Copyright
Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

. (page 31 of 165)
Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 31 of 165)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


16, "


Promoted to Major.


Do


John 1>. Herryman


Sept.


5, **


Dec.


30. "


Revoked.


D.


\i thiir Hggin-


Oct.


20, "


44


30, "


Resigned May 17, 1863.


Dc


Alfred G. Cornelius


Sept.


ft, 44


Jan.


1ft, 1863


Revoked ; resigned as 2d Lieut. April 1, 1SC3.


Do


Nathaniel J. Manning


March an, 1863


31 ay


2ft, "


Mustered out.


Do


r. It. Randall


* 4


21, "


44


2ft, "


Promoted to Major.


Do


John T. Woo.l


44


2n, "


June


1ft, "


liesigued September 1, 1-04.


Do


James Madison Barr


Oct.


1, "


Oct.


2, 41


Mustered out April 13. 180ft.


D^


Henry 11. Mosley


.March


15, 1864


Marcl


1ft. 1864


Commission retui ned.


Do


David It. limit




15, "
15, "
17, "


(l


1ft, "
1ft, "
17, "


On detached duty at muster out of regiment.


Do


John 11. Millman


Mustered out.


Do


Edward C. Cuip


Promoted to Major.


Do


Luther 15. Mesnard

Israel White


31 a V

Aug.


2">, "
11, "
11, "


31 ay

Aug.


2ft, "
11, "
11, '•


Promoted 10 Major.


Do


.Mustered out with regiment.


Do


George N. Holcomh


Mustered out with regiment.


Do


15. MuConnaugh


44


11, "


44


11, "


Mustered out with regiment.


Do


■ has. W. Ferguson


Oct.


17, "


Oct.


17, "


.Mustered out with regiment.


Do.


Michael Murray


44


18, "


44


18, "


Mustered out with regiment.


Do


Wm. 31. King


Jan.


6, 1865


Jan.


6, 1.-65


Honorably discharged April 2ft, 1865.


Do




Feb.


10, "

4, "

2ft, 1866


Feb.
Sept.

Marcl


10, "
4, "

2ft, i860


Killed.


Do. . .
Do




.Mustered out with regiment.


Alex. iMattison


31 arch


Mustered out with regiment.


Do


Elisha Biggurstafl


44


2ft. ' '


• 4


2ft, "


Mastered out as 1st Lieutenant.


let Lirn tenant




June


4. 1861


July


12. 1861


Promoted to C;iplain.


Do.


( has. 15. Jones




4, "


44


12, "


Promoted to Captaiu July 7, L-02.


Do.


Win. 1'. Ken liner


44


4, "


44


12, "


Resigned October 31, 1862.


Do.


Darius Dm la in


44


4, "


44


12, "


Transferred to Twi lftli Battery.


Do.


John W. Bowlus


44


4, "


44


12, "


Promoted to Captain May 10, 1802.


Do.


John W. Boss


44


4, "


44


12, "


Resigned April 27, 1 62.


Do.


Wesley Chamberlain


44


4, "


44


12, 4 '


liesigued Msy 6, 1-02.


Do




'.!


4, "

4, "


!!


12, ' 4
12, "


Honorably discharged September 11, 1862.


Do.


James 11. Pettay


Resigned December 21. 1m. 1.


Do.


Nathaniel llallghton


"


4, "


14


12, "


Promoted to Captain July 30, 1803.


Do.


Win. L. Iloyt


July


1, "


July


1, "


Resigned January 23, 1863.


Do.


Arthur Iliggins


Oct.


16, "


Oct.


16, "


Promoted to Captain October 20, 1802.


Do.


John D. Slerrytnati


Jan.


9, 1802


Jan.


9, 18112


Prom. Sept. 1ft, 1802: lion, disch'd Dec. 30, '62.


Do.


Francis D. Sinclair


"


9, "


44


9, "


Resigned March 12, 1802.


Do.


Nathaniel J. Manning


31 arch


12, "


April


10, "


Promote,! to Captain.


Do.


Wm. A. l'owell


April


27, "


June


3, * 4


Dei lined to accept.


Do.


Benj. W. Blandy


May


6, "


44


3, "


lb signed September 19, 1862.


Do.


James Templet on


A pril


27, "


July


3", "


liesigued February 1. 18i3.


Do.


John T. \\ UOil


May

July


16, "

30, "


A ug.


Hi, "
16, "


Revoked.


Do.


George W. Martin


Honorably discharged October 20, 1S63.


Do.




41


30, "


14


10, "


Killed May 0, 1803



Twenty-Fifth Ohio Infantry.



175



1st Lientenaut
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Liftitenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



El ward II. Severance ..

I'liomas J. .huiii'v

Henry II. Mosley

Win. A. Wnitcraft

Harrington E. Randall .

Andrew J. Hale

David 11. Hunt

Edward C. Cup

John 11. Milliuan

Isaac N. Kirk

Israel WU.te

George C. E : gerton

Lewis K. Wilson

Joseph H. Mollis

James A. Drijgs

Gorge -\. Holcnm

. haries II. King

15. McCo mah

Win. 1". Bloou

Win. Malouy

i has. W. Ferguson

Michael Murray

John O. Archibald

Win. P. Scott

John H K-hn

Al x. Mattison

. lis.ia B.gg-rs al

Oliver W. Williams

John C. Liveusparger...

II z k ah Thomas

I'hiu as G mo

Solomon Eh ,-rsolj

■*, I'. Ilutcliin-on

MauriceS. B 11

Autin Haughtuu

Ethan W. Guthr e

Wui, L. Pouts

Peter Ti iuuart

Samu I II. Stewart

Oliver P. II rshey

Thomas 11. Kerrall ,

Win. J. Kyi •

Samuel J. IJroo.is

John Walton

George W. Men ,

Han J. Cioo ;s

David McGuckiu

It. Y'ohiev Howard

Arthur Iligiins ,

John D. Merrymail

Francis |). Sinclair

Archibald McClellau

Andrew J. Hale

Jam -s Templeton

B.-nj. W. Biaudy

John T. Wojd

lames L. Bali

Hail. in Millikiu

Benj. 1. llawkes

Alston (J. Aichilial I

Nathaniel J. Manning...

Henry II. Mosley

Thomas J. Jauney

Carrington E. Randall..

Win. A. Wnitcraft

Alex. Sinclair

E I ward ('. '.'nip

Samu 1 1". Houston

Edward II. Severance

John 11. Miliman

Wm. II. Davis

Alfred U. Cornelius

Win. Malouy

Isaac X. Kirk

Lewis E. Wilson

J. M. Perry

Alfred A. Lumpkin

Israel White

losepu II. Ho! lis

Jam s A. Driggs

orge N. Hoicomb

Clias. II. Kins

11. McCo lnaugh

Wm. E. Bloon

Michael Murray

lohu O. Archibald

Wm. P. Scott

lohu II. Kehn

Alex. Mattison

Elisha Bigeerstan*

liver W. Wiiliams

John S. Snyder

lohu C. Liveusparger

Austin Hi ii -h ton

Ethan W Gu.luie ,

Wm. L. Pouts

Peter Tri iuait

Samuel K. Stewart

Oliver P. Hers hey

Wm. McF.-e !

■"nomas H. Pen all

Wm. J. Eyle



Sept. II, IS -.2



30,



June

Sept. 5,

Uct. ill,

Jan. 23,
23,

Sept. 11,

Feb. I,

.March 20,



Ian.

May 1
Inly 1
March 15
15
15
13
15
15
15



April
May



Oct.



13,



2.1,
25,
25,
11,
II,
II,
".
H.
'-',
18,
6, ]
111,
10,
IS,

IS,

IS,
4,
4,

2y,
2y,
2y,

2«,



June 15, 1866

4, H.I

4, "

■i 4> ..

" 4. "



Ian.

Feb.



May



jept.



Inly
Jet.
Ian.



May

April

-May

inly

Sept.

Oct.
Iune
Sept.



Jan. 23,

March (>,

S pt. II,

Feb. 1,

April 1,

Jan. 24,

April IS,

June 1,
15,

July 30,

March 16.

Nov. 23,

Feb. 15.

April
-May



1S62
1863



COM. ISSUKO.



Dec. 18.

30,

3u,

3o,

30,

Feb. 20,

March 30,

April s.



May 2."
Aug. 1
.March 15



April
.May



Jan.
b.



May



Sept.



Iune
Ju.y



13,

25,
25,
25,
25,
25,
II.
II,
II,
11.
U,
12,
IS,
6, !
10,



18,
IS,
4,
4,
29,
29,
2U,
29,



186
IS6I



March
April



June
A u '.



lo,
3.
16,

IK,
16,
20,
'S
30,
30,
3.1,



Feb. 20,
March 30,
April s.



.May



13,

25,
25,
25,
12,
12,
17,
17,
17,
17
16,
18,
IS,



24,
25,

25,
15,
15,

15,

July 30,
\'M March 16,
Jan. 12,
March 16,
April 13,
May



1864



25,
25,
12,
12,

K,
1",
17,
17,
is.
Is,
I8i



Revoked.

ItesigDr'd July 2S, ISS3.

Mustered out March 20, 1S65.

Died June, Is 3.

Promoted to Captain.

Kevoked ; icsisiied as 2d Lieutenant.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.

Discharged .March 25, 1SG4.
Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged November 20, 1S63.
Kill d at Gettysburg July I, 1863.
Killed at Gettysburg July I, IStB.
Honorably discharged April 12, 1S64.
Promoted to i 'aptain.
liesigned .\pr.l 2u, 1-iH.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out.
M ustered out.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain,
.moted to Capta iu.
Promote-.j to Captain.
Resigned July s, 1865.
Promoted to Captain.
Promote 1 to Captain.
Honorably discharged April 26, 1SG5.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
liesigned January is, la63.
Deceased.

Honorably discharged March 27, 1365.
Mustered out.
Deceased.
Died April s. 1865.
Mustcr.-d'out with regiment.

. . i. ned July 45, 1865.
It -signed July 18, (865.
Resigned Marcji 2ii. 1866.

Captain One Hundred and Fourth T7. S. C. T.
Mustered out as lieginu utal Quartermaster.
Mustered out as 2d Li utenaut.
Mustered mir «ith regiment.
Al Ustered out as L'd Lieutenant.
Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant.

1 ustered nut as 2d Lieutenant.
.ihsent at date of muster out.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant October 16, 1S61.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant January 9, 1n,2.

i'ii ited to 1st Li uten.-irt January 9, 1S62.

Transferred to Twelfth Battery.
liesigned December 21, 18 2.

Pro ted to 1st Lieutenant April 27, 1W2.

Promote,! to 1st Lieuteu Hit May 6, 1S62.

Promoted: resigned June 3o, 1S02.

liesigned October 6, 1862.

Resigned October 2>, 1861.

Promoted lo Lt. Colon 1 of 7Sth regiment.

Resigned March 12, 1-62.

Pr< ted lo 1st Lientenanl March 12, lsi">2.

Pr oted to 1st Lieutenant June 30, 1862.

Promoted tn 1st Lieutenant September 19, Y>2.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant October 2(>, 1S62.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant Septembers, '62.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant July 30, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant September 11, '62.

liesigned March 6, 1863,

Promoted : discharged March 20, 1S63.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Discharged April 2, 1863.

Promoted S pt. 5, 1862; resigned April 1, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Killed at Gettysburg July I, 1SG3.

Resigned April 18, 1863.

R - aig 1 November 7, 1863.

Promoted to l>t Lieutenant
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mastered out.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to ltd Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
liesigned July 15, 1865.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to lit Lieutenant.



176



Ohio in the War



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


KF.MABKS.






Feb.

May

April
June


JO,
10,
18,

4,
1,
4,
4,
4,
2,
IS,
1ft,
15,
15,
15,
15,


1865
1866


Fob.

May
Sept.

April
June


10,
10.

la,

4,
4,
4,
4,
4,

1%
15,
15,
15,

15,

15,


I860

lSf.fi




Do.


John Walton




Do.
Do.

Do.


George W. Jden


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.


David McGucklu




Do.




Mustered out with regiment.


Do.




Do.


John M. Rhode*




Do.


John Wiyi-r




Do.






Do.


Sainuil G. Shirk




Do.






Do.






Do.















TWENTY-FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE TWENTY-FIFTH was composed of men from almost every section of the
State, and was organized at Camp Chase on the 28th of June, 1861. On the 29th of
July it proceeded to Western Virginia, and was stationed along the Baltimore and Ohio
Railroad from Oakland to the Ohio River. Scouting parties were sent out from the different
posts, and several gangs of bushwhackers were broken up. The regiment was relieved on the
21st of August, and, after a fatiguing march, reported to General Reynolds at Beverly. After a
short halt it marched up Cheat Mountain and encamped on the summit. During the fall and
winter the troops at this point suffered severely. They were continually on duty, either in the
fort or on the picket-line. Sleet or snow fell almost daily ; the men of the Twenty-Fifth were
totally unprovided with overcoats, and many of them were without shoes or blankets.

The camp at Cheat Mountain remained comparatively quiet until the morning of the 12th of
September, when a wagon-train on its way to the valley for rations was surprised and captured.
Companies II and D, of the Twenty -Fifth, were sent immediately in pursuit of the Rebels. Com-
pany H soon met them, and, being re-enforced, it drove them to their main supports, when it was
discovered that the enemy was present in force, under the command of General Robert E. Lee.
Preparations were made for a strenuous defense. Every available man was placed on picket-
duty, and for eight days the skirmishing was continuous. At the end of this time troops from
the valley succeeded in breaking through the Rebel lines, bringing with them to the summit
supplies of provisions, and the Rebel commander, seeing the futility of his efforts, withdrew.

On the 3d of October General Reynolds marched with several Regiments from the summit
against the Rebel works at Greenbrier. After several hours' fighting the expedition returned to
the summit without having accomplished anything of importance. The Twenty-Fifth was
engaged, and was the last regiment to leave the field. On the 25th of November it marched into the
valley, and went into winter-cpiarters at Huttonsville. Several companies, under Captain Wash-
burn, were sent to Elkwater. The duty in the valley was light, and an opportunity was afforded for
the men to recover from the exposure on the mountain. On the 11th of December a detachment
from the regiment, numbering four hundred and sixty men, under Colonel Jones, participated in
an expedition against the enemy at Camp Baldwin. At one o'clock on the morning of the 13th
the force was distributed for the attack. Colonel Jones, with his detachment, and with detach-
ments from the Thirty-Second Ohio and Thirteenth Indiana, was to advance to the right and rear




GRAVES OF OHIO SOLDIERS. LIBBY PRISON, RICHMOND, VA.



Twexty-Fifth Ohio Infantry. 177

of the enemy's camp, and there await the attack in front. Owing to a succession of blunders the
attack was not made in front at the proper time ; and the Rebels having discovered the position of
Colonel Jones, he was forced to make an immediate attack or to retire. He chose the former
course, and at daylight he advanced his line and at once became engaged. The Rebels were driven
in, but being re-enforced, they made a stand, and for three hours the fight raged. Three times the
Rebels were driven into their cabins, and were compelled to fire from the windows ; but at last the
troops under Colonel Jones exhausted their ammunition and were compelled to retire, which
they did in perfect order, and without molestation from the enemy. In this engagement the
regiment lost nine killed and seventy-five severely wounded. On the return march it traveled
sixty miles in twenty-six hours. On the 31st the regiment moved on a raid to HuntersviJIe. It
marched one hundred and six miles in five days, penetrated far into the enemy's country, met
and dispersed considerable numbers of Rebels, and destroyed large quantities of Confederate
stores. At the time this expedition was regarded as one of the greatest feats of the war. While
at Huttonsville company D was detached permanently as a battery of artillery, and was armed
with Wiard's steel guns. It was afterward known as the Twelfth Ohio Battery.

On the 27th of February, 1862, the Twenty-Fifth marched to Beverly. Here the "smooth-
bores " were turned over to the ordnance officer, and the regiment was armed with Vincennes
rifles. They were very effective pieces, but proved too heavy, and were gradually exchanged for
Springfield rifles. On the 1st of April the regiment moved on the Seneca scout. It crossed
Cheat and Alleghany Mountains, passed through Circleville, and arrived at Monterey, having
marched one hundred and twenty-five miles through a country entirely new to National troops.
At Monterey the regiment was joined by a similar expedition, sent by way of Camp Alleghany.
On the 12th General Johnston, who had retired from Monterey upon the advance of the National
troops, made an attack on that point, but, after a sharp engagement, he was repulsed ; and on the
arrival of General Milroy with the remainder of the division, he fell back to McDowell. On
the 18th Milroy moved forward to McDowell, and the Rebels retreated to Staunton. The troops
remained quietly in camp at McDowell until the 7th of May, when a large Rebel force, under
Johnston and Jackson, made its appearance. Heavy forces of skirmishers were thrown out, and
a general engagement was delayed untii the 8th, when General Schenck, with his brigade,
arrived, and the battle of Bull-Pasture Mountain was fought. The Twenty-Fifth opened the
battle by a charge, in which the enemy was driven from his position. Re-enforcements were
sent forward rapidly on both sides, and the battle assumed a serious character. It continued till
after nightfall, and, as darkness settled down upon the mountain, a blazing circle of light from
ten thousand muskets still revealed the position of the opposing armies. It was deemed expe-
dient to fall back to Franklin, and the troops were withdrawn gradually. The Twenty-Fifth
remained until the last regiment had retired, and then it covered the retreat. Its loss in this
engagement was nine killed aud fifty-six wounded.

On the 26th of May the regiment accompanied General Fremont on his march from Frank-
lin to Strasburg, and thence up the Shenandoah Valley in pursuit of Jackson, and participated
in the battle of Cross Keys, with a loss of eight killed, fifty-four wounded, and two missing.
After a short rest at Strasburg the regiment, in July, passed with Sigel's corps into Eastern Vir-
ginia, and pnrticipated in General Pope's campaign along the lines of the Rappahannock, and
from the Rapidan to the plains of Manassas, where, on the 29th and 30th of August, it engaged
in the second battle of Bull Run, with a loss of ten killed, seventy-eight wounded, and twenty-
two missing. On the evening of the 30th the regiment fell back to Centerville, and on the 3d
of September it moved, by way of Fairfax C. H., to Upton Hill, having marched, since the 8th
of August, two hundred and twenty miles, having been under fire fourteen successive days on
the Rappahannock, and having participated in the second battle of Bull Run. From this time
until the spring of 1863 the Twenty-Fifth was engaged in marches and counter-marches, and in
building numerous sets of winter-quarters, until at last it settled down quietly near Brooke's
Station. Battalion drill was practiced daily, and every effort was made to prepare the troops
for the spring campaign.
Vol. 11—12.



178 Ohio in the War.

On the 27th of April, 1863, the army broke camp and started on the C'hancellorsville cam-
paign, and on the 30th it encamped around Chancellorsville. Never was a march better con-
ducted, and it is worthy of note that the Twenty-Fifth left Brooke's Station with four hundred and
forty-three men and took four hundred and forty-four men into camp at Chancellorsville, one man
having joined from hospital, and not one having straggled from the ranks during the march.
The regiment was in the Second Brigade of the First Division of the Eleventh Corps. The First
Brigade of the division occupied the extreme right, and the Second Brigade was on the imme-
diate left of the first. The picket-line extended along the front, but did not cover the right of
the division. Only two or three sentinels were posted on the right, and these but a short distance
from the outer regiments. Thus lay on the afternoon of May 2d the right wing of an army of
one hundred thousand men. Colonels Richardson and Lee, of the Twenty-Fifth and Fifty-Fifth
Ohio, felt the impending danger and quietly sent some tried scouts into the wilderness to the
right of the division. They soon returned with the intelligence that the Rebels were massing
heavily on the right and rear of the corps, and that there were no pickets between the two armies.
The two Ohio Colonels hurried with this intelligence to division head-quarters, but the General
commanding told them that their men "were probably scared," and sent them back to their
regiments.

An hour afterward and Stonewall Jackson with his veteran troops came down upon the
unprepared division. Several regiments in the First Brigade had their guns in stack, and many
of the men were eating their supper. The surprise was complete. No solitary picket-shot told
of the approaching danger, no rattling skirmish heralded the coming storm; but one solid shot,
crashing through the Second Brigade and post division head-quarters, was followed by the
thunder of twenty thousand muskets and the deafening roar of artillery. The First Brigade gave
way in confusion, the men not stopping to unbuckle their knapsacks, but cutting the straps with
their knives. The Twenty-Fifth deployed, changed front, and moved forward some one hundred
yards, exposed to a merciless fire, under the disadvantage of having men from other regiments
breaking through its ranks. The Fifty-Fifth arid Seventy-Fifth Ohio joined the ranks of the
Twenty-Fifth, and these three regiments held their position until the broken fragments of the
First Brigade had passed to their rear and the enemy had encircled them on three sides, and then
they, too, fell back. The next morning the corps was reorganized, and it remained in the
trenches until the 5th, when, with the army, it recrossed the river and went into its old camp at
Brooke's Station. In this engagement the regiment lost seventeen killed, one hundred and
twenty wounded, and thirty-seven missing.

On the 27th of June the regiment started on the Gettysburg campaign, with General Barlow
in command of the division and General Ames in command of the brigade. The Eleventh Corps
passed over the Bull Run battle-field, crossed the Potomac at Edwards's Ferry, marched through
Maryland, and arrived at Emmettsburg on the 29th. On the 1st of July the corps moved toward
Gettysburg, with Barlow's division in advance. Upon reaching the town the division was placed
in position and became engaged almost immediately, and for a short time drove the enemy before
it. The Twenty-Fifth was ordered to support Battery G, of the Fourth United States Artillery,
and it took position under a most trying cannonade. Soon a general advance was ordered, and
the entire division moved forward, but after fighting obstinately for an hour it fell back to Ceme-
tery Hill. Here the Twenty-Fifth, numbering forty-five men and commanded by a Second-
Lieutenant, was deployed as skirmishers on the outskirts of the town, while the remainder of the
division was placed behind stone fences. On the 2d and 3d the regiment still occupied the
advanced lines and suffered severely from sharp-shooters, and on the morning of the 4th it led
the advance into Gettysburg. The majority of the officers had been killed or wounded, and the
regiment was commanded by a First-Lieutenant, who had been wounded in the first day's battle.
The Twenty-Fifth went into action with two hundred and twenty men, and lost twenty killed, one
hundred and thirteen wounded, and fifty missing.

On the afternoon of the 5th the regiment moved in pursuit of the Rebels, marching through
Emmettsburg, Frederick City, Middletown, Boonsboro', and Hagerstown. At the latter city the






Twenty-Fifth Ohio Infantry. 179

division supported Kilpatrick's cavalry in a lively skirmish, driving the Rebel cavalry and
infantry through Hagerstown to their main supports. On the 25th Warrenton Junction was
reached, where the regiment remained in camp until the 6th of August, when, with its division,
it moved for the Department of the South, and took up quarters on Folly Island. The regiment
at this time numbered seventy-two men and was commanded by a Lieutenant. It subsequently
removed to Morris Island and took part in the siege of Fort Wagner. After the capture of the
fort it went into camp on Folly Island beach and an opportunity was afforded for rest and
recuperation.

On the 1st of January, 1864, the regiment re-enlisted, and on the 15th it started for Ohio on
veteran furlough. It was furloughed from Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, on the 3d of February,
and on the 5th of March it rendezvoused at Camp Chase. Many recruits were added to the regi-
ment and one entirely new company, company B, was consolidated with company C, and the new



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 31 of 165)