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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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North Carolina.

On the 22d of March the regiment marched toward Goldsboro', crossed the Neuse River on
the 24th, and went into camp two miles east of the town. The regiment remained in this camp
until the capitulation of Lee and Johnston, when, with the rest of the National army, it
marched, via Richmond, Virginia, to Washington City; there passed in review before President
Johnson and his Cabinet. Thence it was transported by rail to Louisville, Kentucky, where it
lay until the latter part of June, when the regiment was sent with the Second Division of the
Fifteenth Army Corps to Little Rock, Arkansas, arriving on the 4th of July. The regiment
remained in camp there until the 12th of August, when it was mustered out and transported
to Cleveland, Ohio, and there discharged — and the men returned to their respective homes.



Thirty-Eighth Ohio Infantry.



245



38th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


REMARKS.




EDWIN D. BRADLEY....
EDWARD H. PHELPS....
WM. A. CHOATE


June
Feb.
Nov.
June
Feb.
Nov.

June
Jan.
Feb.
May
Nov.
June
July
Jan.
June
Aug.
July
April
June
Aug.

Sept.

Jan.
Feb.

March

Jan.

Dec.
March

Jan.
July
May

Nov.

Jan.
May

Aug.

Sept.

Jan.
Feb.

March

Feb.
March

June
July
Sept.
Dec.
March

April
June


10, 1861
6, 1862

25, 1863

10, 1801
6, 18C2

25, 1863
3, 1864

10, 1861

28, 1862
6, "
9, 1864
3, "

10, 1861
13, 1863

20, 1865
10, 1861

21, 1862
19, "

29, 1S64
10, 1861
12, "

15, "

17, "
21, "

25, "

26, "
1, "
1, "
3, "

5, "
28, 1862

6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "

28, "

19, "
10, "

24, 1863

16, "

23, "

18, "
9, 1S64
9, "
9, "
3, "
3, "
3, "
3, "

20, 1865

20, "

18, "
31, "
31, "

15, 1861

17, "

19, "

25, "

26, "
28, "

li "
1, "
3, "

5, "
10, "
10, "
28, 1S62

6, "
6, "
9, "

12, "
17, "
10, "

21, "
6, "

16, "

19, "
10, "
10, "
16, 1863

24, "

20, "
23, "


Nov.

March

Feb.

Nov.

March

Feb.

Nov.

Jan.
March
May
Nov.

Sept.

Jan.

Nov.

Sept.

Oct.

April

Nov.

Jan.
March

May
Oct.

Jan.
April

Se^t.

May

Nov.

Jan.
May

Nov.

Jan.
March

Oct.

Dec.
Jan.

Sept.


20, 1S61
6, 1S62

25, 1S64

20, 1861
6, 1862

25, 1864
3, "

20, 1S61

28, 1862
6, "
9, 1864
3, "

20, 1S61
1, 1863
20, 1S65
20, 1861
3, 1862

27, "

29, 1864
20, 1861
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "

28, 1862
6, "
6, "
1. "

16, "
16, "
16, "
24, 1S63
22, "
22, "
1, "
1, "
9, 1864
9, "
9, "
3, "
3, "
3, "
3, "
20, 1S65
20, "

18, "
31, "
31, "
20, 1861
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
28, 1862

6, "
6, "
20, "
20, "
16, "
16, "
16, "
16, "
16, "
16, "

19, "
24, 1863
24, 1S64
24, "
24, "

1, "


Resigned February S, 1862.

Killed in action November 25, 1863.

Died of wounds.

Promoted to Colonel.

Promoted to Colonel.

Resigned August 26, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned January 12, 1862.

Resigned February 9, 1862.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned July 13, 1863.

Mustered out January 4, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Never reported to reg't ; resigned June 31

Promoted to Surgeon.

Mustered out March 30, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Resigned July 18, 1863.

Deceased December 10, 1862.

Promoted to Major.

In gunboat service.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned July 13, 1862.

Resigned April 15, 1863.

Resigned June 23, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Declined.

Declined. »

Resigned March 24, 1863.

Declined.

Mustered out June 27, 1865.

Resigned April 12, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Died of wounds.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Died of wounds.

Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mus.tered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Died of wounds as 2d Lieutenant.

Declined promotion.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain ; declined.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain February 6, 1862.

Appointed Captain by President Sept. 10,

Promoted to Captain March 6, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned March 9, 1862.

Resigned February 6, 1862.

Resigned March 12, 1862.

Declined.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned June 16, 1S62 ; revoked.

Deelini'd.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned December 9, 1863.

Resigned November 13, 1863.

Resigned April 20, 1863.

Resigned August 2, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Died of wounds September 1, 1S64.

Resigned February 13, 1865.

Honorably discharged December 29, 1865.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Died December, 1863.




Do




Do










Do






Do






Do








Moses R. Brailey




Do




Do




Do






Do


















Do










Do.




1863.


Do.






Do.


















Do






Do






Do






Do


David S. Tallerday










Do


Wm. Stough




Do






Do






Do






Do






Do






Do


Wm. E. Kintigh


*


Do


Beuj. S. Pindar




Do


Chas. M. Gilbert




Do






Do




Do






Do






Do






Do


E. M. Peucliar




Do






Do






Do






Do






Do






Do




Do






Do






Do






Do






Do.


John W. Pollock




Do






Do


E. D. Canthberrv




1st Lieutenant






Do.






Do.






Do.




862.


Do.


Chas. M. Gilbert




Do.
Do.


Edward D. A. Williams




Do.






Do.






Do.






. Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.


Thomas W. Wright




Do.






Do.






Do.


Isaiah W. White




Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.


Peter V. Fulton




Do.






Do.


Elbright G. Willey




Do.






Do.


Wm. H. Ellis




Do.






Do.
Do.


Abraham W. Burgoyne




Do.




Dec.


9, 1863


Dec.


31, 1863





246



Ohio in the War



DATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



David Renton

Webster Jones

Joseph B. Uoons

Foreman Evans

James A. McQuilken

John W. Pollock

E. D. Cantleberry

Jacob Lane

Edward Metz

Jacob Kelley

James M. Patterson

George W. 'fowl

Wm. Boyers „...

Alphonso A. Evans

David \V. Lazenby

Edward P. McCutclu'on

Albert W. Dolph

Jacob Hater

Simon Waterstone

John Cameron

John W. Pollock

Jacob C. Donaldson

Elias Glcason

Benj. S. Pindar

Thomas W. Wright

Joseph Wagstatt'.

Daniel Tresster

Peter V. Fulton

Charles L. Allen

Abraham W. Burgoyne

Alphonso L. Blanche

Isaiah W. White

Wm. H. Ellis

Elisha Tewlas

Thomas B. Hnnna

James H. Queen

Joseph Newman

Wm. Lasure

David Renton

Webster Jones

John S. Templeton

lames Betts

John Lewis

Joseph B. Coons

Foreman Evans

James A. McQuilken....

John W. Pollock

John Cameron

E. D. Cantleberry

Jacob Lane «

Edward Metz

Jacob Kelley

James M. Patterson

George W. Towl

Chas. Hakes

Wm. Boyers

Alphonso A. Evans

David W. Lazenby

TacobHafer

Simon Waterstone

Wm. A. Carnahan

Martin Trowbridge



April
May
Nov.

Jan.
May



July
Nov.
Aug.



Sept.



Feb.

March

Aug.

March

July

March

Feb.
Juno

Sept.
May
March



April

Nov.



Feb.

June



May
Juno



13, ISO!

13,

13,

9,

9,

9,

3,

3,

3,

3,

20, 1865

20, "

20, "

20, "
28, "
13, "

18, "
31, "
31, "
13, "

3, "

15, 1861

17, "

19, "

21, ||

2fi| "

1. "

1, "

3, "

3, "

5, 1862

6, "
9, "

12, "

16, "

19, "
21, "
10, "

17, "
16, "
10, "

6, 1S63

16, "

24, "

20, "

20, "

21, "
21, "
27, "

25, 1864
25, "
27, "
27, "
27, "
27, "
27, "
27, ,l

18, 1865

18, "
18, "
20, "



April
May
Nov.

Jan,
May



July

Nov.



Feb.
June



May
April

May
Jan.
Feb.



May
June



13, :

13,

13,

9,

9,

9,

3,

3,

3,

3,

20, :

20,
20,
20,
28,
18,
IS,
31,
31,
13,
3,

20, :

20,
20,
20,
20,
20,
20,
20,
20,
20,

5, :

20,
20,
1,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
19,
19,

17, 1
22,
22,
17,

27. :

25,
25,
25,
25,
25,
27,
27,
27,
27,
27,
27,

18, 1
18,
18,



Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned November 14, 1S64.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain ; commission returned.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged Dec. 17, 1S64, aa 2d Lieut.

Mustered out with regiment.

Killed at Jonesboro, 1864,

Blustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Declined.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned July 6, 1863.

Resigned August 26, 1862.

Died December 12, 1863.

Resigned September 1, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Killed in action November 25, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Revoked, special order July 30, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as Q. M. Sergeant.



Thiety-Eighth Ohio Infantry. 247



THIRTY-EIGHTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment was organized at Defiance, Ohio, on the 1st of September, 1S61, under
the President's call for three hundred thousand men for three years. On the 22d of
September it was transferred to Camp Dennison, where it was armed, equipped, and,
to a considerable extent, drilled and disciplined, and then ordered into active service in Ken-
tucky on the 1st of October.

At sunrise on the morning of the 2d the regiment passed through and encamped near the
town of Nicholasville. Remaining here about two weeks, it was ordered to the relief of the
garrison at Wild Cat, Kentucky ; and, after a forced march of sixty miles, reached its destination
on the 19th of October, 1861. Afterward it pursued the enemy to London and Barboursville ;
marched on all the subsequent campaigns during the fall of 1861 ; and Christmas found the
army encamped near Somerset, Kentucky. During the winter of 1861 and 1862, the men, being
almost constantly on duty, and not accustomed to the rough usages of camp life, became sickly ;
and in a short time, out of nine hundred and ninety men, less than three hundred were fit for
duty. The regiment participated in the campaign of Mill Springs, after which it marched to
Louisville, where it arrived February 28, 1862.

On March 1st the regiment embarked on transports destined for Nashville, Tennessee, where
it arrived on the 5th of the same month, and went into camp to prepare for the coming campaign
in the spring of 1862. On the 19th of March it left Nashville with the Army of the Ohio ;
marched through Middle Tennessee, and, during the month of April, encamped on the battle-
field of Pittsburg Landing; marched with the army under Halleck toward Corinth, Mississippi,
and took an active part in the siege of that place.

After the evacuation of Corinth, May 27, 1862, the Thirty-Eighth marched with the army
in pursuit of Beauregard as far as Booneville, and, on its return, encamped near Corinth until
the 20th of June, 1862, when, with the Army of the Ohio, it marched in the direction of Tus-
cumbia, Alabama, where it arrived on the 2Sth of June. Eemaining there until July 21st, it
marched, via Decatur and Huntsville, to Winchester, Tennessee, where it arrived August 7, 1862.

During this month several reconnoitering parties made extensive detours through the mount-
ain spurs, in the direction of Chattanooga, then the head-quarters of the Eebel army. In these
reconnoissances no regiment took a more active part than the Thirty-Eighth Ohio. A party of
eighty men made a forced march of thirty-six miles, captured Tracy City, and, after destroying a
large amount of tobacco, whisky, leather, and articles of less value, returned to camp, having
marched seventy-two miles and destroyed a large amount of property without losing a man.
This march was performed in less than twenty-four hours.

On September 1, 1862, began the retrograde march from the vicinity of Chattanooga, which
terminated only when the army reached the Ohio. The Thirty-Eighth Ohio endured all the
hardships and shared all the trials of that campaign. Eemaining but a short time at Louisville,
on the 1st of October the regiment marched southward with the army, and, on the 8th, found the
enemy in position at Chaplin Hills, near Perryville, Kentucky. The Thirty-Eighth participated
in that battle, and afterward in the campaign in Kentucky, until, on the 27th of October, it went
into camp on Eolling Fork, near Lebanon, Kentucky. Eemaining here but a short time, during
which a detachment of recruits was received, it again took up the line of march in the direction



248 Ohio in the War.

of Nashville, Tennessee. During the months of November and December, 1862, the regiment
was guarding railroads between Gallatin and Nashville. In the latter part of December the
regiment marched to Nashville, and prepared for the approaching campaign, which terminated
with the battle of Stone River. The Thirty-Eighth acted a very conspicuous part in that battle,
losing but few men, however ; and, after the battle, went into camp near the city, where it
remained until March 13th, when it joined the forces then at Triune. While there it built the
earth fortress known as Fort Phelp3.

On the 23d of June, 1863, the Thirty-Eighth marched with the Army of the Cumberland,
and took an active part in the Tullahoma campaign. After resting a short time at Winchester,
Tennessee, on the 17th of August the march for Chattanooga began. The Thirty-Eighth moved
with the center corps, crossing the Cumberland Mountains, and finally halted on the banks of the
Tennessee, opposite Shellmound, where rafts of logs were constructed, preparatory to crossing
the river. Crossing the river on the night of September 2, 1863, the march was resumed across
Lookout and Raccoon Mountains, and the middle of September found the army in Lookout
Valley. Preparations were made for battle by sending everything to the rear that would encumber
the army. The large train belonging to the entire army was sent to Chattanooga, and the Thirty-
Eighth Ohio, detailed by a special order from General Thomas, was charged with the safe transit
of the immense train. Accordingly on the evening of the 18th of September, the train started,
and, ere the morning of the 19th of September dawned, the train was within six miles of Chat-
tanooga. The Thirty-Eighth did not participate in the struggle on the field of Chickamauga,
but it performed the task which the vicissitudes of war assigned it. .

On the 25th of November, 1863, the division to which the Thirty-Eighth belonged assaulted
the fortifications at the foot of Mission Ridge, ascended the hill, and carried the works, driving
the Rebels from them. The Thirty-Eighth was on the extreme left of the army ; and although
Bragg had pronounced the slope inaccessible, yet they moved up, up, up, until the summit was
reached. The fire from the Rebel batteries was terrific, yet comparatively harmless, and but few
were injured. In this charge the regiment lost seven men killed and forty-one wounded.

After pursuing the enemy as far as Ringgold, Georgia, the Thirty-Eighth returned to camp
near Chattanooga, where it re-enlisted as a veteran organization, and was furloughed home. At
the expiration of the furlough the regiment joined the army then at Ringgold, Georgia. Recruits
were sent forward, and when Sherman started for Atlanta the regiment numbered seven hundred
and forty-one men.

On the 5th of May, 1864, the regiment broke camp at Ringgold and marched to Buzzard's
Roost Gap, where it was brought into action. After skirmishing two days a flank movement was
commenced via Villanow and Smoke Creek Gap, nearly in rear of Resaca. Here the Thirty-
Eighth erected field-works and skirmished continually, and though no general engagement took
place, several men were killed and wounded. After the evacuation of that place the regiment
participated in the campaign which followed ; took an active part in the siege of Kenesaw, forti-
fying and skirmishing, and, on the 5th of July, 1864, reached the banks of the Chattahoochie
River. Remaining here until July 17th, the advance was again sounded and the river was crossed.
On the 22d day of July the Thirty-Eighth had the honor of establishing the picket-line of the
Fourteenth Army Corps, near the City of Atlanta. It remained there some time holding its
place in line, until August 3d, when it moved to Utoy Creek. Here, on the 5th of August, a
portion of the regiment (companies A, C, and K) charged the enemy's skirmish-line, and was
successful. Out of the one hundred and twenty men who charged, nine were killed and forty-two
wounded.

On the night of the 25th of August the regiment marched with the army on a flanking
expedition, and, on the 27th, struck the Atlanta and West Point Railroad. Remaining there
until the 31st, it again advanced, and that night took possession of the Macon road, near Red
Oak Station. Remaining there during the night of September 1st, it was ascertained that the
enemy was then fortifying Jonesboro', and the army was put in motion for that place, and about
four o'clock P. M. came upon the pickets of Hardee's corps. Este's brigade (to which the






Thirty-Eighth Ohio Infantry. 249

Thirty-Eighth belonged), of Baird's division was brought forward and assaulted the works. In
this charge the regiment lost, out of three hundred and sixty men, forty-two killed and one
hundred and eight wounded, making a total loss of one hundred and fifty men.

Corporal O. P. Randall had the colors at the onset. He fell lifeless, pierced by a Minie
ball. Corporal Baird next took them, and he too fell dead. Corporal Strawser next took them,
and he fell severely wounded. Corporal Donsey then took the flag and bore it to the works. Of
the five who had in charge the colors, but one (Corporal H. K. Brookes) escaped unharmed,
although not untouched, for five balls passed through his clothing. The dead were buried on a
little knoll near the battle-field, and the regiment encamped near the town of Jonesboro'. On
the 9th of September the troops fell back to Atlanta, and those who were not veterans were dis-
charged.

On the 3d of October, 1864, the army broke camp and retraced its recent line of operations
as far north as Dalton, Georgia — Hood having, in the meantime, marched to the rear of General
Sherman. The Thirty-Eighth accompanied the expedition thus far, moved thence via Gayles-
ville, Alabama, to Rome, and, on the 5th of November, marched to Kingston, Georgia. On the
12th of November communication was severed, and the army started for Savannah, marching
along the line of the Georgia State Railroad, destroying it as they went, until they reached
Atlanta, a second and last time. During the march from Atlanta to Milledgeville there was
nothing to mar the progress of the army. Arriving at the capital on the 24th November, the
Thirty-Eighth Ohio was ordered into the city as a provost-guard, where it remained until the
25th, when the army moved on in the direction of Louisville. Just before reaching Louisville
the army left the road it had been moving on (the Augusta Pike) and niarched directly east. It
became necessary that the bridge across the Big Ogeechee should be destroyed, and the Thirty-
Eighth was designated to perform that duty. This regiment had already marched fifteen miles
that day, and it was yet ten miles to the bridge. After marching ten miles and burning the bridge,
it was then thirteen miles to where the army went into camp. Misfortune being the guide, the
regiment took the wrong road, and marched six miles cut of the way, and it was twelve o'clock
P. M. when it arrived inside the picket-line, having marched that day forty-four miles and
destroyed the bridge.

From Louisville to Savannah the march was an agreeable one, and, on the morning of
December 21st, the Thirty-Eighth Ohio went into camp near the conquered city, the enemy
having evacuated the night before. During the stay of the Thirty-Eighth here, two hundred
drafted men and substitutes were received.

On the 30th of January, 1SG5, the Thirty-Eighth left Savannah with the army and partici-
pated in the "Campaign of the Carolinas," and, after forty days, came to Goldsboro,' North
Carolina. From there it followed the retiring army as far as Holly Springs, North Carolina,
where it remained until after the surrender of Johnston's army. From Holly Springs the regi-
ment marched back to Raleigh, and thence to Richmond, and finally to Alexandria, Virginia,
where it remained until after the grand review at the National Capital, when it encamped near
the City of Washington. Remaining there in a state of inactivity until the 15th of June, orders
were received to proceed by rail to Louisville, Kentucky. Meantime, a portion of the drafted
men were mustered out. On the 15th of June the regiment took the cars for Parkersburg, Vir-
ginia, and from there proceeded by boat to Louisville, Kentucky, where it arrived on the 23d
of June.

Soon after arriving orders were received for the muster-out of the regiment ; and, on the
12th of July, the muster-out was completed, and the regiment proceeded immediately to Cleve-
land, Ohio, where it was finally discharged on the 22d of July, 1865.



250



Ohio in the War.



39th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTEB, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Do

Do

Do

Lt. Colonel...
Do.
Do.

Do

Do

Do

Msxjor

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surston

Do

Do

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do



DATE OF RANK,



Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



JOHN GROESBECIC.

A. W. GILBERT

EDWARD V. NOYEd

DANIEL WEBER

A. \V. Gilbert

Edward V. Noyes

Henry T. McDowell

Daniel Weber

Wit. C. Buck

Henry A. Babbitt

Edward F. Notes

Henky T. McDowell

Wm. H. Lathrop

John S. Jenkins

Daniel Weber

Henry A. Babbitt

i;gb T. Rice

Oliver XV. Nixon

Thomas W. McArthur

Christian Eorester

Iohn A. Foi.leit

Thomas W. Mi-Arthur

Christian Forester

Iohn A. Eollett

Pierre S. Starr

Lyonel J. Smith

Wm. J. Andrews

Benj. XV. Chidlaw

Henry T. McDowell

John C. Kill

George W. Baker

Christopher A. Morgan

John S. Jenkins

Jacob Koenig

Charles W. Pomeroy

Adam Koogle

David C. Benjamin

John Rhodes

Wm. H. Lathrop

John V. Drake

John C. Mnsser

Jacob M. Panlk

Willard P. Stoma

Wm. H. Williams...

John B. Ryan

Ethan 0. Burd

Charles G. Knowles
Wm. H. Newman...
Iohn D. White



Aug.
July
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July

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July

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May
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May
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Dec.

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Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 44 of 165)