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Killed September 19, 1863.

Mustered out with battery.

Promoted.

Mustered out with battery.

Declined prom. ; must d out with battery.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Resigned April 15, 1864.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Declined promotion.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Resigned June 13, 1865.

Mustered out with battery.

Mustered out with battery.

Mustered out with battery.

Died August 16, 1864.

Declined promotion.

Promoted.

Promoted.

Mustered out with battery.

Declined promotion.

Resigned June 4, 1865.

Mustered out July 1, 1865.

Commission returned ; out of service.

Mustered out with battery.

Promoted.

Mustered out with battery.

Mustered out with battery.

Mustered out with battery.

Mustered out July 4, 1865.

Mustered out with battery.

Mustered out with battery.

Mustered out with battery.

Resigned June 10, 1865.

Mustered out with battery.

Mustered out with battery.



FIRST OHIO LIGHT ARTILLERY.



UNDER the militia law of 1860 an organization was formed, called the First Regi-
ment of Light Artillery. It constituted a portion of the Third Brigade, Fourth Divis-
ion, of the Ohio Militia, and consisted of six companies, having one gun to each
company, 'and officered as follows : James Barnett, Colonel ; E. B. Sturgis, Lieutenant-Colonel ;
Gates, Major; Amos Townsend, Quartermaster; Randall Crawford Quartermaster's Ser-
geant. This organization was drilled and disciplined, and, at the breaking- out of the rebellion,
was in a condition, if necessary, to take the field.

In the winter of 1860, in view of the troubles then brewing, and momentarily expected to
culminate in over tacts against the Government, the officers and men of this organization adopted
a resolution tendering their services to the State authorities in the event a' difficulty. This
tender was accepted by Adjutant-General Carrington in complimentary terms, with the remark
that " he did not anticipate that their services would be required." The organization was kept
intact ; and, five days after the fall of Sumter, the following telegram was received :

"Coltjmbtts, April 20 1861.

" Colcmd James Bamett, Cleveland, Ohio :

"Report yonr six pieces, caissons, and full battery, including the Geneva company, at
Columbus forthwith— Monday, if possible. You can hire horses for the guns here or at your
point of service. Bring harness and everything else. Twenty men to each gun. You retain
Colonel's rank. By order. H. B. Carrington, Adjutant-General."



892 Ohio in the War.

In obedience to this order, the command reported at Columbus on Monday night, 22d of
April, and was immediately sent forward by cars to Marietta, where it went into camp, and the
guns were placed in position to cover the place from an anticipated attack from the opposite
shore of Virginia.

The command remained in Camp McClellan, at Marietta, until the 28th of May, when, by
order of General McClellan, two guns, with the requisite complement of men, under command
of Lieutenant-Colonel S. B. Sturgiss, were sent to Colonel Steedman, of the Fourteenth Ohio,
then stationed at Parkersburg, intended for duty on the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Bail-
road. The rest of the command, under Colonel Barnett, followed the next day to Benwood, and
thence to Grafton, where it reported to General T. A. Morris.

The two guns under Lieutenant-Colonel Sturgiss moved up the line of the Baltimore and
Ohio Railroad, and participated in the affair at Philippi. This was the first artillery fired by
the National forces in the War of the Rebellion. After having remained at Philippi about one
month the command was rejoined by the detachment under Lieutenant-Colonel Sturgiss, and
moved with General Morris's forces to Laurel Hill, and joined in the attack made on the Rebels
at that place. The flying Rebels were pursued and again encountered at Carrick's Ford, where
the Rebel commander, General Garnett, was killed and most of his war material captured.
This affair terminated the three-months' term of service. Moving back to Laurel Hill, the reg-
iment lay there until ordered to Columbus for muster-out. This occurred about the 26th of
July, 1861. Being only a State organization, it was necessary, in order that the command might
be paid by the United States authorities, that it should be mustered into and out of the United
States service on the same day.

Governor Dennison being anxious that Ohio should be represented in the field by a full
regiment of light batteries, under proper authority from the War Department, the regiment, with
its twelve light batteries, was mustered into the United States service for three years, dating
from the 3d of September, 1861, the date of Colonel Barnett's commission.

The command was organized by batteries at Camp Dennison, and, as each battery was
filled and equipped, it was sent to the field.



BATTERY A..

Battery A, under Captain C. S. Cotter, was mustered into the service on the 25th of Septem-
ber, 1861. It left immediately thereafter for Louisville, Kentucky, receiving its equipment while
on the march at Cincinnati. It was the first Ohio battery to report in that department. On
October 22d it left, under orders, for Camp Nevin, Kentucky, and reported to General A. M.
McCook. With McCook's command it moved to Green River ; thence to Louisville, Kentucky,
and by river to Nashville, Tennessee. From Nashville it marched to Pittsburg Landing, and
arrived on that field at the close of the action. It also participated in the advance on Corinth.
It then moved with McCook's division to Florence, Alabama, and thence to Battle Creek and
Jasper, Tennessee ; thence it marched to Decherd ; through Winchester to Tullahoma and Shel-
byville, and on to Nashville. After a short rest at Nashville it accompanied Buell's army to Lou-
isville, and through Kentucky.

While on the march to Louisville a detachment of the battery aided in the defense of Mun-
fordsville, and was captured with that garrison by the Rebel forces under General Bragg. It
moved out of Louisville with General J. W. Sill's division, and participated in the numerous
skirmishes and difficulties of that march up to Perryville, Kentucky. At Dog Walk a portion
of the battery was actively engaged. It did not reach Perryville until October 11th, three days
after the battle. It moved with the main army through Danville to Crab Orchard, where the
retrograde march was commenced; thence through Lebanon to Bell's Tavern, Kentucky, and
reached Bowling Green on the 31st of October, and Nashville November 7th.

Under the new commander of the Army of the Cumberland, General W. S. Rosecrans, the



First Ohio Light Artillery. 893

battery moved in McCook's division on Murfreesboro', Tennessee, and operated with that com-
mand on the right of the army. When the disaster occurred on the right at Stone River, it
stubbornly contested the ground with two of its guns saved from capture. The officers and men
fired these guns at every rallying point of the whole space over which McCook's forces passed to
the Nashville Turnpike, where, with Simonson's Indiana Battery, they were placed in position,
and performed effective service throughout the remainder of the battle, and until the last gun
was disabled by a shot from the enemy. After this the officers and men aided in working other
batteries on the field. After taking possession of Murfreesboro' the battery was reorganized and
equipped, and formed, with Simonson's Indiana Battery and the Twentieth Ohio Battery, into
an artillery brigade, for duty in the Second Division of the Army of the Cumberland. It par-
ticipated in the movement on Tullahoma, and at Liberty and Hoover's Gap, and accompanied
McCook over Sand Mountain. It took part in the battle of Chickamauga, and did some of its
best fighting on that eventful day. When nearly surrounded by the enemy, by a change of front
its guns were extricated, but not without the loss of seventeen men killed and wounded. Major
Goodspeed commanded the battery in that battle. It entered Chattanooga with the army, and
aided in the defense of that place. On October 18th the battery moved to Sale Creek and
reported to General Speer, commanding at that point. On the march through East Tennessee to
Strawberry Plains it was almost constantly engaged with the enemy's cavalry up to the 30th of
January, 1864. At this date it re-enlisted, and returned to Ohio on thirty days' veteran furlough.

It was re-mustered at Cincinnati in February, 1864, and returned to Nashville. After a
month's drilling it went to Catoosa Springs and joined the Second Division of the Fourth Army
Corps. It thereafter participated in the whole of the Atlanta campaign. From Atlanta it came
back to Chattanooga, and thence to Pulaski and Columbia, at which points it was engaged with
the Rebels under General Hood. It arrived at Nashville just after the decisive battle before
that city, and had the pleasure of drawing the captured Rebel artillery from off that well-con-
tested field. Thence it marched to Gallatin. Tennessee, and was thereafter taken with Stanley's
division to New Orleans, whence it was sent home and mustered out of the service.

During its service Battery A marched in the States of Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi,
Alabama, and Georgia, four thousand five hundred miles, and was transported by Government
fifteen hundred miles, making a total of six thousand miles traveled. It was in thirty-six skir-
mishes and nine heavy battles. It hurled from the cannon's mouth thirty tons of ammunition
at the Rebels, twenty-five tons of which were fired in the Georgia campaign of 1864, under Gen-
eral Sherman.



BATTERY B.

Was organized at Camp Dennison, and mustered into the service October 8, 1861, with an aggre-
gate strength of one hundred and forty-seven men. By order of General O. M. Mitchel it left
Cincinnati to report to General George H. Thomas, then in command at Camp Dick Robinson,
Kentucky. The first experience it had in the field was a brisk little affair at Camp Wild Cat.
in which it fired twelve rounds and silenced one of the enemy's guns. From Wild Cat it marched
to London, Kentucky, where it remained quietly in camp for two weeks. It then returned in
the direction of Wild Cat, and did not halt until Lebanon was reached. Resting a day or two,
it moved to Danville.

On November 5th the battery, under orders, joined the Seventeenth Ohio at Fishing Creek,
and was engaged during the whole of that month in skirmishes and scouting-duty, with head-
quarters at Somerset. It remained at Fishing Creek until January 17th, when it moved with
General Schcepf's brigade to re-enforce General Thomas at Mill Springs. It took part in the
battle of that name (or Logan's Cross-Roads, as General Thomas calls it), and performed very
effective service. After the fight was ended the battery returned to Somerset, and remained
there until the 10th of February, when it took up the line of march for Louisville, Kentucky.
It embarked at that point on transports for Nashville, arriving there on the 4th of March, 1862,



894 Ohio in the War.

and went into camp with General George H. Thomas's division. On March 16th it was assigned
to the Artillery Keserve, Colonel Barnett commanding, and on the 29th ordered to move with
the Seventh Brigade of BuelPs army. From this date until the 10th of July the battery was
engaged by sections in expeditions through Middle Tennessee, being severally under command
of Captain Standart, Lieutenants Sypher, Bennett, and Sturgiss. Its principal duty was look-
ing after the Rebel cavalry, which then infested that place in large numbers.

On July 18, 1862, it reported to Major-General Nelson at Murfreesboro', and, during the
months of July, August, and September, was almost constantly on the march through portions
of Eastern and Middle Tennessee, and was frequently engaged in skirmishes with the enemy.

On the morning of September 3d the battery left McMinnville, Tennessee, on the march
northward with General Buell's army, halting at Louisville, September 26th. On October 2d it
moved out of Louisville with the army, arriving at Bardstown on the 5th. At the battle of
Perryville the battery had a position on the right wing of the army, but was not engaged.

From the 10th of October up to the 26th of November it was engaged in marching and
counter -marching through Southern Kentucky. On the 26th it reported at Nashville to General
Crittenden, of the Fourth Division, Twenty-First Corps. On December 26th the battery moved,
with its brigade and division, toward Murfreesboro', skirmishing heavily with the enemy in and
about Lavergne. In the battle of Stone River it was stationed on the left of General Negley's
division, being the left division of the right wing. It was involved in the disaster on the right,
but succeeded in withdrawing all its guns from the field. It bore its part in the battle throughout,
and lost seventeen men killed, wounded, and missing, and twenty-one horses killed. Those
killed were Sergeants Thomas J. Thompson and George Wolf, and privates Chauncey Lyon,
Samuel Rumple, and John Elliott.

On January 7, 1863, the battery took position eight miles from Murfreesboro', on Cripple
Creek, on outpost duty, with General Cruft's brigade. It remained here up to the 24th of June,
and then joined in the advance of the National forces on Tullahoma, marching with the left, in
General Crittenden's corps. Nothing of moment occurred on this march. The battery reached
the vicinity of Chattanooga on the 8th of September, and crossing the Tennessee River at Shell
Mound, moved out to Lafayette and Ringgold. On September 18th it went into camp near Lee &
Gordon's Mills. The battle of Chickamauga began the next morning, and the battery was
engaged, with Palmer's division, on the left. On the second day of the battle it was charged by
a large body of the enemy, but succeeded at first in beating them off. A second charge over-
whelmed the battery, and it was compelled to leave two of its guns in the hands of the enemy.
In this charge several members of the battery were wounded and captured.

It was now cooped up with the rest of the army in Chattanooga, and it suffered with them
all the privations of that siege. On October 19th it went into quarters at Black Oak Ridge, just
across the Tennessee River, and remained there until the battle of Chattanooga. It was then
sent to Nashville, arriving there December 6th, and, with five other batteries, went into camp
near that city, all under the personal command of Colonel Barnett. The command was desig-
nated as the First Division of Reserve Artillery. While in this camp Lieutenant Baldwin was
commissioned Captain of the battery.

On January 4, 1864, sixty-five of the original members of the battery had re-enlisted as vet-
erans, and by February 4th were on their way home to enjoy the thirty days' furlough. At
nine o'clock on the morning of February 6th these veterans reached Cleveland, having been in
the service nearly two and a half years.

The battery returned to Nashville in March, and on the 16th of that month reported, by
order of General George H. Thomas, at Bridgeport, Alabama, where it remained until July, 1866.
It was then sent home to Columbus, and there mustered out, being one of the last organizations
to leave the service.



Fiest Ohio Light Aktillery. 895



TSA-TTEHY C.

This battery was organized and mustered into the United States service on the 9th of
September, 1861, at Camp Dennison. On October 1st it left that camp under orders to report
to General George H. Thomas, commanding at Camp Dick Bobinson, Kentucky. It there
joined an expedition, consisting of about ten thousand men under General Albin Schcepf,
for the purpose of relieving East Tennessee. This expedition resulted in the battle of Mill
Springs, and the defeat of the Eebel General Zollicoffer. Battery C here did some effective
firing. One of its discharges — a James projectile — burst over a column of Eebels, killing seven
and wounding thirteen men. The army now concentrated at Nashville, under General Buell.

In March, 1862, the Army of the Ohio was reorganized, and Battery C was retained in the
First Division, under General Thomas. In the movement to Pittsburg Landing across Tennessee,
the battery formed a part of the rear-guard, and therefore did net reach the field in time to take
part in that battle.

In the advance of the army on Corinth the battery was almost incessantly engaged, perform-
ing some of the most arduous duty of its campaigns. On the evacuation of Corinth it joined in
the pursuit of the Eebel army to Boonville, Mississippi, and thereafter returned to Corinth.

From Corinth it marched, under command of Captain Southwick, to Tuscumbia and "Win-
chester, and thence to Nashville, and Louisville, Kentucky, forming a part of the reor-guard of
General Buell's army, then on its way to intercept Bragg's Eebel army in its invasion of Ken-
tucky. While lying at Louisville the Army of the Ohio was again reorganized, and the battery
moved with the Twelfth Corps, under General Gilbert. It was not engaged at Perryville, being
held in reserve near General Buell's head-quarters. It followed in the pursuit of the Eebel army
to Crab Orchard, and then marched back to Bowling Green, where the army was again reorganized
under General Eosecrans.

On October 30, 1862, the battery was placed in the Fourteenth Army Corps, under General
Thomas, and sent to Gallatin, Tennessee. It remained at this place until December 25th, when
it accompanied Colonel Carlin's brigade in an expedition through Kentucky to intercept John
Morgan's forces in a raid on the Louisville and Nashville Eailroad. At Rolling Fork, in an
engagement, on the 31st of December, with Morgan's men, it lost lieutenant Henry W. Paulus,
mortally wounded. From Rolling Fork it was sent to Lavergne, near Nashville, where it
remained until the advance of the army on the Tullahoma campaign. It reached "Winchester
about the middle of July, and on the 19th and 20th of September took part in the battle of Chick -
amauga. The battery was at this time under the command of Captain M. B. Gary. It fought
under the immediate eye of General George H. Thomas, and received a verbal compliment from
that officer on the field of battle. It lost thirteen men, thirty horses, and one gun dismounted.
It fell back with the array into Chattanooga, and was thereafter engaged in the battle of Mission
Ridge. At the close of this campaign it re-enlisted, and returned to Ohio on veteran furlough.

On March 1, 18C4, the battery returned to the field at Chattanooga, and was assigned to the
Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps. On May 2d it started with the army on the Atlanta
campaign, and was engaged in the battles of Resaca, Cassville, New Hope Church, Peachiree
Creek, and siege of Atlanta, during all of this time under command of Lieutenant J. B. Stevens.
In this campaign the battery lost twenty men killed and wounded. On the loth of November it
started with Sherman's army on the Savannah campaign, and encamped in the city of Savannah
December 22, 1864. On this march Lieutenant Stevens was in command of the battery, Captain
Gary having been placed in command of the artillery of the Third Division. On January 28th
it started on the campaign through the Carolinas, and was engaged at Averyville and Benlonville.
In the last-named affair it lost Corporal Daniel Reed, a most excellent soldier.

This closed the active service of the battery. It then marched up through Eichmond to
Washington City, and formed a part of the grand review. On June 15, 1865, it was mustered out
of the service at Cleveland, Ohio.



896 Ohio in the Wae.



BATTEBY I>.

Battery D was mustered into the United States service at Camp Dennison in Septem»
ber, 1861. The organization consisted of one hundred and fifty men. It left Camp Den-
nison on the 1st of November, and on the 10th reported to Brigadier-General William Nelson,
at Mount Sterling, Kentucky. It marched with General Nelson's command up the Big Sandy
Kiver to Piketon, Kentucky, reaching that place on the 10th of November. On its march, at
Ivy Mountain, the battery had a brisk skirmish with the enemy, and lost one man killed.

With the army, the battery returned from Piketon by steamers to Louisa, Kentucky, and
thence to Louisville, arriving at the last-named place November 25, 1861. Three days thereafter
it left Louisville, and on the 29th of November reported to Major-General A. M. McCook, at
Camp Wood, Munfordsville, Kentucky.

On February 13, 1862, the battery reported, under orders, to General Nelson, at Elizabeth-
town, Kentucky, but soon returned to Camp Wood, whence it moved with McCook to Nashville.
From Nashville it moved with the Fourth Division to Pittsburg Landing; thence to Corinth,
Mississippi, and on the 30th of June it was at Athens, Alabama.

On July 30th the battery moved from Columbia, Tennessee, with General Nelson's command,
and was at Lebannon, Kentucky, on the 31st of August, 1862. In September, 1862, at Munfords-
ville, the battery was so unfortunate as to be overwhelmed by the enemy, and its entire force and
material were captured. On this occasion the men were paroled, and sent home to Ohio, where
they remained, at Camp Chase, until exchanged in January, 1863.

The battery was reorganized and re-equipped at Columbus, Ohio, in the latter part of Jan-
uary, 1863, and joined the Third Brigade, Fourth Division, Twenty-Third Army Corps, at Lex-
ington, Kentucky, in March. On April 4th it left Lexington, and on the 18th of the same month
went into camp at Mount Vernon, Kentucky.

On June 14, 1863, Lieutenant Lloyd, with thirty-four men, thirty-one horses, and two guns,
accompanied Colonel Saunders, Chief of Cavalry of the Twenty-Third Army Corps, on a raid
into East Tennessee. It returned June 26th, having lost both guns, and one man murdered by
guerrillas. This raid was carried entirely through East Tennessee, and was for the most part
successful. Important bridges, were burned, a large amount of ordnance and commissary-stores
destroyed, and the enemy damaged in various other ways.

In July the battery marched with General Burnside's army to Cumberland Gap, and took
part in the capture of that Rebel stronghold. In August and September it was engaged in raid-
ing through Kentucky and Tennessee with Colonel Frank Woolford's cavalry. On December 2,
1863, it lost seven men by capture, six of whom died at Andersonville. It was engaged through-
out the entire siege of Knoxville. Immediately after the siege was raised the battery re-enlisted,
and the men were sent to Ohio on thirty days' veteran furlough.

The ranks of the battery were filled at Cleveland, and it returned to Knoxville, Tennessee,
early in 1864. When the march on Atlanta commenced it moved with Sherman's forces, and
was in all the engagements of that arduous and eventful campaign. It operated with the
Twenty-Third Army Corps.

The battery was engaged in the battles of Franklin and Nashville, and after the army of
Hood was driven across the Tennessee River it returned to Nashville, and was sent with the
Twenty-Third Army Corps to Wilmington, North Carolina. It was finally mustered out of
service at Cleveland, July 15, 1865.



First Ohio Light Artillery. 897



BATTERY 3E.

This battery was mustered into the service at Camp Dennison, August 23, 1861, and in
December following it joined, at Bacon Creek, Kentucky, the old Third Division, then in com-
mand of General O. M. Mitchel. It was engaged in nearly all the exploits of that officer
through Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama.

The battery returned with Buell to Louisville, September, 1862, when it was assigned to
General Sill's division. It frequently skirmished with the enemy while following Brao-o-' s
retreating army, as far as Crab Orchard, Kentucky. Thence it marched with the army to Nash-
ville, Tennessee. On November 16, 1862, it had a severe artillery duel with Captain Morgan's
First Louisiana Battery at Lavergne, and drove the enemy from their works. On December 26,
1862, it marched with McCook's right wing to Nolinsville, and the next day assisted in driving
Hardee's Rebel corps beyond Triune. It silenced Robison's Texas Battery, on the left wing of
Bragg's army, and repulsed repeated charges of infantry and cavalry at Stone River on the 30th.

On the morning of December 13, 1862, the battery was overwhelmed, in an exposed position,
on the extreme right of McCook's wing, and, after a brief though stubborn resistance, was cap-
tured. It had three men killed, twenty wounded, and twenty-five taken prisoners. Among the



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 154 of 165)