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improved greatly, and it was principally employed in expeditions for information or for forage.

On the 30th of August, 1862, the Rebel General, Armstrong, with fifteen regiments marching
to destroy railroad communications northward, was held in check the entire day by the Twentieth



142 Ohio in the War.

Ohio, a portion of the Seventy-Eighth Ohio, and two companies of the Second Illinois Cavalry.
The steady fire of the skirmishers from the Twentieth Ohio did much toward restraining the
enemy from any attack in line. Late in the afternoon two companies, G and K of the Twentieth,
were captured by a cavalry charge, but not until they had emptied many a saddle in repulsing
two previous charges. This affair was considered of so much importance that Colonel M. ML
Crocker, commanding the post of Bolivar, was promoted to Brigadier-General, to date from the
day of the engagement. Colonel Force, Major Fry, Captain Kaga, Adjutant Owen, Lieutenants
Ayres, Hills, and Mellick, of the Twentieth, were specially and honorably mentioned in the official
report of Colonel Leggett, who commanded the brigade in this battle.

The regiment assisted in driving Price from Iuka, on the 20th of September, and in the
engagement between Hurlburt and Price at the crossing of the Hatchie near Metamora, Ten-
nessee, it arrived on the field at 4 P. M., with a wagon train loaded with supplies, having
marched twenty-eight miles since 10 o'clock, A. M. The supplies were immediately turned
over and the regiment marched in pursuit of the Rebels that same night.

On the 28th of November the regiment marched southward from Lapran;re in the Second
Brigade of Logan's Division, and on the 4th of December entered Oxford, Mississippi. The
regiment advanced as far as Water Valley, Mississippi, and on the capture of Holly Springe
returned northward, halting a few days at Abbeville, where, on Christmas and New Year's
days, the men regaled themselves on dinners of parched corn. About this time the Seventeenth
Army Corps was organized, and Logan's division became the Third Division in the corps. By
slow marches the Twentieth reached Memphis on the 2Sth of January, 1863, and there received
an addition of two hundred recruits and drafted men. On the 22d of February the regiment
moved down the Mississippi River on the steamer Louisiana, landed at Lake Providence, and a
few weeks later marched to the relief of Porter's fleet, blockaded in Steele's Bayou, and after
spending three days in the Louisiana swamps returned to its camp. The regiment arrived at
Milliken's Bend on the 18th of April, and marched to Hard Times Landing on the Mississippi.
It crossed the river, moved through Port Gibson, and pursued the retreating Rebels to Hawkin-
eon's Ferry on the Big Black.

On the 12th of May the Twentieth deployed in advance of the Seventeenth Corps as it
approached Raymond, Mississippi, and while resting with arms stacked, was fired upon from a
dense thicket beyond a small stream. The regiment immediately formed and advanced across
the creek, using the bank on the opposite side as a breastwork. For an hour the struggle was
severe, and especially so to the Twentieth, as the regiments on the right withdrew their lines a
little distance to the rear, and the flank of the Twentieth was exposed to a raking cross-fire.
Every man stood firm until the line again advanced, and the Rebels gave way. The regiment
lost in this engagement twelve killed and fifty-two wounded. Private Canavan, of company E,
was promoted to a sergeantcy on the field for skillfully managing his company when all the
officers and sergeants were struck down. Captain Wilson was decorated with the Seventeenth
Corps Medal of Honor, in silver, for gallantry in assembling his skirmishers under the very
muzzles of the enemy's guns in the first charge. Lieutenant Weatherby, of company A, being
on the extreme right of the skirmish line with his company, and being cut off from his regi-
ment, assembled his company and reported to the Colonel of the nearest regiment, the Eighty-
First Illinois, and fought as a part of that regiment till the end of the battle; when, as the com-
pany marched to join its regiment, the Eighty-First showed their appreciation of its services
by giving three hearty cheers for the "Twentieth Ohio Boys."

The regiment moved on through Clinton, Jackson, Bottom Depot, to Champion Hills, when
the regiment was early pushed forward to a strong position in a ravine, under such a fire that it
was dangerous for a staff officer to approach with orders. Though the adjoining regiments on
each flank were pushed back as the enemy moved up in mass, the Twentieth held its ground
without wavering till its ammunition was exhausted; it then fixed bayonets and prepared to
maintain its position, but the Sixty-Fifth Ohio came to its assistance from the reserve and the
enemy was driven back.



Twentieth Ohio Infantry. 143

Crossing Big Black the regiment reached the rear of Vickshurg, and acted as support to the
assaulting party on the 21st of May. The regiment did its proportion of work in the saps, and
mines, and trenches, until the 29th of May; when, with the brigade, it withdrew from the line
and accompanied an expedition to the Yazoo Valley. It returned again to Vicksburg on the
4th of June, and was placed in reserve. On the day of its return Colonel Force was ordered to
assume command of the Second Brigade, and was afterward promoted to Brigadier-General.
lieutenant "Walker, acting Adjutant of the Twentieth, was made Captain and Assistant Adju-
tant-General on General Force's staff, and Lieutenant H. O. Dwight was appointed Adjutant,
and held the position to the close of the war, declining a captaincy when it was offered to him.
It was about this time that several of the Twentieth, who had been transferred to the Fifth
United States Heavy Artillery (colored), passed through a severe hand-to-hand action at Mil-
liken's Bend, in which the attacking Rebels were thoroughly defeated by the raw negro troops.

On the 26th of June the regiment, marching with the Second Brigade, withdrew to Tiffin,
near Black River, in order to observe the movements of Johnston. After the fall of Vicksburg
the regiment camped at Bovina Station, on the Mississippi Southern Railroad, but was shortly
ordered to join Sherman's army besieging Jackson. It finally returned to Vicksburg, July 30th,
and encamped in the outskirts of the city. In the latter part of August, the Twentieth was a
part of an expedition to Monroe, on the Ouachita River, and returned to its camp at Vicksburg,
September 1st. On the 7th of October the regiment crossed Big Black at Messenger's Ferry,
skirmished slightly at Boquechitto Creek, advanced toward Canton as far as Livingstofr, thence
to Clinton, and then over the old Champion Hills battle-ground to Big Black and Vicksburg,

In January, 1S64, two-thirds of the men present re-enlisted, and on the 3d of February the
regiment crossed Big Black and joined the celebrated Meridian expedition. In crossing Baker's
Creek one of the enemy's batteries opened upon the column. The Twentieth rapidly formed in
line, and the battery retired. The regiment was compelled to march in line until late in the
afternoon, as the Rebels placed their battery on every hill-top and skirmished briskly along the
road. In spite of this the head of the column passed over eighteen miles, and camped at Jack-
son that night. Passing through Brandon, the troops reached Morton, and from this point to
Meridian the Twentieth acted as rear-guard to the whole army the greater portion of the dis-
tance. After arriving at Meridian the regiment assisted in destroying ten or fifteen miles of
railroad, and then marched to the wagon corral on Chunkey Creek ; and, being misdirected by a
Rebel, it marched eight miles to advance three. The next day the Rebel's house was burned, in
order that he might remember the time he enjoyed the pleasure of misdirecting the Yankees.

On the 20th of February the regiment marched on its return as a part of the convoy for
seven hundred wagons. It marched by way of Hillsboro' and Canton, and reached Vicksburg
on the 4th of March.

The regiment went North on veteran furlough ; and, after spending thirty days at their
homes, rendezvoused at Camp Dennison on the 1st of May, and proceeded to Cairo, Illinois, and
from there by steamer to Clifton, Tennessee. From this point it marched, via Pulaski, Hunts-
ville, Decatur, and Rome, to Acworth, where it joined General Sherman on the 9th of June,
after a march of two hundred and fifty miles from Clifton. In the advance from Acworth the
Twentieth formed the escort to the wagon-train, but finally joined its brigade, on the 23d, at
Bushy Ridge, near Kenesaw Mountain.

On the night of the 26th the Twentieth, with its division, marched to the left of the line,
and at eight o'clock next morning moved vigorously and with great noise upon the eneniv, the
object being to divert the enemy's attention from the general assault made by the other portions
of the National line. The division advanced to within easy range of the Rebel works, near
Marietta, and was exposed to the concentrated fire of four batteries. Having succeeded to a cer-
tain extent in accomplishing their object, the regiment engaged in another demonstration on the
Rebel works in front of its camp at three P. M. ; and, advancing up a thickly wooded hill till
within one hundred yards, of the enemy's works, sustained a brisk musketry tire till dark. On
the 2d of July the regiment marched with its corps to the mouth of the Nickojack Creek, where



144 Ohio in the Wak.

the enemy was found intrenched. After the evacuation of the works at Nickojack, the regiment
was employed in picketing the river, which was lively business, as the Rebels kept up a con-
stant and accurate fire during the day. On the IGth of July the regiment crossed the Chatta-
hoochie at Rossville, and on the 20th readied the Rebel works before Atlanta.

The regiment took position in the advanced line on the 21st, and on the 22d firing was
heard in its rear. The regiment formed in the works; but, as the Rebels advanced, the men
leaped the parapet and faced toward the enemy. The Rebels pressed up to and around the regi-
ment, and the bullets came from front, flank, and rear ; and, according as the fire was hottest in
front or rear, the men of the Twentieth leaped the works and delivered their fire in that direc-
tion. Cartridges became scarce, but portions of companies A, F, and D risked their lives and
obtained, in the very face of the enemy, five cases of ammunition, which were piled up near the
regimental head-quarters; but even this supply was insufficient, and the ammunition of the
wounded and dead was distributed, and charges were made to capture Rebels for their cartridges.
At four o'clock P. M. many of the men had only two or three cartridges left. The batteries in
Atlanta threw shell upon the rear of the brigade, the enemy redoubled their fire in front, and,
placing a captured gun within fifty paces of the flank of the Twentieth, raked the regiment with
cannister. Orders came to withdraw from the works and form a new line, and the Twentieth
slowly retired, the men turning now and then to fire the last cartridge at the enemy. In the
new line the Twentieth was placed in reserve, with the exception of a detachment of about one
hundred men, who were posted in the works on Force's Hill, and fought desperately until the
close of the battle. In this engagement the Twentieth lost forty-four killed, fifty-six wounded,
and fifty-four missing. Instances of personal daring Avere numberless, but Lieutenants
Nmt, of company F, and Skillen, of company G, and the following named enlisted men : Crabbe
and Casey, of company C ; Elder, of company G, and Specker and Stevenson, of company F,
especially distinguished themselves.

The regiment was engaged in changing position and building works until the 24th of Au-
gust, when it received orders to march as guard to the supply trains of the Army of the Ten-
nessee. Four days later the regiment joined its brigade at Fairburn, and assisted in destroying
railroads. In the battle of Jonesboro', on the 31st, the Twentieth was on the left of the Fifteenth
Corps, at right-angle to the main line, as "refused flank," and in this position was greatly
annoyed by a heavy artillery fire. On the 2d of September the regiment took position on a
hill near Lovejoy's Station, where it remained several days, exposed to some annoyance from
the enemy's sharp-shooters, and finally settled down in camp near Atlanta, on the East Point
Road. On the 5th of October the regiment joined the pursuit of Hood, and, after folloAving as
far as Galesville, Alabama, returned and camped at Smyrna Church, about twenty miles from
Atlanta, November 5th.

The regiment left Atlanta with Sherman's army, on the 15th of November, for Savannah.
It participated in the destruction of the tOAvn of Millin, Georgia, and, on reaching Savannah,
took position on the right of the Seventeenth Corps. On the 19th of December it was detached
from the brigade and sent to the Ogeechee, near King's Bridge, where it was engaged in build-
ing wharves on which to land supplies for the army. This work was cut short by the surrender
of Savannah, and the regiment rejoined the brigade, December 24th, in camp at the outskirts of
the city.

The Twentieth embarked on the steamer Fanny, on the 5th of January, 1865, proceeded to
Beaufort, South Carolina, crossed Port Royal Ferry, and advanced until the enemy was found
intrenched beyond a rice swamp. The Twentieth deployed as skirmishers, charged the enemy's
works in fine style, and the regimental colors were soon waving from the parapet. At dark the
troops encamped before the fortifications of Pocotaligo, and, on the morning of the 13th of Jan-
uary, the Twentieth was assigned camping ground beyond the railroad station of Pocotaligo,
and remained there until the 30th of January, when it started on the Carolina campaign.

The head of the column struck the enemy, February 13th, near the bridge across the North
Edisto at Orangeburg. Two companies of the Twentieth were deployed as skirmishers, and



Twentieth Ohio Infantry.



145



goon the regiment advanced on the double-quick and drove the enemy back to their fortifica-
tions, which were concealed by a turn in the road, and from which the Rebels opened fire. The
regiment deployed as skirmishers, advanced through the swamp in water icy-cold and waist deep,
opened fire on the enemy on the opposite side, stood until late in the afternoon, and was relieved.
Next day crossed the river and engaged in destroying the railroad. In this the National losa
was less than the enemy's missing, wounded, or killed. Reached Columbia the night the town
was destroyed ; the next morning marched through its smoking ruins and up the railroad,
destroying it as far as Winnsboro'. On the 24th of February was left in rear of the entire army
to guard the pontoon train ; and, after a wearisome march, entered Cheraw March 3d, and Ben-
nettsville the 6th. The regiment moved on over miserable roads, being frequently compelled to
lift the wagons out of the mud, hub-deep, until March 19th, then moved toward Bentonville,
where it arrived at five P. M. next day. On the 21st fortified rapidly, expecting an attack, but
the enemy withdrew, and on the 24th the regiment entered Goldsboro'. After two weeks' rest
the regiment pushed on to Raleigh, and on the loth of April moved toward Johnston's army.
It became known that Johnston had asked terms for a surrender ; the men seemed crazy with joy ;
they shouted, laughed, flung their hats in the air, threw their knapsacks at each other, hugged
each other, stood on their heads in the mud, and were fairly mad with delight.

Leaving Raleigh, May 1st, the regiment marched via Richmond to Washington ; was in the
grand review, May 24th ; thence was sent to Louisville, Kentucky, and, July 18th, back to
Columbus, where it was mustered out of service.



20th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



KOSTEE, THREE MONTHS' SERVICE.



DATE OP BANK.



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

lit. Colonel....

Major

Surgeon

Ass't Surgeon

Captain

Do. „

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

lBt Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
3d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.

no.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



THOMAS MORTON
J. W. Cruikshank...

0. N. Lamison

E. L. Hill

C. J. Bellows

M. H. Nichols

Ozro Dodds

Thomas Morton

A. V. Thompson

S. R. Mott

C. N. Lamison

Henry Rigby

.J. W. Cruikshank

David S. Cable..

Thomas P. Cook

A. L. Harris

M. Armstrong

J. C. Fry

C. M. Hughes

M. D. Whelplcv

J. W. Sater

David Gans,

E. Arnold

M. Armstrong

S. E. Adams

.). C. Frv

J. F. Sarratt

J. R. McDonald

A. Taylor

J. W. Dunn

James Knapp

T. J. Hustler

Frank Evans

A. L. Harris

Thomas Gray

W. >V. Watts

A. G. Taylor

E. A.James

James Knapp

W. A. O. Measney....

J. C. McDonald

Peter 0. Cain

J. W. Pepper

A. S. Jones

John A. Whiteside...
A. J. Bowers



May



^pril



May

April

May
April



May

April



May
April



May



June
May



23, 1801

23,

23,

13,

13,

20,

1*.

22,

22,

17.

20,

24,

13,

23,

25,

27,

27,

27,

20,

18,

22,

22,

17,

20,

24,

13,

22,

25,

27,

27,

27.

20,

18,

22,

22,

17,

20,

24,

13,

22,

25,

27,

27,

17,

27,

27,



May



Lpril



Mav
April

May

April



May
April

May



Lpril



May
April

May

June

May



2?,
23,
23,
13,
13,
20,
18,
22,
22,
17,
20,

2»,
13,
23,
25,
27,
27,
27,
20,
18,
22,
22,
17,
20,
24,
13,
22,
25,
27,
27,
27,
20,
18,
22,
22,
17,
20,
21,
13,
22,
25,
27,
27,
17,



Elected Colonel.

Elected Major.

Elected Lieutenant-Colonel.



Promoted to Captain.
Quartermaster May 27, 1861.
Promoted to Captain.



Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned June 7, 1861.



Vol. II.— 10.



146



Ohio in the War.



21st REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTEE, THREE MONTHS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel

Major

Surgeon

Ass t Surgeon
Captain ....

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



JESSE S. NORTON.

J. M. Neibling

A. J. Taylor

Wm. M. Eames

D. S. Young

James Wilson

Omer C. Oarr

A slier Cook

Thomas G. Allen*

A. V. Rice

George F. Walker

It. Henry Lovell

A. M. Blackmail

Ira K. Seaman

Samuel A. Strong

Matthew Ewing

D. M. Stoughton

James J. Voorhes

Arnold McMahan

Matthew Ewingr

P. J. Bowman

Morgan D. Shafer

Joshua S. Preble ,

Matthew II. Chance..
Charles H. Vantjne...

John Paul, jr

Charles W. Allen

Frederick R. Miller...



DATE OF RANK.



May



13,

" 13,

April 17,



May
April



July
April



May

April



July
April



COM. ISSUED.



May



April

May
April



Aug.
April



May-
April



Aug.



15, 1

15,

15,

13,

13,

n,

26,
25,

1,
16,
23,
26,
24,
25,
25,

9,
17,
26,
25,

1,
27,
23,



2d Lieutenants.

George Foreman

John E. MeGowan....

Leonard B. Blinn

Guy Pom«roy

George Matthews

J. E. Stearns

J. J. A. Thrapp

Jonas Foster

Ira M. Kelsey

lames P. Arrants

James F. Pocock

George 0. McPherson



Ap.17,'61

r 26, jj

Mayl| "
" 16, "

An. 23, "
11 26, "
" 24, "



J'yl«, "

Ap.27, "



Ap.17,'61
,r 26, '*
" 25, '

M'ayl, '
" 16, '

Ap.23, '
' r 26, '
" 84, '
" 25, '
" 25, '

Augy, '

" 12, '



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Do

Do

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Burgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do



JESSE S. NORTON

JAMES M. NEIBLING...

ARNOLD McMAIIAN

James M. Neidling

D. M. Stoughton

Arnold McMahan

Wm. B. Wicker

Samuel A. Strong

D. M. Stoughton

George F. Walkhr

Arnold McMahan

Isaac Cusac

John C. Martin

Wm. M. Eamf.s

Daniel S. Young

Daniel S. Young

Richard Gray

Wm. C. Payne

D. M. Stoughton

George F. Walker

Arnold McMahan

Silas S. Canfield

Isaac Cusac

Matthew Ewing

Milo Caton

James P. Arrants

H. II. Alban

David Giblis

Chas. II. Yantine

John C. Martin

Lewis E. Brewster

James W. Knaggs

James L. Curry

Charles W. Allen

Win. B. Wicker

Edward L. Baird

James Porter

John C. Martin

Robert S. Hunger

Samuel F. Cheney

Daniel Lewis

John Patterson

Jam es I. Bumpus

Elihu II. Mason

Thomas Anderson

John S. Malioney

Jacob L. Keller

Wm. Welker

George Selvets

Augustus Besanson



DATE OF RANK.



Sept.
Dec.
July
Sept.
Dec.
Feb.
Julv

Sept.
Oct.
Dec.
June
Fel).
July
Sept.
Oct.
Sept.
Aug.
Dec.
Sejjt.



Feb.
April

Oct.
Dec.
Feb.
May
June
Feb.



Jan.
May



com. issued.



1861 Nov.
1S62 Dec.
1MJ5 July

1S61 Nov.
" Dec.



1861

1862



1864
1865

1661
1862

1863
1864

1865
1861

1862



July 12,
12,



Feb.
July
Nov.

Dec.
June
Feb.
July
Dec.

Nov.
Sept.
Dec.
Nov.



1864

1865

1861
1862

1863
1864
1865

1861

18:'.2



Feb.

May

July

Dec.

Feb.

March

June

Feb.



Jan .
May



July



'Killed at Scary Creek, Virginia.



Resigned December 2(1, 1S62.
Honorably discharged December 6, 1864.
.Mustered out as Lieutenant-Colonel.
Promoted to Colonel December 2(1, 1862.
Died of wounds November l l J, 1863.
Promoted to Colonel.

Resigned October 3, 1862.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Resigned June 14, 1863.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out.

Mustered out as Captain August 3, 1865.

Resigned October 3, 186,2.

Musterod out with regiment.

Promoted to Surgeon October 3, 1862.

Mustered out June 5, 1865.

Resigned August 13, 1S63.

Promoted to Major October 3, 1S62.

Promoted to Major.

Promoted to Major.

Mustered out April 1, 1865.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned February 20, 1863.

Resigned Jun • 5, 1865.

Resigned April '.), Ift62.

Honorably discharged March 8, 1665.

Resigned January 25, 1862.

Resigned December 10, 1863.

Commission returned.

Resigned May 13, 1863.

Resigned July 20, 1863; wounded.

Resigned August 28, 1864.

Resigned October 4, 1864 ; wounded.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion.

Promoted.

Declined promotion.

Mustered out with regiment.

Killed Julv 21, 1864.

Mustered out December 29, 1864.

Dismissed January 23, 1865.

Discharged as 1st Lieutenant May 15, 1865.

llun. dise'd as 1st Lieut. Jan. 23, '65; wounrtiti

Mustered out as 2d Lieu tenant May 15, 1S6.">.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant May 15, 186.''.



t Promoted to Captain.



Twenty-First Ohio Infantry.



147



Captain

Do! '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
. Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

D...

Do.



4



0.



Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



Christian B. Sholty

David McClintock

John H. Bolton

Robert F. McDonald

John W. Pember

Squire J. Carlin

John A. Williams

W'm. Vance

James W. Knaggs

Win. B. Wicker

James Porter*

Matthew H. Chance

James L. Curry

Lewis E. Brewster

John C. Martin

Charles II. Vantine

Robert S. Manger

George 0. Mcl'lurson

George Foreman

Joseph E. Stearns

Amos B. Wood

Fnoch B. Wiley

Charles W. Allen

Edward L. Baird

Samu u l F. Cheney

Daniel Lewis

Alex. A. Monroe

Enoch B. Wiley

John Pattprson

James I. Bumpus

Elihu H. Mason

Thomas Anderson

Thomas B. Lamb

John W. Berry

Robert S. Dills worth

Thomas B. Lamb

Ara C. Spaflbrd

John S. Mahoney

Jacob L. Keller

Daniel Richards

George Cleghorn

Wilson J. Vance

Wilson W. Brown

John It. Porter

John Mercer

Wm. Welker

George Scheets

George T. Squire

Augustus Besanson

Christian B. Sholty

David McClintock

Celestine Chochard

Wm. J. Henry

Earl W. Merry

John H. Bolton

Christopher Gundy

Robert F. Bonham

Philip Wilch

Henry Grahlman



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