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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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Lt. Colonel....

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Waoer Swayne

Walter F. Herrick

Horace Park










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Walter V. Herrick




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Asa't Surgeon
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Wm. S. Bell

Corridon Morrow

Chas. E. P. IE

Wesley Anderson

John H. ('. Bonte

Richard L. Chittenden—




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Christian L. Poormau

Harley H. Sa-e

James H. Coulter

John l''ergU:>on


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Peter Brown

Wm. Walker




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April

Julv
Oct.
Aug.

Oct.
■jept.
Dec.

March




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Hiuchmaii L. Prophet




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John C. Hamilton


April

Hay

April

May

Nov.

Jan.
Feb.

April

Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Ian.

Oct.

Ian.

tpril

June


13, 18H4
31, 1863
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9, "
18, "

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1, 1861

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22, 1861
29, 1862

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April
Sept.
April

May
Nov.

Jan.
Feb.

April
Feb.

May
Aug.


13, I.S. 4
7, 1.-63
13, 18-.4
9, "
18, "
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ittho W. Righy




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George W. l'ureell ....




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Andrew J. Fitzgerald

Edward I, > barker

Obadiah M. Davis

Newell E. Carpenter

Jerry 0. McDonald

Henry S. B.-ck

James 11. Speakmau

Crawford W. Armstrong...

J. Alpheus Lantz

Luther Stewart

Hamdeu Heatheriugton....
Alex N Wells




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lit Lieutenant
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Samuel McClaren

Samuel Martin




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Edward J. Keller

Samuel K. Williams




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Sylvester A. Larison

Chas. C. Hey]

Josiah H. Cochran




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272



Ohio in the Wak



1st Lieutenant John M. Crisswcll



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2d Lieutenant
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Renick Ilustui

Zachariah A. Council

Albeit L. Howe

Stacy Taylo:

Otho W. RigtW

Geo. W. Purccll

Martin L. Briner

"Win. A. Lill y

Thomas G. Harper

Jonathan McClareii

Samuel Calvin

Henry J. McFadden

Andrew J. Fitzgerald

Cornelius McCaffrey

Samuel Y. Calvin

Hubert McNary

Edward Lybarger

John VV. Thompson

Samuel S. Snellbaker

Obadiah M. Davis

Newell E. Carpenter

Luther Stewart

Tilde n Jones

George M. Wise

Washington G. Irwin

Henry li. Adams

Hamden Heatherington....

Alex. N. Wells

Harrison Douglass

George W. Baughmau

J. Alpheus Lantz



BATE OV BANK. COM. 1SSUKU.



RK.MAUKS.



June

\1ILT.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Sept.

Oct.

Sept.

Dee.

.March

April



May

Nov.



17, 1862

12, "

3, "

4, "

12, "
1, "

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3, "

5, "
27, "

13, 1861
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13, "
13, "

9, "



Adam Williams

Thomas Dakin

Jason 1$ row u

Peter Zinn

George W. Goodrich

James" W. Dunn

Levi Oman

Willoughby W. Webb

Svlvester A. Lavison

IJinchman L. Prophet

David F. Phillips

John M. Crisswell

Wm. B. Thornhill

Joseph A. Harris

Edward L. Dunbar

John A. l'eudergast

Montgomery Close

Isaac' Young

John C. Hamilton

Renick Huston

Albert L. Howe

George W. Purcell

Martin L. Briner

titho W. Rlgbj

Stacy Taylor

Zachariah A. Connell

Win. A. Lilley

Thomas G. Harper

Jonathan McClaren ,

Samuel Calvin

Robert McNary

Andrew J. Fitzgerald ,

Henry J. McFadden

Samuel J. Worrell

Cornelius McCaffrey

John M. Lindsey

Edward Lybarger

John W. Thompson

Thatcher Vincent

Samuel S. Snellabaker

Milo Wilkison

Obadiab M. Davis

Washington G. Irwin

Henry 11. Adams

Jerry 0. McDonald

Basil M. Simpson

Augustus L. Pendergast ..

John 11. Campbell

George F. Majors

Win. Higgins

James 0' Connell

Willoughby Howe

James McClain

Samuel Pickering



April
May



April



May

Nov.



Jan.
Feb.

A pril
May
July
June

July
Juno
July
Oct.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.

Nov.



Sept.

Dec.
Man
Oct.

Nov.
May

Nov.



May



IS, "

18, "

is, "

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18, 1861

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5, 1863

9, 1864
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16, 1865
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Jan.
Feb.



April
May



4, 1862

10, "

in, •'

in, "

in, "

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89, "

30, "

28, "

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13, 1861

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13, "

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18, "

18, "

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15,
15,
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16,
16,



June 5,



July
Aiur.



Oct,
Dec.



Feb.
Jan.
Feb.



Revoked ; resigned as 21 Lieut. Sept. 3, 1862.

Resigned Januaiy 14, 1363.

Discharged June 27, iso3.

Promoted to Captain.

Deceased.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to Captain.

Absent.

Mustered out November 10, 1S64.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.

Out of service.

Out of service ; resigned April 6, 1865.

Mustered out.

Void; commission returned.

Resigned April 6, 1865.

Declined promotion.*

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined promotion.

.Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.

Revoked.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed in action.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Musteied out with legimeut.






1

in

16

21, 1S62

21,

21,

21,

21,

21,

21,

21,

21,

21,

21,



20,

4, "

4, "

4, "

28, "

28, "

28, "

March 25, ISM

May



April



Nov.



May



Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regimeMt.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned November 24, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Prompted to 1st Lieuteuant.

Resigned May 17, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 17, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned July 7, 1862.

Resigned November 1, 1862.

Resigned June 17.

Resigned July 3, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant June 29, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant,

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
4, 1863 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned January 23, 1.-64.

Honorably discharged March 23, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned August 2, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out.

Honorably discharged December 12, 1863.

Declined promotiou.

Deceased.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Absent on furlough at muster out of reg't.

Mustered out wiili regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Musteied out with regiment.



Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment
Mustered out with regiment.



Forty-Third Ohio Infantry. 273



FORTY-THIRD OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE FORTY-THIRD OHIO was organized at Camp Andrews, Mount Vernon,
Ohio, February 7, 1862. It was recruited at a time when nlen were very difficult to
procure, but through the energy and perseverance of Lieutenant-Colonel Wager Swayne
the regiment was filled to the minimum number and mustered into the service. After having
been well drilled by its Colonel, J. L. Kirby Smith (a nephew of the Rebel General Kirby
Smith), it left its rendezvous for the front on the 21st of February, 1862, and reported to Briga-
dier-General John Pope, commanding the District of Mississippi, on the 26th of February. The
regiment was at once assigned to the Ohio Brigade, composed of the Twenty-Seventh, Thirty-
Ninth, Forty-Third, and Sixty-Third regiments, First Division, Army of the Mississippi.

It was but a few days before the regiment was introduced to active service, for in March,
1862, it was under fire at New Madrid, Missouri, and in all the operations against that post it
bore a prominent part, especially in its final bombardment and capture on the 13th and 14th of
March. The loss of the regiment in killed and wounded was quite severe.

In the movements against Island 10, and the crossing of the Mississippi River in the face of
the enemy, the Forty-Third Ohio bore a conspicuous part, as it did also in the subsequent cap-
ture of the forces of General McCall, at Tiptonville, Tennessee.

The next movement was against Fort Pillow, which was ordered to be abandoned by General
Halleck in order that General Pope's troops might assist in the operations against Corinth, Mis-
sissippi. In all the operations that distinguished the Army of the Mississippi in that campaign,
the Forty-Third bore its part. The actions of the 8th, 9th, and 20th of May, may be particularly
mentioned.

The regiment lay in camp at Clear Creek, Mississippi, until the 20th of August, when it
moved to Iuka, Mississippi, and soon after to Bear Creek, where it remained on garrison-duty
until September 11th, when General Rosecrans began to marshal his forces preparatory to his
campaign against Price and Van Dorn. At Iuka the regiment was present and took part in the
battle of September 19th, and subsequent pursuit of the enemy as far as Cripple Creek. The
Forty -Third Ohio also participated in the arduous marches made by General Rosecrans preceding
the battle of Corinth, whereby his entire force was concentrated at the proper hour to meet the
attack of Price and Van Dorn, October 3d and 4th. In the battle on the last-named day, the
Forty-Third and Sixty-Third Ohio claim to have done more to save the day than any other
organizations. These regiments were posted, the Sixty-Third immediately on the right, and the
Forty-Third immediately on the left of Battery Robinett, and between that battery and Battery
Williams, and were entirely without works or protection of any sort. In descriptions of this
battle other regiments have been assigned to this ground, but the regiments above-named occupied
and held it during the battle. The grand assault by the Rebels was made at daylight on the 4th.
They opened on Battery Robinett with artillery at about three hundred yards, and at ten o'clock
A. M., led by Colonel Rogers, of the Second Texas, moved forward to the assault. The Forty-
Third and Sixty-Third Ohio stood firmly at their posts, and succeeded in staggering the assaulting
column, and in hurling it back, at a time when our lines were broken and our troops were seen
flying from every other part of the field. The opposing forces were but a few feet apart, and fought
almost hand-to-hand, and men went down on both sides in great numbers. Colonel Smith fell
mortally wounded at the first onset, while gallantly discharging his duty. Adjutant Heyl and
Vol. 11—18.



274 Ohio in the War.

Captain Spangler were killed at about the same moment. Captain S. F. Timmons and Lieuten-
ant S. McClaren, A. L. Howe, and H. L. Prophet, received honorable wounds. The casualties
among the men were very severe. In a few minutes of fighting over one-fourth of those engaged
of the Forty-Third were either killed or wounded. The loss of the Sixty-Third was nearly one-
half the number engaged. Colonel Smith died of his wounds on the 12th of October, eight days
after the battle. He was a young soldier of great promise, and his death was mourned by every
man in his regiment.

The next movements in which the Forty-Third Ohio participated was with Grant's army to
Oxford, Mississippi, and in the campaign against Forrest in "West Tennessee, in the winter of
1862-3, and in General Dodge's raid in North Alabama in April, 1SG3. From this time until
October, 1863, the Forty-Third was stationed at different points on the railroads of West Ten-
nessee and Memphis, assisting to keep open the communications of General Grant's army, then
operating against Vicksburg. And when General Sherman made his memorable march from
Memphis for the relief of the Army of the Cumberland, the Forty-Third accompanied him, in
General Dodge's column. Reaching Pulaski, Tennessee, General Dodge's command was halted
and ordered to occupy and repair the railroad from Columbia, Tennessee, to Decatur, Alabama,
the Ohio Brigade going into camp at Prospect, Tennessee.

In December, 1S63, the regiment almost unanimously re-enlisted as veterans, and went home
on furlough of thirty days, in company with the other regiments of the Ohio Brigade. At the
expiration of their furloughs the brigade returned to the field in a body, and immediately there-
after its commander, Colonel John W. Fuller, was directed to cross the Tennessee River and cap-
ture the town of Decatur, Alabama, then held by the Rebels under Roddy. For that purpose
the Forty-Third and Sixty-Third Ohio regiments were ordered to cross the river in small boats,
which was successfully accomplished just at daylight on the 8th. After a slight skirmish the
town was captured and occupied by our troops. A long season of inaction was passed in camp
at this place. In fact the command lay here until the opening of General Sherman's campaign
against Atlanta.

"While at Decatur the Ohio Brigade was discontinued and a new brigade was made, composed
of the Forty-Third and Sixty-Third Ohio, Twenty-Fifth Wisconsin, and the Thirty-Fifth New
Jersey regiments, and placed under the command of Colonel John W. Sprague, of the Sixty-
Third Ohio, and designated as the Second Brigade, Fourth Division of the Sixteenth Army
Corps.

On the 1st of May, 1864, the command to which the Forty-Third was attached marched from
Decatur for Chattanooga, and having taken cars near Huntsville, Alabama, reached Chattanooga
May 3d, and immediately took the advance of the Army of the Tennessee in the Atlanta cam-
paign. On the 5th of May a detachment of the regiment, under Captain D. H. "Williams, took
possession of Mattock's, or Ship's Gap, and held it until the Army of the Tennessee came up and
was readv to cross into and take possession of the Valley of Villanow. The march was continued
through Snake Creek Gap, and on the evening of the 8th of May the command was in line of
battle before Resaca, awaiting the concentration of the army before an advance was made.

The 13th of May was decided on for the advance against Resaca. General Dodge made his
preparations accordingly, and at the appointed time was ready with his command. The Forty-
Third was in the front line and near the extreme right of the National army. In its advance the
National column was irresistible, and swept everything before it. The enemy was sent flying
across the Oostenaula. The loss of the Forty-Third was quite severe.

The next day after the battle (the 14th of May) was spent in heavy skirmishing, in which
the members of the regiment took an active part ; and in the evening of that day Sprague'a
brigade was sent as a support to General John A. Logan, who was to make an assault on a posi-
tion commanding the bridge across the Oostenaula. The assault was made about sunset, and it
was found necessary to send in Sprague's brigade, in order to hold the advantage gained by Logan.
The brigade went forward in gallant style, and not only occupied the ground from whence their
Comrades were about being driven, but pushed the National lines still further to the front, and



Forty-Third Ohio Infantry. 275

held the position thus gained until the night of May loth, against repeated attempts to dislodge
them. All that day was spent in heavy skirmishing with the enemy. The members of the
Forty-Third, as was their custom, took the advance in this mode of fighting, and it was made a
day memorable in the annals of the regiment. The Rebel skirmish-line was literally annihi-
lated, and the dead found next morning lying where they had fallen, the Rebels having evacu-
ated in the night. Of the Forty-Third, company A, Lieutenant O. M. Davis, and H, Captain
A. L. Howe, were the first to enter the enemy's works.

At Dallas the Forty-Third took an important part, and in the advance on the enemy's posi-
tion near Big Shanty, company D, of the regiment, participated in a most brilliant charge of
skirmishers, capturing a strong barricade from the Twenty-Ninth Tennessee, and numerous pris-
oners. Immediately thereafter came the siege of Kenesaw, with its deadly skirmishing, its
grand cannonading, and the disastrous repulse of the National forces on the 29th of June.

The Forty-Third participated in the general movements of its corps until the advance of the
Army of the Tennessee from Roswell upon Decatur, Alabama, when it was detached to hold the
bridge across the Chattahoochie, at the former place, until the army transportation then loading
at Marietta should cross the river. On the morning of July 22d Colonel Swayne, in command
of the Forty-Third Ohio and Ninth Illinois Mounted Infantry, started for Decatur, twenty milea
distant, with a train of some fifteen hundred wagons. On nearing the town it became evident
that a fight was then in progress, and Captain Williams, who had been ordered ahead with two
companies early in the day, hurried his detachment forward until he learned that Colonel
Sprague, after a most gallant resistance against overwhelming numbers, had been compelled to
retreat. This detachment was then placed in position in order to protect the train while it was
filing off in rear of the National army. In the meantime Colonel Swayne arrived with the
remainder of the Forty-Third, on the double-quick, and a section of artillery. At this time the
train was menaced by Iverson's Rebel division of cavalry, assigned to the duty of capturing it,
while two other divisions under Wheeler were to capture Sprague and his three small regiments
in Decatur. Through the audacity of Colonel Sprague and the fearless spirit of his men, com-
bined with the promptitude of Colonel Swayne, not a wagon was lost, thus averting a calamity
that must have been fatal to the success of the National army at that particular time. On enter-
ing the town the next day it was ascertained that the enemy had lost over six hundred men in
killed and wounded, fully two-thirds of the National force in action. During the remainder of
the Atlanta campaign the Forty -Third shared the trials and glories of the Sixteenth Army Corps,
and on the 4th and 7th of August particularly, in advancing the National lines, won the thanks
of Ransom, the division commander, by splendid and steady fighting.

After the fall of Atlanta the Forty-Third enjoyed General Sherman's " full month's rest."
In the reorganization of the army the left wing (Sixteenth Army Corps) was discontinued, and
the Forty-Third was assigned to the Second Brigade, First Division, Seventeenth Army Corps.

The "month's rest" had hardly ended before the rash and impetuous Hood disturbed the
quiet of the National army by his raids to the rear, in the attempt to destroy General Sherman's
communications. The National army wa3 in good trim, and gave immediate chase to the forces
under General Hood. That General was chased to Resaca, through Snake Creek Gap, and west
as far as Gaylesville, Alabama, where he was left to seek his own destruction by running against
the forces of Major-General George H. Thomas.

The Forty-Third Ohio and its brigade hurried back to Atlanta, under orders from General
Sherman, to join his great " march to the sea." Of this campaign, the history of one regiment
is the history of another. It was a daily succession of easy marches, with little interruption,
with plenty of forage for both man and beast, and full of pleasant adventure.

Savannah was reached and besieged. In the operations around that place the Forty-Third
performed its full share of duty, and, after the fall of the city, held, with General Sprague's bri-
gade, the important outpost of Dillon's Bridge.

In January, 1865, the regiment moved to Beaufort, and directly afterward upon Pocotaligo,
on the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, where it lay until the beginning of Sherman's march



276 Ohio in the War.

through the Carolinas, occupying the interim in demonstrations against the enemy at the crossings
of the Salkahatchie.

On the 2d of February the Seventeenth Army Corps marched from Pocotaligo, and having
crossed Whippy Swamp were, in due time, confronting the enemy strongly posted at River's
Bridge. At this place Colonel Swayne, while engaged in selecting a position for his regiment to
camp, lost a leg by a shell. The regiment thus lost a brave and competent leader, who had been
with it from the beginning of its organization, in every march and in every fight, and who had
always shown the utmost devotion to their interests. For his services during the war he has
Bince been made Brigadier and Brevet Major-General.

The day after the fall of Colonel Swayne at River's Bridge the regiment received a baptism
of fire, in a charge on a battery which commanded the bridge and the causeway approaching it.
Down this narrow causeway the regiment rushed amid a storm of shot and shell, compelling the
Rebels to withdraw the battery and uncover the crossing.

In the South Carolina campaign the Forty-Third stood high, as it always had done, for
promptitude, steadiness, and good discipline. The war closing, the regiment went to Washing-
ton, took part in the grand review, and from thence to Louisville, Kentucky, with the Army of
the Tennessee, whence, in July, 1865, it went to Ohio, and was mustered out of service on the
13th of July, 1865.



FORTY-FOUETH OHIO InFANTEY.



277



44th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTEK, THBEE YEAES' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK. COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

It. Colonel

Do.

Do.

Major

Do

Surgeon

Ass't Surgeon

Do.

Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

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Do

Do

let Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do,

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



SAMUEL A. GILBERT....

H. Blair Wilson

A. 0. Mitchell

Lysander \V. Tulley .i

A. 0. Mitchell

Alpheus S. Moore

H. K. Steele

John H. Hougers

Douglas Luce

Benj. F. Davis

Thomas P. Ohilds

Alpheus S. Moore

John C. Langston

Win. W. Woodward

Lysander W. Tulley

John M. Newkirk

Israel Stough

Daniel M. Rouzer

Henry T. Shafer

Wilbur F. Cummings

John M. Bell

Robert Youart

Jacob Souders

Nicholas D. Badger

Jarvis S. Rogers

James M. Shaw

Augustus Dotze

Thomas F. Garlough

Gilmer Telford

Robert Youart

Jacob Souders

George Monroe Shaffer...

Nicholas D. Badger

Jarvis S. Rogers

James M.Shaw

Jeremiah Klinefelder ....

Thomas F. Garlough

Augustus Dotze

Ohas. Evans

Benj. F. Jacobs „

Samuel M. Smith

Samuel C. Howell

Wm. H. Banwell

Thomas B. Douglass

Hezekiah Winger

John C. Allen

A. N. Thompson

Wm. W. Knoop

Samuel F. Todd

James Lewis Ruley

Samuel M. Smith

Leonard Langston

Samuel Billings

Samuel C. Howell

John Tf ouart

Samuel J udy

Wm. H. banwell

Edward E. Ketter

Hezekiah Winger

lohn C. Allen

Thomas B. Douglass

Dewitt Shellabarger

A. N. Thompson

W. H. Simons

Edward Rice

Wm. W. Knoop

Samuel F. Todd

George Green

Frank E. Moores

I. N. Miller

Joseph Badger

A. Pettit

Alex. McAlpin

Robert Lyle

Wm. Sykes



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Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 49 of 165)