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Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Mastered out.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.



Thirty-Fourth Ohio Infantry. 223



THIRTY-FOURTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



HIS regiment was organized at Camp Lucas, Clermont Count}-, Ohio, during the months
of July and August, 1861 ; the first detachment entering camp July loth, and the first
regular companies, under Captains Broadwell and Evans, July 21st. On the morning
of September 1st it moved to Camp Dennison, and was there prepared for the field, adopting as
its uniform (a license allowable at that early period of the Avar) a light blue Zouave dress. In
compliment to their Colonel, the name of " Piatt Zouaves" was adopted.

The regiment left Camp Dennison on the 15th of September, 1861, for Western Virginia,
with full ranks, and arrived at Camp Enyart, on the Kanawha River, on the 20th of the same
month. On the 25th it fought its first battle in a gap near Chapmanville, Logan County, Virginia,
whipping a Virginia regiment, inflicting considerable loss to the Rebels in men, and badly wound-
ing their commander, Colonel Davis. The loss of the Thirty-Fourth was one killed and eight
wounded. During the remainder of the autumn and winter the regiment was engaged un the
arduous duty of guarding the rear of General Rosecrans's army, and the counties of Cabell, Put-
nam, Mason, Wayne, and Logan were kept pretty free from guerillas by continual scouting.

In March, 1862, the Thirty-Fourth was ordered to Gauley Bridge to join General Cox
in his demonstration on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. The regiment participated in
the battle of Princeton, on the 17th and 18th of May, losing several men. Lieutenants Peck
and Peters were wounded, and Captain O. P. Evans taken prisoner. Humphrey Marshall com-
manded the Rebels.

When General Cox was ordered to join General McClellan, in August, 1862, there were six
regiments left to guard the Kanawha Valley. The Thirty-Fourth and Thirty-Seventh held the
outpost at Fayetteville, where, on the morning of September 10th, they were attacked by a Rebel
force, under General Loring, ten thousand strong. With the aid of admirable breastworks, pre-
viously constructed by General Scammon, two ten-pound brass field pieces and four six-pound
mountain howitzers, the position was held until midnight, when the place was evacuated. Part
of the time the Thirty-Fourth fought in the open field, and repeatedly charged on the enemy.
Its loss was necessarily heavy. Of six companies engaged (the other four, under Major Frank-
lin, being on a scout) the loss was one hundred and thirty, or fully one-third. One-half of the
officers were either killed or wounded. Cutting their way out under a heavy fire, the National
troops fell back towards the Kanawha river, made a stand at Cotton Mountain the next day,
and at Charleston on the 12th, where a severe engagement took place. From this point the
entire National force fell back to Point Pleasant, leaving the entire valley in the hands of the
Rebels. In October General Cox returned with his command, when another advance was made,
and the valley regained.

From this time until May, 1863, nothing of moment occurred to vary the monotony of garri-
son duty. During May the regiment was furnished with horses and transformed into "Mounted
Rifles."

On the 13th of July, 1863, an expedition, consisting of the Thirty-Fourth, two companies
of the First, and seven companies of the Second Virginia Cavalry, under command of Colonel
Toland, made a demonstration 6n the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, striking it, on the even-
ing of the 18th, at Wytheville. A desperate fight ensued, the enemy occupying the houses, barns,
yards, etc., on a slight elevation to the rear of the town. About dark the National forces sue-



224 Ohio in the Wae.

ceeded in capturing the enemy's artillery, and driving him in all directions. Captain Delany,
commanding First Virginia, was killed, and Colonel Powell, Second Virginia, badly wounded.
The Thirty-Fourth Ohio lost four killed, including Colonel Toland, thirteen wounded and thirty-
three missing. (Colonel Toland was shot from a window of a house in his immediate vicinity,
while seated on his horse, engaged in giving orders, surrounded by a few of his staff. The ball
passed through his left breast. The Colonel did not fall from his horse, but caught the mane
with his right hand, when his Orderly, who was about fifty yards distant from him, ran and
caught him before he had time to reach the ground. With his last breath he requested that his
horse and sword be sent to his mother.)

The brigade left Camp Piatt with nearly one thousand men ; marched six hundred and
fifty-two miles in eleven days, traversing some of the highest mountains in West Virginia, cap-
turing over two hundred and fifty horses and three hundred and sixty prisoners, two pieces of
artillery, and a large amount of commissary stores; destroyed between three and five thousand
stand of arms, a bridge of importance, and partially burned one of the wealthiest cities in
Virginia.

Upon the fall of Colonel Toland, the command devolved upon Lieutenant-Colonel Franklin,
who decided on a retrograde movement. This he found it difficult to execute, from the fact that
the Rebel General McCausland had blockaded the roads in the most effectual manner. For sev-
eral days the command was moving in the mountains, destitute of food for themselves or fodder
for their horses, and continually harassed by Rebel cavalry. On the day previous to the arrival
of the regiment at Wytheville, company C, acting as rear-guard, was attacked by a Superior force
of Rebel cavalry. A number was killed and wounded, and Captain Cutter and fifteen men were
taken prisoners.

Several expeditions, under General Duffie (who had assumed command of the Kanawha
cavalry), to Lewisburg and vicinity, completed this year's campaign.

In January, 1864, about two-thirds of the regiment re-enlisted as veterans. On the 29th of
April, 1864, the regiment was divided in two detachments. The mounted portion was to operate
with the cavalry, under General Averill ; the dismounted, with the Thirty-Sixth Ohio Volunteer
Infantry, in General Crook's division of infantry.

On the 1st of May, 1864, the second expedition for the destruction of the Virginia and Ten-
nessee Railroad left Charleston. On the 9th the cavalry arrived at Wytheville, encountered the
. Rebels under General Morgan, were repulsed, and compelled to fall back, with considerable loss.
The infantry, under General Crook, was more successful. On the same day that Averill was
defeated, Crook achieved a solid victory over General Jenkins at Cloyd Mountain, near Dublin
Depot, which was captured the same evening. On the day following the enemy was again
encountered and defeated at the railroad bridge over New River, and the bridge totally destroyed.
From this point the command returned to Meadow Bluffs, crossing Salt Pond and Peter's Moun-
tains and the Greenbrier River, arriving at their destination on the 19th of May, completing a
distance of four hundred miles marched during the month.

From Meadow Bluffs the Thirty-Fourth started to join General Hunter, at Staunton, in the
Shenandoah Valley, passing through White Sulphur Springs, Callahan's Stand, and crossing
Panther Gap Mountain, where a skirmish ensued. On the 5th of June the regiment reached
Goshen, on the Virginia Central Railroad, and skirmished with a body of cavalry at Cow Pas-
ture River. The day after the Rebels were met at Buffalo Gap, in a position secure from direct
attack, but General Hayes's brigade succeeded in flanking and driving them out of it.

Staunton was reached on the 8th of June, where the Thirty-Fourth made its final prepara-
tions to join General Hunter on his disastrous raid to Lynchburg. General Hunter, now re-
enforced by Generals Crook, Averill, and Duffie, left Staunton on the 9th, and, passing through
Brownsburg, reached Lexington on the 11th. The evening of the 14th found the regiment at
Buckhannon, on the James River, at which point a few shots were exchanged with a small Rebel
force that had been driven out of Lexington. Crossing the Blue Ridge, near the Peaks of Otter,
the town of Liberty was reached on the 16th, when another skirmish occurred. From this point






Thirty-Fourth Ohio Infantry. 225

General Crook's command, with whom the dismounted members of the Thirty-Fourth were serv-
ing, was sent on a flanking expedition across the James, for the purpose of attacking Lynchburg
in the rear, the cavalry, on the left, to make a diversion in their favor. The attack was made
late in the afternoon of the 18th of June, was partly successful, and, in the opinion of the
Thirty-Fourth, would have been entirely so had General Crook been allowed to occupy the city
that night, according to his wish, but orders from his superior officer forbade it. The enemy were
re-enforced that night by about twenty thousand men from the vicinity of Richmond, under the
command of General Early, which, of course, so strengthened the city that it was impossible,
with the small and illy-appointed force under General Hunter, to cope with the Rebels.

The situation was fully developed early the next morning by a fierce cannonade from the
Rebels, which was promptly replied to by the National forces. In the afternoon an engagement
occurred, in which the Thirty-Fourth suffered severely. The retreat of the National forces com-
menced at dark on the 19th of June. The rear being heavily pressed by the pursuing enemy,
the second skirmish occurred at Liberty. At Salem, on the 21st, while the artillery of Hunter's
command was passing through a narrow defile, totally unsupported, a party of Rebels made a
6udden descent from the hills, and, dispersing the drivers and gunners, commenced the work of
destruction by shooting horses, cutting spokes and harness, and blowing up caissons. The
mounted portion of the Thirty-Fourth, being a few miles in the rear, hurried to the scene of
action, dismounted, and, with Lieutenant-Colonel Shaw as their leader, encountered the Rebels.
After a sharp fight the Rebels were driven off and the artillery regained.

The retreat was continued. Big and Little Sewell Mountains were crossed, and Charleston
reached on the 1st of July, where the exhausted, ragged, and starved troops were permitted to
rest. Thus ended this most disastrous expedition. The constant skirmishing, the starved bodies,
and blistered feet of those who participated in it, made "Hunter's retreat from Lynchburg" an
event long to be remembered.

The Thirty-Fourth lay at Charleston on the 10th of July, when it embarked on transports
for Parkersburg. (A day or two previous to this move the whole regiment was dismounted and
horses and equipments turned over to the cavalry.) From Parkersburg the regiment moved by
rail to Martinsburg, arriving there on the 14th of July, 1864.

The regiment was now in the Shenandoah Valley. On the 20th of July, while General
Crook, with his main force and the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps, was pressing Early back on
Winchester, General Duval's brigade, of which the Thirty-Fourth was a part, attempted to occupy
the place in advance of the Rebels, by a forced march from Martinsburg. Early, anticipating the
movement, had sent forward his old division, under General Ramseur, to check it. The National
force, only twelve hundred strong, met and attacked the Rebels two miles from Winchester,
completely routing them, capturing their artillery, and killing and wounding all their brigade
commanders. The loss of the Thirty-Fourth was ten killed and twenty wounded. Four days
later occurred the fourth battle of Winchester, in which General Early, taking advantage of the
absence of the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps, overwhelmed General Crook — the latter, however,
effecting an orderly retreat, with the loss of only a few wagons. In this battle General Duval's
brigade had the honor of bringing up the rear, and the Thirty-Fourth suffered severely, losing
their commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Shaw, a cool, determined soldier, and Christian. He was
struck in the abdomen by a musket-ball, and was borne from the field by a few faithful men of
his regiment, placed in an ambulance, and carried eleven miles distant, to a place called Bunker
Hill, where he died. His last words were, " Welcome, welcome death ! " Captain G. W. McKay
was wounded about the same time in the leg, and would have fallen into the hands of the enemy
but for the heroic devotion of some of his men, who carried him on a litter fifteen miles to Sandy
Hook, Maryland, where he died.

The command of the regiment devolved upon Captain S. R. S. West, who fully sustained his
reputation as a brave and gallant officer. The next day, July 25th, another stand was made at
Martinsburg, the Thirty-Fourth being the last regiment to leave the field, which it did under a
galling fire.

Vol. 11—15.



226 Ohio in the Wak.

The time of the regiment between the 25th of July and the 3d of September was occupied aa
follows : July 26th, forded the Potomac at Williamsport ; 27th, marched to Sandy Hook, Mary-
land, opposite Harper's Ferry ; 28th, crossed the Potomac at Halltown ; 30th, recrossed to Sandy
Hook; 31st, marched through Middletown toward Pennsylvania State line; August 1st, continued
the march to Wolfville, Maryland; 3d, returned by same road to Frederick City, Maryland, and
encamped on the Monocacy ; 6th, returned to Harper's Ferry ; 8th recrossed the Potomac and
moved in the direction of Halltown ; 10th, reached Berryville, Virginia; 11th, marched in line
of battle in the direction of Front Royal — heavy skirmishing with Early, who was falling back
on Fisher's Hill ; 12th, reached Cedar Creek, fdund the enemy had burned the bridge, and was
intrenched on the south bank of the stream. The Thirty-Fourth lay here until the evening of
the 17th (skirmishing heavily in the meantime). It then fell back, marching all night, passing
through Winchester, and camping at Berryville early next morning. The 20th of August found
the Thirty-Fourth at Charlestown, with the enemy close in its rear. In the expectation of an
attack, breastworks were thrown up ; but, after waiting in vain until ten o'clock at night, the regi-
ment fell back to Halltown. The enemy still followed, and, taking a position in the immediate
front of the regiment, heavy skirmishing ensued until the 27th, when they withdrew to demon-
strate on the upper Potomac. On the day following the Thirty-Fourth again occupied Charles-
town, where the regimental officers were busily engaged making up the necessary papers for the
discharge of the non-veterans, who, on the morning of the 3d of September, proceeded to Colum-
bus, Ohio, in charge of Captain West.

During the few months previous to this time the Thirty-Fourth had been largely re-enforced
by new recruits. Counting the veterans and the men of 1862, it still numbered between four and
five hundred men, present and absent. (On the evening of the day on which the non-veterans
left, the regiment participated in the battle of Berryville. The non-veterans were near enough to
hear the booming of cannon.)

The enemy fell back to Winchester and Bunker Hill. The Thirty-Fourth marched to Sum-
mit Point, and lay in camp until the morning of the 19th of September, the day on which occurred
Sheridan's famous battle of Winchester, it being the third time the regiment had fought over
nearly the same ground. It suffered terribly that day, the color-guard having no less than six
men, in quick succession, killed and wounded while carrying the flag. It was finally brought
through safe by George Rynals, of company A. All know the result of that glorious battle, and
remember Sheridan's celebrated dispatch, commencing: "I am moving up the Valley to-night !"
In accordance with this announcement, the next evening found the regiment at Cedar Creek,
where it lay until the 22d, when occurred the battle of Fisher's Hill. Here again, by the excel-
lent management of General George Crook, the enemy was successfully flanked, which resulted
in his total rout and the capture of all his artillery. The loss of the Thirty-Fourth in the last
two engagements was sixty-one killed.

The National forces followed the retreating and demoralized enemy to Harrisonburg, where
they lay until the 6th of October. In the meantime the cavalry were busily engaged in burning
barns filled with grain, driving in stock of all kinds, and otherwise rendering the Valley unten-
able as a base of supplies, and literally fulfilling Grant's order to Sheridan, to render it so deso-
late and provisionless that "a crow, in passing over it, would be compelled to carry his rations
with him." By the 6th the work of devastation was completed, and the National army again
fell back to Cedar Creek ; while the enemy, following at a respectful distance, once more resumed
his old position at Fisher's Hill.

Of General Early's desperate attempt to regain his lost laurels on the 19th of October, and
of his partial success on the morning of " Sheridan's Ride " to the scene of action, and the irre-
trievable disaster of the Rebels in the afternoon, much has been said and sung. The brunt of the
morning's surprise and attack fell on the left flank, composed of General Crook's corps, which,
with the Nineteenth Corps occupying the center of the line, was badly shattered. The Sixth
Corps, on the right, had time to fall back in good order. The troops were rallied near Middle-



Thirty-Fourth Ohio Infantry. 227

town, from whence the final advance was made, which swept everything hefore it. It is sufficient
to say that the day was won.

The evening before the battle the regiment, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel L. Fur-
ney, was sent on picket. In the morning, before dawn, when the surprise occurred, the Colonel
and eighteen of his men were taken prisoners. The Colonel escaped at Mount Jackson, and
joined his command a few days thereafter. The loss of the Thirty-Fourth in this affair was two
killed, twelve wounded, and eighteen prisoners. From this time until the latter part of December,
1861, the regiment lay in the neighborhood of Kernstown, when it marched to Opequan Crossing,
and from thence to Martinsburg.

On the evening of the 22d of December, as the regiment was leaving Martinsburg, on its way
to Webster, by rail, the train on which it was being transported came in collision with one loaded
with coal, killing two men and wounding fourteen. It reached Webster on the 25th and Beverly
on the 28th. >

On the 11th of January, 1865, the post of Beverly, garrisoned by the Thirty-Fourth, which,
by this time, was reduced to three hundred men present for duty, and the dismounted portion of
the Eighth Ohio Cavalry, was attacked by the enemy, under command of General Rosser. So
secret and sudden was the attack — no alarm whatever being given until the enemy were in the
quarters — that resistance was out of the question, and nearly every man was at one time a prisoner,
though subsequently a great many escaped, favored by the darkness and intense excitement of the
occasion. Colonel Youart, of the Eighth, commanding post, and Colonel Furney, were both
captured, but afterward escaped. The survivors of this most unfortunate and disgraceful affair
fell back to Philippi, and from thence were ordered to Cumberland, Maryland, where they were
consolidated with the Thirty-Sixth Ohio, (General Crook's old regiment), commanded by Colonel
H. F. Duval. The union of the separate organizations dates from the 22d of February, 1865, in
which the old Thirty-Fourth loses its identity — the coalition being known as the Thirty-Sixth
Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry.



228



Ohio in the War.



35th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTEE, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Mm or

Dc

Surgeon

Do

A88't Surgeon
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Do

Captain



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

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Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

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Do

Do

Do. :

Do

Do

Ifit Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

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Do.

Do.

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Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
Do.
Do.



FERD. VANDERVEER....

Charles L'H. Lorn

Henry V. N. Boyhton

Henry V. N. Boynton

Joseph L. Budd

Perkins A. Gordon

Francis D. Morris

Francis D. Morris

Charles 0. Wright

H. Landis

John Woud

Joshua C. Hoblett

Thomas Stone..

Joseph L. liudd

John S. Earhart

Nathaniel Boeder

Michael S. Gunckle

David M. Cans

Oliver H. Parshall

Samuel L'Hommedieu

Henry Mill lory

Andrew J. Lewis

Ransford Smith

Samuel Martindale

Jonathan Henioger

Lewis F. Dougherty

John G. Vanilerveer

Eil ward Cottingham

Wm. M. (,'. Steele

Philip Rothenbush

Theodore D. Mather

imuel L. llouser

James H. Bone

Joel K. Deaidorf!

Frederick W. Keil

George B. Wright

John G. Vanderveer

Ransford Smith

Lewis F. Dougherty

Wm. C. Dine

Samuel Martindale

Edward Cottingham

Joseph C. Thomas

Win. M. C. Steele

Andrew J. Lewis

Philip Rothenbush

Wm. H. Eacott

Theodore D. Mather

Jonathan ileninger

Samuel L. Houser

Thomas M. Harlan

James H. Bone

Julian R. Fitch.

Frederick W. Keil

L. P. Thorn peon

John Adams

I. F. Sanders

David W. Schaerter

Robert B. Davidson

Joseph H. Taylor

James Sabine

Beni. F. Miller

Richard Ford

James E. Harris

Lewis Lanebright

Daniel Stiles

Wm. H. Eacott

lames H. Bone

Julian R. Fitch

Theodore D. Mather

L. P. Thompson

Thomas M. Harlan

George F. Earheart

Win. Andrew ,

Joseph S. Claypoole

John Adams

Joseph F. Saunders

David W. Schaeller

Samuel L. Houser

John N. Strode

Robert B. Davidson

Joseph H. Taylor

James Sabine

Benj. F. Miller

David Stiles



July 26, 1861



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DATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



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July
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Feb.
Sept.
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Feb.



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June
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Oct.
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Jan.
July
Feb.
Aug.
March



Sept.
June
Aug.



Sept.



June

Oct.

Nov.

Oct.

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April

Feb.

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July

Aug.

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March

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July
April
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March



May
June
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REMARKS.



Brig. Gen. of Vols, and Brvt. Maj. Gen.

igned July 13 1863.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned November 2, 1863.
Resigned August 8, IH 2 ; disability.
Resigned August fi, 18fi2.

Promoted to Surgeon; resigned June 18, 1S64.
Mustered out September 27, 1S64.
Resigned November 19, (863.
Resigned February 19, 1^63.
Resigned Juti- fi, 1862.
Promoted to Minor.
Died August 10, lsfi3.
Dismissed August 12, N".3.
Resigned October 24, 1SB2.
Died November L'», 1863.
Killed September 19, ISfiS.
Mustered nut with regiment
Resigned February 17, 1S62.
Resigned January 4, lsfi4.

Honorably discharged Feb. IS, 1863. [21. - 63.
Dismissed July 2fi,'fi3; revoked; hon. dis. Aug.
Resigned September 20, 1864. |20, 1S64.

Killed at battle of Peach-tree Creek, Ga., July
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out March 11, 1S05.



Declined promotion.

Mustered out with regiin-nt. [Sep. 13.'63.

Died Oct. '63, from wounds at Chickamauga

Resigned September 18, 1863.



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