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position, and John Morgan, the Rebel freebooter, was making his triumphant way through
Indiana and into Ohio. The State was almost completely stripped of organized troops, and it
became urgently necessary that some plan should be adopted by which a force could be quickly
raised with which to combat the invaders of its soil.

Governor Tod went to work, with his accustomed energy, and in a very short time succeeded
in bringing into the field a respectable body of troops, with which the movements of Morgan
were much embarrassed. Among other troops raised at this time were those composing the
Fifth Independent Battalion of Cavalry. The call was made for six months' service. The first
company was composed mainly of residents of Columbus. It was recruited by Mr. John F.
Ijams, of that city, and was mounted and equipped at all points, and sent to the southern border
of the State, where it performed valuable duty in scouting and keeping watch of the movements
of Morgan and his followers. For a period of over three weeks these patriotic men, fresh from
the civil pursuits of life, and unused to the hardships of the field, were in the saddle almost
constantly.

After the capture of Morgan and his band, Captain Ijams was ordered to report at Camp
Chase and proceed to recruit his organization to a force of four companies which, being accom-
plished in a few weeks, was classed as the Fifth Independent Battalion of Ohio Volunteer Cav-
alry, and Captain Ijams was promoted to Major.

On September 8th he received orders to report, with his command, to General D. C. Cox, at
Cincinnati. The battalion was sent into Eastern Kentucky, with orders to make head-quarters
at Flemingsburg. This portion of the State was then unguarded, and bands of guerrillas and
horse-thieves were holding high carnival, robbing friends and foes, and murdering Union citizens.

Soon after its arrival in Kentucky the battalion instituted a series of scouts and raids
through the rugged hill country of that region up to Pound Gap, resulting in the capture of a
number of the most noted guerrillas, and completely breaking up their pillaging raids. Peace
and security were thus restored to the inhabitants of Eastern Kentucky.

Although the Fifth Independent Battalion did not participate in any regular battle, it was
only because there was no organized force pitted against it. Owing to the exigencies of the
service it was kept in the field some time beyond its term of enlistment. It was finally mus-
tered out of the service, at Columbus, in November, 1863.



932



Ohio in the Wae.



6th OHIO INDEPENDENT CAVALRY COMPANY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK


1 COM.


ISSUED.


REMARKS.






Sept. u, un

" 11, "
" 11, "

Dec. 16, "


Sept.

| ;;

Dec.


25, ISfil

25| "

Hi, "




1st Lieutenant

2d Lieutenant

Do.


Resigned December 9, 1S61.





SIXTH OHIO INDEPENDENT CAVALRY COMPANY.



THIS company, recruited in the counties of Greene and Hamilton, rendezvoused in August
and September, 1861, at Camp Dennison, and on the 23d of the latter month was ordered
to Washington City. Quarters were there assigned the company in the Park-House
Barracks, and, by the persistent efforts of the Captain, it was armed, equipped, and splendidly
mounted. The camp was soon moved to a pine grove, near the old Soldiers' Home, and called
Camp Ohio. Strict discipline was maintained, and the men made rapid progress in their new
profession. The company was finally attached to the Third New York Volunteer Cavalry,
and denominated company L. On the 9th of December it joined the regiment at Camp Bates,
near Poolesville.

In January, 1862, the company was designated to cross the Potomac at Conrad's Ferry, to
pass around the pickets, and to dash into Leesburg, capture General Hill, and retreat across the
river. Sabers were ground, the fleetest horses and boldest men selected, and all night they
awaited orders to move ; but, on account of a change in the position of the pickets, the attempt
was abandoned. On the 1st of March company L, with the battalion, crossed the Potomac at
Harper's Ferry and moved to the outpost beyond Charlestown, Virginia. Berryville was soon
occupied ; and on the morning after the occupation company L was engaged in a skirmish with
Ashby's cavalry, driving them several miles. From here the forces marched to Winchester,
where the cavalry again made a successful dash at Ashby and Stuart. After remaining a few
days the battalion returned to Harper's Ferry ; and on the day of the battle of Winchester
marched for Washington City, where it remained until the latter part of April, when it moved
to Alexandria, preparatory to embarking for North Carolina. Except a short detention on
account of fog at Fortress Monroe, the company had a prosperous voyage, without accident ; and
on the evening of the 12th of May cast anchor in the harbor of Newbern. As soon as the regi-
ment landed it was sent in detachments to the outposts; the most important of these, on the Trent
Eoad, being guarded by four companies, of which company L was one.

The summer was occupied in scouting and in expeditions to the interior, until the 1st of
September, when the battalion moved to Washington, North Carolina, for the purpose of joining
an expedition to the Boanoke in the direction of Hamilton. Upon the arrival of Colonel John
Mix who took command of the post, all intercourse through the lines was prohibited ; and on
the mornin°- of the 6th the expedition moved, company L taking the advance. Scarcely had
they started when a volley of musketry was heard on the opposite side of the town, and Captain
Garrard wheeled the advance and dashed in the direction of the firing. The first platoon



Sixth Ohio Independent Cavaley. 933

charged through the Eebels, who were found on the Greenville Road. The second platoon, con-
sisting of a Lieutenant and sixteen men, without any support, formed across a narrow street, and
until after broad daylight held the enemy at bay successfully, resisting three charges. The Rebels
were at last completely routed with a heavy loss. Company L had ten men wounded and four-
teen horses killed and disabled. After scouting the country for a day or two, bringing in pris-
oners and arms, company L was ordered to Plymouth, on the Roanoke, on the 9th ; and after
remaining ten days was ordered to Newbern, where it arrived on the 29th.

About this time the battalion made a raid through the neighboring country, capturing
nearly two hundred horses and mules, returning to Newbern on the 15th of November. The
company was engaged in scouting and picket-duty until December 11th, when General Foster
moved from Newbern, intending to penetrate, if possible, to Raleigh. During this movement
company L acted as cavalry provost-guard of the army, and shared in the battles of Kingston,
White Hall, and Goldsboro' Bridge. After the return of this expedition all was quiet until the
the 13th of March, 1863, when the Rebels attacked Newbern, but failed to take the place, and
fell back just in time to avoid a complete defeat from a flank movement, made by way of "Wash-
ington, for the purpose of cutting off their retreat. During the siege of Washington, which
immediately followed, the cavalry was kept continually on the scout. In the early part of
autumn twelve hundred cavalry, with some artillery, made a raid on the Tarboro' Railroad,
which they succeeded in cutting, and captured a large amount of property belonging to the Rebel
Government. Nine regiments of infantry, three of cavalry, and two batteries endeavored to
prevent their return, and had it not been for the thorough knowledge of the guide with the
country they must have been cut off. When within five miles of Newbern they were com-
pletely surrounded, and an engagement seemed inevitable ; but the gunboats came to their assist-
ance and the Rebels retreated.

Sharing in all the raids, scouts, skirmishes, and battles around Richmond, in the spring of
1864, some were killed and others captured ; and when the company's time expired but very few
were left to muster out. As evidence of the ability of the men who composed this company it
is only necessary to say that it furnished to the service one Colonel, one Major, four Captains,
and fourteen Lieutenants.



934



Ohio in the Wab.



SHERMANS BODY-GUARD,

OR, SEVENTH INDEPENDENT COMPANY SHARP-SHOOTERS.



.ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Captain Watson C. Squire.

Po Win. McCrory

1st Lieutenant Wm. McCrory

2d Lieutenant'Janies Cox ,



DATE OF RANK



Nov. 11, 1862

March 1865

11, 1 ve-
il. "



Nov.



COM. ISSUED.



REMARKS.



f On det. duty, chiefly as Judse-Adv"te, after
I Chickamausa ; Brevet Major.
Brevet Major.

[sea.
In command of company during march to the



SHERMAN'S BODY-GUARD,

OR, SEVENTH INDEPENDENT COMPANY SHARP-SHOOTERS.



THIS command was recruited in the summer and fall of 1862, and was mustered into
the service as the Seventh Independent Company of Sharp-Shooters, for three years,
at Cleveland, on the 27th of January, 1863. It continued in active service until the
2Sth of July, 1865, when it was mustered out at Camp Chase.

During this period it was on duty as Sharp-Shooters, first under General Rosecrans, from
the 10th of March, 1863, until his supersedure, and then under General George H. Thomas. It
participated in the battle of Chickamauga (losing their First-Sergeant, A. D. Baily, a good
officer), Lookout Mountain, and Mission Ridge. It also kept up, at a point about four miles
below Chattanooga, known as the Little Suck, a brisk sharp-shooter's duel with a similar com-
pany of Alabamians, during a part of the siege of Chattanooga, and finally drove them from
their position.

On the 20th of May, 1864, the company was ordered to General Sherman's head-quarters,
where it remained on duty near the person of the Commanding General of that army until the
close of the war — with inconsiderable loss, save on a foraging expedition near Marietta, Georgia,
in which eight men were captured. These remained in Rebel prisons until the close of the war.

The company was with General Sherman through the march to the sea, the campaign of the
Carolinas, and the Grand Review, and it accompanied him to St. Louis, where it continued to
serve for a short time as head-quarters' guard. It was under the command of Captain Squire
until his detail as a Judge-Advocate after Chickamauga, and for the rest of the time under Cap-
tain McCrory, save during the march to the sea, when, in the absence of Captain McCrory,
Lieutenant Cox had command.

On its departure for Ohio for muster-out, General Sherman issued the following:



Dexnison Guards.



935



"Head-quarters Military Division of the Mississippi, )
"St. Louis, Missouri, July 17, 1865. J

"The General commanding tenders to the officers and men of the Seventh Independent
Company of Ohio Sharp-Shooters his personal thanks for their long and valuable services near
his person in the eventful campaigns beginning at Chattanooga, on the 1st of May, 1864, and
ending with the war.

"He commends them as a fine body of intelligent young volunteers, to whom he attributes
his personal safety in the battles, marches, and bivouacks in Georgia and the Carolinas.

"He wishes them long life and a proud consciousness of having done their duty with a
cheerfulness, precision, and intelligence worthy the great cause in which they were engaged, and
he bespeaks for them a kind and generous welcome back to their old homes in Ohio.

" W. T. SHERMAN,

"Major-General."



DENNISON GUARDS.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



BANK.


NAME.


DATE OF BANK.


COM. ISSUED.


BEMAEKS.




E. V. Brookfield


May 19, 1862
19, "












Discharsed September 24, 1S62.


Do.
















Appointed but never mustered.












DENNISQN GUARDS.



HIS independent company of infantry was recruited and organized at Camp Dennison
between May and August, 1862, to serve three years. It was, however, under orders
from the War Department, mustered out of the service on the 24th of January, 1863.



936



Ohio in the Wae,



TRUMBULL GUARDS.



KOSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.





BANK.


NAME.


DATE OF BANK.


COM. ISSUED.


REMARKS.




Chas. W. Smith


Nov. 9, 1862
" 9, "
" 9, "








Thos. P. Gilinan



















TRUMBULL GUARDS.



T



HIS independent company of infantry was organized at Gallipolis, on the 9th of Novem-
ber, 1862, under an enlistment for three years. Under orders from the War Department,
it was mustered out of service July 1, 1865.



DEPARTMENTAL CORPS.



ROSTER.



Captain

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
2d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.



Jas. L. Deens ,

Hamilton Eaton

.las. P. Avrick

Samuel Beard .....

Wm. Smith

Geo. P. Nuzum...

Noble Carter

Aquiila Thomas..
Samuel J. Evans.
Tyson C. Rowles.
Wm. H. Lingo ...
Jno. C. Hampton



DATE OF BANK.



July
Aug.



July
Aug.



July
Aug.



16, 1863

15, "
19, "
28. "

16, "
19, "
19, "
28, "
16, "

18, "

19, "
28, "



COM. ISSUED.



DEPARTMENTAL CORPS.



THIS was an anomalous organization composed of eight companies, four from Pennsylvania
and four from Ohio, enlisted for service in the Department of the Monongahela during the
pleasure of the President.
The Ohio companies were organized, respectively, at Barnesville, Somerton, and Hendrys-
burg, Ohio, between the 12th and 27th of July, 1863. They were mustered out of the service
November 1, 1864.



Wallace Guards.



937



CAPTAIN BARD'S COMPANY.



ROSTER, THIRTY DAYS' SERVICE.





RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM. ISSUED.


REMARKS.






Sept. 2, 18fi2 Clustered out at expiration of service.


1st Lieutenant


Peter C. Bonte









CAPTAIN BARD'S COMPANY.



T



HIS independent company of infantry was organized at Cincinnati during the sudden
alarm in the fall of 1862, to serve for thirty days. On October 3, 1862, it was mustered
out, by reason of the expiration of its term of enlistment.



WALLACE GUARDS.



ROSTER, THIRTY DAYS' SERVICE.





BANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.

1


COM. ISSUED.


REMARKS.






1
,,., Sept.


2, 1862




Mustered out at expiration of service.
Mustered out at expiration of service.
Mustered out at expiration of service.




2, "

2, "






H. M. Diggins













WALLACE GUARDS.



THIS independent infantry company was another of the hasty organizations formed at Cin-
cinnati in the fall of 1862, during the alarm about the safety of the city, and was among
the few of them that were mustered into the United States service. On the 4th of Octo-
ber, 1862, it was mustered out by reason of the expiration of its term of enlistment.



938



Ohio in the War



SECOND OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTALION.



EOSTEB, SIXTY DAYS' SERVICE.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM. ISSUED.


REMARKS.




Robert R Waddell


Aug. 16, 1864
Oct. 18, "
Aug. 16, "
Oct. is, "

Aug. lli, "
Oct. 18, "






Do






Mustered out with battery.










Do.
















Do

















2d OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTALION.



THIS battalion — so called on the books of the War Department— was composed of two
companies, organized at separate times for temporary service, near the close of the Na-
tional Guard movement in 1864. The first company was organized at Columbus, on
the 16th of August, and mustered out on the loth of October. The second was organized at the
same place on the 18th of October, and mustered out on the 16th of December — the service of
each being limited to guard-duty.



FOURTH OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTALION.



ROSTER, SIX MONTHS' SERVICE.



Major

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
2d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



JosF.rH T. Wheeler

John H. Winder

Joseph C. Grannan...
Francis (J. Russell...

Joshua Gore

Samuel Will man.

Win. C. Taylor

Thomas W. Cook

Rani V. Petard

Andrew P. Morgan..

J. K. Holbrook

Isaac W. Short

James Walters

David Thomas

Joseph F. Kirkhart.
Alex. M. Guthrie



DATE OF RANK.



Aug.
July
Aug.



S-pt.
Aug.



Sept.



21, 1863

18, "
21,

22,
22,
21,

3,

3,
22,
1",
29,

3,

3,



" 22

Sept. 29|



COM. ISSUED.



• Mustered out with battalion.



Second Ohio Battery.



939



FOURTH OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTALION.



THIS battalion of Ohio cavalry, composed of five companies, was organized at Cincinnati
from 3d of August to 21st of September, 1863, to serve for six months. From the na-
ture of the organization the service was necessarily detached. The several companies
were mustered out as their respective terms of enlistment expired, from loth of February to 14th
March, 1864.



SECOND OHIO BATTERY— N. G.



ROSTER, SIXTY DAYS' SERVICE.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM. ISSUED.


REMARKS.




Samuel M. Espy bet. 17, l*M






1st Lieutenant

Do.
2d Lieutenant












" 17, "












"" J







SECOND OHIO BATTERY— N. G.



THE history of the Second Ohio Independent Battery has already been given (pp. 830-31),
but another organization from Ohio was mustered into the United States service for the
short term of sixty days, which, on the books of the War Department, is known by the
same name.

It was organized at Camp Cleveland, on the 17th of October, 1864, and was mustered out by
reason of the expiration of its term of enlistment, on 22d of December, 1864. Its whole term
of service was spent in guarding the depot of Eebel prisoners at Johnson's Island.



910



Ohio in the Wak.






EIGHTH OHIO BATTERY— N. G.



ROSTER, SIXTY DAYS' SERVICE.



BANK.


NAME. |DATE OF BANK.


COM. ISSUED.


EEMABKS.


Ca tiin


1

Charles H. Babcock Sept. 9, 18f>4

Fred. (J. Gruuinger Aug. 15, "




Mustered out « ith battery.


1st Lieutenant
2d Lieutenant








Mustered out with battery.









EIGHTH OHIO BATTERY— N. G.



Ill IS was another of the sixty days' organizations called out for the defense of the depot for
Rebel prisoners at Johnson's Island. It was organized at the island on the 15th of August,
1864 and it remained on duty there until the 17th of October, 1864, when it was mustered
out by reason of the expiration of its term of enlistment.



EIGHTH OHIO BATTERY— N. G.

Four Months' Service.



11 WO months after the muster-out of the battery last mentioned, it was reorganized under
its Second-Lieutenant, Henry Fish, to serve on the same species of duty for four months ;
and on the books of the War Department it was given the same name already borne by
two other organizations. It was mustered into the service on the 19th of December, 1864, and
by reason of the expiration of its term of enlistment, was mustered out on the 19th of April,
1865.



INDEX.



Aldie, Battle of, Sixth Cav., p. 791.
Alleghany, Camp, advance on, Thirty-Second

inf., 213.
Allen, Q. M. Sergeant Frank P., First Cav.,

killed at Ebenezer Church, 753.

Anderson, Colonel Sixth Inf., wounded three

times, 53.

Anderson, Fort, capture of, One Hundred and

Eighteenth inf., 612.

-Antietam, Battle of, Fifth Inf., 45 ; Eighth

inf., 67; Eleventh inf., 84; Twelfth inf., 90; Twenty-
Third inf., 161; Twenty-Eighth inf., 195; Thirtieth inf.,
204 ; Thirty-Sixth inf., 234.

Appomattox C. H., Battle of, Thirteenth Cav.,

827.

Arkansas, Army of, assignment of Twenty-
Second inf., 156.

Arkansas Post, Battle of, Fortv-Eighth Inf.,

298; Seventy-Sixth inf., 441; Eighty-Third inf., 461;
Ninety-Sixth inf., 532; One Hundred and Fourteenth
inf., 599; One Hundred and Twentieth inf., 615; Fourth
ind. bat., 835; Eighth iud. bat., 848; Seventeenth ind.
hat., 871.

Armstrong, Lieutenant-Colonel Ninety-Fifth

inf., escapes from Richmond, 52-.

Ashland, Battle of, Second Cav., 759 ; Third

cav., 766.

Athens, Battle of, One Hundred and Second

inf., 551; Eighteenth Mich, inf., 554.

Atlanta, Battle of, Twentv-Seventh Inf., 191 ;

Thirtieth inf., 205; Forty-First inf., 265; Forty-Sixth
iuf., 288.

Atlanta, Campaign of, First Inf., 20 ; Fifth

inf., 46; Sixth inf., 52; Tenth inf., SO; Thirteenth inf.,
97; Fourteenth inf., 106; Seventeenth inf., 124; Nine-
teenth iuf, 137; Twentv-First inf., 151; Twenty-Sixth
inf., 186: Twentv-Ninth inf., 199; Thirtv-First inf., 210;
Thirty-Second inf., 215; Thirty-Third inf., 220; Thirty-
Fifth inf., 230; Thirty-Seventh inf.. 242; Thirtv-Eighth
inf., 24S; Thirty-Ninth inf., 254; Fortieth inf., 258; For-
ty-Third inf., 274; Forty-Fifth inf., 283; Forty-Seventh
inf., 294; Forty-Ninth inf., 303; Fiftieth inf.. 307; Fifty-
First inf., 311 ; Fiftv-Second inf., 319; Fiftv-Fourth inf.,
328; Fifty- Fifth inf., 333; Fiftv-Seventh inf.. 345; Fifty-
Ninth inf., 355; Sixty-First inf., 364; Sixty-Fonrth inf.,
379; Sixty-Fifth inf., 3<4; Sixtv-Sixth inf., 3-9: Sixty-
Eighth inf., 397; Sixtv-Ninth Inf., 402; Seventieth inf.,
406 ; Seventy-Third inf., 423; Sevnty-Fourth inf., 428;
Seventy-Sixth inf., 442; Seventy-Eighth inf.. 452; Sev-
enty-Ninth inf., 456; Eighty-First inf., 468; Eighty-Sec-
ond inf.. 475; Eighty-Ninth inf., 498; Ninety-Second inf.,
515; Nin»ty-Third inf., 520; Ninety-Seventh inf., 536;
Ninety-Eighth inf., 541 : Ninety-Ninth inf., 544 ; One Hun-
dredth inf., 547; One Hundred and First inf., 550; One
Hun lrt-d and Third inf., 559; One Hundred and Fourth
inf., 563; One Hundred ami Fifth inf., 570; One Hundred
and Eighth inf., 5*2 ; One Hundred and Eleventh inf., 592 ;
One Hundred and Thirteenth inf., 596; One Hundred
and Eishteenth inf., 612; One Hundred and Twentv-
First inf.. 621 ; One Hundred and Twentv-Fourth inf..
639; One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth inf., 645; First cav.,
752; Third cav., 7o.S ; Fourth cav., 773; Seventh cav.,
802; Ninth cav., 812; Tenth cav., 816; Third ind hat.,
833; Fourth ind. bat.. 836; Sixth ind. bat., 843; Four-
teenth ind. hat., 861 ; Fifteenth ind. bat., 867; Niueteenth
ind. bat., 876; Twentieth ind. bat., 878; Batterv A, First
It. arty, 893; Batterv C, First It. art'y, 895; Battory D,
First It. art'y, 896; Battery I, First It. art'y, 902.

Atlanta. Siege of, Twentieth Inf., 144.
Atlanta and West Point Railroad, Kaid

on, Ninth cav., 811.

Auburn Mills, Battle of, Sixth Cav., 791.
Averysboro', Battle of, Seventy-Ninth Inf.,

457; Ninth cav., 813.

941



B



Baker Creek, Crossing of, Fifty-Sixth Inf.,

337.

Baldwin, Camp, Expedition against, Twenty-
Fifth inf., 176.
Bard's Company, 937.
Bardstown, Engagement at, First Cav., 749 ;

Third cav., 765.

Bean Station, Battle of, Second Cav., 759 ;

Seventh cav., 801.

Bell, Captain John M., Forty-Fourth Inf.,

drowned in Kanawha. 278.

Bently, Mrs., of Franklin, cares for National

soldiers, 844.

Benton, Battle of, Seventh Ind. Bat., 846.

Bentonville, Battle of, Twenty-First Inf.,
152; Thirty-Third inf., 220; Thirty-Ninth inf., 255; For-
ty-Sixth inf., 289; Seventy-Third inf., 425; Seventy-
Fourth inf., 430; Seventy-Ninth inf., 457; Eighty-Sec-
ond inf., 478; Ninety-Eighth inf., 541 j One Hundred and
Eighth iuf., 582; One Hundred and Thirteenth inf., 576;
One Hundred and Twenty-First inf., 623; Ninth car.,
813.

Berryville, Battle of, Twenty-Third Inf.,

165; Thirty-Sixth inf., 237; One Hundred and Twenty-
Third inf., 632; One Hundred and Forty-Fourth inf.. 674

Beverly, Surrender of, Thirty-Fourth Inf.,

227.

Beverly, Battle of, Eighth Cav., 806.
Birdsong's Ferry, Skirmish at, Forty-Sixth

inf., 2-6.

Blakely, Fort, Siege of, Seventy-Second Inf.,

416.

Bloomery Furnace, Skirmish at, Fifth Inf.,

43.

Blue's Gap, Capture of, Fifth inf., 42.

Blue Springs, Battle of, One Hundred and

Third inf., 538; Seventh cav., 800.

Blunt's Missouri Campaign, Second Cav.,

Bolivar, Battle of, Twentieth inf., 141 ; Sev-
enty-Eighth inf., 451.

Boone, Lieutenant-Colonel One Hundred and
Fifteenth inf., commands battalion in Cincinnati, 603
note.

Bowers, Private Seth, Fifteenth Ind. Bat.,

bird lights on him during engagement at the Chatta-
hoochie, -67.

Bragg, General, Advance into Kentucky, First
Inf., 16; Third inf., 30; Thirteenth inf., 94; "pursued
from. First inf.. 17; Third inf.. 31.

Brice's Cross-Roads, Battle of, Seventy-Sec-
ond inf., 415.
Bridgeport, Engagement near, Fourth Cav.,

Brinkman, Corporal, Saves colors at Port Re-
public, Fifth inf., 44.
Bristoe Station, Battle of, Sixth Cav., 791.
Britton Lane, Battle of, Fourth Ind. Cav.

co., 930.

Brough, Governor, Makes a speech to Twenty-
Fourth inf., 172.

Brown, Private William F., Fifty-Ninth Inf.,
gallantry of at Stone River, 354.

Brown's Ferry, Battle of, Sixth Inf., 52.
Brown's School-House, John, Skirmish at,



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