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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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driving the Rebel raider back. After considerable marching, the brigade encountered Forrest at
Parker's Cross Roads, and took an active part in the engagement at that place, capturing seven
guns, three hundred and sixty prisoners, and four hundred horses. In this capture the Twenty-
Seventh bore an honorable share. The Ohio Brigade followed Forrest to the Tennessee River,
marching in the middle of winter, over ice one day and in fathomless mud the next, without
tents, without rubber blankets, without proper food, and without ambulances. When the troops
reached Corinth one-fifth of the men were bare-footed, and the Surgeon of the Twenty-Seventh
reported officially that the deaths resulting from that march equaled the losses of a severe skir-
mish. When the brigade arrived at Corinth, it was attached to General Dodge's command ; and
though the garrison was living on half rations, in view of the hardships the Ohio troops had
sustained, full supplies were issued to them. Comfortable log huts were built, and quite a rivalry
sprang up among the regiments as to whose camp should be the finest. That of the Twenty-
Seventh was laid out with great care and taste, and was remarkably neat and clean.

The brigade moved eastward with General Dodge, through Iuka and the Tuseumbia Valley.
General Dodge drove the Rebel cavalry from Bear Creek, and followed as far east as Town Creek.
After returning from Town Creek the Ohio Brigade was ordered to Memphis, and remained some
time, performing garrison duty. During its stay at Memphis the Twenty-Seventh was engaged
in several reconnoissances, and one hundred men from the regiment, with detachments from the
other regiments of the brigade, were engaged in guarding prisoners of war from Yicksburg to
Johnson's Island, Fort Delaware, and other points. In October, 1863, the brigade left Memphis,
and moved ma Corinth to Iuka. In the march from Iuka the Twenty-Seventh was in the advance
brigade, and moved from eighteen to twenty miles per day, and encamped at night from six to
ten miles in advance of the main column. Communication was held each night by means of
rockets. General Dodge finally halted with a large portion of his command at Pulaski, but the
Ohio Brigade marched about fifteen miles south and occupied Prospect. Here the troops were






Twenty- Seventh Ohio Infantry. 191



employed in building fortifications and bridges. When these works were about completed the
Twenty-Seventh re-enlisted as veterans and were furloughed to their homes. Shortly after their
'return to the field the Ohio Brigade moved against Decatur and captured it. Fortifications were
laid out, and the town was soon well intrenched. "While at Decatur the Ohio Brigade was dis-
continued, and the Twenty-Seventh and Thirty-Ninth Ohio, Sixty-Fourth Illinois, and Eigh-
teenth Missouri, constituted the First Brigade (Colonel Fuller commanding) of the Fourth
Division, Sixteenth Army Corps.

On the 1st of May, 1S64, the Fourth Division moved from Decatur and joined the main
army at Chattanooga. When the army approached Resaca, the Twenty-Seventh, with other reg-
iments, was ordered to move upon the railroad north of the town, to damage it as much as pos-
sible, and to endeavor to reach the bridge over the Oostenaula. They were succeeding well in
their undertaking when they were recalled and fell back to Snake Creek Gap. At Dallas,
Georgia, early on the morning of the 27th of May, the pickets were sharply attacked by the
Bebels, and driven back to within easy musket range of the main body. The brigade formed in
line, and two companies of the Twenty-Seventh advanced on the double-quick to re-enforce the
guard. The Rebels were driven back, but Captain Sawyer, commanding the skirmish-line, and
his First-Lieutenant, Henry W. Diebolt, were mortally wounded ; and these two officers, who
had served in the same company and eaten at the same table, were laid side by side that evening,
in the little grave-yard just north of Dallas. The regiment was engaged with Hood's corps on
the 28th of May, skirmished at Big Shanty in June, and fought at Kenesaw, losing heavily, both
in officers and men. On the 4th of July, 1864, the regiment participated in the action at Nic-
ojack Creek, advancing at the head of the division with fixed bayonets, -and charging the Rebel
works with complete success.

On the 22d of July, before Atlanta, the regiment was engaged in one of its most severe bat-
tles, and sustained its heaviest loss. It charged the enemy again and again, and at one time,
when threatened on its flanks, changed front to rear, under fire, formed the new line promptly,
and again advanced to the charge. Under a clump of pines, two miles south-east of Atlanta,
near where they fell, rest the heroes of the Twenty-Seventh who were killed upon that field.
The regiment was with the Sixteenth Corps as it moved to the west side of Atlanta, and partici-
pated in the skirmish of July 27th, driving back the enemy's cavalry. In August the regiment
was sent to Marietta, where it remained till the fall of Atlanta. From the time it left Chatta-
nooga till Atlanta was in our possession, it had lost sixteen officers and two hundred and one
men, only six of whom (all enlisted men) were reported "missing." This was a loss of more
than half the men present for duty when the regiment left Chattanooga.

The regiment pursued Hood northward, and, after returning, marched with Sherman to the
sea, skirmishing near Savannah, with slight loss. It shared in the campaign of the Carolinas,
and at the crossing of the Salkehatchie, South Carolina, the Twenty-Seventh literally hewed its
way through forest and swamp, with water nearly up to the waist, for more than a mile, and was
among the first to find a way to cross the river. At Cheraw, South Carolina, the Twenty-Seventh
was the first regiment to enter the town, skirmishing with the Rebel cavalry, driving them
through the streets of the town and across the Pedee. Here the regiment captured a fine English
twenty-pound gun, which bore the following inscription : " Presented to the sovereign State of
South Carolina, by one of her citizens residing abroad, in commemoration of the 20th of Decem-
• ber, 1860 " (the day South Carolina seceded). At Bentonville, North Carolina, Monroe's divis-
ion, to which the Twenty-Seventh belonged, attacked the enemy's left, and pushed forward so
vigorously that the skirmish-line was at General Joe Johnston's head-quarters before they were
aware of it. This was the last time the Twenty-Seventh was under fire.

After the surrender of Johnston it moved via Richmond to Washington, participated in the
review, and then proceeded to Louisville. In July, 1S65, the regiment was ordered to Camp
Dennison, and there the members of it received their final payment and discharge.



192



Ohio in the War.



28th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Do

Lt. Colonel....

Ho

Do

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Do

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Major

Do

Do

Surgeon

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Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do



DATE OF RANK.



Do.
Do.
Do.
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1st Lieutenant

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AUGUST MOOK

GOTTFRIED BECKER..

Gottfried Becker

Alex. Bolender

Alex. Bolender

Gottfried Becker

Ernest Schachi

Edwin Frey

rudolph heintz

Alex. Bolender

ERNEST Schachi

Gerhard Saal

Chas. E. Denig

Vdolph Shoenkein

George P. Hackinberq..

George Cornell

A. E. Jenner

Joseph Hebbell

Karl Beischlag

Finest Schachi

Albert Bitter

.Matthias Reich ings

Louis Frey

Arthur Foruriger

Henry Sonimer

Tobias Naglc

Bernhard Eith

Maurice Wcsoiowski

George Sonimer

Win. Ewald

Charles Drach ,

Matthew Louterbach

Augustus Fix

Edwin Frey

Louis Frey

Frederick Wiesiug

Charles Dracii

John A in rein

Arnold Heer

Albeit Trailb

Samuel Rosenthal

Herman Koenigsberger .

Leupuld Markbreit

Edwin Frey

F. Birk

Charles II. Mayer

Win. Ewald

Augustus Fix

Matthew Louterbach

Alex. Bolender ,

Ernest Zimmerman

Edwin Frey

Chas. Drach

Gronewald

Philip Wich

Charles A. Lucius

Albert Bitter

Frederick Wiesing

\ n ton Qrodzicki

John Anirein

Carlo Peipho

Arnold Heer

Frank Schmidt

Albeit Traub

Martin Ho user

Herman Koenigsberger.

Gottlieb Hummel

Samuel Rosenthal

Leopold Markbreit

Louis C. Friutz

Ferdinand Hoi/.er

Conrad Schlicher

Herman Gut hard

John Lang

Louis Welt/.el

Albeit Liomin

Augustus Gliell

Michael Klein

John J. Schellenbaum...

Henry Raabe

John Roedell

Henry Oker

Rudolph Guthenst In....
Frederick llagcubuch...



June

Nov.
June

Sept.

May

Aug.



lime
Oct.
Sept.
June
Feb.
lime
July
April
June
July
June



Oct.
; Jan.

10, 1861 iOct.
24, l«BZi„,



10, 1861
27, 1863



COM. I88CED.



14, 1863

5, "

March 27, "

Dec. 14, 1364



July
March

June

March

July



10, 1861

9, "
24, "
10, "

26, 1S63
10, 1861

4, 1862

28, 1863

29, "
24, "
10, "
13, 1861
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "

27, "



Sept.

Oct.

.March 24,
24,



17,
3.
1,
1",
25,
24,
1,



May

Aug.
Jan.
Dec.
Oct.



30, 1861
10, 1864
30, 1861



10, ls64
14, "
30, 1861



REMARKS.



Oct.
Feb.
Oct.
July

April
June
July
Oct.



30, 1861

26, 1863
30, I8'.l

23, 1862

28, 1863

29, "

24, "

30, 1861
3", "

" 30, "

30, "

" 30, "

30, "

" 3o, "

30, "

30, "

" 30, "

" 30, "

41 30 "

March 20,' 1862

May

June



April

July
Nov.
June



July



Sept.
Oct.



19, 1864
22, "
22, "
7, 1862
is, 1864
13, 1861
13, "
13, "

12, "

13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
15, "



13,

23,
10,
26,



Dec.



April



1,
24,
24,
31,
15,

15,

8,
8,



March 19, 1864
April 22.



Dec.
Nov.

Oct.



22, "
31, 1S62
is, 1864
30, 1861
30, "
30, "
SO, "



Nov.
Ian.
March
Feb.

March 17,
April 18,
June
Man h

April
July
Oct.

Sept.

March 17
Dec. 26,

31,

Feb. 2.'., 1863
March 17,

24,



21, 1C
1,



1,

6,

25,
1,

-I,



30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

r. 20,

20,

20,

2o,

■2 Jan. 21,

March 20,

20,

May 1,

June 3,



April



22, 1864

22, 1
22, 1
22,



f Breveted Brigadier-General; mustered out
I July 23, 1864.

Resigned September 24, 1862.

Resigned March 17, 1S63.

Declined.

Mustered out July 23, 1364

Declined.

Not mustered out.

Resigned October 9, 1864.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Sept. 24, '63.

Killed at battle of Piedmont.

Resigned January 21, 1863.

Mustered out July 23, 1864.

Resigned April 16, 1863.

Resigned February 14, 1863.

Declined.

M usteqed out July 23, 1864.

Mustered out July 23, 1864.

Resigned January 1, 1862.

Promoted to Major.

Transferred to 1st Lieutenancy.

Resigned March 24, 1863.

Resigned July 17, 1862.

Resigned June 8, 1862.

Musteied out.

Resigned March, 1362.

Resigneil July 25, lsti2.

Resigned March 17, 1862.

Resigned October 1, 1862.

Declined promotion.

Resigned March 24, 1863.

Mustered out July 23, ISM.

Mustered c*it.

Reinstated ; mustered out July 23, 1364.

Mustered out Julv 23, 1864.

Mustered out July 23, 1864.

Resigned.

Mustered out December 17, 1864.

Mustered out July 23, 1864.

Dei lined promotion.

Mustered out.

Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant July 23, 1864.

(In detached service at muster out of reg't.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned August 27, lsul.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned.

Piuinoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

igned October 21, ls61.
Resigned October 21, 1861.
Resigned December 27, 1861.
Resigned February 14, 1362.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned November 10, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.

Appointed Captain losth reg't July 30, 1362.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned December 26, 1862.
Revoked.

Resigneil April 18, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.



April



June
April



15, It!

31,

31,



Declined promotion ; mustered out July 23,'C4.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Resigned December 31, 1362.

Resigned March 17, 1882.

Mustered out July 23, 1864.

Mustered out Julv 23, 1864.

Resigned April 22, 1863.

.Mustered out July 2.3, 1.864.
1863 Mustered out July 23, 1864.
8, " .Mustered out July 23, 1864.
8, " [Mustered out.
22, 1864 Mustered out.
11, 1863 Mustered out.
22, 1864 Musteied out.

22 " Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant July 23
lsj " [Mustered out with regiment.



1864.



Twenty-Eighth Ohio Infantry



193



let Lieutenant
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

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Do.

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Do.



Christian Hildebrand....

Albert Traub

Carlo Peiplio

Arnold Heer

John Am rein

-Martin House r

Emil Wilde

Frank Schmidt

Anton Grodzicki

Herman Kue nigh beige r.

Leopold Markbreit

Samuel Rosenthal

Louis C. Frintz

Charles Miller

Lucas Sch wank

John Lang

Ferdinand llul/.er

Gottlieb Hummel

Herman Gut hard

Augustus Grioff

Conrad Sell 1 ichor

Joseph Ncwbacker

El ward Otte

Michael Klein

James Gr. Wurtlnngtoi].

John Roedell

Albert Liomin

August Herman

Louis Weitzell

Henry Raabe

Louis Gerhard t

John J. Sehellenbaum...

Henry Oker

Rudolph Guthenstein ...

George Kappes

Wni. Althammer

lohn Eppinger.

Jacob Mork

Michael Sehmitthenier .

Ernest Kudell

Churles Woelfer

Frederick Kuhlnian

lacob Zeeb

Frank Birk

Frederick Eberhardt

John 11 user

Christian Tinge

George Siering

George Benziug



DATE OF RANK.



Nov.
June



Sept.
Oct.



Jan.
March



April

June

Aug.

April

July

March

Sept.

July

Oct.

Dec.

April

Feb.

March



A pril



Dec.
lune



18, HW4
13, 1861
13, "



13,
13,
13,
13,
13,
13,
11,
II,

27|
27,
1,
11,

21, 1S'.2
1, "
1, "

17. "

15, "

is! "

5, "

26, "

14, "

25, "

17, "

2-1, "

25, "
311, "

1, "

26, "

22, 1864

21, 1*3

2, "
24, "

17, "
24, "
2n, 18fi4

22, "
22, "
22, "
22, "

18, "



15, 1862



COM. ISSUED.



Xov.

Oct.



Jan.
May



Sept.
Dec.



April



Nor.
Dec.



Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned October 29, 186*.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned April 5, 1862.
Resigned March 17, 18(12.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Revoked.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned September 25, 1805.
Resigned July 3(1. 1865.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Died February 6, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned February 21, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned -March 2, 18(13.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out July 23, 1804.
Resigned March 11, 1864.
-Mustered out.
Mustered out.
Clustered out April 28, 18r.4.
Mustered out April 28, 1864.
Mustered out July 23, 1864.
Killed at battle of Piedmont.
Mustered out.
Mustered out.
Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.



Vol. 11—13.



194 Ohio in the War.



TWENTY-EIGHTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



rrUIE TWENTY- EIGHTH OHIO was accepted by the President direct, through
^ the exertion of Hon. John A. Gurley, on the 10th of June, 1861. Owing to the
M absence of the proper officer, the muster-in was delayed until the 6th of July, when
the regiment went to Camp Dennison.

The regiment, thoroughly organized, equipped, and drilled, moved to Point Pleasant, Vir-
ginia, July 31st, and to Parkersburg August 10th. Here Colonel Moor was ordered by General
Rosecrans to scout the counties of Jackson and Roane, with four hundred picked men, which
resulted in relieving the town of Spencer, the Rebels having besieged the home-guards, who had
barricaded and fortified the court-house. The remainder of the regiment marched to Clarksburg,
and was ordered to Buckhannon on the 16th. Colonel Moor, after accomplishing his mission,
arrived at Buckhannon August 23d, and the regiment, as a part of General Rosecrans's army,
marched to Bulltown on the 27th, to Sutton September 1st, and started for Summerville on the
7th. At noon on the 10th the Rebels, under Floyd, were found intrenched near Carnifex Ferry,
the attack on which commenced in the afternoon and lasted until night-fall. During the night
Floyd retreated. The Twenty-Eighth lost three killed and twenty-seven wounded.

On the 14th the regiment crossed Gauley River and marched to Camp Lookout, and, on
September 25th, marched to Big Sewell Mountain ; remained opposite the fortified position of
the Rebels (Lee commanding) until the 6th of October, when, at ten o'clock at night, the retreat
commenced over horrid roads. The troops arrived at Camp Anderson (on New River) on the
9th, crossed New River to Fayetteville on the 19th, and returned the same night after some skir-
mishing. On the 21st the pickets on New River were attacked. Two companies of the regi-
ment, directed to re-enforce the pickets, soon repulsed the Rebels. Company C had one killed
and one wounded. On December 6th Camp Anderson was evacuated, and the troops marched to
Gauley. The regiment was drilled and instructed thoroughly, and May 2, 1862, was marched to
Fayetteville, where General Cox assumed command, and formed the Kanawha Division into
four brigades. The Twenty-Eighth, Thirty-Fourth, Thirty-Seventh Regiments, and Simmond's
Battery, of Ohio troops, constituting the Second Brigade, Colonel Moor commanding, moved on
the Tennessee and Virginia Railroad May 10th, by way of Raleigh, Flat Top Mountain, and
Princeton, arriving at French Mill May 14th.

Two companies of the Twenty-Eighth were sent across East River Mountain to reconnoiter,
and fell in with a Rebel force at Wolf Creek with commissary stores. Killed three and captured
•sight prisoners, a number of arms and horses, and burned the wagons and stores.

May 15th Colonel Moor sent five companies of the Twenty-Eighth, four companies of the
Thirty-Seventh, and two companies of the Thirty-Fourth Regiments, under command of Lieu-
tenant-Colonel Blessing, up the East River and Wytheville Road, to ascertain the Rebel force
at Rocky Gap, with orders to return next day. About nine P. M. General Cox and staff
arrived at French Mill, having been attacked and driven from Princeton that afternoon, his
force scattering in the woods. Colonel Moor marched with his brigade for Princeton forthwith;
the companies under Lieutenant-Colonel Blessing were notified by courier to march direct on
Princeton by the Wytheville road and join the brigade in the morning. The brigade arrived
at Princeton at six A. M., much fatigued, the enemy having evacuated after burning commissary



Twenty-Eighth Ohio Infantry. 195

and quartermaster's stores, and leaving a picket for observation, which retired as our skirmishers
became visible.

Learning from our wounded that the Rebels, under General Marshal, were in position one
mile west of town, Colonel Moor, with five companies and one Parrott gun, took possession of the
cemetery. General Cox, with the rest of the brigade, remained in town, waiting for the First
Brigade, under Colonel Scammon, which was falling back also from the Narrows of New River.
An artillery duel and 6ome skirmishing ensued, in which the Rebels wasted much ammunition.
At ten o'clock A. M. heavy musketry firing was heard, distant about one and a half miles, on
the heights of the Wytheville road, the first sign of the detachment ordered to move to Princeton
by the Wytheville road. Five companies were ordered to advance to their support, which order,
however, was not complied with, and Lieutenant-Colonel Blessing was forced back with a loss
of eighteen dead and fifty-six wounded — the Twenty-Eighth having six dead and eleven wounded.
In the afternoon the First Brigade arrived, and, during the night, General Cox concluded to fall
back on Flat Top Mountain.

At three o'clock A. M. the retrogade movement commenced. At noon, the ten companies
under Blessing, driven back the day before, fell in with our column near Blue Stone River, hav-
ing marched all night by a circuitous route through Black Oak Mountains. The division reached
Flat Top without molestation, May 19th.

Up to the 14th of August, companies A, C, D, E, and F had skirmishes on divers expedi-
tions, losing but few men. Receiving orders to proceed to Washington City, the division left
Flat Top Mountain August loth, for the Kanawha and Ohio River via Parkersburg, and arrived
at Washington August 25th ; marched to Fort Albany the 26th ; to Fort Buffalo on the 2Sth.
The regiment skirmished with Stuart's cavalry at Falls Church, September 4th.

General McClellan assuming command of the army, the division was attached to the Ninth
Corps, under General Reno. Coming up with the Rebels near Frederick City, Maryland, Sep-
tember 13th, Colonel Moor, with the cavalry attached to his brigade, was ordered to force an
entrance and drive the Rebels out of the town, which was accomplished after a sharp contest.

On the 14th the battle of South Mountain was fought, and the Kanawha Division bore the
brunt of the battle. At Antietam the Twenty-Eighth was the first regiment which forded the
creek above the stone bridge, and remained in front of the Ninth Corps in skirmish-line all night.
It lost forty-two killed and wounded. On the 8th of October marched with the division to Clear
Springs, and, on the 9th, to Hancock, watching Stuart's cavalry, which had recrossed the Potomac.
The division was ordered to march for the Kanawha on the 14th. The Twenty-Eighth Regi-
ment, after a tedious march, arrived at Brownstown on the 17th of November. During
December expeditions were sent through Wyoming and Logan Counties, capturing many
prisoners and horses.

January 8, 1S63, the regiment was ordered to Buckhannon. April 28th, General Roberts
having assumed command of the troops in the District of Western Virginia, the regiment fell
back under him to Clarksburg, before the Rebel General Jones, and advanced on Weston again,
May 9th. The command marched to Maryland, opposite New Creek, June 16th. Meanwhile
Western Virginia was threatened with another invasion, and the regiment was ordered to
inarch to Beverly, and arrived on the 7th of July. After many marches and skirmishes in
the mountains, General Averell arrived with a brigade of cavalry, and, on the 1st of November,
the whole force moved south, across Cheat Mountain, through Pocahontas into Greenbrier. On
the oth the advance came in contact with the enemy at Millpoint, who made a hasty retreat to
Droop Mountain. On the 6th the infantry forces were ordered to flank and attack the enemy,
under General Echols, if possible, in the rear, which was done, and the Rebels routed, stating
their loss in killed, wounded, and captured, at eight hundred.

On the 7th our forces marched to Lewisburgh, picking up prisoners, cannon, and other aban-
doned property. On the 8th Colonel Moor, in charge of the prisoners, captured some arms and
four hundred cattle, and was ordered with the infantry and Keeper's battery to return to Beverly;
General Averill with the cavalry taking another road. The force reached Beverly on the 12th,



196 Ohio in the War.

marching and bivouacking in snow and ice. On the Sth of December the regiment, -with a column
under Colonel Moor, in co-operation with General Averill's great raid to Salem, advanced again
to threaten Lewisburg, diverting the attention of the Rebels and remaining near Falling Springs
until General Averill passed the enemy's rear. On the 13th the regiment marched to Elk
Mountain, and found the pass blockaded with rocks and heavy timbers for two miles. At early
dawn on the loth a detail of men Mas sent up the mountain to remove the blockade, which
was accomplished, and at ten o'clock the march was resumed and Beverly reached on the lTtli,



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 34 of 165)