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Rebels were not given time to gather force sufficient to attack the expedition in the mountain
fastnesses, where they could have inflicted summary punishment upon the National troops.

A few days after the return of this expedition to Lewisburgh, in the early morning of May
23d, General Heth, with from twenty-five hundred to three thousand Rebels, drove in the
National pickets, and from a strong position on the hill east of the town began to shell the camp.



234 Ohio in the War.

The Thirty-Sixth, under Lieutenant-Colonel Clarke, and the Forty-Fourth, containing in the
aggregate not more than twelve hundred effective men, were ordered to repel the attack. Disap-
pearing for a few moments among the houses and streets of the town, the National force suddenly
emerged upon the open fields occupied by the Rebels. In twenty minutes the Rebels were driven
back over the summit of the hill and utterly routed, with a loss of sixty killed and left upon the
field, one hundred and seventy-five prisoners, four pieces of artillery, and three hundred stand
of small arms, besides a very large number of wounded whom they hurriedly carried off the
field. The victory was promptly and gloriously won. The Thirty-Sixth lost seven killed and
forty-four wounded, and five captured on picket. The loss of the Forty-Fourth was less. Colo-
nel Crook had no artillery, and his cavalry remained in reserve. This was a fair stand-up fight,
in open ground, the enemy having the great advantage in numbers, position, and in the morale
of the attack. Some fiendish citizens of Lewisburg shot some of our wounded and bleeding sol-
diers as they were struggling back from the battle-field through the town to the hospital. The
next day after the battle the National dead were buried in a beautiful grove near the camp, and a
picket-fence placed around their graves.

On the 29th of May the expedition moved back to Meadow Bluffs, in order to be nearer its
base of supply. Here it was joined by the Forty-Seventh Ohio. On the 22d of June the bri-
gade moved down to Salt Sulphur Springs, and Union, Monroe County, to return the early morn-
ing call received from General Heth at Lewisburg. Although possessing a much superior force,
the General reported " not at home," and hastily betook himself to the mountains.

On the 14th of August the regiment, with other forces under General Cox, started for Camp
Piatt, on the Kanawha River, to embark on steamers for Parkersburg, and thence to Washington
and the Army of the Potomac. At Parkersburg Major Andrews, who had been ordered to Ohio
a short time before, joined the regiment, with nearly one hundred recruits, increasing its force to
one thousand and twenty men. August 25th the Thirty-Sixth, with a part of the Thirtieth Ohio,
reached Warrenton Junction in advance of the rest of General Cox's Kanawha division, and was
assigned by General Pope to duty at his head-quarters. General Stonewall Jackson having
broken in upon Pope's rear, the National forces moved north with the head-quarter train on the
afternoon of the 27th of August, and camped after dark near the battle-ground at Bristow Sta-
tion. In the succeeding battle of Bull Run the Thirty-Sixth was held in reserve by General
Pope, and on the evening of that defeat performed signal service, in arresting stragglers and fugi-
tives from the battle, thus preventing thousands from hurrying back to Washington and creating
a panic of dismay similar to that after the first battle of Bull Run.

On the 2d of September the regiment fell back to Munson's Hill, near Alexandria, and went
into camp for a few days. On the 7th it left Washington with the rest of the Kanawha division
for Maryland to repel Lee's invasion. It reached Frederick, Maryland, on the 12th, in advance
of the rest of McClellan's army, and had a brisk skirmish with General Stewart's cavalry, the
rear-guard of Lee's army. In this little brush Colonel Moore, of the Twenty-Eighth Ohio, the
commander of the brigade, was captured. This gave Colonel Crook command of the brigade,
and left Lieutenant-Colonel Clarke in command of the Thirty-Sixth. On the 14th of September
the regiment and brigade was actively engaged in the battle of South Mountain, and with it
made a memorable bayonet charge, by which the enemy were so scattered and routed that they
never rallied on that part of the field again. The Thirty -Sixth lost several men, chiefly on the
ri^ht, where for a short time the enemy obtained an enfilading fire on it. After the charge the
regiment was employed to support batteries and other similar work, but was not very actively
engaged.

Three days later the Thirty-Sixth was actively engaged in the battle of Antietam. It con-
stituted a part of General Burnside's force on the left. In making a forward movement in the
afternoon over open ground, it being a very large and sightly regiment, drew upon itself a heavy
artillery fire. In this fire Colonel Clarke was instantly killed by a ten-pound shell while engaged
in halting his regiment, and Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews look his place in command. Colonel
Clarke was a native of Massachusetts, and was an intelligent and brave officer, a man of great



Thirty-Sixth Ohio Infantry. 235

personal purity and worth, a Christian gentleman and soldier. His death was deeply mourned
by the regiment. His body was brought home, and now sleeps under a tasteful monument
erected by his fellow-officers in the beautiful cemetery in Marietta.

After the fall of Colonel Clarke, Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews moved the regiment forward
up the hill a short distance to a stone wall, where it was somewhat subjected to an infantry fire
but was sheltered from the Rebel artillery. It being now near night-fall, and General Burnside'a
troops having failed to gain as much ground as the Thirty-Sixth had gained, and it being thus
left without support, at the order of General Crook the regiment was marched back to the hill
bordering Antietam Creek, where the men 6lept on their arms during the night.

During the following day the Thirty-Sixth remained on the front line, its skirmishers
exchanging compliments with the Rebel sharpshooters. The enemy had retreated in the night.
The loss of the regiment in this battle was small in number, its exposure being chiefly to artil-
lery fire. After the battle the regiment moved down and encamped near the mouth of Antietam
Creek, where it remained until October 6th, when the Kanawha division was ordered back to
West Virginia. It marched to Hagerstown and thence west to Hancock, where it took the cars
on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad for Clarksburg, West Virginia. The regiment and brigade
left Clarksburg toward the close of October for the Kanawha Valley, and reached Charleston on
the 16th of November. Its stay at Charleston was for a period of nearly three months.

On the 25th of January, 1863, the Thirty-Sixth embarked on steamers for Nashville, Ten-
nessee, to join the army of General Rosecrans, reaching that place early in February. After
remaining a few days in Nashville the regiment, with the Eleventh and Ninety-Second Ohio, all
under command of General Crook, was ordered to Carthage, up the Cumberland River. Early
in April Colonel Andrews resigned to resume his Professorship in Marietta College, his place
having generously been kept vacant for him while serving his country in the army. He was a
brave officer and polished gentleman. His successor was William G. Jones, of Cincinnati, a
regular army officer.

Early in June the brigade and regiment marched across the country from Carthage to Mur-
freesboro' to join the main army, and was attached to Major-General Reynolds's division. On
the 24th of June it moved southward with the army through a drenching rain, and had a sharp
engagement with the enemy the same evening and part of the next day at Hoover's Gap. The
enemy were driven so sharply that they were compelled to evacuate Tullahoma and continue
their retreat. The pursuit was necessarily and aggravatingly slow, owing to the wretched condi-
tion of the roads. At Big Spring the National forces made a halt of several days, and then
moved by way of University Place down to and crossed the Tennessee River at Shellmound,
thence over Raccoon Mountain to Trenton, Georgia, where another halt of several days was
made. They then moved up the valley some ten miles and crossed Lookout Mountain, descend-
ing into McLemore's Cove, where a day or two was spent in reconnoitering. They then moved
out to Pond Spring, in the neighborhood of which the enemy was discovered in considerable
force.

On the 18th of September General Crittenden, then some eighteen or twenty miles to the
north-west, being heavily pressed, and it becoming evident that the Rebels meant to make a
stand and fight, the National forces were ordered to close up quickly. This order compelled
them an all-night march. Soon after sunrise Crawfish Spring was passed, and the line of battle
was at once formed near that locality. Soon the low mutterings, as of distant thunder, were
heard rolling up the vallev, telling that the work of death on the field of Chickamauga had com-
menced. In the afternoon, while making a charge, the brave and gallant Colonel W. G. Jones
fell, mortally wounded, and expired soon after. Lieutenant-Colonel H. F. Duvall immediately
assumed command, and carried the regiment through the fight. With the Fourteenth Corps, to
which the Thirty-Sixth belonged, it assisted into Chattanooga the remnants of the National army.
The casualty list of the Thirty-Sixth shows a sad loss in this battle of Chickamauga. Seventy
brave and gallant soldiers, officers and men, yielded up their lives for their country.

From the time the National forces entered Chattanooga until the 1st of November, it was in



236 Ohio in the War.

a state of siege and on half rations. Soon after entering the town the Thirty-Sixth made a
reconnoissance, in which it lost a dozen men. The regiment participated in the memorable
coup de main resulting in the capture of Brown's Ferry, on the Tennessee River, below Chatta-
nooga, and on the 25th of November took part in the victory of Mission Ridge, in which it lost
eighty-three men.

In February, 1864, the regiment re-enlisted, and on the 10th of March the men were sent
home on veteran furlough. At the expiration of the thirty days the regiment was sent to its
old familiar camping-ground at Charleston, West Virginia. From thence (General George Crook
commanding the brigade) it started on a raid to Dublin Depot, on the Virginia and Tennessee
Railroad, a point that had never been reached by the National forces, although several attempts
had been made. The expedition moved via the Falls of Kanawha, Raleigh, and Princeton. At
Princeton a smart skirmish occurred, and at Cloyd's Mountain the enemy was found in position,
ready to dispute the further progress of the National forces. A severe engagement ensued, in
which the Rebels were driven from their works, two pieces of artillery captured, and the notorious
A. G. Jenkins mortally wounded and captured. A large amount of Rebel Government property
was destroyed, including locomotives, cars, siege-guns, work-shops, and the railroad bridge across
New River. Having accomplished the object of the expedition, and being short of supplies, the
National forces moved rapidly back through Union to Meadow Bluff, where a supply train was
met. Soon after reaching this point orders were received to join General Hunter in the Shenan-
doah Valley, and as soon as the necessary supplies could be brought forward the march began.
The maiden battle-field of the regiment was passed over going through White and Warm Sul-
phur Springs and Goshen, on the Virginia Central Railroad. At the latter place a fine bridge,
spanning the Calf- Pasture River, was burned, and the railroad track destroyed for the greater part
of the way to Cravysville, where the mountain was crossed and a junction effected with General
Hunter two days after his victory at Piedmont. Skirmishing was kept up from Warm Springs
to Staunton, with a Rebel force under one " Mudwall " Jackson, who took good care to keep well
out of the way.

On the 10th of June the National force left Staunton for Lynchburg, skirmishing all the way
to Lexington, where "Mudwall " showed the first sign of being in earnest, and delivered him-
self of a pleasant little fight, which didn't hurt either side much; but snuffing danger from afar,
he burned the bridge across the North River, and a couple of flouring- mills, and again showed
his heels. On entering Lexington, the National forces burned the Virginia Military Institute,
the fine dwelling-houses belonging to it, and the residence of ex-Governor Letcher. The loss of
the Thirty-Sixth was three killed and five wounded.

From Lexington General Hunter moved by way of Buckhannon, thence across the Blue
Ridge, between the Peaks of Otter, to Liberty. From Liberty, bridges were burned and the rail-
road destroyed to within a short distance of Lynchburg. At the old Stone Church, on the Liberty
Pike, the Rebels were encountered and driven on the run inside of their fortifications. Night
coming on, operations were suspended. By morning affairs had assumed a different aspect. The
Rebel General Early had arrived from Richmond with a heavy force, and at daylight opened on
us with ai-tillery, which soon ceased; but steady skirmishing was kept up till about noon, when
the National force was most furiously assailed, but stood its ground, and in turn succeeded in
driving the Rebels back inside their works. Meantime it had been decided to fall back, which
was done as quietly as possible during the night. Then commenced one of the hardest marches
of the war. Supplies were nearly exhausted, and foraging had to be resorted to, with an active
enemy hanging upon the rear. The retreat was continued via Liberty, Buford's Gap, Salem,
Newcastle, Sweet and White Sulphur Springs, and Lewisburg, to Charleston, on the Kanawha.
The demoralized, half-starved, and broken-down expedition reached Charleston in sad plight.

On the 12th of July the National troops embarked, including the Thirty-Sixth Ohio, on
steamers at Charleston for Parkersburg, and from thence to the Shenandoah Valley by rail,
reaching Martinsburg on the 15th. On the 19th a sharp little fight occurred at Cabletown, in
which the regiment lost three men killed and four wounded. Again, on the 24th, an engagement



Thirty-Sixth Ohio infantry. 237

was had at Kernstown, four miles from Winchester, in which the division lost one hundred and
fifty men killed and wounded. This was the first time the Thirty-Sixth Ohio ever showed its
back to the enemy. It is true, it left the field of Chickaniauga, and retreated from before
Lynchburg, but in both instances the organization was perfect. At this place, however, the
regiment and division left the field in disorder. The retreat was made via Martinsburg and
Williamsport into Maryland, going into camp at Pleasant Valley on the 27th of July.

A body of Rebel cavalry having passed through Maryland into Pennsylvania, the National
forces were ordered to move up through Middletown toward the Pennsylvania line to intercept
them ; but hearing that they had burned Chambersburg and were moving toward Cumberland,
the Nationals returned to the Shenandoah Valiey via Frederick City and Harper's Ferry.

On the 7th of August General Sheridan took command of the Array of the Shenandoah,
and the 11th found it at Cedar Creek. After skirmishing three or four days the Nationals
fell back again down the Valley to Halltown, four miles from Harper's Ferry. Here fortifica-
tions were hastily thrown up and an attack from the Rebels awaited. The brigade of which
the Thirty-Sixth Ohio formed a part was, on two occasions, and the division at another, sent out
to reconnoiter and develop the strength and position of the enemy, which was successfully
accomplished each time, and many prisoners captured, but not without heavy loss in killed and
wounded. On the 26th the Kebels fell back and were pursued by the National forces.

On September 3d the little Army of West Virginia, under General George Crook, had a
severe engagement of four hours' duration at Berryviile. The Thirty-Sixth Ohio distinguished
itself as much in this battle, perhaps, as in any other of the war. Its loss in killed and wounded
was twenty-five. Captain J. C. Selby, a brave and true soldier, was mortally wounded.

The battle of Opequan occurred on the 19th of September. The Thirty-Sixth Ohio occupied
the right of the army. General Crook's little Army of West Virginia, about four thousand
strong, made a flank attack, which resulted in a junction with our cavalry, and in the complete
rout of the Rebel army. The regiment lost in this battle thirty-three killed and wounded.

The afternoon of September 22d found the National army at Fisher's Hill, making its way
over rocks and through gullies and bushes along the base of North Mountain, to strike the
enemy again on the flank, a task which was fully accomplished. The movement was a complete
surprise to the Rebels, and resulted in an almost bloodless victory to the National forces. The
Thirty-Sixth lost four men wounded. Early's fugitive army was followed as far as Harrisonburg,
at which place the National forces halted and soon fell back to Cedar Creek, where, on the 19th
of October, the Army of West Virginia was surprised by a furious attack at early dawn by the
whole Rebel army; and the National army, consisting of the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps and
the Army of West Virginia, were sent flying down the Valley some four miles, where the National
lines were re-formed and awaited the onset of the enemy.

In the meantime General Phil. Sheridan (who had been absent in Washington) came up.
He made some slight changes in the disposition of the troops and awaited the enemy's move-
ments. About two P. M. a portion of the National line was attacked, but the Rebels were hand-
somely repulsed, and, immediately after, the whole National line was ordered forward, and in an
hour's time the Rebel army was flying up the Valley in the utmost confusion. The loss of the
Thirty-Sixth was twenty-two killed and wounded. All the National dead were found in the
field stripped naked.

The Thirty- Sixth Ohio remained in the Shenandoah Valley until the latter part of Decem-
ber. It Avas then sent to Cumberland, Maryland, and while there was consolidated with the
Thirty-Fourth Ohio. In April, 1865, the consolidated regiment was sent back to Winchester,
and from thence to Staunton, where it remained until the middle of June. It was then ordered
to Cumberland, Maryland, by way of Winchester and Romney, and from Cumberland to Wheel-
ing, where it was mustered out of the service on the 27th of July, sent to Columbus, Ohio, and
paid and disbanded on the 1st of August, 1865.



238



Ohio in the War.



37th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTEE, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF HANK.



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel ....

Major

Do

Surgeon

Do

Do

Do

Do

Ass't Surgeon

Do.

Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

D<

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Di

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Dj.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



EDWARD SIBER

L. Vox Blf.ssingh

Chablf.s Ankf.lk

Ciiarlks Hipp

Conrad Scih.nuk

a. 0. swartzwf.i.df.r

Wm. Arnold

augtstus wlbdf.nback

FltF.DF.RIOK Hohly

lUI.IUS C. SCHENCK

KUGENK. HlNGI.ER

A. W. BlLLHARDT

Adoi.ph Gkrwig

L. Quedenfeld

L. You Blessingh

Charles Hipp

I oh n G. Eberhardt

Frederick H. Rehwinklc ...

\ ii ton Valendar

Frederick Sheening

Charles Messner

Win. Krauss

II. Goeke

F. M. Sturdlef.

Charles Morritz

George Boelini

Ailolph Von Kissinger

lohu Bayer

Win. Weste

Paul Wittieh

Theodore Voges

Frederick Krumni

Wm. Schnltz

Win. Koenig

lohn II a mm

Henry Schmidt

lacob Merry

Theodore Nicberg

Herma.ii Rosen baum

Gustav Bait her

John Hamm

Herman Can

Died rich Schmidt

Charles Manuel

Louis S( bastian

Louis Lambert

Jacob Litter

Henry Rentsch

Robert Seng

George Burl i m

H. Gceke

Wm. Schnltz

Frederick Kriinim

Adolph Von Kissinger

Anton Peterson

Wm. Schnltz

Charb-s Morritz

John Bayer

F. Ingold

Win. Weste

A. Huber

Theodore Voges

John Ham in

W m . K cen ig

Paul Wittieh

Henry Schmidt

Magnus W. Blucher

Arthur Stoppel

Louis Kccppcl

George W. Tciiniie

Joseph Lang -ndei fer

John H. Frenches

Sebaldus Hassler

Jacob Merry ,

Gustav Wintzer

Florentine Finn

Theodore Nciberg

Herman Rosen baum

Louis Wilms

Herman Rau

Gustav Baither ,

Wm. Weiss

Died rich Schmidt

Charles Manuel ,

Louis Sebastian ,



Sept.

Oct.

Aug.

June

Oct.

Feb.

Ian.

Oct.

April

Sept.

Dec.

Jan.

Oct.

Sept.



Oct.



Feb.

March
April
May
luue
Oct.
pt.
Nov.

Dec.



12, 1861



March
\pril



Juno
Jan.



April

May

Sept.



Dec.
Aug.
Feb.



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26, 1

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22,
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Sept.
Jan.
Feb.

lune
Oct.
April

Ian.

Dec.
March
Oct.
Dec.



March 20, 1868
h. IS. "
May
lune
Sept.



Nov.

Dec.



Feb.
Jan.
June
April

May
June
Jan.



April



Mav
Dec.



March

April

May

June
Oct.
Nov.



Jan.
April
May



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April 29, 1864
s> 29, "

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May
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Jan.
Feb.
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Resigned March 23, lSf>4.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned June 5, 1668.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned November 20, 1862.

Appointed A. A. G. by the President.

Mustered out January ii, 1863.

Discharged March 28, ISM.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned as Surgeon November 28. isr>2.

Mustered out lor promotion March 10, ISM.

.Mustered out Oct. 7, 04; expiration of service.

Deceased.

Killed in action at Princeton May 17, 1862.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned December 29, 1S62.

Resigned Octobers, 1862.

Resigned March 31, 1862.

Died of wounds May 18, ISM.

Resigned November 16, 1S62.

Resigned April 19, IS62.

Killed at Logan, 1861.

Discharged September 26, 1862.

Mustered out December 21, ISM.

Mastered oat January 4, 1865.

Resigned December 20, 1862.

Mustered out January 4, 1865.

Resigned March 4, Is63.

Killed at Kenesaw July 22, 18M

Mustered out.

igned as 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out March 12, 1865.
Honorably discharged November 28, 1863.
Honorably discharged November 22, ISM.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Declined promotion ; commission returned.
Mustered out with regiment.
Declined promotion ; commission returned.

Mustered out April I, 1865, as 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain March 31, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned December 27, 1861.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February 6, 1S62.

Pi muted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged April 2">, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned November 9, 1S62.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Died of wounds May 28, 1S62.

Resigned October 19, 1802.

Resigned May 26. 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned February 23. 1S64.

Resigned September 24, ISM.

Killed May 20. Is63.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed May 20, 1863.

Died of wounds September 21, 1864

Resigned September 20, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

On detached duty at muster out of regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out January 5, 1365.

Killed May 13, 1885.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.



Thirty-Seventh Ohio Infantry.



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