Copyright
Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

. (page 156 of 165)
Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 156 of 165)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


nooga it was engaged in the night fight at Wauhatchie Valley, in which the Rebels were badly
defeated. It was also engaged at Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge.

The battery was then moved to Bridgeport and Stevenson, Alabama. It remained at the
last-named place until the 3d of July, 1865, when it was ordered to Camp Lennison, Ohio, and
there mustered out of service July 17, 1865.



BATTERY JL..

Battery L, First Ohio Light Artillery, was recruited at Portsmouth, Ohio, in October, 1861,
by L. N. Robinson. It reported at Camp Dennison November 7th, and remained in camp, per-
fecting its drill, until January 20, 1862, when it joined General Lander's command, at Patter-
son's Creek, West Virginia, arriving at that point January 27th. It marched with Lander to
Paw-Paw Tunnel, but did not take part in the Bloomery Gap fight, which occurred shortly
afterward.

On March 1st the battery and command started for Winchester, Virginia, but the death of
General Lander compelled a return. On March 7th another move was made toward Winchester,
by way of Martinsburg, General James Shields in command. On March 20th the battery had a
brisk skirmish with Ashby's cavalry, and again returned to Winchester. On the 22d it had
another skirmish with Ashby's cavalry, and drove it back.

On March 23d the battle of Winchester was fought. The battery was in several positions
during the day, the last one being on the right wing, which the Rebels attempted to turn, but
failing, took shelter behind a stone wall. A few solid shot from Battery L, and a simultaneous
charge of infantry, closed the battle. The battery lost one man killed and several wounded.

The Rebels were pushed up the valley to Harrisonburg, after which the battery crossed the
Massanutten Mountains and the Blue Ridge, and joined General McDowell at Fredericksburg,
May 21, 1862. It was ordered back, however, to intercept Stonewall Jackson on his return from
his raid against General Banks. In performance of this duty the battery crossed the Bull Run
Mountains and the Blue Ridge, and on May 31st was engaged at Front Royal, one section, under
Lieutenant Dorries, firing repeated rounds at the enemy. One man was wounded.

On the 1st of June the battery marched up the south branch of the Shenandoah, and on the
8th arrived at Port Republic. Captain Robinson, with one section of the battery, dashed into
the town with Colonel Carroll's cavalry. This opened the battle of Port Republic. The army
of Stonewall Jackson at once attacked, and after a sharp fight the National forces were compelled
to retire. One piece of artillery was lost by Battery L. This piece, under command of Sergeant
James Gildea, was stationed in front of the covered bridge, double-shotted with canister. When
the bridge was filled with Rebels, making their way across, Sergeant Gildea pulled the lanyard,
spiked the piece, and was severely wounded in escaping.

On June 9th the battery became hotly engaged, and repulsed several stubborn charges, in



904 Ohio in the Wak.

which the gallantry of Sergeant P. Houser and Corporal Sam. Cochran were conspicuous. On
June 8th and 9th the battery lost two men killed and several wounded. Lieutenant C. H. Rob-
inson and six men were taken prisoners. Thirty horses were killed, and three pieces of artillery
left on the field.

The battery fell back through Luray and Front Royal to Alexandria, Virginia, where it
went into camp to recruit and refit. Captain Robinson went to Ohio on the recruiting-service.

On August 29th Battery L was again ordered to the front, and on that day took part in the
battle of Chantilly. It marched with General McClellan's forces on the Antietam campaign, and
at Shepherdstown, September 19th, became engaged with the enemy. The battery went into
camp near Sharpsburg, Maryland, and remained there until November. Captain Robinson went
home on sick leave, and was mustered out of the service November 12, 1S62.

On November 1st the battery moved with the Army of the Potomac, being attached to the
Second Division of the Fifth Corps. It passed with the army into Virginia, and went into win-
ter-quarters near Stoneman's Switch, on the railroad between Aquia Creek and Fredericksburg.

On December 13th the battery crossed the Rappahannock into the city of Fredericksburg,
and remained in its streets under fire until the morning of the lGth, when it recrossed the river.
It took part in another advance on Fredericksburg February 21st, but was mud-bound, and
returned to its old camp.

On April 30, 1863, the battery entered on the Chancellorsville campaign, crossing the Rappa-
hannock at United States Ford. It became actively engaged on the morning of the 3d of May,
at Chancellorsville, and at intervals during the day losing Lieutenant Dorries and one man killed,
and a number of men wounded. One caisson was badly disabled, and several horses were killed.
On the 4th and 5th of May the battery had another engagement with the enemy in recrossing
the Rappahannock.

On June 1st the battery moved to Banks's Ford, on picket-duty, and on the 13th of June
started with the Fifth Corps on the Gettysburg campaign, passing through Manassas Junction,
and crossing the Potomac at Edwards's Ferry, and thence through Maryland to the battle-field
of Gettysburg, where it arrived on July 2d, at eight o'clock A. M. The battery was assigned
position on the extreme right of the line, under a sharp skirmish-fire. About four o'clock P. M.
it moved and parked on the Baltimore Turnpike. Afterward it followed the Second Division of
the Fifth Corps, on the trot, taking position on the right hand slope and foot of " Little Round
Top," where it became warmly engaged with Longstreet's corps, which was making desperate
efforts to turn the left. So close was the work that the guns were double-shotted with canister, and
worked so rapidly that the men could not lay hands upon them. The battery became the nucleus
around which the hotly-pressed division rallied and forced the enemy back to his lines. The
battery remained in the same position during the 3d instant. It lost several men wounded, but
none killed. The infantry in line near the battery lost quite a number killed and wounded.

It crossed the Potomac with the Fifth Corps into Virginia, going into camp at Beverly Ford,
on the Rappahannock. Thence it marched to Culpepper C. H., and on the 12th of October
entered with the army on the celebrated race for Manassas Junction between Generals Meade and
Lee, and just missed the fight at Bristoe Station. It thereafter followed the fortunes of the
army, and took part in the battle at Rappahannock Ford.

On November 27th the battery crossed the Rapidan at Gold Mine Ford, and the next day
became warmly engaged on the Orange C. H. Plank Road, where it lost one man and several
horses killed, and a number of men wounded. The battery recrossed the river with the army,
and went into winter-quarters at Warrenton Junction. On December 22d five men of the battery
were captured by guerrillas.

On January 1, 1864, thirty-five men of the battery re-enlisted as veterans. During the latter
part of April it went to Camp Barry, Washington City, to recruit and refit. Thence it went into
the fortifications of "Washington, occupying Forts Phil. Kearney and Sumner.

After the fight at Fort Stephens on July 11, 1864, the battery was attached to Dwight's
division, Nineteenth Army Corps, marched with it into Maryland Virginia, and participated in



First Ohio Light Artillery. 905

the Snicker's Ferry fight. Returning to Washington, it marched with its division in pursuit of
Early's Rebel forces, and went into camp at Harper's Ferry.

On September 15th the battery reported to General Sheridan at Summit Point, Virginia, and
moved with his army up the Valley, taking part in the battles of Winchester and Fisher's Hill.
The whole army went into camp beyond Harrisonburg for a few days, and then returned down
the Valley to Cedar Creek, where the battery occupied the right of General Crook's command.
During this march three members of the battery were captured by the enemy.

In the battle of Cedar Creek, October 19th, the battery opened fire at daylight on the sud-
denly-appearing enemy. This lasted but a short time, and the left having been turned and some
of its artillery captured, it became involved in the common and hasty retreat. General Sheridan
appeared upon the field, and the lines were re-established. The battery had twelve different posi-
tions during the day, and behaved handsomely, having fired the first and last artillery shot in
the battle. It covered the retreat and led in the advance. One man was killed and twelve were
wounded, some very severely by shell.

The battery remained in Camp Russell, near Winchester, Virginia, until the latter part of
December. Thence it went to Harper's Ferry and took rail to New Creek, West Virginia, reach-
ing that point on January 4, 1865. It remained at New Creek in winter-cpiarters until June 30,
1865, when it was taken to Columbus, and there mustered out July 4, 1865.

Battery L was in service three years and eight months, and during that time traveled three
thousand five hundred miles. It lost, in killed, one officer and six men, had fifty men wounded,
and one officer and fourteen men were taken prisoners. It also had one hundred horses killed in
service, having, during its campaigns, had charge of four different batteries. It took part in the
battles of Winchester, March 23, 1S62 ; Port Republic, Chantilly, Antietam, Fredericksburg,
Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Fort Stephens, Winchester, September 19, 1864 ; Fish-
er's Hill, and Cedar Creek.



BATTERY M.

Was recruited in the counties of Auglaize, Shelby, and Miami, and organized at Camp Dennison
in September, 1861. It was mustered into the United States service by Captain P. H. Breslin,
United States army, December 3, 1861. In January, 1862, in company with Battery F, it pro-
ceeded to Louisville, Kentucky, and reported to Major-General Buell, who was at that time
organizing the Army of the Ohio.

The battery was ordered to join the main army at Bowling Green. It moved with the army
to Nashville, and was there attached to the Artillery Reserve, Colonel Barnett commanding,
with which it operated during the march to and the battle of Pittsburg Landing. It also took
an active part in all the movements before Corinth, and, after the evacuation of that place by
the Rebels, moved to Huntsville and Stevenson, Alabama.

In August, 1862, it returned to Nashville, and remained there as part of its garrison during
Buell's march to Louisville and through Kentucky, and until the return of the army to Nash-
ville under Rosecrans.

Battery M was then assigned to General Negley's division, of the Fourteenth Corps, and
with that division took part in all the skirmishes preceding the battle of Stone River. It greatly
distinguished itself in that engagement.

When Rosecrans's army moved from Murfreesboro' toward Tullahoma and Chattanooga,
Battery M accompanied it, and took part in all the skirmishes of that march. It also fought
through the battle of Chickamauga and the subsequent victory of Mission Ridge.

At this time the battery was ordered to turn over its guns and horses, and, with the remain-
der of the First Ohio Light Artillery, was taken to Nashville and organized into an Artillery
Reserve, under the command of Colonel James Barnett. While in Nashville it was recruited



906 Ohio its the War.

up to its maximum, and newly equipped with guns and horses. It was shortly thereafter again
ordered to the field, and on the 25th of June, 1864, it joined the main army at Kenesaw, Georgia.

On July 22d the battery joined General George H. Thomas's Fourth Army Corps at Peach-
tree Creek, having marched overland from Nashville. It was assigned to the command of Major-
General D. S. Stanley, and was immediately placed in the trenches before Atlanta, where it
remained until the flanking movement against Jonesboro'. From that time to the battle of
Jonesboro' the battery was attached to the First Division of the Fourth Army Corps, and
took part in all its marches and skirmishes. Pushing on with the army from Jonesboro' to
Lovejoy's, the battery took part in the hot work at the last-named place.

A few days thereafter the whole army wa.s ordered back to Atlanta, and while there battery
M was relieved from duty and ordered to Chattanooga. Here it was mustered out in October,
1864. Immediately thereafter it was sent home, paid, and discharged.



It will be observed that each battery has a separate and distinct history, notwithstanding
they were component parts of the First Ohio Light Artillery. So scattered, indeed, was this
organization that its commanding officer, Colonel James Barnett, of Cleveland, seldom had a
sufficient number of its companies together to constitute a respectable command. The different
butteries were, therefore, compelled to rely on their company officers for orders, and to those
officers belongs mainly the credit of whatever merit they displayed.

On two occasions during the war the regiment was consolidated (or at least nearl}' so), and
placed, with other organizations, in an Artillery Reserve, the combined force under the com-
mand of Colonel Barnett. This officer proved himself fully competent for the position, and,
whether in command of the Artillery Reserve, or acting as chief artillery officer of head-quarters
staff, gave full and complete satisfaction.

The amount of effective service performed by the respective batteries of the First Ohio
Light Artillery was very great. They were constantly on duty, and were ever to be found in
the most dangerous and critical positions






First Ohio Heavy Artillery.



907



1st REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER HEAVY ARTILLERY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OE RANK. 1 COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Ass't Surgeon

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Chaplain

Do

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
■ Do.

Do.



CHATJNCEYG. IIAWLET

ClIAUNOEY G. HAWLEY

FokdycE Bt. Keith

Fordyce M. Keith

Wm. G. Dickson

Robert W. Caldwell

Timothy S. Matthews

Henry L. Barnes

John L. Fiiiestone

C M. Finch

Wm. C. Paine

Stkicklano Albright

Silas E. Sheldon

W. T. Evans

E. G. Hard

A. B. Lai'fekty

Henry C. Beard

George A. E. Carey

Tunis T. Kendricks

Jacod Delay

Robert W. Caldwell

Wm. C. Hayes

Leonidas C. Heaton

Henry L. Barnes

James A. Murphy

Amos B. Cole

James Gatewood

Wm. J. Evans

Alex. Lewis

Wm. Pease

Wm. Carroll

Joshua S. Preble

Henry J. Bly

Samuel Bevens

John C. Morgan

Benj. F. Holman

James C. Cadot

Wm. Carroll

Samuel Bevens

Benj. F. Holman

John C. Morgan

Alex. E. McMilliu

Jacob M. Tener

Francis Walter

James C. Cadot

George Dickersou

Samuel Saylor

I imothy S. Matthews

Washington 0. Appier

Joseph S. Jeffries

Elisha Fitzwilliams

George L. Hayes

Hugh S. Fullerton

S. S. Forrester

James K. Oldson

John Q. Shumwav

Wm. S. Martin

Calvin C. Blingus

Wm. II. Wallace

Bolivar Webber

Ebenezer Wilson

James H. Aiusley

Nelson E. Prentiss

John S. Armstrong

George H. Kitehey

Dan. W. Firestone

J. W. Wallace

Samuel B. Violet

Joseph Rule

Thomas M. James

John Foreman

Philander s. Abbott

Lewis Farris

Clinton D. Evans

Joseph S. Jeffries

Peter B. Hayes

George L. Hayes

J. W. Wallace

James B. Oldson

Samuel B. Violet

Wm. S. Martin

Samuel Drummoud

David Foster

Nesbit Coinley

John S. Armstrong



1, 1863 Sept.



July
Aug.

April
Sept.

Dec.

May

July

Aug.

Nov.

Jan.

Feb.

Aug.

March

July

Aug.



1862

l, 1863

30,
3,



Oct.

July

May

Aug.

May

July

Nov.

Dec.

April

Ian.

July

Aug.



1864
1865
1862



Oct.

I uly
May

Sept.

Aug.



Inly
I nne

Aug.



Sept.

Nov.
Dec.

April

luly



Nov.
Ian.
May
July

Aug.



July
Aug.

March



19,

30,

1,

24,

20,

16,

16,

1,

1,

10,

1,

1,

10,

10,

10,

24,



14,

9,
»,
13,
13,
13,
20,
20,
31,



Dec.
Sept.
Dec.

Sept.



April
Dec.



Feb.

May

July

Sept.

Nov.

.Tan.

Feb.

Sept.

March

Dec.



April
Jan.
Dec.



Sept.
Dec.

Sept.



April
July



Nov.
Jan.
May
Dec.



Sept.

April



1863 Mustered out with regiment.
1862 Promoted to Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment.
1862 Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
IS63 Mustered out with regiment.

Discharged January 29. 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

1864 Mustered out with regiment.

1862 Mustered out with regiment.

Declined.

Resigned August. 1.5, 1863.
Commission returned.
Declined; commission returned.
Resigned August 23, 1864.
Resigned January 9, 1865.
Mustered out with regiment.
Blustered out with regiment.

1863 Resigned April 7, 1S64.

1865 Mustered out with regiment.
ISO.' Promoted to Major.

Resigned December 1, 1863.
Resigned November 14, 1*3.
Promoted to Major.
Mustered out with regiment.
Kesigned December 19, 1864.
Mustered out with regiment.
Blustered out with regiment.



isr>4

1865



"



6, 186!



20,



mustered out wan regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out July 19, ISO").

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Blustered out with regiment.

Sick at muster out of regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain 1st U. S. Col'd Heavy Art.

Resigned December 14, 1S63.

Declined promotion; mustered out with reg't.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Major.

Declined promotion.

Mustered out. with regiment.

Ki-signed February 2"), 1S64.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned August 12, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

-Mustered out with regiment.

Blustered out with regiment.

Resigned January 17, 186.",.

Kesigned May 5, 1864.

Honorably discharged May 27, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out July 25, 1865.

Blustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Blustered out June 20, 1865.

Blustered out June 20, 1865.

Blustered out with regiment.

.Mustered out June 20, 1865.

Blustered out with regiment.

Blustered out June 20, 11965.

Blustered out with regiment.

Kesigned June 12, 1865.

Blustered out with regiment.

Blustered out with regiment.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Kesigned Btarch 2!, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Honorably discharged May 17, 1864.

Resig-ied November I'.'f. 1h;;>.

Discharged April 9, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



908



Ohio in the Wae.



2d Lieutenant
Do.
Do
Do
Do
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



DATE OF RANK



Lewis Farris Aug.

.Clinton D. Evans

.Samuel R. Russell I "

.lames W. Potts "

Thomas M. .lames June

Dan. YV. Firestone Aug.

Edmund W. S. Ncff July

Wm. H. Bonsall lug.

David C. Howard '

John Ilutseupillar

Joseph Rule June

Lot Davies Aug.

Hugh Shoop luly

David Delay \ug.

John Foreman I '

George H. Ritchey "

Philander S. Abbott I "

Benejah C. Miller "

Thomas W. Terry Nov.

Win. 0. Cole I "

Uri S. Keith I "

Isaac C. Wynn 'Dec.

Charles M. Stensou "

Noah S. Clark April

John Daacomb

Alexander Power

David Sum lily

Robert W. Hubbard

Hilburn 0. Miller

Augustas W. Ridgeway

James Martin

David J. Comley

James W. Tarleton

Wiu. llevens

James Q. Fish

Marshall Brambleth

Wallace E. Brattou

Win. Lawson

John N. Forster



July



Sept.

Not.



Jan.
May



10, 1



24,


"


in,
1,

In,


«


1,

1,

23,


;;










1*1




it,


"


9, L


*4


9,


14


9,


14


9,




13.


»


13,


14


13,


44


13,


14


26,


44


26,


4k



COM. ISSUED.



Sept.



Dec.

April
July-



Sept.
Nov.



2U, 1S65 Jan.
30,



I May



ifi,

lfi,

16,

Hi-
re,

16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,

In,
16,
U,
IB,
MS,
1G,
21,
21,
21,
HI,
21,

9. :

9,



13,
13,
13,
13,
13,
26,
26,

as,
ao, :

30,
31,
31,



Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out February 2n, 1364.
Mustered out July 19, 1865.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned May 13, 1865.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned November 23, 1S63.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned November 22, 1S64.
Died May 3, IS64.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned June s, 1865.
Mustered out June 20, 1865.
Mustered out June 20, 1865.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Must'ied out with regiment.
Declined promotion.
Mastered out June 20, 1S65.
Resigned June 24, 1.S65
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned October 2S, 1*64.

Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out June 20, 1865.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out June 20, 1*6.5.
Mustered out with regiment.



The history of this organization is included in the sketch of the One Hundred and Seven-
teenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, on pages 60S and 609 of this work. The 117th formed the nu-
cleus of the First Ohio Heavy Artillery.



Second Ohio Heavy Aktillery.



909



2d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER HEAVY ARTILLERY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



LI ATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel ....

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

•Surgeon

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Do

Captain

Do



Do
Do
Do
Do
Do,
Do
Do
Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

let Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do'.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



HORATIO G. GIBSON.,

Horatio G. Gibson

Martin B. Kwing ,

Martin B. Ewing

Lafayette Hammond ...

Wm. S. Irwin

Dan. W. Hoffman

Puii.ir Roth rock

Lemon S. Powell ,

Strickland Albright...
Frank E. Powers

B. A. Dwyer

E. V. Kk.ndig

John Morgan

John V. Spf.nce

John Q. Gibson

Wm. S. Irwin

George F. Sonner

Philip Roth rock

Horace G. Whiting

.lolm G. Durbeck

Wm. B. Bowland

Edward 8. Aleshire

Orris 0. King

John E. Herbert

Thomas A. Stevenson

Dan. W. Hoffman

Lemon S. Powell

Wm. H. H. Crowell

Stoweli S. Hazen

Harley N. Giffurd

Wm. F. Houston

S. S. Burke

Samuel Coleman

Richard Burns

James E. Dresbach

Alplifiis R. Rogers

James B. Donuy

Isaac J. Vance

Wm. H. Murphy

Alonzo J. Thompson

Walter S. Bradford

Samuel S. Burke

lacob M. Grim

Samuel Coleman

Isaac J. Vance

Wm. H. Eacott

Harley N. Gi fiord

David Cozad

Charles O. Baker

Thomas J. Cooper

Walter S. Bradford

James E. Hebard

John Q. Gibson

Walter B. King

Stephen D. Rockhill

Wm. H. Murphy

James E. Dresbach

.lames B. Doney

Alonzo J. Thompson

Stowel! S. Hazen

Richard Burns

Alpheus R. Rogers ,

Win. F. Houston ,

John F. Wisnewski

Samuel N. Castle

Thomas M. Sechler

Charles W. Dovle

Walter G. Harmon

Charles II. Newton

Ira Temple

Wm. T. Evans

Adrian A. Burrows

Harrison Wiley

Hiram 0. Holt

Emery Godden

Charles A. McManis

John D. Vandeman

James A. Hedges ,

Edward A. Davidson

Walter G. Marraon

Wm. R. Lawrence ,

Win. P. Chapman

Charles W. Doyle

Louis Baer ,



July
Aug.
Sept.

Aug.
Oct.
Aug.



Sept.
Nov.
Sept.
Dec.
July
Sept.
Aug.



isra

1864

18t :



Oct.



Aug.
Oct.



Sept.
Nov.

Oct.
Dec.

Oct.



1864
1863



1W

1864

1863



Sept.
June
July
Aug.
Oct.



14, 1864



12,



IS,

Feb. 10,
March IS,
April S,
May 31,

31,
June hi,

16.
July



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 156 of 165)