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The next ten days were spent by the regiment without tents or camp equipage, in the mud
and lain, and the terrible stench of the battle-field. With the baggage, which reached the com-
mand on April 11th, came pleasant weather, and the blush of early spring spread itself over the
battle-field.

The regiment participated in the approach to and siege of Corinth. During the march on
the 31st of April, 1862, Captain Franklin E. Stowe, of company G, died of disease. On May
22d, near Farmington, the regiment had a picket skirmish in which six men were wounded, two
of whom subsequently died. On May 29ih it entered Corinth with the army, and on the 3d of
June marched in pursuit of the enemy, going as far as Brownsboro'. It then returned to Iuka,
and there joined General Buell's column, and marched with it to Florence, Alabama, and to
Battle Creek, which last place it reached July 14th. On July 21st Lieutenant David W. Hil-
debrand died of disease.

On August 21st the regiment marched from Battle Creek, with General McCook's division,
to Nashville. At that place it joined the concentrated army under General Buell, and with it
made that arduous march to Louisville, Kentucky.

On October 1st the regiment marched out of Louisville with Crittenden's division on the
Bardstown Turnpike, passing through that place and reaching the vicinity of Perryville on Octo-
ber 8th, in time to witness a portion of that battle, but not to participate. After the battle was
ended, the regiment moved with the army in pursuit of the Rebels, and in the vicinity of Crab
Orchard had a running skirmish, capturing a Bebel gun with its accouterments.

The Rebel army having retreated from Kentucky by way of Cumberland Gap, the Nine-
teenth marched through Somerset and Glasgow to Gallatin. After doing provost-duty at Galla-
tin for two weeks, it joined its division at the Hermitage, and passing through Nashville, went
into camp on the Murfreesboro' Turnpike, near the State Lunatic Asylum.

On December 26th the regiment, under command of Major Charles F. Manderson, marched
with the army in its advance on Murfreesboro'. December 31st it was thrown across Stone River,
on the left, with the view of swinging around into Murfreesboro', but the disaster to McCook's
right wing compelled its withdrawal, and recrossing the river it passed to the right, and by a
determined resistance aided to check the advance of the Rebels. Under the personal lead of
Major-General Rosecrans, Beatty's brigade charged the enemy, drove him about three-fourths of
a mile ; and held by the position until relieved by Colonel M. B. Walker's brigade.

On January 2d, with the Fourteenth and Twenty-Third Brigades, the regiment crossed Stone
River, and received the charge of the Rebel column under Breckinridge. They were forced to
retreat, but the pursuing Rebels coming under the range of the massed artillery, were driven
back over the river and beyond it, with great slaughter. The Nineteenth Ohio and the Ninth
Kentucky were the first to cross Stone River, and with the assistance of men of other regiments
captured four pieces of artillery from the famous Washington (Louisiana) Battery. A mile of
ground was gained, and had darkness not prevented, they would have gone into Murfreesboro'.
Captain Bean, of company E, Lieutenant Bell, of company C, Lieutenant Donovan, of company
B, and Sergeant-Major Lyman Tilee were here killed. Lieutenant Sutherland, company H, and
Lieutenant Keel, company F, were severely wounded. The regiment entered the battle with four



Nineteenth Ohio Infantky. 137

hundred and forty-nine men, and lost in killed, wounded, and missing, two hundred and thir-
teen, nearly one-half.

Murfreesboro' was occupied January 4, 1863. The regiment went into camp on the Lib-
erty Turnpike. On January oth Lieutenant-Colonel Hollingsworth having resigned, Major C.
F. Manderson was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, and Captain H. G. Stratton to Major.

The whole army remained at Murfreesboro' until June 28th, during which time the Nine-
teenth guarded an ammunition train to Manchester over the worst of roads. Thence it marched
to McMinnville, where it remained until August 16th. It then crossed the Cumberland Mount-
ains to Pikeville, in Sequatchie Valley, and with the division passed over Lookout Mountain,
and readied Lee & Gordon's Mills on the 13th of September. At Crawfish Springs the regiment
had a brisk skirmish in which two men of company D were killed.

On September 18th, at nine o'clock A. M., the Nineteenth was ordered, with the Seventy -Ninth
Indiana, supported by the Ninth and Seventeenth Kentucky, to advance upon the enemy. The
regiment advanced with a cheer, drove the enemy, and captured a Rebel battery, with some
prisoners. The advance of this small force was checked by a large body of the enemy, which
forced it back, but not until it had secured and carried off its captures. As they fell back they
were mistaken for Rebel troops and fired upon. This fatal mistake caused the loss of a number
of men. McCook's division opportunely charged the advancing Rebels and drove them in turn.

On September 20th, the second day of the battle of Chickamauga, the regiment held an
important position, and performed its share of hard fighting until nightfali^when the whole army
withdrew to Chattanooga. Captain Uriah W. Irwin received a wound in this battle, which
caused his death December 8, 1863. Lieutenant W. F. McHenry was also severely wounded.
A private of company G received seven wounds during the first day's battle. The aggregate los3
of the regiment was one hundred men killed, wounded, and missing.

The Nineteenth remained in Chattanooga during the siege. On November 23d the regiment
took part in the advance on Orchard Knob, and lost some twenty men, killed and wounded. On
November ^5th it participated in that glorious charge on the Rebel works at the foot of Mission
Ridge, and seizing the inspiration, climbed, without orders, the precipitous sides of the mount-
ain and aided in driving the Rebels over and down the opposite side. In this charge the regi-
ment lost one man killed and thirteen wounded.

Returning to Chattanooga, it was almost immediately sent with Sherman toward Knoxville.
This march was among the severest during the war. The men were ragged and almost shoeless,
and left their footprints in blood on the snowy ground. Finding that Longstreet had raised the
siege of Knoxville, the forces moved to Strawberry Plains and Flat Creek. At the last-named
place, on January 1, 1864, four hundred men of the Nineteenth Ohio re-enlisted as veteran vol-
unteers. On January 4th the regiment left Flat Creek, and by the 16th reached Chattanooga,
where the papers being prepared, the three years' regiment was mustered out of, and the veteran
Nineteenth Ohio mustered into, the service. The regiment then returned to Ohio, reaching
Cleveland on the 16th of February.

On March 17th the veterans were promptly in camp at Cleveland. They returned immedi-
ately to the front, reaching Knoxville on the 24th of March. The regiment remained here up to
the 9th of April, when it moved to McDonald's Station, Tennessee, and with the Third Brigade,
Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, remained quietly in camp, awaiting the return of non-vete-
rans and preparing for the Atlanta campaign.

On May 6th Sherman's entire command entered on the Atlanta campaign. The Nineteenth
was sent to Parker's Gap, to hold that pass. On May 20th it rejoined its brigade at Cassville.
Moving with the column, the Nineteenth participated in the sharp fight at New Hope Church.
Captain Charles Brewer, of company E, was killed, Major Nash lost his left hand, Captain
Smith, of company G, was severely wounded in the head, and forty-four men were killed and
wounded. The regiment was engaged at Kenesaw, at Peachtree Creek, and at the crossing of the
Chattahoochie River, and was under fire almost daily up to the evacuation of Atlanta. It also
passed with Sherman around to the right of Atlanta in the affair at Jonesboro'.



138 Ohio in the War

On September 2, 1SG4, the regiment participated in the action at Lovejoy Station. Captain
Miller, of company I, was killed ; Colonel C. F. Manderson severely wounded in the spine; Captain
Agard, of company K, severely wounded in the shoulder. Seventy men were killed and wounded.
It captured the enemy's front line of works and held it for three days, and until Sherman's army
returned to Atlanta.

The entire loss of the regiment in the Atlanta campaign was : killed, two commissioned
officers and twenty-eight men ; wounded, six commissioned officers and ninety-six men ; missing,
thirteen men ; total, one hundred and forty-five. Lieutenant Wm. F. McIIenry, of company I,
was killed in front of Atlanta on the 24th of August, 1864, and Captain Lewis E. Fix, of com-
pany B, was severely wounded on the same day.

On October 1st, after General Sherman had started with the main army in his march to the
sea, the Nineteenth, forming a part of General George II. Thomas's command, left Atlanta and
marched toward Nashville to aid in opposing General Hood.

On October 29th, at the battle of Franklin, the regiment was held in reserve. It reached
Nashville the night after the battle of Franklin, and during the investment of that place by the
Eebels engaged in frequent sorties, with inconsiderable loss.

The regiment participated in the battle of Nashville with small loss, and then followed in
pursuit of Hood's defeated and demoralized army to the Tennessee Eiver.

On January 5, 1865, the regiment was at Huntsville, Alabama, where comfortable quarters
were erected, but were only occupied until the 31st, when the command again moved to Nashville,
for what purpose it was never ascertained, for on February 6th it was ordered back to Huntsville.

On March 17th Colonel Manderson resigned from physical disability, and Colonel Stratton
having resigned some months earlier, Major Nash was made Lieutenant-Colonel, and remained
in command of the regiment during the rest of its service.

From Huntsville it was moved into East Tennessee. Marching as far as the Virginia line,
it then returned to Nashville on April 25th. On June 16th it formed a part of that column of
troops sent to Texas, reaching Green Lake July 14, 1865. It left Green Lake September 11th,
and arrived at San Antonio on the 23d. This march was one of the most arduous of all its
campaigns. The excessive heat and lack of water caused intense suffering. The march was
made over one of the sandy plains of that region.

On October 21st the Nineteenth was mustered out of service at San Antonio, and started on
its return home. It reached Columbus, Ohio, on November 22d, and was paid off and dis-
charged at Camp Chase November 25, 1865, after nearly five years of varied and honorable
service.



Twentieth Ohio Infantry



139



20th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY:



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


REMARKS.




OHAS. WHITTLESEY
MANNING F. FORCE
HARRISON WILSON
JOHN C. FRY


\llg.
April
June


19, IBfil
19, 18S2
21, I8U5
7, 1864
19, 1861
19, 1862
7, 1864
fi, 1865
11, "

21, "
11, 1861
19, 1862

7, 18fi4

22, "
fi, 1865

11, "
1, "

21, "

7, 1861

12, 1864
9, 1861

13, 18fi2

21, "
16, 1861
28. 1862

18, 1861

3, "

4, "

4, "

8, "
1(1, "
l(i, "

5, "

19, 1862

9, "

27, "
19, "

24, "
11, "
19, "

9, "
8, "

14, "
3, "

5, 1863
16, "
14, "

19, "
1, 1864

2(1, "

20, "

20, "

22, "

25, "
fi, 1865

6, "
6, "

6, "
fi, "

11, "
11, "
11, "
11, "
11, "
11, "
10, "

21, "

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18, 1861

19, "
31, "

3, "

4, "

7, "

in, "
n, "

16, "

n, "

iii', "

19, 1862

28, "

22, "


Dec.
.May

June
Feb.

Dec.

May

Feb.
Jan.

June
Dec.
3Iay
Feb.
April
Jan.

April

June

Dec.

Oct.

Pec.

31 ay

Aug.

Dec.

Aug.

Dec.

Jan.
Feh.

3Iarch
Jan.

May

June
Sept.
Oct.
Jan.
Feb.

April
May

Jan.
April

July
Jan.

June
Dec.

Jan.
Dec.
Feb.
3Iarch


16, 1861
1, 1862

21, 1865
9, 1S64

lfi, 1861
1, is, ,2
8, 18fi4
fi, 18(55

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16, "
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22, "

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21, "

12, "
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12, 1863
10, "

10, "

25, "

25, "
30, 1861

20, "
20, "

20, "

22, "
25, 1861

fi, 1865
6, "
fi, "
fi, "
fi, "

11, "
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11, "
11, "
11, "
11, "
10, "

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16, "
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22, 18fi2
lfi, 18«1
19, 1S62

fi, "
6, "


Resigned April 19, 18fi2.

Appointed Brigadier-General.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned October 19, ISM, as Lieut. Col.

Promoted to Colonel.

Resigned January 7, 18S4.

Resigned October 19, 18fi4 : promoted to

Mastered out November 25, 1864.

Promoted to Colonel.

3Iustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Resigned April 1, 18fi4.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mastered out as Captain.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out as Captain.

3Iustered out September 18, 1864.

Mustered out witli regiment.

Dieil 3Iay 13, 1862.

Prompted to Surgeon.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned April 28, 1862.

R -signed July 20, 1863.

Promoted to 3Iaior.

Resigned February 22, 1862.

Resigned February 16, 1863.

Resigned January 5, isfiS.

Resigned November 14, 1862.

Appointed Major 96th regiment Aug. 8,

Resigned April 25, 1863.

Resigned February 9, 1862.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned April 2fi, 1862.

Honorably discharged January 6, 1864.

Declined.

3Iustered out.

Promoted to Major.

Declined promotion.

Resigned December 3, 1862.

Honorably discharged 3Iarch 28, isfi4.

Mustered nut December 18, 1864.

Died October 20, 1863.

Resigned April 14, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Mustered out October 18, I8fi4.

Mnstered out Novembers, 1865.

Promoted tn Major.

Kill -1 in ivctiori June 2fi, 1864.

3Iust -red out.

Promoted to Major.

Mustered out as Captain with regiment

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion ; mnstered out as Q

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mastered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mastered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.

Mastered out with regiment.
Promoted to Cantain.
Mnstered out August 18. 1864.
Resigned February 28, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to 3Iaior 67th regiment.
Resigned 31ay 16, 1862.

Promoted to Captain February 19, 1862.

Resigned April 21.
Promoted to Captain.




Do

Do




Do.








\ug.
April
Jan.

June
Sept.
April
Jan.
April
Jan.

April
June
S pt.
Oct.
Sept.
31 ay
Aug.
Dec.

July

Aug.
Sept.

Dec.

Feb.

Jan.
April

Feb.

April

Sept.

Aug.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

April

Jan.
April

July
Jan.

June
Aug.

Sept.

Oct.
Dec.

Feb.




Do




[nel.
Colo-


Do




Do

Do

Do


HARRISON Wn.S'iN




Do


John- C. Fry

Francis 31. Shackles




Do




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Do






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Do. .












Do.






Do.






Chaplain

Do.






John C. Frv




Do


Elisha Hyatt




Do ...






Do


John N. Cassell

•James 31. McCoy

Charlea H. 3IcElrov




Do

Do


862.


Do


Wm. W. Updearali'.




Do






Do






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Do






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Do






Do.






Do


Velorus T. Hills




Do






Do


George L. 31cllick....+




Do




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Do.






Do.


Wm. D. Heal




Do






Do




Do


Wm. 31. Waddell




Do




Do.


Henry D. Dwight




Do


Wm. Rush




Do






Do


Caleb Taylor




Do






Do


John W. Skillen


31.


Do






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Do.


Joshua E. Clark




Do


Joseph Haines




Do




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Do.
Do.


Peter X. Hitchcock




Do.






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Do.






Do.


VeloruB T. Hills




Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.


Edward C. Downs




Do.






Do.






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♦For three months' Roster see page lfi7.



140



Ohio in the War



DATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



1st Lieutenant
Do.
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Do.
Do.
i Lieutenant
Do.
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Do.
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Do.
Do.
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Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



David R. Rinehart

Wm. II. Jacobs

Nathan Bostwick

Wm. D. Neil

Harrison Wilson

Wm. D. Neil

Reuben M. Colby

Arthur X. HumiatoD.

Peter Weatherby

Wm. L. Waddell

Reuben M. Colby

J. B. Walker

Henry D. Dwight

Presley McCafferty

Reuben Woodmancy...

Joshua L. Dunlevy

Wm. Hush

Samuel G. Hasler

Wm. H. N'agle

John G. Stevenson

Caleb Taylor

Edmund E. Nutt

John W. Manning

John W. Skillen

A. B. Godfrey

Newton R. Persinger.

Thomas S. Hawley

Win. L. Barrington...

Chaney Grimes

C. W. McCracken

SylusA. Reynolds

Daniel Fitzgerald

Jesse L. Felt

Wm. L. Phillips

Jesse L. Dickensheets.

George Thoura

Erastus N. Owen

Lyman N. Ayers

Conrad Garvis

Henry Sherman

Wm. H. Jacobs

Wm. D. Nea!

Nathan Bostwick

Henry M. Davis

Reuben M. Colby

Herman H. Sberwiu...

Peter Weatherby

Robert J. Irwin

Seneca Hale

Henry 0. Dwight

Arthur N. Humiston.,

Wm. L. Waddell

J. B. Walker

Samuel II. Davis

Reuben Woodmancy...

Presley McCafferty

Joshua L. Dunlevy

Wm. W. McCracken...

Wm. Rush

Russell B. Neil

Samuel G. Hasler

Wm. H. Nagle

Byron Selby

John G. Stephenson....

Caleb Taylor

Edmund E. Nutt

Columbus V. Johnson
John W. Manning



Jan.
April

Feb.

May

April

Aug.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.
April



May-
July
Aug.
Juno



Aug.

Sept.



Oct.
Dec.



Nov
March

Feb.
April

May

Aug.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

April

Feb.

Jan.
April

June
Nov.



27, 1S62
lit, "
24, "
24, "

15, "
IK, "
19, "

8, "

14, "

3, "

5, 186:

28, "

16. "
14, "

19, "

20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "



25,

19,

11, IS65

11, "

11, "

11, "

11, "

11, "

11, "

11, "

11, "

11, "

15, 1861
3, "
8, "

10, "

10, "

16, "

18, "
5, "

16, "

19, 1862
2.', "
28, "
26, "

5, "

31, "

11, "
19, "
24, "
16, "

15, "
8, "

14, "

3, "

3, "

8, 1863

16, "
16, "
28, "
14, "
19, "

I, "

16, "



Jan.
May



Dec.
Jan.

Feb.

April

May

April



May-
July

Aug.
Jan.



Jan.
Dec.

Feb.
March

Jan.
May



Dec.
Jan.
Eel).

May



April
May



June
April



27, 1S62 Resigned June 28, 1863.

1, " Promoted to Captain.

9, " Promoted to Captain.

9, " Resigned May 16, 1862.

15, " Promoted to Captain.
3, " Broijioted to Captain.

24, "jfievoked.

10, " Promoted to Captain.

12, 1S63 rromoted to Captain.

10, " Promoted to Captain.

10, " Promoted to Captain.

8, " Appointed Assistant Adj. Gen. Oct. 10, 1863.

8, " Declined promotion ; mustered out as Adjt.

25, " Killed ; commission returned.

25, " Honorably discharged November 1, 1864.

20, 1S64 Honorably discharged as 2d Lieutenant.

20, " Mustered out^

20, " Mustered out.

2", " Mustered out with regiment.

20, " Mustered out December 18, 1854.

20, " Mustered out.

20, " Promoted to Captain.

9, " Mustered out.

9, " Declined promotion ; mustered out as Q. M.

25, " Deserted.

19, " Promoted to Captain.

11, 1S65 Promoted to Captain.
11, " Promoted to Captain.

11, " Musterevl out with regiment.

11, " Mustered out with regiment.

11, " Mustered out with regiment.

11, " Mustered out with regiment.

11, " Mustered out with regiment.

11, " Mustered out with regiment.

11, " Mustered out with regiment.

11, " Mustered out with regiment.

16, 1S61 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

16, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant February 22, '62.

16, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

16, " .Mustered out March 5, 1862.

16, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

16, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant April 26, 18G2.

16, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

22, 1862 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

16, 1S61 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

19, 1862 Resigned March 3, 1862.

6. " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

6, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

27, " Resigned February 16, 1863.

1, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

1, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

15, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

3, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

3, " Died April 14, 1S63.

3, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

24, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

10, " Honorably discharged April 28, 1863.

12, 18fi3 Honorably discharged August 19, 1863.
10, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

10, " Appointed 1st Lieutenant.

25, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
25, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
25, " Killed.

8, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

25, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

25, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

18, " Mustered out December 12, 1863

22, 1864 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.






Twentieth Ohio Infantry. 14L



TWENTIETH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE TWENTIETH OHIO was organized for the three months' service in May,
1861, bnt beyond its roster, which is given in the proper place, little or nothing of its
history or movements need be said in this connection. First-Lieutenant John C. Fry was
soon promoted to Captain, and continued in the service, entering the three years' organization
with his company, and was made Colonel of the regiment in January, 1864.

The reorganization took place at Camp King, near Covington, Kentucky, on the 21st of Oc-
tober, 1861. Its commander, Colonel Charles Whittlesey, a citizen of Northern Ohio, graduated
at West Point, and for some years preceding the war was an eminent engineer and geologist,
residing much of the time in the region of Lake Superior. He supervised and carried toward
completion the defenses of Cincinnati, which were commenced back of Covington by General O.
M. Mitchel. While there, and mainly under the supervision of Lieutenant-Colonel M. F. Force,
the members of this regiment were imbued with that thoroughly soldierly spirit which adhered
to them through all the vicissitudes of their field-service.

During the winter of 1861 and 1862 the regiment was employed in guarding several batteries
in the rear of Covington and Newport. Four companies were sent during the winter into an
insurrectionary district near Warsaw, Kentucky, and on the 11th of February, 1862, the entire
regiment, with the exception of company K, embarked on the steamers Emma Duncan and Doctor
Kane for the Cumberland River.

The Twentieth arrived at Fort Donelson on the evening of the 14th of February, and was
under fire to some extent, during the 15th. It marched to the extreme right of the army,
was placed in reserve, and was compelled to stand a severe test in seeing crowds of stragglers fall-
ing back from the front, and in being forced to hear their wild reports of disaster and defeat ; but,
notwithstanding these discouragements, the regiment passed through its first battle with no little
credit to every man. After the surrender of the Fort the Twentieth was sent North in charge of
prisoners, and became scattered all over the land. By the middle of March seven companies had
been brought together, and they proceeded up the Tennessee River, on the expedition to Yellow
Creek, on the steamer Continental, which General Sherman occupied as head-quarters.

On the 6th of April, while on inspection in camp at Adamsville, the Twentieth heard the
booming of the guns at Pittsburg Landing, and at 3 P. M. marched to the field, went into position
on the right of the army, and spent a comfortless night standing in the rain. The regiment par-
ticipated in the next day's battle with considerable loss, and is fully entitled to a share in the glory
of the victory. It was commanded during the engagement by Lieutenant-Colonel Force, Colonel
Whittlesey being in command of a brigade. During the advance on Corinth the Twentieth
remained on duty at Pittsburg Landing. Death and sickness held a perfect carnival in its camp,
and it was accustomed to appear on parade with scarcely one hundred men. After the fall of
Corinth, the regiment moved to Purely, and there joining its division, marched to Bolivar, where
it was left as a part of the garrison on the 6th of June, 1862. Here the health of the regiment



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