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juncture that Brigadier-General Saunders, commanding the division, and Adjutant Fearns, of
the Forty-Fifth, fell mortally wounded. These troops were again moved across the Holston
River and posted in the works on its south bank, where they remained until the siege was aban-
doned in December. In the fighting of the ISth of November the Forty-Fifth lost five men
killed and six mortally wounded, including the Adjutant.

The regiment was next engaged in the action at Bean's Station, on the 14th of December,
but without sustaining any loss.

After Longstreet retired toward Virginia the Forty-Fifth, with the Eleventh and Twenty-
Seventh Kentucky Mounted Infantry, were sent to Cumberland Gap, and that neighborhood,
where they remained until the 8th of February, 18G4, when, the animals of the brigade being
nearly all worn out, it was marched to Mount Sterling, Kentucky, to be refitted and remounted.
This design, however, was never carried out, and the regiment ever after served as infantry
proper.

Leaving Mount Sterling April 6th, and Camp Nelson on the 19th of the same month, the
Forty-Fifth, with the One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois, and the Eleventh and Sixteenth Ken-
tucky Regiments, marched across the mountains to East Tennessee, reaching Knoxville on the
3d of May. In a few days the regiment was forwarded by rail to Cleveland, Tennessee, whence
it marched to Tunnel Hill, Georgia, where it was attached to the Second Brigade, Second Division,
Twenty-Third Army Corps, on the 11th. Three days later the battle of Resaca was fought, in
which action the Forty-Fifth regiment had two men killed and three mortally wounded; one of
whom was Captain Scott, of company A, who commanded the left wing on the occasion, in the
absence of the Lieutenant-Colonel and Major. It afterward participated in many of the actions
which marked the remarkable Atlanta campaign, which closed with the affair at Lovejoy's Sta-
tion, having been engaged at New Hope Church, near Dallas, Lost Mountain, and in front of
Kenesaw Mountain, besides many other points. Toward the end of June the Forty-Fifth was
transferred to the Second Brigade of the First Division, Fourth Corps.

With the Fourth Corps the regiment returned to Middle Tennessee early in November, 1864,
and participated in the sanguinary battle of Franklin, and afterward in the two days' fighting in
front of Nashville, which resulted so disastrously to the Rebel Army of Tennessee under General
Hood.

In the spring of 1865 the Forty-Fifth accompanied the Fourth Corps to East Tennessee ;
returned with it to Nashville toward the end of April, and was then mustered out of service, on
the 15th of the following June, having at that time two months to serve to complete its term of
enlistment.



284



Ohio in the War.



46th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Do

Do

lit. Colonel....

Do

Do

Do

Do

Major „

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Do

Do

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Do.

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



THOS. WORTHINGTON..

CHAS. (.'. WALCUTT

KDWARD N. UPTON

uarles c. walcutt ,

William Smith.

Isaac N. Alkxander

Edward N. Upton

John B. Neil ,

Chari.es C. Walcutt ,

William Smith

Henuy II. Giesy

Foshua M. Heath

Isaac N. Alexander

Edward N. Upton

John B. Nf.ii

John B. Foster

James I). Robinson

I \mes McFadden

W. W. Bridge

D. P. Smedley

Davis II alderman

Greeni.eaf C. Norton

D. P. Smedley

J. P. ShaKELFOBD

Davis Haldkuman

C. J. Hasan

Wm. Baker

George A. Exi.ine

Foshua M. Heath ,

A. G. Sharp ,

Harding C. Geary ,

John Wiesman ,

Win. Pinney

Henry H. Giesy

Philip A. Crow

Mitchell 0. Lilley ,

Wm. Smith

Charles Ly brand ,

Isaac N. Alexander

Edward N. Upton

Emanuel Giesy ,

John J. Catron

Jacob Lohrer.

John Ramsey

Lucas A. Bowers ,

John B. Noil

Harrison McMichael ,

Joseph Meilen ,

Charles H. liice

Ebenezer 15. Bickett ,

Wm. W. Watts

John Lutz

John B. Foster

Elias H. Parsons

leb Roberts

Marshall B. Wright

David P. Dunalhan

Milton LoehiHT

Lemuel Glove

Louis Morquart

John A. Murliu

Wm. S. Dalton

John Ackermaii

Isaac N. Alexander

Edward N. Uptou

Emanuel Giesy

John B. Neil

Jacob Lohrer

Francis M. Lenville

Wm. Nessler

John J. Carron

Charles E. Taylor

Thomas C. Piatt

Charles C. Movers

L. A. Bowers

Harrison McMichael

Joseph Meilen

John Ramsey

George F. Ctarey

Charles II. Rice

John Lutz

Ebenezer H. Bickett

John II. Valentine

Wm. W. Watts

David Stewart ,



DATE OF RANK.



July

Sept.

July
Jan.
Sept.
Aug.
Dec.
July
Oct.
Jan.
Sept.

July
Aug.

Fan.
luly
Sept.
Oct.
Aug.

Sept.

Jan.
Oct.



March

Feb.

Nov.
Sept.
Oct.



Nov.

Dec.



April

Sept.



Dec.
Jan.



April
July



29, 1861
16, 1862
16, 1865

30, 18ii2
16, "
19, 1864

22, "
16, I860

1, 1861

30, 1862
16, "
13, 1S64
11, "
19, "

23, 1865
16, "
11, 1861
11. "
26, "
19, 1S64

15, 1865
19, 1861

■J, 186.'
8, "
11, 1863

16, 1865
1, 1862
3, 1864

Kl, 1861

16, "

17. "
29, "

8, "
16, "

23, "

31, "
31, "

24, 1862
3D, "

6, "
16, "
16, "
29, "
21, 1863

13, "

14, 1S64
13, "
13, "
13, "
11, "
11, "
11, "
19, "
19, "



Feb. 2, 1S6.'



Jan.
Oct.
July
Feb.
Oct.
Aug.
Dec.
July
Feb.

Aug.
July
Aug.

Fan.
July
Sept.
Feb.
Aug.
Sept.
Jan.
Feb.
Oct.

March
Feb.

Nov.
Feb.



April

July

Sept.



Nov.
Dec.



April
Aug.
Sept.

April
Jan.

Sept.
Dec.



2, "
2, "
2, "
18, "
16, "
10, 1861
10, "
27, "
1, "
16, "

29, "
8, "

16, "

23, "
31, "
31, "

24, 1862

30, '
6,

18,
16,
16,
14, 1864
21, 1863
13, "
4, 1862
30, "



COM. ISSUED.



11, 1862



June
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.



\pril
July-



April
July
Feb.



June

Oct.

Dec.

Jan.

A pril

Feb.



It, ]

13,

13,

l'i,
11,
11,
11,

19,
I'- 1 ,
19,

2. 1

2,

2,

2,

2,

1\
16,

7, 1

7,

7,

7,

7,

7,

7,

7,

7,

7,

7,

7,
17,



1863

18^4
1863



Honorably discharged November 21, 1862.

Promoted to Brigadier-General of VoIb.

Mustered out with regiment as Lieut. Col.

Promoted to Colonel September 16, 1862.

Honorably discharged Julv 22, 1864.

designed December 22, 1865.

Promoted to Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment as Major.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Killed May 28, 1864 ; buried at Lancaster, Ohio.

Killed July 22, 1864.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment as Captain.

Resigned November 21, 1861.

Discharged August 19, 1862.

Died August 6, ism.

Resigned December 29, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Died August 10, 1862.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Declined.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Mustered out with regiment.

Died August 25, 1862.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned April 24, 1863.

Killed at Shiloh April 6, 1862.

Resigned May 28, 1864.

Honorably discharged July 22, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Discharged December 29, 1862.

Resigned January 21, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned January 13, 1S63.

Promoted to Major.

Promoted to Major.

Declined ; commission returned.

Resigned May I, 1864.

Resigned September 24, 1864.

Killed September 5, 1864.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Major.

Mustered out at expiration of time.

Returned commission.

Mastered out with regiment.

Died June 27. 1864.

Honorably discharged October 20, 1864.

Killed August 3, 1864.

Promoted to M;ijor.

Mustered out with regiment.

Killed at Lovejoy's Station Sept. 5, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Lieut.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain by Pres. April 25, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Died July 24.

Killed September 4, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned December 30, 1862.

Mustered out August 18, 1862.

Resigned August 8, 1863.

Resigned.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed September 5, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Revoked.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned July 13, IS64.

I Promoted to Captain.

|Died August 10, ISH3.






Forty-Sixth Ohio Ikfantry.



285



MATE OF RANK.



lat Lieutenant John 15. Foster April

Do. Klias II. Parsons

Do. Caleb Rob. its

Do. Jesse II. Brandt July-
Do. Joseph Amos

Do. Marshall 15. Wright

Do. Win. 8. Dalton Aus

Do. David P. Dniiatliaii

Do. Milton Louhner

Do. Lemuel Grove

Do. Louis Morquart

Do. John A. jluiiin

Do. John Ackerman

Do. Lodwick H. Hopkiu

Do. Jacoli Scho.-k

Do. Joseph Abright Tib.

Do. (leorge R. Snell "

Do. Henry G. Beatty "

Do. Win. De Moss "

Do. L"wi-i V. IJoss I "

Do. Henry H. Brooks |May

Do. John W. Shan' ".

Do. Ausu>tus 15. Wood I "

Do. Charles E. Skecls I.July

Do. XoahDur.kn

2d Lieutenant Harri-on Mi-Michael Feb.

Do. tieorge F. (Jrarey _ O.t.

Do. Charles H. like •'

Do. Joseph Mellen "

Do. Win. W. Watts ••

Do. John Lutz I "

1 Do. Amos L. Parks Nov.

Do. llirain B. Wilson Dec.

Do. John Ramsey I "

Do. Joseph A. Stewart Jan.

Do. Charles B. R. Barker | "

Do. John B. Foster April

Do. David Stewart "

Do. Kbenezer B. Biekett Aug.

Do. Marshall B. Wright Sept.

Do. George Gorman...

Do. Klias H. Parsons

Do. Caleb Roberts Dec.

Do. John C. Howard Sept.

Do. John H. Valentine May

Do. Jesse 11. Brandt Dec.

Do. Joseph Amos Jan.

Do. W. P. Thatche

Do. Marshall B. Wright Starch

Do. -Noah Dunken July

Du. John C. Lilley

Do. James E. Moore

Do. Thomas J. Brellsford

Do. Charles W. Kelsey....

Do. Allen McCutchen

Do. John F. Mcllvaine...

Do. Win. M. Swartz

Do. Alexander Mullen

Do. John Kngle

Do. Abraham De Long...



14, ISM

14,

14,

13,

13,

13,

19,

19,

19,

19,

19,

19,

19,

19,

19,
2, 1855
2, "
2, "
2, "
2, "

31, "

31, "

31, "
5, "

16, "
JO, ISril



17, "

23, "

29, "
13, "

23, "
31, "

24, 1862

30, "
6, "
6, "

18, "
Hi, '

6,
Hi,
26,

4,
14,
30,

21, 1863

13, "

6, "

n>, ise;

Hi, "

Hi, "

16, "

Hi, "

16, "

Iti, "

16, "

J6, "

Hi, "

16, "



com. issi-i:i).



April
July
Aug.



May

July
Feb.



Oct.
Dec.



Jan.

Feb.



April
July



7,
7,
7,
28,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,

16,
16,
16,

16,
16,



Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged November I, 1864.

Honorably discharged.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain,

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered nit August 1. 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered mil with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as Sergt. Maj.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned March !., 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant Sept. 16, 1S62.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Discharged December 31, US62.

Killed at Shiloh April 6, I8i>2.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Killed accidentally May 14, 1862.

Resigned September 6, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Revoked.

Killed in action November 25, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Discharged April II, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned July 13, 1864.

Honorably discharged April 29, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

1



Mustered out with regiment as Sergeants;
r complimentary commissions given after
muster out.



286 Ohio in the War.






TOBTY-SIXTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE FORTY -SIXTH OHIO was recruited at Worthington, Franklin County,
Ohio, in the month of September, and was organized on the 16th of October, 1S61. It
was sent to the held from Camp Chase on the 18th of February, 1SG2, with an aggre-
gate of nine hundred and seventy-five men, and on the 22d it reported at Paducah, Kentucky.
It was brigaded with the Sixth Iowa and the Fortieth Illinois, and was attached to General
Sherman's division.

The regiment, with four companies of the Fortieth Illinois, embarked for the Upper Ten-
nessee on the Gth of March, and landed at Savannah on the 8th. Here it remained, within eight
miles of the enemy's camp at Pittsburg Landing, for four days, when the grand army arrived,
and on the morning of the 14th the fleet reached Pittsburg Landing, which the Rebels had evac-
uated. A detail from the Forty-Sixth vaa the first organized body of troops to disembark. The
regiment was posted a short distance to the right of Shiloh Church, and there it remained in
comparative quiet until the battle. On Saturday, April 5th, companies B and K were on picket.
During the night the enemy was feeling the lines constantly, and at daylight his columns could
be seen deploying in the distance. At sunrise a Rebel cavalry officer emerged from the woods
within thirty yards of the picket-line, and, checking his horse, he stood for a moment in seem-
ing composure, and then inquired: "Are these Union pickets?" He was told they were, and
was ordered to come up. He attempted to turn his horse again into the woods, and in an instant
the unerring rifle of Sergeant Glenn emptied its deadly contents into his brain ; but before the
sun had set, the Sergeant, too, lay stark and stiff on the bloody field. The regiment was engaged
during the entire battle, with a loss of two hundred and eighty killed and wounded, and fifteen
captured. The dead were conveyed to a spot a little to the south of the summit of the ridge
overlooking Owl Creek, immediately in front of the first line of battle, and near the Purdy
Road, and there they were interred in single graves with the honors of war.

The regiment remained upon the battle-field until the 27th of April, when it moved with
the army upon Corinth*. The summer and part of the autumn of 1SG2 were spent in garrisoning
the line of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and in performing provost-duiy in Memphis.
In November the regiment started on a campaign through the interior of Mississippi, under Gen-
eral Grant; but, after marching about one hundred miles, the troops were compelled to return
to Holly Springs, in consequence of the line of communication having been cut. The regiment
was again stationed along the Memphis and Charleston Road ; and, being mounted, it was
employed principally in raiding and scouting in Northern Mississippi. Early in June, 1S63, the
regiment was transported to Vicksburg, and it participated in the siege of that place. On the
evening of the 4th of July, after the surrender, the regiment took up the line of march in the
direction of Jackson, Mississippi, and at eleven o'clock P. M. it halted in the vicinity of Big
Black River. Companies E and K were ordered forward to the ford at Birdsong's Ferry, which,
after a long search in the darkness, they found; but they had not been there long until unmis-
takable signs of the enemy were discovered in their immediate front on the opposite bank. It
proved to be General Joe Johnston, who, with his army, had reached that point on his way to
the relief of Vicksburg. At daybreak the enemy opened fire upon the two companies, and,
though they were in a sharp bend of the river, and to a great extent surrounded, they held their
position gallantly, but sustained considerable loss. It required several days' severe skirmishing



Forty-Sixth Ohio Infantry. 287

to effect a crossing; and, after gaining the eastern side of the river, the troops moved on upon
Jackson, to which point Johnston retreated. After several days' fighting, the enemy was forced
to evacuate the city, and the regiment returned to Big Black and went into camp. In this cam-
paign the men suffered greatly from heat and the scarcity of water. On the return march the
6ick and wounded were carried on the shoulders of fatigue details, on stretchers, exposed to the
burning sun, for a distance of thirty miles.

On the 10th of October the regiment, with the Fifteenth Corps, under General Sherman,
embarked for Memphis, and from there it marched to the relief of Chattanooga, arriving on the
20th of November. At the battle of Mission Ridge the regiment was engaged severely, and it
sustained a heavy loss in killed and wounded. Immediately after this battle the regiment moved
on the Knoxville campaign, and, having raised the siege of that place, it marched to Scottsboro',
Alabama, for winter-quarters. It arrived on the 31st of December, 1863, having marched over
five hundred miles in about two months, exposed to inclement weather, without tents and almost
without food and clothing. Here the regiment was armed with Spencer's repeating rifled mus-
ket; and here, too, it re-enlisted as veterans. It was furloughed on the 30th of March, 1864,
and, after an absence of thirty-eight days, it returned to its camp at Scottsboro'.

On the 1st of May the regiment moved in the direction of Chattanooga, and thence, by way
of Snake Creek Gap, to Resaca, where it was actively engaged on the 13th, 14th, and 15th of
May, but with small loss. The regiment moved on through Kingston and Van Wert to Dallas,
arriving on the 26th. After severe skirmishing, it took position on the Villa Rica Road, on the
extreme right of the army, and within five hundred yards of the enemy. On the 27th the Reb-
els made a bold dash to capture a battery of Parrott guns, but they were repulsed by the brigade
of which the regiment was a part. The next day the Rebels made a general attack, but were
again repulsed. In these two engagements the Spencer rifles caused such havoc in the charging
columns, that ever after the Forty-Sixth was known and dreaded throughout the opposing army.
On the 1st of June the regiment, with its division, moved to the left, and relieved the Second
and Third Brigades of General Geary's division, Twentieth Corps. Here the regiment partici-
pated in the battle of New Hope Church. The command gained a position within one hundred
yards of the enemy, and, after severe skirmishing, and by aid of a system of works, the line was
advanced to within eighty yards. The enemy's fire harassed the brigade greatly, and Colonel
Walcutt, commanding the brigade, determined to gain the Rebel line without loss to his com-
mand. His plan succeeded admirably. He arranged the brigade as though a charge was to be
made, with flags flying and all the buglers on the line ; and he directed his men, who were well
covered with works, to stand with their pieces directed along the enemy's parapet. "When the
bugles sounded the forward, the enemy raised, as had been expected, to repel the anticipated
assault, but he received, instead, a very severe fire. The result was that the enemy abandoned
his works in confusion, and during the night withdrew from the front of the brigade.

On the 6th of June the brigade passed through Acworth, and went into bivouac until the
9th, when it accompanied General Garrard's cavalry on a reconnoissance to the vicinity of Ken-
esaw, and there rejoined its division. During the movements on Kenesaw the brigade was in
reserve until the loth of June, when, Avith the division, it was moved to the extreme left of the
army. The Forty-Sixth, with its brigade, supported by the other two brigades of the division,
was ordered to charge a line on a ridge a half a mile distant. This was done in gallant style.
Twenty-two officers, four hundred men, and six hundred stand of small arms were captured,
and many of the enemy were killed and wounded. The division was again placed in reserve
until the 25th, when it took position at the base of Kenesaw, and engaged in skirmishing. On
the evening of the. 26th V\'alcutt's brigade and two brigades from General Morgan L. Smith's
division were detailed as a storming party. The movement took place the next day. "Walcutt'd
brigade led ihe column, with the Forty-Sixth in advance as skirmishers. The troops moved for-
ward with determination, but it was impossible for them to force their way through the heavy
abattis to the enemy's main works, and they were obliged to withdraw. In this assault the
Forty-Sixth captured sixty prisoners, but its own loss in killed and wounded was severe. After



288 Ohio in the War.

the evacuation of Kenesaw the regiment moved through Marietta to the junction of the Nicko-
jack with the Chattahoochie. Here it engaged in skirmishing for several days, and then marched
to Roswell's Factory, where a crossing of the Chattahoochie was forced on the loth of July.
The regiment remained in bivouac at this point until the 19th, when it moved for Atlanta, and
on the evening of the 20th went into line in front of the city.

The regiment was engaged in skirmishing until the 22d, when it assisted in repelling an
attack on the Seventeenth Corps. Walcutt's brigade was posted on the left of the Fifteenth
Corps, joining the right of the Seventeenth Corps. When the engagement opened the brigade
was faced from west to south, partially closing the gap between the two corps. The troops on
the right of the brigade gave way, and the enemy gained its rear, while another column was
making a direct assault. The column in front was repulsed, and the column in rear was cap-
tured. The Forty-Sixth, with its Spencers, did gallant service, and had the honor of retaking a
battery of Parrott guns captured by the Rebels during the day. At Ezra Church the regiment
was again engaged. When the attack was made the brigade was in reserve, but the regiment was
called upon to support the Third Brigade of its division, and it moved into action. While the
battle was going on a captured Rebel informed the commanding officer of the regiment that he
was of the Thirtieth Louisiana, and that the Forty-Sixth was the regiment that had confronted
his at Pittsburg Landing. This was made known to the men, and, remembering their disastrous
beginning there, they worked their pieces with redoubled energy. The colors of the Thirtieth
Louisiana were captured, and the Colonel, with ten of his officers and fully one-half of his men,
were killed. The flag, which was a present from the ladies of New Orleans to the regiment,
was presented by General Logan to its immediate captor, Harry Davis, and was contributed by
him to the trophies of the State of Ohio, and it can now be seen in the State-House at Columbus.

On the 3d of August the brigade took up an advanced position, and the Forty-Sixth, with
details from other regiments, was ordered to drive in or to capture the enemy's outposts. The
contest was severe, but it resulted in the capture of about one hundred prisoners. From this
time the regiment was constantly engaged in skirmishing until the 26th, when it participated in
Sherman's flank movement to Jonesboro'. On the evening of the 28th the division crossed Flint
River and went into position near Jonesboro'. On the afternoon of the next day the Rebels
made their attack. Three companies of the Forty-Sixth were on the skirmish-line, and the
remainder of the regiment was in reserve. The three companies held their ground until the
enemy passed their flank, when they retired to the reserve. The regiment received instructions
to charge the Rebel line as soon as it wavered. This order was executed, and four officers and
fifty men were captured. On the 2d of September the regiment was again engaged, and it suc-
ceeded in capturing the enemy's fortified skirmish-line. The regiment followed Hardee's
retreating army, and, when near Lovejoy's Station, a halt was made, and the Forty-Sixth was
deployed in front of the Fourth Division, Fifteenth Corps, while in front of General Corse's
division of the Seventeenth Corps the Sixty-Sixth Illinois was deployed, and preparations were
made for an advance. The men of the two regiments challenged each other as to which should



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 51 of 165)