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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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and sought by every means in their power to induce them to remain true to the cause in which
they were enlisted.

Finally, an order from the War Department called colored men into the service of the United
States. Boards were convened lor the examination of officers, and promises were given that the
next Congress would provide for them by placing them on an equality with the other troops.

The organization was changed from the One Hundred and Twenty-Seventh Ohio to the Fifth
Regiment of United States Colored Troops, and G. W. Shurtleff, of Oberlin, was appointed Lieu-
tenant-Colonel. This gentleman, who had previously made a fine reputation as a gallant officer
in the Seventh Ohio, infused new life into the enterprise, and brought order out of chaos to such
degree that recruiting went on more rapidly.

Officers were appointed, and early in November the regiment, fully equipped, went to Vir-
ginia with nine companies and nearly the full complement of officers. A few days after its ar-
rival at Norfolk Colonel Conine, who had been commissioned by the President as commander
of the regiment, reported for duty. and assumed command.

In December, 1863, the regiment formed part of the command under General Wild in the
rapid raid made by that officer through the enemy's country to Elizabeth City, North Carolina.
While on this raid a detachment of four companies of the Fifth, while on the march, were
attacked by guerrillas in- ambush. Four men of the detachment were killed, and several
wounded by the first fire. Flankers were .promptly thrown out to uncover the enemy and ascer-
tain their strength, but, failing to dislodge or draw them from their position, Captain George B.
Cock, with his company, made a charge which scattered them into the adjacent swamps.

In January, 186-1, the regiment moved to Yorktown, where it remained until April. During
this time it twice marie rapid marches up the peninsula to the Chickahominy River, within a few
miles of Richmond. In February Coptain Speer joined the regiment with the tenth company.



One Hundred and Twenty-Seventh Ohio Infantry. 917

In May, 1864, the regiment accompanied the expedition planned by Major-General Butler
from Fortress Monroe against Richmond and Petersburg, forming a part of the colored division
of the Eighteenth Army Corps. The Fifth was the first regiment to gain the shore at City Point,
capturing the Rebel signal officers and the corps stationed there. Up to the loth of June the
greater part of the time of the regiment was employed in picketing and fortifying City Point
and Fort Converse, on the Appomattox River.

The loth of June, 1864, is memorable as the beginning of the siege of Petersburg, when the
colored division stormed the heights, and captured two strong earthworks, with several pieces of
artillery. General "Baldy" Smith, who commanded the Eighteenth Corps, watched the colored
division with great anxiety, and when he saw them carry the works with the bayonet, he exclaimed :
" That is equal to Lookout Mountain. No troops ever did better fighting !"

In this action the regiment lost a number of men and one officer killed. Among the wounded
was Colonel Conine, who shortly afterward was sent to hospital at Annapolis, and while there
tendered his resignation.

From the date of this action up to the 15th of August the regiment was constantly on duty
in the trenches, building forts, or on the skirmish-line, during which time it lost many men and
several valuable officers. In the latter part of August the Third Division of the Eighteenth
Corps (colored troops), under General Paine, was withdrawn from the front of Petersburg, and
transferred to the north side of the James River, at Deep Bottom. "While in camp at this place
the Fifth received three hundred and seventy-five recruits from Ohio, making, all told, one hun-
dred and eleven men to each company. Many of the men, however, were on detached service,
and in hospitals, sick and wounded. On September 29, 1864, occurred the battle of Chapin's
Farm, the storming of New Market Heights, and the capture of Fort Harrison. At daylight the
colored troops moved from their camps at Deep Bottom, drove in the Rebel pickets, and assaulted
their works at New Market. The first onset was made by the Fourth and Sixth Regiments
United States Colored Troops, and was repulsed with severe loss. The Fifth, Thirty-Sixth, and
Thirty-Eighth regiments then charged, in the face of a deadly fire of musketry, across a stream
densely fringed with thick underbrush, over thorny abattis, and carried the works like a storm.
In this assault forty-five men dead, and many wounded, were left upon the field. Colonel Shurt-
leff and three, of the Captain's of the Fifth were wounded. In the afternoon of the same day the
Fifth, along with a brigade of white troops, assaulted Fort Gilmer. The white troops faltered,
wavered, and finally withdrew in confusion, while the Fifth Colored, unsupported and alone,
pressed on close up to the fort, and two or three of the men had actually scaled the walls, when
Major Terry received an order to withdraw the regiment, which was effected in good order. A
few men and one Lieutenant were left on the field, and fell into the hands of the enemy. In
this day's fighting the regiment lost nine officers wounded, one of whom (Captain Wilbur) died ;
and out of five hundred and fifty men in rank who went into the fight, eighty-five were killed
and two hundred and forty-eight wounded, the loss thus amounting to over fifty per cent. The
bare mention of the fact constitutes an encomium as high as any troops may hope to win. Ser-
geants Beatty, Holland, Pimm, and Brunson, of the Fifth, were awarded medals, both by Con-
gress and by General Butler, for gallantry in this action.

General Paine's division of colored troops (in which the Fifth was included) accompanied
General Terry's expedition against Fort Fisher and Wilmington. At the capture of Fort Fisher
the colored troops rendered good service by keeping at bay the Rebel General Hoke's division,
which was attempting to re-enforce the garrison. They also took an active part in the assault on
Sugar Loaf and Fort Anderson, and marched with Terry's command to Raleigh, North Carolina.

After the surrender of the Rebel armies the Fifth was stationed awhile at Goldsboro'.
Thence it went to Newbern and to Carolina City. In the latter part of September it returned to
Columbus, where, after as honorable service as any of the regiments, it was discharged, October
5, 1865.



918



Ohio in the War.



4th REGIMENT VIRGINIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTEB, THREE YEAR'S SERVICE.



DATE OF COM.



REMARKS.



Colonel

Do

Lt. Colonel

Do

Major

Do

Adjutant

Do

Quartermaster

Surgeon

Do

Assistant .Surgeon
Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do

Do

Do

Do

2d Lieutenant

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do

Do



J. J. LIGHTBURN...
.(AMES H. DAYTON

W. 11. H. Russell

.John L. Vance

John T. Hall

Henry Graham

P. B. Stanuf.ry

Alpheus Beall

J. V. Steven's

G". K. ACKLEY

John R. 1'hilsox

John R. Philson

H. C. Waterman

WoODHLLL

J. 8. Weltou

John L. Vance

T. J. Smith

Arza Goodspoed ,

Wm. E. Brown

George W. Story

Henry Graham

P. H. Brunker

A. Vance

James 11. Dayton

M. V. Llghtburn

B. W. Curtis

B. J. Rawlins

John L. Mallanoe

D. A. Russell

W. S. Hall

Wm. H. Graham

B. D. Boawell

0. A. Shepard

John Mansell

D. A. Smith

Wm. Bailey

B. J. Rawlins

John L. Mallanee

E. 0. Carson

Wm. S. Hall

JohnDeLill

H. F. Donnally

C. A. Sliepard

J. .Mans. 11

John Say re

Wm. H. II. Sisson

W. L. McMasters

W. H. Hankerson

Edward Mallory

J. A. Scott

Luther Lightburn

Michael Christie

James Dale

B. Chile

John Davis

B. W. Curtis

W. L. McMasters

W. H. Hankerson

D. A. Russell

William Dug

William Blake

Benjamin D. Boswell..

James Dale

AlphensBell

John McDonald

Alex. Wartumberg

Robert Dyke

John Dean

Allen Broomfield

Wm. Hodge

tViri. M alone

E. H. Trickle



July
April
July
April
July
April
July
April
July-



April
April
July



April



— , 1861
15, 1861
— , 1861
15, 1864
— , 1861
lfl, 1864
— , 1861
15, 1864
— , 1861



April 15,
15,
IS,

15,



July



April 15, 1864

•' 15, "

15, "

" 15, "

15, "

" 15, "

15, "



July



Janehew, West Virginia.

Sandy Hill, West Virginia.

Point Pleasant, West Virginia.

Pomeroy, Ohio

Pomeroy, Ohio.
Racine, Ohio.

Racine, Ohio.

Middleport, Ohio.

Point Pleasant, West Virginia.

Mason City, West Virginia.

Gallipolis, Ohio.

Pomeroy, Ohio.

Athens, Ohio.

Pomeroy, Ohio.

Pomeroy, Ohio.

Gallipolis, Ohio.

Pomeroy, Ohio.

Gallipolis. Ohio.

New Creek, West Virginia.



Pomeroy, Ohio.
Gallipolis, Ohio.
Letart, West Virginia.
Athens, Ohio.
Pomeroy, Ohio.
Murraysville, West Virginia.
Gallipolis, Ohio.
Pomeroy, Ohio.
Gallipolis, Ohio.
Cumberland, Maryland.



Mason City, West Virginia.
Middleport, Ohio.
Pomeroy, Ohio.
Athens, Ohio.
Pomeroy, Ohio.
Murraysville, West Virginia.
Gallipolis, Ohio.
Pomeroy, Ohio.
Gallipolis, Ohio.
Erostburg, Maryland.



Foueth Virginia Infantry. 919



FOURTH VIRGINIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment, although mustered into the service as a Virginia organization, was
recruited mainly in Ohio. Seven full companies of it were recruited in the counties of
Meigs, Gallia, Lawrence, and Athens. These numbered some six hundred men. Por-
tions of the remaining companies were also interspersed with Ohioans.

The regiment was organized and mustered into the service in July, 1861, at Point Pleasant,
West Virginia.

The regiment moved from Point Pleasant on the 22d of August, 1861, up the Kanawha Val-
ley, and operated in connection with General Rosecrans's army until November, 1861. Durinw
the winter of 1861-2 it was in camp at Ceredo, West Virginia. Being there joined to Colonel
Garfield's division, it marched with it on his expedition to Louisa C. EL, in Eastern Kentucky.

On April 3d the regiment marched up the Kanawha Valley and joined General Cox's com-
mand. It participated in the fights at Fayette C. H., Gauley, and Charleston, on the 4th, 8th,
and 13th of September, 1862. Being overwhelmed by the enemy, the army retreated down the
valley to Point Pleasant, where it remained until the 19th of October, when, being re-enforced
by General G. W. Morgan's command from Cumberland Gap, it again marched up the Kanawha
Valley in pursuit of a Rebel force under General Eckles. It skirmished with the enemy at
Pocotaligo, with slight loss. The Rebels were driven out of the valley and the forces rested at
Fayetteville.

On December 30th the regiment left Fayetteville and marched to Camp Piatt, where it em-
barked on transports with General Hugh Ewing's brigade, destined for Vicksburg. The flotilla
arrived at Vicksburg on February 2, 1863, and the regiment was attached to the Second Division
of the Fifteenth Army Corps, General F. P. Blair commanding.

On April 5th it took part with General Sherman's command in the disastrous attack on
Haines's Bluff. It remained at Young's Point, opposite Vicksburg, until April 12th ; was then
taken to Grand Gulf, and marched to the rear of Vicksburg. Crossing Black River Bridge, the
regiment and division reached Vicksburg on May 18, 1863.

On the morning of May 19th the regiment participated in a charge on the enemy's line of
intrenchments, in which it lost one hundred and ninety-two men and officers killed and wounded,
out of four hundred with which it entered the charge. On May 22d it was in a second assault,
and lost thirty-one officers and men killed and wounded. It continued in the front line of the
army during the whole of the siege (losing men almost daily) until the surrender of Vicksburg,
on July 4, 1863.

On the night of July 4th it was dispatched to Jackson, Mississippi, in Sherman's column
moving against General Joe Johnston. It skirmished with the enemy from Black River Bridge
to Jackson, and took part in the ten days' siege and capture of Jackson. It then returned to
Camp Sherman, within fourteen miles of Vicksburg, where it remained for two months.

On September 27th the regiment marched to Vicksburg and there, taking transports, sailed
to Memphis, Tennessee. It left Memphis on October 2Sth and marched toward Chattanooga with
Sherman's command. At Bear Creek, a point about half way between Memphis and Chatta-
nooga, the army was attacked by Forrest's Rebel cavalry. A fierce fight ensued, in which the
Fourth Virginia lost heavily.

On November 21st the regiment arrived at Chattanooga, and on the 24th crossed the Ten-
nessee River on General Bragg's right. The 24th and 25th were consumed in fighting,



920 Ohio in the War.

with heavy loss. On November 26th it followed in the pursuit of Bragg's army to Ringgold,
Georgia. It then marched with General Sherman's column to the relief of General Burnside
at Knoxville, Tennessee. Not being needed at Knoxville, the command crossed the Smoky
Mountains into North Carolina, in pursuit of Longstreet's Rebel forces. On December 1st orders
were received to return to Larkinsville, Alabama, where it arrived on tbe 16th of December,
after marching nine hundred and ninety-six miles.

The next event in the history of the Fourth Virginia was its re-enlistment on February 3,
1864. On March 15th the regiment started for Wheeling, West Virginia, on its veteran furlough.
When, a month later, it reported for duty, numerous changes were made in tbe line and staff.

On May 3d the Fourth started from Gallipolis, Ohio, and joined General Hunter's command
at Cedar Creek, West Virginia. It marched with the army to Piedmont, Virginia, and on June
5th was engaged in a battle with the enemy at that place. About thirty officers and men were
killed and wounded.

On June 6th the regiment started with Hunter's command on the Lynchburg raid. It was
in the fight at Lynchburg, with slight loss. The army having been defeated, it retreated to
Charleston, West Virginia, where it arrived on July 3d. It embarked on board transports and
was conveyed to Parkersburg, West Virginia; thence on cars to a point near Hancock, Mary-
land, from which the regiment marched to Snicker's Ferry.

On July 18, 1864, the Fourth was engaged in a sharp fight with Early's command, losing
one-third of its number, killed and wounded. On July 22d it moved up to Winchester, and on
the 24th was engaged in the battle of Winchester, losing heavily of officers and men. Being
defeated, the forces retrqated through Martinsburg into Maryland. Nothing of interest trans-
pired until the 19th of September, when the regiment was engaged in the battle of Opequan,
whence the Rebels retreated up the valley to Cedar Creek, where, on the 19th of October, it was
engaged in the battle of Cedar Creek. After this battle the regiment returned to Stephenson's
Depot, where it remained until the latter part of December. It then marched to Cumberland,
Maryland ; thence to New Creek, and remained until the latter part of May, 1865.

The regiment was ordered to Wheeling for muster-out in the latter part of June, 1865, and
was at that time paid off and disbanded. It numbered two hundred and forty, rank and file, at
its muster-out.



Independent Companies of Shakp-shootees. 921



INDEPENDENT COMPANIES OF SHARP-SHOOTERS.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK



COM. ISSUED.



Captain
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Calvin Reed

Campbell Dougherty ,

George A. Taylor

Jacob Flegle

Gershom M. Barber

David W. Botsford

Charles H. Co-

James H. Keed

Samuel MeCamaut

Win. C. Squire

Charles A. Barton

Wm. L. Stearns

Henry A. Stevens

Benj. G. Lougstfeth

James Walterniine

A. J. Davis

Isaiah Dough man

Jonathan Pickard

Franklin H. Sowers

David W. Botsford

W'm. N. Watson

Robert Shank

David C. Johns

James H. Keed

George L. Evans

muel McCamant

George M. Barrick

Wm. McCrory

Cyrus B. Moore

Norman D Macham

S. S. Blackford

Thomas D. Mitchell

Joseph W. Ledick

John Pifer

Robert C. Williamson

Franklin II. Sowers ,

W. L. Stearns

David W. Botsford

Wm. N. Watson

Wm. C. Lemon

David C. Johns

James H. Keed

George L. Evans

James Cox

David N Lung

Wm. H. Lawrence

John D. Ualsey



Nov.

April

Sept.

Nov.

.Vpril

Nov.

Dec.

July

Nov.

Aug.

March

Nov.

April
Sept.
Nov.

June

April

Nov.

A pril

June

Dec.

Jan.

July

Nov.

Aug.

Feb.

March
Nov.

April
lept.

Oct.

Nov.

March

June

April

N'ov.

April

luue

Oct.

Aug.

Jan.

March



20, 1861
25,

5, 1862
26, '

I,
26, 1865

16, 1862

17, 1863
5, 1865

11, 1862

1, 18fi3

1, 1864

31, "

2(1, 1861

25, "
5, 1862

26, "

1, "

20, 1863
14, 1861
26, 186

1, l.Sti2
10, 186T

1, "
17, "
28, 1S65

111 1862
1, 16li3
26, 1861
31, "

20, lsr.i



25

5, 1862
26, "
14, "
20, 1863
19, 1864
14, "
26, "
12, 1862
10, 1863

1, "
22. 1862

1, 1863
16, 1861
31, "



Feb. 16, 1862 Attached to 6Rth Illinois Vol. Inf. [1863.
Attached to 66th I. V. I.; must, out Dec. 3,
Attached to 66th Illinois Vol. Inf.
Transferred to 79th regiment O. V. I.

1S63 Mustered out to accept promotion.

1865 Mustered out July 19, 1865.

1863 Resigned December 17, 1863.
Resigned June 24, 1865
.Mustered out July 19, 1865.
Detailed on General Kosseau's staff.
Mustered out July 19, 1865.

1864 Transferred to 60th regiment 0. V. I.
Transferred to 60th regiment O. V. I.

1862 Attached to 66th Illinois Vol. Inf.
Attached to 6nth Illinois Vol. Inf.
Attached to 66th Illinois Vol. Inf.
Transferred to 79th regiment O. V. I.

1863 designed September 9, 1804.
Discharged May 7, 1S64.

1864 Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out July 19, 1805.

186:; Resigned April 111, i863.
Resigned May 30, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned January 9, 1865.

1865 Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out Julv 19, 1865.

1863 Mustered out July 28, 1865.
Mustered out July 19. 1865.

1864 Transferred to 60th regiment O. V. I.
Transferred to 60th regiment 0. V. I.

186L' Attached to 66th Illinois Vol. Inf.
Attached to 66th Illinois Vol. Inf.
Attached to 66th Illinois Vol. Inf.
Transferred to 79th regiment O. V. I.

1863 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to Captain 9th company.

1864 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

1865 Mustered out Julv 19, 1.865.
186:; Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out July 28, 1865.
Mustered out July 19, 1865.
Transferred to BOth regiment 0. V. I.
Transferred to 60th regiment O. V. I.



April

Nov.

Feb.

April

Feb.

Dec.

July

"eb.

Aug.

March

Feb.

April

Nov.

Feb.

Dec.

June

April

Feb.

April

June

Dec.

Jan.

July

Feb.

Aug.

March



Feb. 26,



April

Nov.

Feb.

Dec.

March

June

April

Feb.

April

Tune

Feb.

Aug.

March



li'..



922 Ohio in the Wae.



INDEPENDENT COMPANIES OF SHARP-SHOOTERS.



IN all, ten companies of sharp-shooters were recruited and partially organized in Ohio. But
three of them, however, had an active company organization (and were recognized through-
out the war) as sharp-shooters. These were Company G, organized at Dayton; Company
H, at Findley, and Company K, at Lima, in September and October, 1861. It was originally
intended to raise a full regiment, to be known as Birge's Western Sharp-shooters, and to be sent
to General Fremont, but the project failed. As each company was raised it was sent to the field,
being there attached to some regiment not yet having men enough to secure the commissions of
the regimental officers. All, however, were taken by regiments from other than their own State.
Company G left Dayton for Benton Barracks, Missouri, in October, 1SG1 ; was armed with
the American target rifle, and equipped with bear-skin shot-pouch, scraped powder-horn, squirrel-
tail cap, blue coat, and gray pantaloons. After some skirmishing duty in Missouri, it was sent
up the Cumberland Biver, to Fort Donelson, where its members opened the battle and bore an
honorable part throughout. Subsequently it was in the battle of Pittsburg Landing. It was
then merged, by order of the Secretary of War, into the Fourteenth Missouri. After partici-
pating in the battle of Corinth, and some of the other movements through the summer and fall
of 1862 in that region, it became, on November 28, 1862, by order of the Secretary of "War, a
part of the Sixty-Sixth Illinois, Companies H and K being also in the same regiment. The
three served in the following engagements and skirmishes:

Tuscumbia Bridge, Miss., Feb. 8, 1863; Danville, Miss., March 24 and 31, 1863; Eienzi,
April 1, 1863; Blackland, Miss., April 7 and 8, 1863; Kienzi, May 19, 1863; Jumpertown, Miss.,
July 19, 1863; Hatchie Biver, July 23, 1863; Booneville, Miss., August 31, 1863; Whiteside's
Farm, Miss., Sept. 9, 1863.

They re-enlisted as veterans in December, and early in 1864 received their veteran furlough,
going with their regiment to Chicago, and being then detached and sent home to Ohio. On their
return in time for the Atlanta campaign they became a part of the left wing, Sixteenth Army
Corps, McPherson's army, and in this position passed through the actions of that famous march.
The men enumerate the following battles and skirmishes as a part of their record:

Taylor's Bidge, Georgia, May 8, .1864; Snake Creek Gap, Georgia, May 9, 1864; Dick's
Bidge and Sugar Valley, Georgia, May 11 and 12, 1864; Besaca, Georgia, May 13, 1864; Lay's
Ferry, Georgia, May 14 and 15, 1864; Rome's Cross-roads, Georgia, May 16, 1864; Dallas,
Georgia, May 26 to June 1, 1864; Lone Mountain, Georgia, June 1, 1864; New Hope, Georgia,
June 3, 1864; Big Shanty, Georgia, June 11, 1864; Brush Mountain, Georgia, June 15, 1S64;
Little Kenesaw, June 21, 1864; Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, June 25 to July 2, 1864; Ruffs
Mills and Nicojack Creek, Georgia, July 4, 1864; Howe's Ferry, Georgia, July 7 and 8, 1864;
Cross Keys, Georgia, July 18, 1864; Peachtree and Nancy's Creek, July 19, 1864; Decatur,
Georgia, July 20, 1864; before Atlanta, July 21, 1864; Bald Hill, Georgia, July 22, 1864; How-
ard House, Georgia, July 22, 1864; before Atlanta, July 23 to 26, 1864; Utoy Creek, July 27,
1864; Ezra Church, Georgia, July 28, 1864; Proctor's Creek and Cherry Bun, Georgia, July 31
and August 1, 1864; Proctor's Creek again, August 4 and 11, 1864; siege of Atlanta, August 12
to 26, 1864; Jonesboro', Georgia, August 31, and September 1, 1864; Lovejoy's Station, Georgia,
September 2 to 5, 1864.

In this campaign their losses were twenty-two killed or mortally wounded, eighteen prison-
ers, and four missing, supposed to have been murdered by guerrillas, near Dalton, Georgia.
They subsequently participated in. the easy march to the sea and in the campaign of the
Carol inas.

They were mustered out at Louisville on the 15th of July, 1S65, and were paid and dis-
charged at Camp Dennison.



Union Light Guard.



923



UNION LIGHT GUARD.



BOSTEK, TEHEE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK



com. issvk;i.



REMARKS.



Captain

1st Lieutenant

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.



Georse A. Bennett
Arthur W. White.,
.lames B. Jameson
James B. Jameson.
George C. Ashman



Dec. 19, 18B3

Nov, 6, "

Dec. 14, 1864

Nov. 6, 1863

Feh. 4, 1665



19, 1S<>3

18, "
14, 1S64

19, 1863
4, IS65



Discharsed June 10, 1S65.

Discharged,

Mustered out September 9, 1865.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out September 9, ISfij.



UNION LIGHT GUARD.



THIS organization -was perfected in December of 1863, and was intended by Governor Tod
as the Body-guard of President Lincoln. The Governor had previously visited Washing-
ton, and while there noticed the "unguarded situation of the Capitol, the President's
house, and the person of President Lincoln, and, knowing the desperate character of the Cab-
inet at Richmond, he came home somewhat apprehensive for the safety of the public offices, and
more especially for the life of the President. He at once commenced raising the Union Light
Guard, by recruiting one man in each county of the State. By December 22d, 1863, the com-
pany was completed, and on the morning of that day it started for Washington City.



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 158 of 165)