, Mississippi; thence to Vicksburg, and home to Camp
Dennison, where it was mustered out, paid off and discharged.



Eighth Ohio Independent Battery.



847



8th OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



EOSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



Captain

Do

Do

Vet Lieutenant

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
2d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



Lewis Margraff

Charles H. Smith..
James F. Putnam...
Charles H. Smith..

Emil Smith

James F. Putnam .
Amos H. Worley....

Jeremiah Cain

Jacob Ileitzman ....

Emil Smith

James F. Putnam..
Jacob M. Porter ....

Jeremiah Cain

Francis M. Coover.
Thomas Lewis



Jan.
July
Feb.
Jan.
July
Dec.
Feb.
June
Jan.
April
I uly
Dec.
Feb.
Juua
Feb.



12.



12, I8B2



March 14,

Nov. 1(1,

May 9,

March It,

Nov. 10,

Dec. 9,

Aug. 19,

June 14,

March 14,

April 2ii,

Nov. Kl,

Dec. 9,

Aug. 19,

June 14,

Feb. 10,



Honorably discharged July 9, 1S62.
Resigned February 4, 1863.
Mustered out August 7, 1865.
Promoted to Captain.
Revoked ; resigned May 29, 1S63.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out August 7, 186ft.
Mustered out August 7, 18(tt.
Resigned April 2s, 1862.
Mustered out.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned January 29, 1SK3.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out August 7, 18K5.
Resigned July IS, 1S65.



EIGHTH OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



THE EIGHTH OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY was recruited in the coun-
ties of Montgomery, Darke, and Miami, and organized at Camp Dennison, Ohio, March
10, 1862. March 22d it moved, under orders, to Benton Barracks, near St. Louis, Mis-
souri, and on its arrival there reported to General Halleck, commanding at that post. Without
going into quarters the battery was placed on transports and ordered to report to General Grant,
at Savannah, on the Tennessee River.

On March 28th it arrived at Savannah, and, without landing, proceeded on up the river, and
reported to General W. T. Sherman, at Pittsburg Landing. It went into camp a short distance
from the landing, where it remained until the commencement of the battle, on the 6th of April.

In both days of the battle the battery fought with General Sherman's division, and was, on
several occasions, in close contest with the enemy, and in the charge made by the Rebels in mass,
on Sunday evening, was within a few paces of their advanced skirmish-line. The loss of the
battery in this battle was one killed — Sergeant Leonard Uliery, of Greenville, and three
wounded.

In the advance on Corinth the battery moved with Lew. Wallace's brigade, of the Second
Division, occupying the extreme right of the division. Marching by day, and erecting fortifica-
tions at night, it reached a point within two miles of Corinth. Discovering that the town was
evacuated it entered that place with Halleck's forces.

Resting on its arms it remained in Corinth about three hours, and was then ordered to march
with General Grant's column to Memphis, Tennessee, which place was reached June 17, 1862.
The battery remained in Memphis, engaged in frequent scouts and skirmishes, until December
20, 1862. On that day it started with General Sherman's command for Vicksburg, Mississippi,
and on the 27th of December took part in the disastrous repulse of the National forces, undei



848 Ohio in the War.

Sherman, at Chickasaw Bayou. It remained in this critical position from Saturday until Thurs-
day, exposed to the enemy's fire during all of that time. January 1, 1863, it retreated with the
army to the transports, and made its way to the Mississippi River.

On January 6, 1863, the battery joined the expedition against Arkansas Post, and took a
prominent part in that successful affair.

Young's Point was its next rendezvous, where it went into camp, and remained until the
opening of General Grant's campaign against, and in the rear of, Vicksburg. In that campaign
it participated in the battles of Grand Gulf, Black River Bridge, Raymond, Champion Hill, and
in the rear of Vicksburg. For this service the battery received the special thanks of Generals
Grant and Sherman. It operated on the extreme right of the National line in General Steele's
division, of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and used thirty-pound Parrott guns, the heaviest pieces
on the line.

After the surrender of Vicksburg the battery was sent to Jackson, Mississippi, to help look
after the Rebel forces under Johnston. That matter settled, it returned to Vicksburg, where it
went into barracks, and remained until December, 18G3. It then accompanied General Sherman
on his Meridian expedition. Returning to Vicksburg the battery was placed on duty in the city,
where it remained, with occasional expeditions to the interior, until December, 1864.

December. 22, 1864, it accompanied an expedition to the central part of Mississippi, to destroy
the Central Mississippi Railroad, and prevent re-enforcements from reaching General Hood,
who was then on his retreat from Nashville. Forty miles of track, three locomotives, and forty
cars, loaded with Confederate cotton and corn, were destroyed. A battle was also fought at the
bridge over Black River. The enemy was driven out of strong stockades and the bridge burned.

The battery made its way back to Yazoo City and Vicksburg. At Yazoo City it was sur-
rounded by the enemy, but, crossing the river, it escaped down the opposite bank, under fire for
Rome four miles.

The battery remained at Vicksburg until May 20, 1865, and was then ordered to Natchez,
where it performed garrison-duty until the last of June. It was then ordered to Vicksburg, and
was kept on provost-duty in that city up the last of July, 1865. It was then ordered to Camp
Dennison, Ohio, and mustered out of service at that camp, August 9, 1865.



Ninth Ohio Independent Battery.



849



9th OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



ROSTER, THREES YEARS' SERVICE.



Captain

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Henry S. Wetmore Oct.

Harrison B. York Dec.

Leonard P. Barrows Oct.

John M. Hinde Aug.

Heury A. Tallmadge Sept.

George S. Hazen Dec.

George J. Kundell May

Frank Keeny June

Win. W. James Nov.

George W. Church Feb.

John'M. Hinde Oct.

Henry A. Tallmadge Aug.

George S. Hazen Sept.

Harrison B. York

George J. Rundell Dec.

Edward Oowles "

Frank Keeny May

Wm. W. James "

George \V. Church June

Albert Reeves Nov.

Hiram D. York Feb.



DATE OF RANK



11, 1861

12, 1862
II, 1861

3, 1862
11, "
5, "
9, ISM
27, "
10, "

10, 1865

11, IS6I
3, 1S62

II, "

11, "
5, "

12, "

8, ISM

9, "
27, "
10, "
10, 1S65



COM. ISSUED.



Nov.
Dec.
Nov.
Aug.
Dec.

May
June
Nov.
Feb.
Nov.
Aug.
Nov.
Dec.



May

June
Nov.
Feb.



Resigned December 12, 1S62.
Mustered out July 25, 1865.
Resigned August 3. 18fi2.
Resigned December 5, 1862.
Resigned June 7, 18M.
Resigned April 28, 18M.
Honorably discharged.
Mustered out July 25, 1865.
Resigned January 21, 1865.
Mustered out July 25, 1865.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned April 12, 18M.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out July 25, 1865.
Mustered out July 25, 1865.



NINTH OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



THIS battery was organized at Camp Wood, Cleveland, Ohio, on October 11, 1861. It
was intended to form a part of the Forty-First Ohio Infantry. The strength of the
command was three commissioned officers and eighty men. It was at first fitted out
aB a four-gun battery, with two ten-pounders and two twelve-pound howitzers, but afterward
became a full six-gun battery.

The battery moved from Cleveland December 7, 1861, and arrived at Camp Gilbert, Ken-
tucky, December 20, 1861. It remained in this camp, for drill, until January 7, 1862, and then •
joined General Carter, at Somerset, Kentucky. This arduous march was accomplished in seven
days, over the most wretched roads that could be imagined. The battery reported at Somerset
January 17th. On the 19th it took part in the battle of Mill Springs, and, by order of Gen-
eral George H. Thomas, was posted on a hill commanding the ferry on the Cumberland
River, over which the troops of the enemy were being transported with all possible dispatch. A
few well-directed shots, at a distance of nearly two miles, set the steam ferry-boat on fire, and
compelled an immediate surrender of the Rebel works. The battery encamped for the night in
the works, and returned to Somerset January 22d, making the march through deep mud and
heavy rains.

For its gallant services in the battle of Mill Springs, General Thomas (approved by Major-
General Buell) gave two of the captured six-pound bronze guns to the battery, fitted out with
captured horses and harness.

Vol. II.— 54.



850 Ohio %ts the War.

On January 30, 1862, the Ninth moved from Somerset for Cumberland Ford, by way of
London, Kentucky ; and, after a march of seven days, over routes rendered almost impassable
from mud and heavy rains, arrived at London February 5th, and Cumberland Ford February
1G, 18G2. This point is fourteen miles distant from Cumberland Gap, which was at that time
occupied by a Rebel force under General Rains.

Hard marching, fatigue, and exposure began to tell upon the health of the men. At one
time (March 12, 1862) thirty-five men only were reported fit for duty. Owing to the scarcity of
forage the horses nearly all died.

On March 21st, in connection with a brigade of infantry, under General Carter, the battery
marched from Cumberland Ford on a reconnoissance of the enemy's position at Cumberland
Gap. This reconnoissance brought on an engagement, which commenced on the morning of
March 22, 1862. The Ninth gained a position one and a quarter miles from the Rebel works
on the extreme point of Elrod Ridge, and was under fire for seven hours without casualty.

On March 23d the battery returned to Cumberland Ford, where it lay in camp for several
months. On June 7th it marched to Rodgers's Gap, in the Cumberland Mountains, crossing
into Powell's Valley on the 14th. Further advance being countermanded by orders from Gen-
eral Buell, the battery returned to Williamsburg, Kentucky.

The disheartening process of again climbing the mountains being accomplished, orders were
received, with enthusiasm, to return once more to the valley, where the battery took part in the
movements against the enemy which resulted in the capture, by the United States forces, of Cum-
berland Gap, June 19, 1862. On the 18th of August the Rebels re-entered Kentucky and
invested the Gap, cutting off all supplies from the National forces. Sergeant Calvin Coolidge,
of the battery, with five men and four wagons, foraging near Richmond, Kentucky, were cap-
tured by the enemy. The Sergeant was badly wounded in the disastrous battle of Richmond.

The Ninth having received a new supply of horses a few days previous to communication
being cut off, orders were received to transfer them to the Seventh Regiment Kentucky Infantry.
Skirmishes were of daily occurrence with the enemy in front, the artillery coming in for its
full share.

On September 17, 1862, at night, the United States forces at Cumberland Gap, under Gen-
eral George W. Morgan, commenced their memorable retreat. The Ninth Ohio Battery and
Thirty-Third Indiana Infantry took the advance and marched to Manchester, Kentucky, having
in charge a train of one hundred wagons, filled with ammunition. During the march the Rebel
cavalry were continually harassing the retreating column.

The battery having thus been placed in charge of a train, on the safety of which the whole
retreat depended, felt like sacrificing themselves to a man rather than permit it to be captured ;
and on this determination it acted during the whole of that arduous march. Owing to the
scarcity of water, the men were ordered to fill their canteens upon the eve of march, with the
understanding that it must last two days, when it was expected the command would reach the
Kentucky River. The first night of the march from Manchester being very dark, one of the
gun-carriages was overturned, falling down a perpendicular bank twelve feet. The ammunition
in the limber-chest exploded when it reached the bottom, severely wounding three men, and
causing a general consternation, from the idea that a masked Rebel battery had opened fire upon
the retreating columns. The wreck was instantly cleared and the column again put in motion.
Day and night the almost exhausted troops toiled on, the infantry frequently making halts
that the batteries might hurry to the front and beat off an attack by the Rebels.

The provisions gave out, and the men made corn, gathered from the fields along the way,
their food, grating it by means of their tin plates, which were perforated with holes for that
purpose.

After sixteen days' marching, Greenupsburg, Kentucky, on the Ohio River, was reached on
the 2d of October, 1862, at nightfall, i he Ohio River and shore was plainly seen in the clear
moonlight, and drew from the wearied officers and men a succession of cheers, which cime
Btraight from their hearts. The river was crossed on the 3d of October. The citizens of Wheel



Ninth Ohio Independent Batteey. 851

r

ersburg, Ohio, came en masse with provisions to feed the hungry soldiers ; and if ever kindness
was appreciated, it was by those bronzed and suffering veterans. At other places the same kind-
ness was manifested.

After remaining in camp a few days, resting, the battery reported, by order, to Major-Gen-
eral Gordon Granger, at Covington, Kentucky, where it arrived October 17, 1862. After draw-
ing a new supply of clothing and a complete outfit of guns and horses, the battery marched to
Lexington, Kentucky, where, on October 31st, it was joined by Sergeant Rundell with sixty-six
recruits, making it number three commissioned officers and one hundred and fifty-six men, and
six twelve-pound Napoleon guns. Here the battery was joined by Captain Henry S. "Wet more,
and was placed in a camp of instruction, near the residence of James B. Clay, until November
25, 1862. On the 26th of November it reported to General A. Baird, at Nicholasville, Kentucky.

The Ninth Independent Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery being now recognized at the
War Department as a six-gun battery, and as such entitled to a full complement of officers, Sec-
ond-Lieutenant Henry A. Tallmadge was commissioned as First-Lieutenant, and Sergeants Geo.
S. Hazen and Harrison B. York as Second-Lieutenants, the three promotions dating from Sep-
lember 11, 1862. The resignation of First-Lieutenant John M. Hinde being accepted on Decem-
ber 5, 1862, Second-Lieutenant George S. Hazen was commissioned as First-Lieutenant, and
Sergeant George J. Eundell as Second-Lieutenant from the same date.

On December 10, 1862, the battery left Nicholasville, Kentucky, and arrived at Danville,
Kentucky, the next day. At this point the resignation of Captain Henry S. Wetmore was
accepted, and Lieutenant H. B. York was commissioned as Captain, to date from December 12,
1882. On December 26, 1862, the battery marched from Danville toward Lebanon, Kentucky,
to look after John Morgan's cavalry, but returned the next day, after an unsuccessful scout
through the rain and mud.

On January 26, 1863, the battery received orders to report to the Army of the Cumberland
at Nashville, and on January 31st sailed on transports from Louisville for Nashville. Arriving
at Nashville, it encamped there until March 6th, when it moved out to Franklin and took
position with the right wing of the Army of the Cumberland. On March 9th it pursued the
Rebel cavalry to within five miles of Columbia without bringing on an engagement, and return-
ing to Franklin on the 12th. On the 27th of March the battery returned to Brentwood with a
brigade of infantry, the garrison of that place having been captured the day previous by the
enemy. On April 8th the battery again returned to Franklin, Tennessee, and, in company with
a brigade of infantry, had a brisk skirmish with the enemy, pursuing him four miles, and
returning to camp at midnight. On June 11th, at Triune, the enemy made a sudden demon-
stration in force, but was repulsed, with some loss on both sides. During June and July the
Ninth had several skirmishes around Triune and Murfreesboro', and on the 5th of September
marched for Tullahoma, Tennessee.

On November 21, 1863, the battery, Captain H. B. York commanding, was assigned to the
First Division, Twelfth Corps, Department of the Cumberland, Captain H. B. York being
announced as Chief of Artillery of the Division, Brigadier-General A. S. Williams commanding.

On December 23, 1863, four men of the battery were captured by guerrillas, from a foraging
train, in Lincoln County, Tennessee. The Rebels tied their hands behind them and then inhu-
manly shot them, throwing their bodies into Elk River. Two of these men escaped by getting
their hands loose and swimming to the shore — one of the two dying the next day. The other,
James W. Foley, of Hudson, Ohio, was permanently disabled in the right leg. General Order,
No. 6, Head-Quarters Army of the Cumberland, series of 1864, was immediately issued, mak-
ing an assessment of $30,000 on the neighborhood, for the benefit of the families of the three
murdered men.

On February 22, 1864, forty-one men of the original organization, being three-fourths of
the number present, having re-enlisted as veterans, were permitted, together with Captain H.
B. York and First-Lieutenant H. A. Tallmadge, to report at Cleveland, Ohio, as an organiza-
tion, for the purpose of again recruiting its ranks.



852



Ohio in the War



On the 9th of April, 1864, the battery reported at Tullahoma, Tennessee, with an aggregate
of one hundred and fifty-one men and five commissioned officers, only three men being absent.

In the early part of May the battery started with General Sherman's forces on the Atlanta
campaign, and fought throughout that remarkable march. It also followed that General in his
" March to the Sea."

The battery was mustered out of the service at Cleveland, Ohio, on July 25, 1865.



10th OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



BOSTEB, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF BANK.



COM. ISSUED.



REMARKS.



Captain

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



H. Berlaco White

Francis Seaman

J. R. Grain

F. W. Bardwell

Ambrose A. Blount..
Edward Grossekoff....

Win. L. Newcomb

J. K. Drain

Joseph B. Gase

James E. Gillmoie....
Ambrose A. Blount...
Edward (irossekoff....

George Kltder

Lanson Zane

John K. Grain

Joseph B. Gage

James E. Gillmore....
Samuel A. Galbreath
Joseph C. Bontecou...



Jan.

May

Dec.

Jan.

March

April

Keb.

May

D'-c.

Jan.

March

Jan.

Dec.

May

Dec.

Feb.



March
May
Dec.
May

June
May



86,

9,
Dec. 14,

14,
March 14,

14,



June

May

March

May

Dec.

Feb.



Discharged March 4, 1864.
Discharged October 26, 1.S64.
Mustered out July 17, 18fio.
Resigned February 28, 1863.
Resigned April 4, 1862.
Resigned February 9, 1863.
Discharged April 5, 1864.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out July 17, I860.
Mustered out July 17, I860..
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned November 3, 1863.
Discharged April 5, 1864.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenaut.
Mustered out July 17, I860.
Mustered out July 17, 1863.



TENTH OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY.



THIS BATTERY was organized at Xenia on the 9th of January, 1862, and was mus-
tered into the service at Camp Dennison on the 3d of March. It was rapidly armed
and equipped, and was ordered to St. Louis, Missouri. On the 4th of April it moved
up the Tennessee River to Pittsburg Landing, where it arrived on the 9th. On the 13th it
received some twenty men from the Thirteenth Ohio Battery, whose officers had been discharged
because, in attempting to obey orders, they had lost their guns. The men were distributed
among several Ohio batteries, and were brave and faithful soldiers. The battery moved upon
Corinth with the army; but, during the siege, it was held in reserve and took no active part in
operations. From the 25th of June to the middle of September the battery remained at Corinth.
It then moved to Iuka, and remained at that post on garrison-duty. While there the supply
of forage ran short, and orders were given to procure it from the adjacent country. A portion
of the men, under command of Lieutenant Grossekoff, while in the performance of this duty,
were attacked by Roddy's Rebel cavalry at a point five miles below Iuka, and lost, by capture,
privates Wm. F. Nixon, Richard Sparrow, John W. Shoemaker, Abe Hulsizer, and William
Leslie. These men were taken to Southern prisons, and were afterward exchanged.






Tenth Ohio Independent Battery. 853

On October 1st the battery moved toward Corinth. On the 2d it passed through Corinth and
stopped for the night at a fort south-west of the town. On the morning of the 3d it was ordered
to take position near where the Chewalla Road crosses the Memphis Railroad. From this place
the battery was ordered into position just north of Corinth. About eleven o'clock on the morning
of the 4th the Rebel lines advanced. The battery opened with shell, and one piece was disabled
after the first fire by a shell getting fast half way down. Two shells were fired by each of the other
three pieces, and then canister (doubled) was used to the direct front. The ground was favorable
for canister-practice ; and at each fire gaps of twenty, thirty, and forty feet wide were cut in the
advancing columns. The battery stopped three columns of Rebels, and each piece was pouring
out from eighteen to twenty rounds of canister per minute, when the order was given to retire.
The Rebels had advanced on the right, and the battery was without the support of a single mus-
ket, right or left. The pintle-key of the third piece had to be tied in its place ; and the Cor-
poral, while tying it, discovered that the sponge-bucket was left. He called out: "Get the
bucket, Number Two." George S. Wright, a boy of eighteen, acting as Number One, ran back
toward the Rebels, picked up the bucket when they were not more than twenty-five yards from



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