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George II. Guild

Thomas B. George

Rudolph De Steigner

Nathan W. Daniels

Thomas B. George

Samuel S. Gold

John E. Ray

Cyrus S. Bates

Charles Lindenberg

Wm. B. Lambert

S. W. McCulloch

Robert K. Seig

Thomas J. Stone

Joseph Coe

Samuel C. Bosler

Frank Bryer

Samuel E. Henderson

Andrew Smith ,

Richard B. Crawford

James H. Scott

John P. Millet

James H. Merrill

Erastus C. Hawkins

James C. Armstrong

Henry S. Leister

John G. Clifford

Henry Netchey

Iff. Sussman

Hailey H. Sage

Joseph II. Powell

Charles P. Cavis

John Dauhwuth

Howard S. Woodrow

Sanford F. Timmons

John Murphy

Wm. D. W. Mitchell



Wm. Rains

Frank J. Jones

James W. McConnell

David P. Doherty

Thomas F. Murdock

Thomas B. George

Samuel S. Gold

John E. Ray

Henry H. Kendrick

S. W. McCulloch ,

M. Sussman

Cyrus S. Bates ,

Charles Lindenberg

Robert K. Seig

Win. B. Lambert

Joseph Coe

J. K. Guthrie

Wm. II. Campbell

Thomas J. Stone

John Fox

James C. Witaker

Richard B. Crawford

Samuel C. Bosler

Frank Bryer

Frank Geiger ,

Samuel E. Henderson....

James Thompson

Robert F. Wolfkill

Wm. A. Short

George H. Dorman

Emery Maline

Frank Reiger

James S. Caskcy

Daniel M. Rutern

Franklin Blackburn



Sept.



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Resigned September 29, 1864, as let Lieut.

Mastered out August 26, i860.

Honorably discharged January 26, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned May 17, 1S65.

Dismissed August 15, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain October 25, 1861.

Promoted to Captain February 5, 1862.

Promoted to Captain November 8, 1861.

Promoted to Captain January 9, 1862.

Resigned January 13, 1862.

Promoted to Captain March 12, 1862.

Resigned January 3, 1862.

Resigned October 15, 1861.

Promoted to Captain May 13, 1862.

Promoted to Captain May 31, 1862.

Promoted to Captain February 19, 1862.

Declined.

Died October 18, 1861.

Promoted to Captain August 14, 1862.

Promoted to Captain August 14, 1862.

Promoted to Captain July 28, 1862.

Died January 8, 1863.

Honorably discharged September 11, 1862.

Promoted to Captain January 1, 1863.

Resigned March 15, 1S62.

Resigned March 15, 1S62.

Resigned May 10, 1862.

Promoted January 1, 1863.

Dismissed March 1, 1S63.

Revoked.

Resigned December 8, 1862.

Mustered out July 13, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain January 1, 1862.

Promoted to Captain

Resigned January 19, 1864.

.■Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged November 7, 1863.

Resigned February 8, 1864.

Mustered out.

Resigned April 15, 1864.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned June is, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned September 6, 1861.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant November 8, 1861.

Resigned January 3, 1862.

Resigned September 24, 1861.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant U. S. A.

Resigned September 24, 1861.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 9, 1852.

Resigned November 4, 1861.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 21, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant February 5, 1S62.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant March 15, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant May 13, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant May 31, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant July 28, 1S62.

Resigned March 22, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant July 13, 1S62.

Canceled.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant August 14, 1S62.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant August 14, 1S62.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant September 11, '62.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant Decembers, 1862.

Promoted to iKt Lieutenant January 1, 1863.

Resigned December 20, 1S62.

Revoked; no vacancy.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 1, 1S63.

Killed at Stone River December 31, 1863.

Killed at Stone River December 31, 1863.

Resigned February 11, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant March 1, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 1, 1S63.

Discharged on account of wounds.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 1, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out.

Mustered oat.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Resigned February 15, 1864.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Resigned May ?9, 1S64.



Thirteenth Ohio Infantry. 93



THIRTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE THIRTEENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY was organized at
Camp Jackson, Columbus, about the 20th of April, 1861, under the command of W. S.
Smith, an experienced officer of the regular army, as Colonel; C. B. Mason, Lieutenant-
Colonel, and J. G. Hawkins, Major. Thursday, May 9th, it moved to Camp Dennison, where it
was disciplined, drilled, and prepared for the arduous struggle in which it was to participate.

On the 30th of June the regiment left Camp Dennison, and embarked on the Ohio River for
Western Virginia, to re-enforce the column of General McClellan, then operating in that region.
On Monday,' July 1st, it reached Parkersburg, Virginia, numbering one thousand men, rank and
file. On the 14th it left Paikersburg by the Parkersburg Branch Railroad for Oakland, on the
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. From thence it marched to Greenland Gap, in pursuit of a Rebel
force, said to be intrenched at that place. Finding no enemy, it retraced its steps to Oakland.
From thence to Clarksburg, and through obstructed roads to the town of Sutton, on Elk River, in
a valley surrounded on all sides with large hills. The Thirteenth, in company with the National
forces to the number of five thousand infantry and artillery, encamped on these hills, the artillery
commanding all approaches to the town Frequent scouts were made into the surrounding coun-
try, but nothing of importance transpired.

On the 10th of September Colonel Sunh led his regiment in the battle of Carnifex Ferry,
occupying the extreme left, and made a good record for the command. From this date until
November 6th, the regiment was encamped at Gauley Bridge, having frequent skirmishes with
the enemy.

On the 6th of November, Benham's brigade, composed of the Tenth, Twelfth, and Thirteenth
Ohio regiments, crossed the Kanawha and went into camp at Loup Creek. McMullen's battery
having joined the brigade on the 12th, the combined force set out in pursuit of General Floyd. The
Thirteenth Ohio held the post of honor, and was preceded by company A as skirmishers. The
first brush occurred at Cotton Hill, in which the regiment lost one killed and two wounded.
Floyd made good his retreat to Lewisburg, and the National troops halted at Fayetteville. The
Rebels having been driven from West Virginia, the principal portion of the troops were withdrawn
from that section, and transferred by transports down the Ohio River to Jeffersonville, Indiana,
the Thirteenth going into camp near that place, opposite Louisville. On the 11th of December it
received orders to join the column under Buell, then about to resume his chase after Bragg's
Rebel army. On the 13th the regiment went into camp near Elizabethtown, Kentucky, and
remained there until the 26th, when, with the rest of the forces, it moved to Bacon Creek. Here
the most rigid drill was instituted, giving confidence to the men and to the regiment as an
organization.

On the 10th of February, 1862, the regiment received orders to march, and entered Bowling
Green on the evening of the 15th of February, to find it evacuated. On the 22d the regiment took
cars on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, forming the advance of Buell's army on Nashville,
and reached Gallatin, forty miles from Nashville, where, under the superintendence of Colonel
Scott, Assistant-Secretary of War, an important bridge over the Cumberland, damaged by the



94 Ohio in the War.

enemy in their retreat, was repaired. Reaching Nashville on the 26th, the Thirteenth crossed
the Cumherland on the steamer "Lady Jackson," marched through the city, and encamped two
miles beyond.

On the 1st of March the Seventeenth Brigade advanced on Lavergne, on the Murfreeshoro'
Pike, in support of a detachment of National troops that had been attacked by the enemy. The
enemy retreated, and the Thirteenth returned to its camp. Tuesday, March 10th, the regiment
was detached from Mitchel's division and ordered to report to General Crittenden. On the 19th
companies A and G were detached from the regiment to assist the First Michigan to repair
bridges on the Alabama and Tennessee Rivers, and on the 2d of April the remainder of the
regiment, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Hawkins, joined the column on the march to
re-enforce General Grant, then in anticipation of an attack from the Rebels on Pittsburg Landing.
The regiment, after a terrible march, endured in common with the other troops, reached the town
of Savannah, on the Tennessee River, on the morning of the Cth of April. It was at once
forwarded to the battle-field, and with the Fifth Division, formed on the right of Nelson's com-
mand. About eight o'clock the division moved forward to meet the foe. It soon came upon the
enemy in position, supported by the famous Washington Battery, of New Orleans. The Thir-
teenth Ohio, burning to avenge their fallen comrades of the day before, sprang for this battery,
and after a desperate struggle, captured it entire, but only to lose it, as the enemy in larger
numbers made a charge and retook their pieces. In this affair the Major, Ben. Piatt Runkle,
fell, severely wounded, and was reported dead.

About one o'clock, when the last grand advance of the National army was made, another
attempt was made by the Thirteenth to capture the Washington (Rebel) Battery. It was suc-
cessful, and the famed guns were once more the trophies of the regiment. The enemy, foiled in
his attempt to sweep the National forces into the Tennessee, retreated, and on the 29th the Thir-
teenth Ohio, complete once more, joined in the advance on Corinth. The regiment reached the
vicinity of Corinth about the 12th of May, where it performed its share on the picket-line and
the various affairs with the enemy, until the evacuation of the city on the 31st of May.

The Fourteenth Division, on the morning of 4th June, started with the army of Buell on its
advance against Chattanooga. On the 5th it crossed the Tuscumbia River, the Thirteenth Ohio
camping at' Danville. On the 24th the regiment crossed the Tennessee to Florence, Alabama,
and encamped on the right of the Twenty-Fifth, at Shallow Creek, seven miles from the city. On
Monday, July 1st, Huntsville, Alabama, was reached, after an excessively fatiguing march. On
the 9th it was detached from the division to perform guard duty on the Chattanooga Railroad.
It, however, joined the division at Stevenson a few days thereafter, and on the 16th went into
camp at that well-known spot, "Battle Creek," familiar to the memory of every soldier of the old
organization of the Army of the Ohio. Here they remained until the 21st day of August.
During a considerable portion of their sojourn at Battle Creek the troops, from the scarcity of
provisions, were placed on half-rations.

On August 20th orders were received to march. Bragg had left Chattanooga, and was well
on his way to Louisville, Kentucky, with designs on Indiana and Ohio. Then commenced a
march that has made the Army of the Ohio a record as enduring as time. From the 21st of
August until the 26th of September, a period of thirty-six days, the National soldiers patiently
toiled on after their exultant enemy, enduring the hot rays of the sun, almost unbearable thirst,
half-rations, and the stifling dust. What soldier of the Thirteenth Ohio will ever forget this
terrible march? On the 26th the troops reached Louisville, having outmarched and passed, on
a parallel road, the Rebel army. After a rest until the 1st of October, the pursuit of Bragg was
resumed.

On the 8th of October the right wing, under Rousseau and McCook, encountered the enemy
at Perryville, and attacked without orders and before the commanding General's preparations
were complete. The Thirteenth Ohio, in Crittenden's division, on the right, as well as the other
troops in that organization, were not actively engaged. Having repulsed the attack the enemy
continued his retreat, and Crittenden's division pursued as far as Mount Vernon, when they halted



Thirteenth Ohio Infantry. 95

and rejoined the main column. In this pursuit the regiment penetrated the country watered by
the Big Rockcastle River, called by some, "Wild Cat Country," one of the wildest and most
mountainous localities in Kentucky.

On the 30th of October General Buell was relieved, and General "William S. Rosecrans
assigned to the command of the Army of the Ohio. The National troops immediately pushed in
pursuit of the enemy, and on "Wednesday, the 5th of November, the tents of the Thirteenth Ohio
were pitched near Glasgow, Kentucky, having, by forced marches from Mount Vernon, Kentucky,
accomplished the distance in twelve days. From this point to within half a mile of Nashville,
nothing of great moment occurred, although the regiment was almost continually under arms to
repel skirmishers.

On Tuesday, December 2d, the Fifth Division, consisting of three brigades, General Van
Cleve commanding, was reviewed by General Rosecrans, who paid a high compliment to the
soldierly appearance of the Thirteenth Ohio, reminding them at the same time that he had a
lively remembrance of their services in "Western Virginia.

Picket duty and foraging, interspersed with an occasional skirmish, were the daily occupa-
tions of the regiment until the advance on Murfreesboro', December 26, 1862. In one of the
skirmishes near Lavergne, with "Wheeler's cavalry, after a severe fight, the Thirteenth lost two
men killed and several wounded, and Lieutenant Bates, cf company B, captured.

Crittenden's division (in which was the Thirteenth Ohio) held the left wing, Thomas the
center, and McCook the right. The grand advance commenced on the morning of the 2Gth. The
Thirteenth Ohio moved with Crittenden's column out on the Nashville and Murfreesboro' Pike
toward Lavergne. The enemy slowly fell back, fighting as they retreated. On the morning of
the 27th Lavergne was shelled, and the rebels immediately evacuated the place. By order
of General Rosecrans, the next day (being Sunday) was observed as a day of rest. On the 29th
the advance was sounded and the entire line moved forward, and, after some fighting, reached
Stone River in the evening. McCook's column met with more resistance, and did not get up
until the next day at noon.

On the morning of Wednesday, December 31st, the Thirteenth Ohio, under Colonel Jos. G.
Hawkins, was ordered in from outpost duty, and took position in line with their brigade, (the
Fourteenth), constituting the Second Brigade of the Fifth Division, composed of the Forty-
Fourth and Eighty-Sixth Indiana, Fifty-Ninth and Thirteenth Ohio, and the Third Wisconsin
Battery, under command of Colonel F. P. Fyffe. Receiving orders to cross Stone River and
threaten the enemy, the regiment, with the division of Van Cleve, had commenced the advance
when the orders were countermanded. The right wing, under McCook, had been driven back,
and the center was in danger. The Thirteenth Ohio was at once counter-marched and "double-
quicked" back to the Murfreesboro' Pike, where it assisted in the rescue of a train that was about
being captured by the enemy's cavalry. About ten o'clock the brigade received orders to form on
the right of the First Brigade, with Colonel Hawkins's brigade on its right, (the Second Brigade's
right), and advanced down the slope of the Cedar Ridge and across an open field toward the
enemy, in the wood beA'ond. In this advance the Thirteenth Ohio occupied the left of
the second line, covering the Thirty-Ninth Ohio, and having the Eignty-Sixth Ohio on its
right. Some disorder cjccurred in the line from the density of the woods on the slope, but on
emerging into the open field, the line was "dressed" and advanced regularly across the field.
The front line, consisting of the Fifty-Ninth Ohio and Forty-Fourth Indiana, pushed rapidly
forward and entered the woods. The Thirteenth Ohio and Eighty-Sixth Indiana were sheltered
behind a fence, adjacent to the woods in front, in readiness to support the front line. In a few
moments the front line was desperately attacked and driven back over the second line. The
Thirteenth Ohio immediately opened on the enemy, and held them in check until it became
evident that it was outflanked. At this time Colonel Hawkins was killed, and with him others
of the regiment. The command devolved upon Major Dwight Jarvis. The regiment continued
fighting the enemy until they had passed around both flanks, when Major Jarvis, after repeated
commands and expostulations, induced the men to fall back; but in doing so they became some-



96 Ohio in the War.

what disordered, and suffered sadly from a Eebel battery, which played upon them in their retreat.
Reaching the line of reserves on the border of the woods, the regiment halted, re-formed, and
turned on the enemy, driving them back with considerable loss. In this brief struggle of an
hour's duration, the Thirteenth Ohio lost one hundred and forty-two officers and men in killed,
wounded, and missing. The day following, January 1, 1863, the Thirteenth did not participate in
any important movement. January 2d the regiment was on the extreme left of the National
lines, on the south bank of Stone River. At three P. M. the Rebels, in three lines of battle,
charged the National position, compelling the Thirteenth, with others, to fall back under cover
of the artillery on the north bank. The enemy still pushed forward, when thirty-six pieces of
National artillery opened with canister and grape, literally mowing down the Rebels, and com-
pelling their instant and speedy retreat from the field. The Thirteenth bivouacked on the north
bank of the river that night. The morning of the 3d found Murfreesboro' evacuated, and the
enemy in full retreat. The loss of the regiment in this series of battles was thirty-one killed,
eighty-five wounded, and sixty -nine missing — total, one hundred and eighty-five.

The regiment did not participate in any movement or engagement of special moment during
the long sojourn of the "Army of the Cumberland" at Murfreesboro'. On June 24, 1863, the
bugles sounded the advance Southward, and on the 27th of the same month the regiment once
more joined the marching column. About August 1st it reached and occupied McMinnville.
Rosecrans's movements threatening the envelopment of Bragg, the latter General rapidly retreated
from Tullahoma, falling back on Chattanooga. On the morning of the 16th of August, with the
entire corps under Crittenden, the organization pushed forward by the Pikeville route. Thi3
movement seriously threatening one of the flanks of Bragg's forces, that General again retreated,
completely uncovering Chattanooga. On the 9th of September the Thirteenth, with drums beat-
ing and banners flying, marched through this celebrated city of imaginary impregnability, and
encamped for the night at Rossville, five miles south of Chattanooga.

When the concentration of the army began, previous to the battle of Chickamauga, the
Thirteenth, with the remaining troops of Van Cleve's division, took post on the southern spur
of Missionary Ridge. On the morning of the 19th of September the battle of Chickamauga
opened, and through all the varying fortunes of that and the succeeding day, the Thirteenth
preserved unsullied its record, made sacred at Stone River.

The regiment, during this series of battles, was commanded by its Lieutenant-Colonel, the
Colonel (Dwight Jarvis) being absent on duty at McMinnville. Colonel Jarvis rejoined the regi-
ment shortly afterward. The Lieutenant-Colonel was killed, and the Major severely wounded,
and the skeleton ranks, after the battle of Chattanooga, attested the heavy and mournful loss
of rank and file.

The National army fell back into the fortifications at Chattanooga. On the 22d the regiment
had a severe skirmish with the enemy on Missionary Ridge, which continued during the entire
forenoon of that day. In the afternoon it withdrew from its position to its former place in the
intrenchments of Chattanooga. Here it remained until November 23d, when it again moved.
General Thomas now commanded the three old corps of the Army of the Cumberland. General
Grant directed the onward movement, and the preliminaries toward the expulsion of Bragg from
Missionary Ridge were at once commenced. History has already recorded the successful charge
that swept the Rebel host down the mountain, across the valley, and converted its retreat into a
shameful rout. In this charge the Thirteenth bore itself bravely, and, it is claimed, was the first
to plant its colors on the Rebel works, and Sergeant Daniel Ritter, of company A, was the first
man of the regiment to scale and enter the fortifications. The losses of the regiment in this affair
were severe. On the 2Sth of November the Thirteenth Ohio, with the Third Division, and
another division of the Fourth Corps, to which it had been attached since the reorganization at
Chattanooga, advanced to the rescue of Knoxville, then besieged by Longstreet. Upon the
approach of the National forces, the enemy retreated, and was pursued as far as Blain's Cross
Roads, and Four Corners, near Clinch Mountain. The regiment during these marches suffered
severely for the want of shoes and clothing, as well as rations. For a great portion of the time it



Thirteenth Ohio Infantey. 97

was compelled to subsist off the country through, which it marched. From Blain's Cross-Eoads it
advanced in pursuit of the enemy to Strawberry Plains, crossed the Holston River and marched
to Dandridge, twenty-three miles from the North Carolina line. Here it encountered the enemy
and sharp skirmishing ensued, but no general engagement, the Rebels rapidly getting out of the
way of the progressive Yankees. Upon the retreat of the enemy the National forces returned
over the most horrible roads and through weather of almost incessant snow and rain to the Plains
and from thence to Knoxville.

Leave of absence was now granted the regiment to enable it to return to Chattanooga, settle
its affairs and visit their homes in Ohio ; thirty days being granted for that purpose, in considera-
tion of their having enlisted a3 veterans. The remainder of the regiment — those who did not re-
enlist — were transferred to the Fifty-Ninth Ohio, of the same brigade, division and corps to
which the original Thirteenth had been attached. The Fifty-Ninth was at this time (January 28
1864) stationed at Marysville, sixteen miles south-west of Knoxville. At this date, after thirty- '
four months of marching and fighting, closes the first term of service of the Thirteenth Ohio
Volunteer Infantry.

On the 5th of January, 1864, three-fourths of the members of the Thirteenth Ohio re-enlisted
for another term of three years' service. Their muster was, however, delayed until the 10th of
February. The commissioned officers were Colonel Dwight Jarvis, Captain McCulloch, and
Lieutenants Bosler, Plenderson, Crawford, Rutern, and George.

The veterans reached Columbus, Ohio, on the 25th of February, were furloughed to their



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