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Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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24, ISM
8, 1 62
1, '

IS, 1865

27, lSiil
8, 1862
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10, 1865

18, "
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27, 1861
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2-i, 1861



20, 1861
31, 1362
3, "

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20, 1861



Jacob Koenig Oct.



Horace G. S;oms...,

John R. Parker

Wm. C. Buck

John W. Orr

John R. Council ,

Jacob Broad well

Jeremiah Hall

Daniel Weber

Henry A. Babbitt

George T. Rice

Wm. Benze

Andrew Robinson

Elijah B. Fairchild

Wm. H. Minton

Frank Iliaht

James Walker

Wm. H. Anshuiz

Oscar N. Carr

Win. H. 1'ittenger

Oliver P. Biown ,

Robert s. Pomeroy..-.

James Drake

Homer Montgomery

John C. Mnsser

Wm. Edgarton

John F. Welch

Willard P. Stoms

John J. Hooker

Ethan O. Hurd

Wm. 11. Lathrop

Samuel II. Rulon

Fletcher Hypes

Jacob M. Paulk

Charles F. Sedani

Win. II. Williams



Dec.

April

May



13, '
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20, lis
31, '
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26,
18,
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8, 1863

9, 1864



COM. ISSUED.



Aug.

July

Oct.

May

Aug.

luly

Oct.

Feb.

May

June

Aug.

July

Oct.

May

Jan.

May

June

Nov.

June

Oct.

March

Nov.

June

Aug.

Dec,

Jan.

May

Aug.



March
Jan.



May



July



25, "

25, "

2, "

11, ll=fii

11, "

11, "

11, "

11, "

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Jan.
Feb.



April
July



Oct.
Dec.



March
May



March
Jan.



Feb.
May



Dec.



31,
31,
31,
31,
31,
31,
31,
31,
31,
31,
31,
28, 1S61



Resigned July 8, 1S62.
Resigned October 1, 1862.
Honorably discharged April 22, 1S65.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to Colonel Julv 8, 1862.
Promoted to Colonel October 1, 1862.
Mustered out.
Promoted to Colonel.
Mustered out as Captain May 15, 1865.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Colonel 3d Alabama col'd reg't April 20, 1S64.
Must, red out.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned May 31. 1862.
Resigned September 3, 1862.
Revoked.

Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to Surgeon. [Nov. 12, 1S62.

Promoted to Surgeon Sept. 3, 1862; resigned
Promoted to Surgeon.
Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned April 9, 1862.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned April 12, 1862. [26, 1862.

Appointed com'y subsistence by Pies t, Nov.

Resigned January 6, 1862.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned October 17, 1862.

Died October 2, 1861.

Died November 30, 1861.

Resigned July 7, 1862.

Resigned February 3, 1S62.

Promoted to Major.

Killed in action.

Hesigued July 3, 1862.

Mustered out.

Resigned June 10, 1862.

Resigned September 16, 1864.

Resigned December 19, 1862.

Resigned March 5, ism.

Resigned April 8, 1862.
Mustered out.
Resigned April 29, 1864.
Dead.

Resigned September 16, 1864.
Resigned January 7, 1864.
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Resigned.
Mustered out.

Mustered out Aueust9, 1864.
Resigned Septembei 26^ 1864.
Promoted to Major.
Promoted to Major.
Promoted to Major.
Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned June 26, 1865.
.Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned.

Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mastered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned Juue 25, IS62.
Resigned June 16, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Discharged November 21, 1362.
Promoted lo Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned January 10, 1862.
Resigned October 1, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned (or mu-tered out) February 18,
Jan. 1, 1862 Promoted to Captain.



July

Aug.



Thikty-Ninth Ohio Infantey.



251



DATE OF RANK



COM. ISSUED.



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Do.
Do.
Do.



Lewis Sonntag

Henry W. Sheppard....
Charles G. Knowles....
Thomas D. Minton....

Daniel Weber

Wm. II. Newman

John B. Ryan

John C. Burnett

John D. White

Wm. C. Buck

August lvropp

John W. Orr

Horace G. Stoms

John R. Parker

John R. Gunnel]

Bennett N. Davis

Uriah D. Hunter

Jacob Broad well

Jeremiah Hall

Wm. R. Babb

Henry A. Babbitt ......

Frank Fort man

George T. Bice

Wm. R. Rabie

Silas 0. Losel

Win. H. McGurdy

Wm. H Williams

Henry Finger

Greenbury Miller ,

Wm. Benze

Andrew Robinson

Elijah B. Fairchild....

James Walker

Wm. H. Anshutz

Oscar N. Carr ,

Wm. H. Pittenger

Oliver P. Brown

Robert S. Pomeroy

James Drake

John Whetstone

Homer Montgomery ...

Ely Steeu

Granville H. Eilis

Uex. McTaggert

Barney Shultz

Lucius 31. Hubbard....

Thomas G. Mears

Peter Thompson

Wm. Snodgrass

Henry L. Colgrove

Hichard A. Taylor

J. L. MeClain

Lewis Son u tag

Henry W. Sheppard....

Thomas D. Minton

Daniel Weber

Julio Davis

Chas. Miller

Wm. H. Williams

John V. Drake

Nathan R. Thompson.

Chas. G. Knowles

Harlan A. Edwards

Andrew J. Lawell

Uriah Hoffman

John C. Burnett

John W. Johnson

Wm. C. Buck

Wm. H. Newman ,

John B. Kyan

John D. White

Bennett N. Davis ,

Horace G. Stoms

John W. Orr

Jacob Broad well

John R. Parker

Frank Fortman

Wvatt H. Hawrick ....

Wm. R. Babb

George T. Rice

Uriah D. Hunter

Henry A. Babbitt

Wm. M. Chapman

Wm. R. Rabie

Silas 0. Losel

Wm. H. McCurdy

Wm. H. Williams

Horace Knowles

Henry Finger

Greenbury Miller

Wm. Belize

Andrew Robinson

Elijah B. Fairchild

Wm. H. Minton

Frank Hight

James Walker

Wm. H. Anshutz

Oscar N. Carr

Oliver P. Brown

Robert S. Pomeroy

Wm. H. Pittenger

Granville H. Ellis



Feb



8, 1S62



19,
" 28,

March 26,
Feb. 28,
April
June



July

I une
Aug.
July
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

April

July

May



July
Jan.



May

June
July



Oct.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
March



April

Feb.

May
June



July

Aug.
Oct.

Nov.

D v: ; »

April
June
May



July



12,
10,
18,
25,

3,

8,
10,

2,

7,

1,
26,
19,
31,
13, 1863

20!

9, 1S64
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9,
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31,
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10,

8,

2,

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31,
31,

8, 1863
13, "
20,
24,

9, 1S6-1
9, "
9,
9,
9,



13, "
13, "

11, 1S6.



April
May



July



Oct.
Dec.
May



Tuly

May



July



May



July
Aug.



Oct.
Jan.



Feb.
M arch



April
May



Feb.
July



Oct.
Dec.

March

May

July

May



July



25,
25,
20,

9, '
9,



9,

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Resigned February 22, 1802.
Resigned June 10, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Kesigued March 26, 1S62.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned April 13, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned April 1, 1864.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned April 1, 1864.
Kesigued June 20, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned September 20, 1864.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned September 15, 1864.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned September 15, 1664.
Mustered out.

Resigned September 16, 1S64.
Resigued.

Resigned September 16, 1864.
Resigned.

Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned June 2(1, 1865.
Blustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.
Discharged July I, 1865.
Mustered out with regiment.
Blustered out with regiment.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned May 23, 1S62.
Resigned June 16, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned October 7, 1801.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned June 18, 1862.
Resigned June 10, 1862.
Resigned April 26, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned December 31, 1S62.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Declined ; discharged.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned July 24. 1S63.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned April 9, 1864.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant Sept. 20, 1SG4.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Tom o ted to 1st Lieutenant.
. romoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



252



Ohio in the War.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF HANK.


COM. ISSUED.


RF.MABKf,


3d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do




July 11, isr,r>
11, "

Feb. 14, "

" 14, "

" 14, "

14, "

" 14, "

May IS, "
" 18, "
" IS, "
" 18, "
" 18, "
" 18, "
" IS, "
18, "

June ft, "
f., "

July 10, "


July 11,1805
" 11, "

Feb. 14, "
" 14, "
" 14, "
" 14, "
" 14, "

May is, "

" IS, "

" 18, "
ii ]Si .i

18, "
18, "
IS, "
18, "

June 6, "
" 6, "

July 10, "


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.




Promoted to let Lieutenant.


Henry L. Colgrove


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do




Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.
Do


Peter Thompson


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.
Do.
Do.
Do


Allen Master

J. Li. McOlain

Adilison Bowser


Mustered out witli regiment.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Blustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.


Do.




Mustered out with regiment.


Do.
Do.


But'll Congdon


Dismissed.

Mu-tered out with regiment.


Do.
Do.
Do.


Delmer Stone...


Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.


Do.













THIRTY-NINTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE THIRTY-NINTH OHIO rendezvoused at Camp Colerain, ten miles north of
Cincinnati, during the month of July, 1861. On the 31st of July seven companies were
mustered into the service; and on the 2d of August, they moved to Camp Dennison,
where the remaining three companies and the field and staff officers were mustered in. Being
fully armed and equipped, the regiment moved on Sunday, August 18th, by rail to St. Louis,
to join the forces organizing under General Fremont. It was the first Ohio regiment to enter
the State of Missouri.

It remained in camp near the fair grounds, officers and men perfecting themselves in drill,
until the 6th of September, when nine companies were ordered to Macon, on the North Missouri
Railroad, to join the forces under General Sturgis. Company K was left in charge of the camp
and garrison equipage. On arriving at Macon four companies were ordered to St. Joseph.
This separation lasted about five months. The four companies performed guard-duty along the
North Missouri Railroad until about the 1st of February, when they were ordered to St. Louis,
and rejoined the company left at that place. The other five companies, (C, D, F, G, and H),
with the troops under General Sturgis, moved to the relief of Lexington; but before that place
was reached, the garrison surrendered, and Sturgis moved to Kansas City, arriving on the 22d of
September. This was the first march for the soldiers of the Thirty-Ninth, and, as it was made
rapidly and without transportation, they suffered severely. On the 15th of October the command
again took up the line of march, and, passing through Pleasant Hill, Osceola, and Greenfield, it
arrived at Springfield on the night of November 2d.

On the 9th of November the entire army, under General Hunter, moved toward the Missouri
River. It reached Sedalia on the loth of November, and remained there until the 8th of Decem-
ber, when it moved to Syracuse, where it remained during the months of December and January.
On the 2d of February, 1862, the command, crossing the Missouri River at Booneville, moved by
way of Columbia, Fulton, Danville, and St. Charles, to St. Louis. The regiment arrived at Ben-
ton Barracks on the 19th, when the companies were again united. The march from Syracuse to
St. Louis was very severe; the- weather was cold; the roads were almost impassable; and the
men were compelled frequently to pull the ordnance and supply wagons over the hills by hand.

On the 22d of February the regiment embarked on transports and sailed for Commerce, Mis-



Thirty-Ninth Ohio Infantry. 253

souri, arriving on the 24th. It formed part of the First Brigade, First Division of the army
under General Pope. The troops moved upon New Madrid, and arrived in sight of that place
on the 3d of March. A movement was made at once upon the defenses, and the enemy's position
was developed. The regiment assisted in all the 'operations that resulted in the capture of New
Madrid and Island No. 10; and, on the 13th of April, it embarked on transports and sailed down
the Mississippi to within a few miles of Fort Pillow. Here it remained until the 17th of April,
when it sailed for Hamburg Landing, on the Tennessee Kiver, and formed part of the army under
General Halleck. From this time until the evacuation of Corinth by the Rebels the regiment
made numerous reconnoissances, and engaged in a large number of skirmishes, losing many men.
It held the advance of Pope's army on entering Corinth, and was one of the first regiments to
occupy the place. After pursuing the retreating Rebels as far as Boonville, the regiment
returned to within five miles of Corinth and encamped on Clear Creek. Here officers' school,
company, and battalion drill was held daily. On the 25th of July the regiment was armed with
the Whitney rifle, saber bayonet, instead of the Greenwood rifle, with which it had been pre-
viously supplied.

On the 29th of August the Thirty-Ninth moved to Iuka. Here the regiment was again
divided. Two companies were ordered to Eastport, four companies were distributed at different
points along the railroad, and the remaining four were stationed near Iuka. On the 24th forty-
four recruits were received from Ohio.

On the 11th of September the entire command moved toward Corinth, and, leaving all camp
and garrison equipage near that place, it marched to Jacinto, to co-operate with other forces in a
movement against General Price, then occupying Iuka. The column of which the regiment was
a part arrived in advance of the co-operating columns, and, before they could come up, gave
battle and defeated the enemy. The command pursued the Rebels for two days, and then returned
by a circuitous route to Corinth, arriving in time to participate in the sanguinary conflict of
October 3d and 4th, and in the pursuit of the Rebels as far as Baldwin. The regiment then
returned to Corinth, and was engaged in constructing the inner line of works for the defense
of the place. During these operations sixty-three recruits arrived from Ohio for the regiment.

On the 4th of November the regiment moved to Grand Junction, and joined the army under
General Grant. It advanced to Oxford, Mississippi, and was engaged frequently in skirmishes
and reconnoissances. On the 18th of December the Thirty-Ninth, with the Twenty-Seventh Ohio,
moved by rail to Jackson, Tennessee, to look after General Forrest, who, with a large force, was
making raids on the railroads in that vicinity, and was cutting off the supplies for General
Grant's army. On the 27th, forming a part of General Sullivan's command, it moved to Tren-
ton, and thence to Parker's Cross Roads, where, on the 31st of December, the force under Forrest
was met, defeated, and driven across the Tennessee River. After this the regiment moved to
Corinth, arriving on the 9th of January, 1S63. The march from Jackson to the Tennessee River
and on to Corinth was very severe upon the troops. They moved with but two days' rations,
and the country afforded scanty supplies. They subsisted on limited quantities of fresh meat,
which could be gathered on the march, and on meal, which the men ground in small and dilapi-
dated mills found in that country. In addition to this many of the men were without shoes,
which rendered the march fatiguing and occasioned much suffering from the cold.

The regiment remained at Corinth until the 19th of April, when it moved with the expedi-
tion, under General Dodge, to the Tuscumbia Valley, for the purpose of engaging the attention
of the Rebels while other forces cut the railroads in the rear of Bragg's army. After an
absence of two weeks it returned to Corinth, and from that place it moved, on the 12th of May,
to Memphis.

On the 18th of October the regiment moved by way of Corinth, Eastport, Lauderdale, and
Pulaski, to Prospect, Tennessee, where it re-enlisted on the 26th of December. On the 27th five
hundred and thirty-four men were mustered into the service as veteran volunteers. On the 29th
they left for Camp Dennison, Ohio, where they received a furlough for thirty days. Those who
did not re-enlist were left at Prospect, in charge of the regiment's camp and equipage. On the



254 Ohio in the War.

llth of February, 1S64, the regiment rendezvoused at Camp Dennison, having gained by enlist-
ment one hundred and twelve men. On the 12th it moved by transports to Nashville, thence by
rail to Pulaski, and from there it marched to Athens, Alabama. The regiment moved to Decatur
on the llth of April ; and, on the 1st of May, forming part of the Fourth Division of the Six-
teenth Corps, under General Dodge, it moved in the direction of Chattanooga.

On the 5th of May the regiment moved on the Atlanta campaign, marching by way of Ship's
and Snake Creek Gap to Resaca. It took part in the battle at that place, May 14th and 15th;
and, on the 16th, crossed the Oostenaula River at Lay's Ferry, and moved by way of Adairsville
to Kingston. On the 23d it crossed the Etowah River and marched to Dallas, taking part in the
action there. On the 1st of June it moved to Acworth, and, on the 10th, to Big Shanty, pushing
the enemy to the base of Kenesaw Mountain, where the regiment remained under constant fire
until July 3d, when the enemy abandoned his line, and took position near the Chattahoo-
chie River.

On the 4th of July the regiment engaged in a successful assault on the enemy's works at
Nicojack Creek. On the 5th it moved to Sandtown, and on the llth crossed the Chattahoochic
near Rosswell. On the 19th it marched to Decatur, and on the 22d assisted in repelling the attack
of Hardee's corps on the left flank of the Army of the Tennessee. This was the most severe
engagement in which the regiment participated during its term of service. It lost one-third of
its number in killed and wounded. On the 27th, passing by the rear, it went into position on the
right of General Sherman's army; and from this time until the 2Gth of August was engaged
constantly with the enemy, pressing him at last into the main defenses of Atlanta.

The Sixteenth Corps moved to the Montgomery and Atlanta Railroad at Fairburn, where
the regiment assisted in destroying the railroad track ; and, on the 30th, moved to Joneshoro'.
On the 1st of September it pursued the retreating Rebels to Lovejoy's Station, and, on the 5th, it
returned and went into camp at East Point, five miles, south of Atlanta. During this campaign
the regiment lost twenty-four men killed and one hundred and sixty-eight wounded. It was on
the march or in battle almost constantly, and scarcely an hour passed during which the sound of
a hostile gun could not be heard.

The regiment remained at East Point until the 4th of October, when, forming part of the
First Division, Seventeenth Corps, it marched in pursuit of Hood, moving by way of Marietta,
Big Shanty, and Kingston, to Resaca, and driving the Rebels down Lookout Valley and across
the Coosa River. The pursuit ended at Galesville, Alabama, and the regiment returned to
Marietta, where, on the 9th of November, it was paid for the first time in nine months. On the
12th of November, after being thoroughly equipped, the regiment moved three miles north of
Marietta, and assisted in destroying the railroad leading to Chattanooga ; and the next day it
moved to Atlanta.

On the 15th of November the regiment started on the march to the sea. It crossed the
Ocmulgee River on pontoons, passed through McDonough, Jackson, Monticello, and Hillsboro',
and struck the Macon and Savannah Railroad at Gordon Station on the 22d. The next day was
occupied in destroying the railroad. The march was continued along the railroad, the troops
destroying a portion of the track each day. The Oconee and Ogeechee Rivers were crossed, and
on the 1st of December Millen was readied. On the 10th the regiment approached the fortifica-
tions of Savannah, and helped to drive the enemy within his works. On the llth it moved south
of the Ogeechee Canal, and constructed a line of intrenchments ; and the next day it moved toward
O-sabaw Sound, to open communication with the fleet, and thus procure supplies. Some delay
occurred in obtaining supplies from the fleet, and on the 14th the regiment marched as escort to
a forage-train. It was necessary to go twenty-five miles before forage could be obtained. The
regiment returned to camp on the 16th, and moved immediately with its division toward the
Altcmaha River, to destroy the Savannah and Florida Railroad. This was accomplished on the
18th, and the command returned to camp. "When Savannah was evacuated, the Thirty-Ninth
encamped near Thunderbolt, and from there it moved, on the 1st of January, 1S65, on transports
to Pocotaligo, South Carolina. Here it received two hundred and four recruits from Ohio.



Thikty- Ninth Ohio Infantry. 255

/

On the 30th of January the regiment entered upon the campaign of the Carolina 1 ?. It
engaged in the action at Rivers Bridge, on the Salkehatchie, February 3d and 4th ; and, on the
7th, struck the Charleston and Augusta Railroad at Midway. It crossed the Edisto at Binaker's
Bridge, passed through Orangeburg, crossed the Saluda and Broad Rivers, and on the 17th entered
the capital of South Carolina. On the next day the regiment assisted in destroying the tracks
around the Columbia and North Carolina Railroad depots, and then resumed the march through
Winnsboro' and Liberty Hill to Camden, where the regiment encamped on the 28th.

On the 3d of March the regiment engaged the enemy seven miles from Cheraw, drove him
through the town and across the Great Pedee River, and captured large quantities of ordnance
and other stores. On the 4th the Thirty-Ninth Ohio, with the Eighteenth Missouri, crossed the
river in boats and drove the enemy from the eastern bank. This enabled the pontoons to be
laid when the corps crossed, and the march was continued to Fayetteville, North Carolina,
which was reached on the 11th. On the 13th the march was continued in the direction of Clin-
ton. On the 17th it was reported that the left wing of the army was confronted by a large force
of the enemy near Bentonville. The regiment, after four days and nights hard marching,
arrived at that place, and took part in the action there on the 21st of March, with a loss of four
killed, seventeen wounded, and three missing. From here the regiment moved to Goldsboro',



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