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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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Ouincy A. Randall

Finh-y Brit ton

Jeremiah E. Milhoof

Henry R. Skinner

Matthew P. Cullican

Oscar A. Clark

Thomas Crook

Joseph Power

George Foreman

Joseph E. St'-ams

Enoch B. Wiley

John Patterson

Simon B. Webber

Charles W. Allen

Joab Squire, jr

Samuel F. Cheney

Alex. A. Monroe

Amos E. Wood

Daniel Lewis

James Blakely

Thomas Anderson

James I. Bumpus

Wm. A. Prior

John W. Berry

Thomas B. Lamb

Ara C. Spafford

John S. Mahoney

(acob L. Keller

Daniel Richards

Robert S. Dillsworth

George Cleghorn

Robert Buffum

Wilson J. Vance

Wilson W. Brown

John R. Porter

John Mercer

James Blakely

Mark Wood

Wm. Welker

Christian B. Sholty

David McClintock



DATE OK RANK.



July



Sept.



April

Jan.

Dec.

April

Nov.

Dec.

Oct.

Dec.

Feb.

May



Feb.



May



June
July-



Sept.



Feb.

Jan.

Feb.

May

April

Aug.

Oct.

Dec.



Nov.
March

Dec.

April
May

June.

Sept.
Feb.



12, 1865

12, "

12,

12,

12,

12,

19, 1861

19,

19,

19,

19,

Wi

l'J,

19,

iy,
19.

19,
19,

3, 1862
3, "



21, "

17, 186

9, 1862
is,

3,'
20,

20,

20, 1863

13, "

14, "-

13, "

29, 1864

29, "

29, "

29, "

29, "

30, "
30, "

20, 186J

28, "
23, "

23. "

15, "
15, "
15, "
10, "

10, "

11. "

11, "
13. *'
13, "
26, "

12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "

12, "
19, 1861
19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "
19, "

19, "
8, 1S62
8, "

21, "

8, "

9, "
9, "

26, "

3, "

20, "
S, "

18, "

1, "
20, "

24, 1S63

2, "

13, "

13, "

14, "
14, "
26, 1864

29, "
29, "
29, "



COM. ISSUED.



July 12, 1865

" 12, "

12, "

12, "

12, "

" 12, "

Nov. 11, 1861



May-
June
July
Feb.

Dec.

Feb.
April
May
June



Dec.
Jan.



May



June

July-



May
June



July

Feb.



April
June



Sept.
Feb.



Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant.



l'-\

i?.
12,
■2,
12,
12,
'-',
12,
12,

li, :



ii,
ii,
ii,
ii,
ii,
u,
ii,

8, 1862

8, "

1,

6,

6,

8,

12, 1863
12. "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
24, 1863

8, "
15, "
29, "
29, "
14, "
2.i, 1864.
29, "
29, "
29, "



Resigned January 8, 1S62.

Resigned December 5, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out September 20, 1864.

Resigned January 21, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out at expiration of service.

Resigned December 17, 1361.
1862 Honorably discharged Sept. 11, '62 ; reinstated

Revoked. [Nov. 18, '61'.

Died June 13, 1863.

Killed.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out December 27, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned Mav 21, 1863.
l862]Killed December 31, 1862.

" I Promoted to Captain.
1S63 Promoted to Captain.
" IPromoted to Captain ; discharged.
' | Promoted to Captain.
" 'Revoked.

" I Resigned January 6, 1865.
" IKilled June 27, 1864.
1864 Resigned January 8, 1865. [Lieut.

" Died in prison Oct. 14, '64 ; not mustered as 1st
" Promoted to Captain.
" I Promoted to Captain.
" Discharged January 31, 1865.
" I Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant Feb. 8, 1865.
" I Resigned April 2, 1864.
lS65iDischarged as an enlisted man.

Declined promotion.

Mustered out February 4, 1865, as 2d Lieut.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned July 3, 1365.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted) te Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion.

Discharged; wounded.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion.



Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. [Aug. 26, '62

Appointed A. A. G. by Presid't, rank as (Hpt.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned March 9. 1362.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Appointed 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Revoked.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned February 15. 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Itesigned April 2*, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out March 31, 1365.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Killed September 20, 1863, at Chickamauga.

Hon. discharged Nov. 3, 1864; wounded.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



148 Ohio in the War.



TWENTY-FIRST OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE TWENTY-FIRST OHIO was organized at Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, on
the 27th of April, 1861. It moved on the 23d of May, passing through Columbus,
where it received its arms, to Gallipolis. It went into camp at that place and remained
there until the 3d of July, when it moved to Ravenswood, by order of General McClellan, to
re-enforce the Seventeenth Ohio, then expecting an attack from O. Jennings Wise, whose force.-*
lay at a little town called Ripley, twelve or fifteen miles from the river.

The National force under Colonel Norton, of the Twenty-First Ohio, disembarked at eleven
o'clock at night, made a forced march to Ripley, surprised the Rebels and drove them from the
place. The expedition then returned by steamer to Gallipolis. A day or two after this Colonel
Norton made a reconnoissance up the Kanawha River, and captured forty prominent Rebel citi-
zens as hostages for the good treatment and safe return of some loyal Virginians captured by the
notorious Jenkins. Colonel Norton also led an expedition to Jenkins's farm, just below Guy-
andotte, consisting of company F, Captain George F. Walker, and company C, Lieutenant A.
McMahan, and captured a steamboat load of cattle, horses, corn, etc., for the use of the army,
and once more returned to their camp at Gallipolis.

On the 11th of July General Cox took command of the brigade, consisting of the Eleventh,
Twelfth, and Twenty-First Ohio, the First and Second Kentucky, Cotter's First Ohio Battery of
two guns, and Captain George's cavalry, and marched to Red House, on the Kanawha River.
At this place Colonel Norton was ordered to make a reconnoissance for the purpose of discov-
ering the Rebel position. Company F, Captain George F. Walker ; company II, Captain A. M.
Blackman, and company G, Captain Lovell, with a portion of Captain George's cavalry, started,
cinder command of Colonel Norton, early on Sunday morning, the 14th of July, moving on
three different roads, all terminating at a little village on Scarey Creek, where it empties into
the Kanawha River. After marching some eight miles the enemy's pickets were encountered
in a church, from which they fired and fell back on their main body. Skirmishers were thrown
out by Colonel Norton, which developed the enemy in force on the opposite bank of the creek,
occupying a Btrong position, with a full battery.

After developing the strength of the Rebels, the National troops fell back two miles, and at
twelve o'clock that night were re-enforced by the remaining companies of the Twenty-First Ohio
and part of the Second Kentucky, under Lieutenant-Colonel Enyart; but, lacking artillery,
Colonel Norton thought it best to fall back and await the arrival of the main body. On the 15th
the main body, under General Cox, arrived, and, on the morning of the 17th, Colonel Lowe was
placed in command of a force, consisting of his own regiment ; company K, Captain S. A.
Strong, and company D, Captain Thomas G. Allen, of the Twenty-First ; Captain Cotter's two
rifled guns, and a portion of Captain George's cavalry, as an attacking column, and ordered to
drive the enemy from his position. The fight opened at great disadvantage to the Nationals,
from the fact that their old United States smooth-bore muskets did not carry far enough to
reach the enemy, who were stationed in the bed of the creek and protected by its high banks.
Colcnel Norton seeing the disadvantage, determined to drive the enemy out of the creek with



Twenty-First Ohio Infantry. 149

the bayonet, and, as a preliminary movement, sent a flanking force to turn the enemy's left, and
divert his attention from the contemplated charge in front. The charge was successfully made
by Colonel Norton, with two companies of the Twelfth Ohio under Lieutenant-Colonel White,
and two companies of the Twenty-First Ohio, the enemy being lifted out of the creek, and the
whole Rebel force driven back. Colonel Norton was severely wounded through the hips in this
affair, but remained on the field, hoping to be supported by Colonel Lowe. Three messengers
were dispatched to Colonel Lowe, one of whom was killed, but the needed support was not
given. In the meantime the enemy received re-enforcements; and, discovering that the Na-
tional force was not properly supported, again advanced their column, and in turn drove them,
capturing Colonel Norton and Lieutenant Brown, of the Twelfth Ohio, who had remained with
Colonel Norton and the other wounded.

The loss in this engagement was nine killed, including Captain Allen and Lieutenant Poin-
eroy, of company D, and seventeen wounded.

On the evening of the battle, Colonel Woodruff, of the Second Kentucky ; Colonel De Vil-
liers, of the Eleventh Ohio, and Lieutenant-Colonel George W. Neff, of the First Kentucky,
rode up to the battle-ground by a different road from that on which the troops were retreating,
and were instantly made prisoners by the Rebels.

The Twenty-First Ohio remained in the field, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Neib-
ling, until ordered home to be mustered out, which occurred on the 12th of August, 1861, at Co-
lumbus, Ohio. It was again reorganized, on the 19th of September, 1861, for the three years'
campaign, and mustered into the service at Findlay, Ohio. It received marching orders a few
days thereafter, was supplied with arms at Camp Dennison on the 2d' of October, and marched
the same day for Nicholasville, Kentucky. It remained there ten days, and was then ordered to
march to McCormick's Gap to join General Nelson, then in command at that point.

During that campaign no engagement occurred, excepting that at Ivy Mountain, in which
the Rebels attempted an ambush, but were foiled and whipped, mainly through a flank move-
ment executed by the Twenty-First Ohio. The Rebels were driven from that line, and the whole
command returned to Louisville, reaching that city in November.

The National army was reorganized in the following December, under General Buell, and
moved to Bacon Creek and Green River, where it remained in winter-quarters up to late in
Februarj r . In General O. M. Mitchel's division the Twenty-First marched on Bowling Green,
driving the Rebels from that strong position. Then moving direct on Nashville, General Mitchel
summoned the city authorities to surrender, which demand was promptly acceded to. Colonel
Kennett, of the Fourth Ohio Cavalry, took possession of the city on the 13th of March.

On the 17th General Mitchel's column moved out on the Murfreesboro' turnpike, occupied
Murfreesboro' on the 19th, and remained there until the 4th of April, when it moved on Hunts-
ville. At this point the famous expedition under Andrews, a citizen of Kentucky, was sent out
to sever the Rebel communication with Richmond, so as to prevent re-enforcements from reach-
ing Beauregard. This was made up from the Twenty-First, Thirty-Third, and Second Ohio,
and consisted of twenty-four men. It failed by reason of meeting trains on the road not specified
in the time-table in possession of Andrews.

From Fayetteville the command moved, on the morning of the 10th of April, for Huntsville,
and reached that place on the morning of the 11th, drove the Rebels out, captured three hun-
dred prisoners, sixteen locomotives, and a large number of freight and passenger cars.

The most vigorous measures were then inaugurated by General Mitchel. Expeditions were
sent in every direction, railroad bridges burned, and every precaution taken against surprise.
One of these, which consisted of company C, Captain McMahan, and company F, Captain H. H.
Alban, of the Twenty-First, and a portion of the Thirty-^hird Ohio, all under command of
Colonel Oscar F. Moore, of the Thirty-Third, was sent to Stevenson, Alabama, to burn an important
bridge spanning the Tennessee River. It was completely successful, and returned to Huntsville.

About the 20th of April Captain Milo Caton, company H, of the Twenty-First Ohio, was
6ent in charge of Rebel prisoners to Nashville. On his return he was surrounded by Morgan's



150 Ohio in the War.

cavalry, and, after a hard fight, the Captain and his company were obliged to surrender. The
whole party were sent to Eichmond. Captain Caton remained in Eebel prisons over a year. On
the 28th of May the regiment moved to Athens to relieve Colonel Turchin, and remained there
up to the 28th of August. While the Twenty-First Ohio was at Athens the nucleus of the First
Alabama loyal regiment was formed, mainly through the efforts of Captain McMahan.

The regiment returned from Athens, Alabama, to Nashville, on the 29th of August, 1862,
and arrived on the 2d of September. It remained with its division, under the command of
Brigadier-General James S. Negley, and was besieged in the city until the 7th of November,
when the siege was raised by the approach of the army under General Eosecrans. During the
sie»e the Twenty-First Ohio was engaged in the sallies of Lavergne, White's Creek, Wilson's
Bend, and Franklin Pike. At Lavergne the regiment captured a part of the Third Alabama
Eifle Eegiment, with their colors and camp and garrison equipage, and fifty-four horses.

On the 19th of November General Eosecrans issued a special order, complimenting this regi-
ment for its efficiency on the grand guard around Nashville.

On the 26th of December the Twenty-First Ohio moved with the army against the enemy at
Murfreesboro'. Skirmishing continued incessantly until December 31st, when a general battle
commenced and continued until January 3d. The Twenty-First Ohio was engaged every day —
first in the center, and (January 2d) on the left of the army. In the battle of January 2d, with
the Eebels under Breckinridge, the Twenty-First charged across Stone Eiver, the water being
waist-deep, and captured three brass field-pieces, the only artillery captured in the battle before
Murfreesboro'. After the battle, Captain A. McMahan, of company C, was recommended to the
Governor of Ohio for promotion by General James S. Negley, and was soon afterward appointed
Major of his regiment. On the 4th of January the Twenty-First entered Murfreesboro', having
the advance of its division.

In the battle of Stone Eiver the regiment lost one officer, Lieutenant Enoch B. Wiley, of
company C, and forty-six men killed, and Lieutenant J. W. Knaggs and seventy-five men
wounded. Seventeen men were captured.

During the occupation of Murfreesboro', from January 4th to June 24th, 1863, the Twenty-
First was engaged in several expeditions and skirmishes. On the 24th of June it moved with
the army upon the enemy at Tullahoma. The enemy having retired upon Chattanooga, the
Twenty-First went into camp with the army at Decherd Station on the 7th of July. On the
16th of August, it crossed the Tennessee Eiver near Stevenson, and dragging its artillery and
trains over Lookout Mountain by hand, it found the enemy at Dug Gap, Georgia, on the 11th
of September.

Heavy skirmishing continued until the 19th, when the enemy was found in force on the
line of Chickamauga Creek. The regiment immediately deployed into line of battle, under
command of Lieutenant-Colonel D. M. Stoughton, and opened a brisk fire upon the Eebels,
which continued until night. Early the next morning (Sunday, September 20th) the battle
was resumed. At eleven o'clock the Twenty-First was posted on Horseshoe Eidge, upon the
earnest request of Brigadier-General J. M. Brannon, who retired with his troops to another part
of the field soon afterward. Immediately after forming in this new position, the Twenty-First
became fully engaged, and a severe contest resulted in the repulse of the enemy, not, however,
without severe loss to the Twenty-First. Lieutenant-Colonel Stoughton had an arm fractured
and soon after died. The command now devolved upon Major A. McMahan.

The result of the battle, by three o'clock in the afternoon, demonstrated the inability of
the National army to meet successfully the immensely superior numbers under command of
General Bragg. The National troops were forced back on the right and left ; but the Twenty-
First, being armed with Colt's revolving rifles, continued to hold its position. The Eebela
charged upon the regiment in this position five times without successs, retiring each time with
severe loss. An hour before sundown a full battery was brought to bear upon it, inflicting severe
damage. Under cover of the smoke of this battery the Eebels charged again, but were met
wiih a volley and a counter-charge, and the Twenty-First continued to hold its position.



Twenty-First Ohio Infantry. 151

The scene at this time was horrible. The battery had set fire to the leaves and dry brush,
and the dead and wounded were consumed by the fire. To remedy this was out of the question.
To detain the Rebels, if possible, was all that could be expected while the troops of McCook'a
corps, which had been so severely crushed, could effect a retreat. The ammunition was now
nearly exhausted, and a further supply could not be found nearer than Chattanooga, nearly a
day's march distant. The cartridge-boxes of the dead were searched, and also the hospitals, for
any that might be carried there in the cartridge-boxes of the wounded. By economy the regi-
ment continued to fire until dark, when its last shot was expended. At this time the enemy had
appeared upon the right and rear, and the regiment, now greatly reduced in numbers, was formed
for one more desperate effort to hold the ridge and give time for our shattered columns to effect a
retreat. A charge was ordered by Major McMahan, and, though entirely without ammunition,
the bayonet was applied with entire success. The enemy was forced back, leaving nine prisoners
with the Twenty-First Ohio.

The helpless condition of the regiment was discovered by the enemy in its inability to
return their fire. It was now after dark, and, in a second attempt to push back the enemy with
the bayonet, the Twenty-First Ohio was overwhelmed, and Major McMahan and one hundred
and fifteen of the officers and men of the command were captured. The Twenty-First Ohio
expended, in this battle, forty-three thousand five hundred and fifty rounds of Colt's fixed am-
munition, and sustained a loss of one officer and fifty men killed, three officers and ninety-eight
men wounded, and twelve officers and one hundred and four men captured.

The survivors of the regiment retired with the army to Chattanooga, where it arrived Sep-
tember 22d, and remained until January 1, 1864, when it re-enlisted as a veteran organization,
mainly through the efforts of Quartermaster Daniel Lewis, Quartermaster-Sergeant Geo. Sheets,
and the non-commissioned officers of the regiment, and returned to Ohio upon veteran furlough.
It had in the meantime, however, been present at the battle of Mission Ridge.

The regiment returned to Chattanooga on the 6th of March and moved forward to Ringgold,
Georgia, from which point it moved, May 7th, with Sherman's grand army upon the campaign to
Atlanta, Georgia. Fighting soon commenced, and the regiment opened its veteran campaign with
the battle of Buzzard's Roost, May 9th, and Resaca, May 15th. Moving forward the regiment was
present at the battle of New Hope Church, and on the morning of May 2Sth, while the regiment
was moving to a position in reserve, a piece of stray shell fractured the right arm of Colonel
James M. Neibling, and the command of the regiment again devolved upon Major A. McMahan,
who had just returned from Libby Prison.

The regiment was immediately ordered to the front, and in capturing a ridge which was
abandoned without a fight on the evening before, company K sustained a loss of four men killed
and two wounded. The position thus captured commanded that of the enemy, and was held by
the Twenty-First Ohio until the enemy withdrew.

Skirmishing continued daily until the enemy presented front at Kenesaw Mountain, June
17th. The Twenty-First was engaged at this point every day, holding the front line at Bald
Knob, twelve days and nights in succession, at which point Lieutenant Robert S. Dilworth,
of company G, and two men were killed and ten men wounded. On the 4th of July the
regiment marched through Marietta in pursuit of the enemy, who had retired toward the
Chattahoochie River the previous night. Skirmishing continued until the 9th of July, when
the regiment was ordered forward to learn the position of the enemy, with orders to attack and
drive in his outposts. A severe engagement at Vining's Station was the result. Two regi-
ments of the enemy, the Fourth Mississippi and Fifty-Fourth Louisiana Infantry, were encount-
ered in their rifle-pits. A charge was ordered by Major McMahan, the rifle-pits captured,
with seventeen prisoners and thirty-three stand of new English rifles. The enemy was driven
into his main works after a desperate struggle, in which the Twenty-First Ohio lost fifteen men
killed, and two officers and thirty-seven men wounded, and one officer missing.

The regiment continued to hold the rifle-pits and annoy the enemy in his main works.
Corporal William Waltman, of company G, upon this occasion led his company in the charge,



152 Ohio in the War.

and would have been promoted had not his term of enlistment expired before his commission
could be obtained. Early in the morning of July 10th the enemy withdrew, and the regiment
advanced by daylight to the Chattahoochie River. No other troops besides the Twenty-First
Ohio were engaged on this occasion.

Having crossed the river, the regiment again engaged the enemy at Nancy's Creek, July
19th, and continued to engage him until July 20th, when the battle of Peach Tree Creek was
fought. In this battle Captain Daniel Lewis, company C, was killed, Sergeant-Major Earll W.
Merry was wounded, and had a leg amputated.

On the 22d of July the siege of Atlanta was commenced, and continued until the night of
September 1st, when the defense of that city was abandoned by the enemy in consequence of his
defeat at Jonesboro', thirty-five miles south of Atlanta. The Twenty-first Ohio during the siege
of Atlanta was engaged with the enemy on several occasions, and was under his fire every day.

At the battle of Jonesboro', Georgia, September 1st, which won Atlanta, the regiment was
again engaged, and again added new laurels to its character as a fighting regiment. Its loss in
this battle was five men killed, thirty men wounded, and one man missing. After the battle of
Jonesboro' the Twenty-First returned with the army to Atlanta, and went into camp on the 8th
of September. The total loss of the regiment in this campaign, from May 7th to the occupation
of Atlanta, September 2d, was two officers and thirty-two men killed, and five officers and one
hundred and nineteen men wounded, many of whom subsequently died.

On the 3d of October the regiment moved with the army in pursuit of Hood toward Chatta-
nooga, and arrived at Galesville, Alabama, October 20th. From this point it returned to Atlanta,
where it again arrived on the loth of November. On the 16th it moved with the army in the
direction of Savannah, Georgia. On the 4th of December it was engaged with the enemy near
Lumpkin Station, on the Augusta and Savannah Railroad. From the 12th to the night of the
20th of December it was engaged with the enemy's outposts before Savannah, and entered the
city the following morning at nine o'clock A. M., in advance of its army corps.

During this campaign the regiment destroyed three miles of railroad and captured eight
thousand rations for its own use. It also captured forage to supply twenty-one head of horses
and mules attached to the regiment during the campaign. Six prisoners of war were also cap-
tured. The regiment lost one man wounded, and fourteen men were "bush-whacked" by the
enemy.

The regiment moved again from Savannah, Georgia, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel
McMahan upon the campaign through North and South Carolina. It was engaged at Rocky
Mount, South Carolina, and subsequently at Averysboro', North Carolina, and participated in



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