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comrades.

The Rebel army was pursued up to Crab Orchard, Kentucky, without further results. The
National forces were then marched back, by easy stages, to Nashville.

On November 9, 1862, the regiment and brigade, under Colonel Stanley Mathews, were sent
out on a foraging expedition, and at Dobson's Ferry, Stone River, met and defeated Wheeler's
Rebel cavalry, who had by some means got in their rear. The fight was made by five companies
of the Fifty-First, and five companies of the Thirty-Fifth Indiana, led by Colonel Stanley
Mathews. The Fifty-First lost thirteen men wounded, three of whom subsequently died ;
and the Thirty-Fifth Indiana lost its Lieutenant-Colonel (severely wounded), its Adjutant
(killed), and a number of men. Colonel Mathews, while in the thickest of the tight, was thrown
from his horse and severely injured, but kept the field and command until the troops arrived
safely in camp.

On December 2t>th the regiment moved out on the Murfreesboro' Turnpike, with Brigadier-
General Van Cleve's division, of the Twenty-First Army Corps, marching toward Stone River.
Nothing of moment occurred until the 31st of December, when the regiment, having been
thrown across Stone River on a reconnoissance, found the enemy in force, and returned to its
camp. On January 1, 1861, it again crossed the river and took position, four companies being
thrown out as skirmishers. Advancing half a mile, they met the enemy and skirmished with
him all that day and night, and part of the next day. On the afternoon of the 2d of January
Breckinridge's Rebel division made a charge, and flanking the right, swept it to the west side
of Stone River. The Fifty-First left thirty-two of its number dead on the field, one hundred
and five wounded, and forty -six captured. It was at this juncture that General Rosecrans massed



Fifty-First Ohio Infantry. 311

his artillery, and settled the fortunes of the day by almost literally blowing the Rebel column
of attack into and across Stone River.

The enemy retreated during the night of the 2d. On the morning of the 3d the Rebels
opened a furious cannonade ; but reconnoissances being made, it was discovered that he was
drawing off his forces toward Shelbyville. On the morning of the 4th, the enemy having disap-
peared, the army marched into and took possession of Murfreesboro'.

The army lay at Murfreesboro' until the 24th of June, when it moved on the Tullahoma
campaign. The route of the Fifty-First and its division was by the way of McMinnville, cross-
ing the Cumberland Mountains into the Sequatchie Valley; thence to Point Lookout, near Chat-
tanooga, and from there to Ringgold. At the latter place, on September 11th, Wheeler's Rebel
cavalry was met, defeated, and driven to Tunnel Hill.

On the 12th the regiment marched to Lee & Gordon's Mills ; on the 13th it made a recon-
noissance to Shield's Gap, and on the 14th went into position at Crawfish Springs. From that
time until the opening of the battle of Chickamauga the members of the regiment feasted on
roasting-ears and sweet potatoes.

On the evening of the 18th of September the Fifty-First, being relieved by the Sixth Ohio,
marched back to Lee & Gordon's Mills, where it went into position, and lay upon its arms all
that night. On the morning of the 19th the regiment met the enemy and drove him back a
quarter of a mile; but in doing so lost eight men killed, twenty-five wounded, and as many cap-
tured. The enemy, receiving re-enforcements, in turn drove the regiment back to its former
position, where it lay on its arms for the night.

On September 20th the regiment was marched to the left to re-enforce General Thomas's col-
umn, and on arriving at its position it took part in the effort to stay the enemy in his attempt to
get into the rear of the National forces, through a gap left in the lines. The regiment struck
the Rebel General Adams's division, wounded and captured its commander, and drove it pell-
mell. It was then brought back and again formed on the extreme left of General Thomas's
command. .

In this battle the Fifty-First lost twelve men and one officer wounded, and thirty captured,
including Colonel R. W. McLain, Lieutenants Rittelley, McNeil, and James Weatherbee and
Assistant-Surgeon Wing.

On September 21st the army retired behind intrenchments to Chattanooga, and was there
besieged by the Rebel forces until the latter part of the following November, when the siege
was raised.

On November 24th the regiment participated in the storming of Lookout Mountain, and on
the 25th took part in the taking of Rossville Gap, through Mission Ridge. Its loss in these two
affairs was one killed and seven wounded.

On January 1, 1864, the Fifty-First re-enlisted, and on February 10th arrived at Columbus
on veteran furlough of thirty days. It returned to the front at Blue Springs, near Cleveland,
Tennessee. It remained at this place in camp until May 4th, when it marched to Catoosa
Springs, and entered on the Atlanta campaign. On May 14th it was engaged at Resaca, and on
the 20th of June at Kenesaw. At the first-named place it lost one officer and ten men wounded
and one man killed. At Kenesaw it lost two officers (Captain Samuel Stephens and Lieutenant
Workman) killed, and ten men killed and thirty wounded. From this time until Atlanta was
taken the regiment was almost hourly engaged with the enemy.

On September 1st the regiment was at Jonesboro', and took part in that engagement ; and
on the 2d pursued the enemy to Lovejoy's Station. Here it lost ten men wounded. It then fell
back to Atlanta, and on the 8th of September entered that city. It lay there quietly in camj)
until the 3d of October, when it marched toward Chattanooga, passing through Cassville, King-
ston, Rome, Resaca, and Snake Creek Gap. This march was made in consequence of the Rebel
General Hood's movement to the rear of Atlanta, and the consequent return of General Hood's
army. At this time a series of arduous marches were made in pursuit of the enemy through
Tennessee and Alabama, ending at Pulaski, Tennessee, where it went into camp until November



312 Ohio in the War.

22, 1864. It then fell back with General Thomas's command to Columbia, Spring Hill, Frank-
lin, and Nashville.

It was engaged at Spring Hill, but in the battle of Franklin it occupied a position not
involved in the fight. A number of its men were, however, engaged as skirmishers.

On December 14th and 15th the regiment took part in the battle of Nashville, with a loss
of one man killed and fifteen wounded. It joined in the pursuit of the enemy up to Lexington,
Alabama. This march was arduous in the extreme, the roads being almost knee-deep in mud
and water. The regiment then proceeded to Huntsville, where, on January 5, 1865, it went
into camp.

On March 20th it went by rail to Strawberry Plains, and from thence to Bull's Gap, Ten-
nessee. On April 5th it went by rail to Nashville, where it remained until June 16th. It was
then taken to Texas, via New Orleans, and landed at Indianola, Texas, July 25, 1865. Thence
it marched to Blue Lake, and thence to Victoria.

On October 3, 1865, the regiment was mustered out at Victoria by Captain Wm. Nicholas,
Commissary of Musters of the Central District of Texas, and on the 4th was on its way to Ohio,
where it arrived on November 1, 1865. It was discharged at Camp Chase, near Columbus,
Ohio, after a long and faithful term of arduous service honorably performed.



Fifty-Second Ohio Infantry.



313



52d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Do

Lt. Colonel ....

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Do

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.,
Do.
Do.

f'haplain

Captain

Do! Z'.'.Z.

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do. ...

Do

Do.

Do

Do

lBt Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



DATE OF RANK.



DAMEL MrCOOK

CHARLES W. CLANCKY

|D. D. T. Cowan-.

;Charles W. Clancey

[J. Taylor Holmes

'Israel D. Clark

| .Matthew L. .Morrow

I. Tayloii Holmes

Wm. H. Bv«

!Joel Morsk

: Henry M. Duct

I Arthur J. Rosa

N'atha.x S. Hill

|Hehry M. DlFE,

Arthur J. Rosa

D. RlDENOCR

S, A. Simpson

Asbvry L. Petty

Charles \V. Clancey

Jacob E. Motfet

Israel I). Clark

Matthew L. Morrow

Parker A. Elson

James B. Donoelson

J. Taylor Holmes

Joseph A. Culbertsoii

Peter Schneider

Andrew S. Bloom

Wni. H. Buck

Charles Swift

Edward L. Anderson

Abisha C. Thomas

Wm. H. Sturgis

John H. Collier

Samuel Hothaker

Salathiel M. Neighbor

Samuel C. Hutchinson

Honrv 0. Mansfield

George W. Masury

Ira H. Pool

James M. Summers

Win. II. Lane

Frank B. James

Sylvester L. Brice

Alex. B. Mclntyre

Christopher W. Grimes

Isaac Stoker

(jasper Rudolph

Wm. H. Sturgis

Abisha C. Thomas

Wm. H. Buck

John H. Collier

Alex. Smith

John Irwin

Samuel Lot baker

Charles Swift

■jeorge H. Matmry

Edward L. Anderson

Charles H. Blackburn

Israel Fisher

Wm. II. Kaufiniau

John J. Troxeil

Ira H. Pool....-

Samuel C. Hiitchinsou

Henrv U. Mansfield

Wm. H. Lane

James M. Summers

Wm. P. Sharkland

Wm. A. Judkins

Addison P. Marsh

Sylvester L. Brice

Alex. B. Mclntyre

Frank B. James

Christopher W. Grimes

Isaac Stokes

Samuel J. Bieut

Gasper Itudolph

Adam Kneckt

Samuel W. Dun

Julius Armstrong

Wm. H. Bay ,

Wm. D. Scott

Wm. D. Scott

Wm. Freeman



July
May

Aug.

Feb.

Jan.
Oct.
May



15, is>;

31, lNi."
20, IS>2

18, 1863
31, 18<
8, 1862

8,



COM. ISSUED.



Jan. 31, 1865



May
Oct.

July

Sept.

July
May

Sept.
Aug.



Oct.
Dec.
Ian.
Feb;



use

1864



1861
lNi2



21,
S.

31,
7,
1,



.March 8,
18.



May-



Dec.



May



Oct.
Nov.



Dec.
Jan.



Dec.
Feb.



1

18,
March 18,
May 19,
March 24,
Jan. 7,

June 18,
Nov. 18,
Dec. 9,



1 «62
1863



Jan.
June



6, "



Aug.
May

Aug.
March 30
Jan. 31
Oct. 27
March 14
May 8
Jan



May

Oct.

July

Sept.
July
Mav
Sept.
Aug.



Oct. 27

Feb. 10

June 2»i

Feb. 20

April y

March 30

May 12
June



Aug.
May

Dec.



Oct.
Feb.



April
May
June
July-
Jan.
July
Nov.
Dec.



Jan.
June



1S62 Died of w'dsrece'dat Kenesaw Mt.July 18,'64.
1863 Mustered out as Lieutenant-Colonel.

1862 Honorably discharged February 18, 1663.

1863 Promoted to Colonel.
1865 Mustered out as Major.
1862! Resigned March 8, 1863.

1863 Revoked : resigned as Captain May 23, 1S63.
" Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 4

1S6SI Resigned May 9, 1863.

Resigned September 6, 1S64.

Is i'.2

1864 Died February 20, 1864.

■' |Mustered out with regiment.
1862; Promoted to Surgeon.
' Promoted to Surgeon.
Commission returned.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned February 2, 1863.
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Resigned February 1, 1863.
Promoted to Major.
Resigned May 23, 1863.
Resigned March 18, 1863.
Resigned May 19, 1863.
Promoted to Major.
Resigned December 31, 1862.
Deceased July 19, 1864.
Resigued January 7, 1863.
Promoted to Major.
JJesigned April 7, 1865.
Blustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned August 25, 1865.
Revoked.

Resigned January 31, 1865.
Died of wounds.
Mustered out with regiment.
Honorably discharged NovemDer 1, 1864.
Declined promotion.

Died of wounds received at Peachtree Creek.
Died April 16, I<s65.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.



1863



1 -< 4



1S65



Mustered out with regiment as R. Q. M.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned July 27, 1863.

Resigned July 11, 1862.

Resigned December 20, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned November 26, 1862.

Resigned November 20, 1862.

Resigned Januarv 21, 1863.

Discharged October 23, 1863.

Promoted to Captain April 24, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigued as 2d Lieutenant May 9, 1803.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned June f, 1^63.

Detached.

Resigned October 18, 1863

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

2d Lieutenant Signal Corps U. S. A.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined to accept.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

1 No discharge furnished ; this man stands as

J Sergeant-Major on roll.



314



Ohio in the Wae.



DATE OK HANK.



COM. ISSUED.



REMARKS.



l»t Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Isaac L. Mills

John Sreinaa

Daniel T. Heucroi't

A. B. Holmes

rrank Hurt

Thomas Hammond

Win. A. .1 ml kins

Ezckiel E. Mills

Win. II. Kauffraan

Salathiel Hughbel

Henry 0. Mansfield

Samuel C. Hutchinson.

Addison P. Marsh

James M . Summers

Edwin .1. Donaldson ...

Samuel .1. Brent

Lucius P. Dunham

Frank B. .lames

Gasper Rudolph

James II. Donaldson...,

Sylvester L. Brice

Adam Kneckt

Samuel W. Duff

David Neighbor

David S. Miser

Julius Armstrong

Wm. H. Buy

Isaac Stokes



June 6, ISte

" H, "

" 6, "



An?.



Oct.
Jan.
Dec.
Ijuly
Dec.

.Web.
! «■

'May
Jan.

May

Dec.
May



6,

1, 1862

1, "



9, "

8. "

II, "

16, "

21, "

21, "

S, "

20, isr,3

31, 1862

1 1 , 1863
29, 1SC>2
13, 1863

IS, "

12, "



June 6, 186f>



Oct.
Jan.

Feb.



9, 1864



May

April
July
May

June
April
May



Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted; resigned February 13, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Discharged November 1, 18G2.
Promoted to. 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned March 2-1, 1663.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Died July 19, 18H4.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Honorably discharged March 18, 18i".">.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Honorably discharged October 26, 1863.
Honorably discharged Ausust 21, 1S&4.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieuteuant.



FIFTY-SECOND OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



IN the organization of the three-years' regiments, this number (the Fifty-Second) was,
for some unexplained reason, left unfilled, notwithstanding repeated efforts had been
made to fill it. In May, 1862, Governor Tod called to his aid Captain Dan. McCook,
to whom lie issued a commission as Colonel. On his arrival at Columbus from the field of Pitts-
burg Landing, the new Colonel went to work with alacrity and energy in the raising of his new
command. During the first month of his labors he was quite successful. After that recruiting
for that or any other organization lagged heavily,- and almost ceased, and the middle of August
was reached before an organization was effected, and then only by a partial consolidation with
other straggling organizations.

At sunrise on the 25th of August, 1862, the Fifty-Second Ohio, under orders, left Camp Den-
nison for Lexington, Kentucky, passing through Cincinnati. While on the wharf, awaiting
transportation across the Ohio River, a banner was presented to the regiment by citizens of the
" Queen City." The presentation ceremonies concluded, the regiment crossed the river to Cov-
ington, and, taking the railroad cars, reached Lexington the following morning. After getting
settled in camp, Colonel McCook was placed in command of the post and of all the forces in and
about the city.

In the evening of August 30th orders were received to march to the relief of General Nel-
son, whose troops had met with disaster at Big Hill, near Richmond, Kentucky. Before day-
light of the following morning the Fifty-Second Ohio had reached the Kentucky River, fifteen
miles from Lexington. Rumors of disaster and defeat were here changed into certainty. The
National forces had been completely routed, with great loss in killed, wounded, and prisoners.

Soon after dawn the enemy made his appearance on the opposite side of the river in force,
and, after the interchange of a few shots between pickets, a deliberate withdrawal of all the
National forces began. After reaching Lexington, and remaining in its vicinity until the evening
of September 1st, the regiment moved with the column, acting as rear-guard toward Louisville,



Fifty-Second Ohio Infantry. 315

Kentucky. Then commenced a period of hardship and suffering that surely has never been par-
alleled, or at least surpassed, in the annals of warfare. What was true of the Fifty-Second Ohio
was true of nearly every regiment in the retreating column. The men had not been inured to
the hardships of the service ; and what would have put to the fullest test the powers of endurance
of veterans was being suffered by raw recruits. All engaged in that march will ever remember
the source from whence came the greatest misery. The parched lips, the blood-shot eyes, the
quick, smothered breathings, the uncertain, tottering gait, all proclaimed the thirst that was
hourly consuming the very life-blood of those excessively wearied soldiers. The springs were
dried up, the heat and dust were terrible, and, added to all these, was the momentary anticipa-
tion of an attack from the army under Kirby Smith, flushed with a recent victory. No language
can ever portray the tortures of those few days.

The Fifty-Second Ohio, forming, as it did, the rear-guard of the hastily-retreating column,
came in for (if possible) an additional share of hardship and suffering. If straggling among the
men was possible in the front regiments, it was impossible among those of the rear. Therefore
the most exact discipline was absolutely necessary, and was carried out rigidly and to the letter.
Men in their agony of suffering would reel out of the ranks and attempt to reach some inviting
farm-yard to quench their burning thirst, but were sternly met by the Colonel or his Adjutant
and driven back to their places.

The retreat was ended, and the regiment went into camp at Louisville on the 6th of Septem-
ber, 1862. At this date the army under General Buell, in pursuit of the Rebel forces under
Bragg, had reached Louisville. The citizens of the city and surrounding country were in the
greatest alarm for their safety. Kentucky was overrun by the armies of Generals Bragg and
Kirby Smith, and an attack was momentarily expected. Meantime the work of reorganizing
and recruiting the National forces steadily progressed. The new regiments were placed in bri-
gades and divisions. The Fifty-Second Ohio, Eighty-Fifth, Eighty-Sixth, and One Hundred and
Twenty-Fifth Illinois were thrown into a brigade.

On the 1st of October, 1862, the regiment and brigade moved out of Louisville with the
army, then resuming the pursuit of Bragg's retreating forces. The Rebel army was vigorously
followed, until, at the little village of Perryville, nestled among what are called the Chaplin
Hills, a collision occurred. The brigade in which the Fifty-Second was placed had attacked the
enemy about four o'clock on the morning of the same day, and carried Peter's Hill after a sharp
conflict. General Bragg ordered the hill retaken, and, as has since been authoritatively learned,
informed the division he sent to do the work that they must take the battery (meaning Captain
Barnett's Battery I, Second Illinois) attached to the brigade. Bragg said to his troops: "It is
supported by green troops, and can easily be captured." His troops made every effort to carry
out their commander's orders, but were sent howling back. The regiment and battery, instead
of giving way, stood up to their work like veterans. In the general attack several of the new
regiments showed signs of demoralization, but as the fight progressed their ranks were closed up,
and they stood Arm in line until the battle was ended.

The pursuit was resumed the next morning, and on that march the command was much
reduced by sickness, and a large number of the members of the Fifty-Second were compelled to
go" into hospitals along the roads clear up to Nashville.

At Bowling Green, Kentucky, General William S. Rosecrans relieved General Buell and
assumed command of the army, and the Fifty-Second Ohio moved with what was then called the
Fourteenth Army Corps. On reaching the vicinity of Nashville the Fifty-Second and the other
regiments of its brigade were, on the 10th of December, detailed as a part of the garrison of the
city of Nashville, and were accordingly sent to that post, where they remained on duty until the
7th day of March, 1863.

The Fifty-Second Ohio was not immediately engaged in the battle of Stone River ; but,
while that battle was raging, the left wing of the Fifty-Second was detailed as a part of the force
to escort an ammunition-train to the front. The enemy's cavalry were swarming in the rear,
and the roads were closely watched by them to prevent re-enforcements or aid of any kind



316 Ohio in the War.

reaching Rosecrans's forces. It was, therefore, a responsible and dangerous task to perform.
Seven miles from Nashville, near the Lunatic Asylum, on the Murfreesboro' Pike, the train was
attacked by a Rebel cavalry force under the command of Pegram and Wheeler. After a brief
skirmish, in which the enemy were handsomely repulsed, the train moved on, and reached its
destination in safety. The conduct of the troops in this affair called forth the warmest com-
mendation from General Rosecrans.

The battle of Stone River being ended, the regiment returned to Nashville and resumed its
former duties. Early in March the brigade was sent over to Franklin to look after Van Dorn's
forces, but, after remaining there a few days, returned to its old camp, nothing having transpired
to require its services. It will be recollected that about that time Van Dorn was killed by a Dr.
Peters, and that his forces were driven out of Franklin by. a National column on the 9th of
March, 1863.

On the 7th of April the regiment received its first payment since entering the field, and
marched .with a portion of General James D. Morgan's division to Brentwood Station, eleven
miles south of Nashville, where it went into camp and remained up to June 5th, and again
returned to Nashville. The brigade remained in General Morgan's division until after the battle
of Chickamauga.

On the 28th of June the brigade was ordered, to Murfreesboro' to perform garrison-duty,
General Rosecrans having commenced his forward movement a few days before. It did not,
however, remain long in Murfreesboro', as on the 16th of July it was once more in its old camp
at Nashville. During its long stay in Nashville, Murfreesboro', and other stations, discipline and
drill had not been neglected, and the regiment had attained to a high degree in both. Its arms
(the Springfield musket) were perfect mirrors, and carried the palm for being the neatest,
brightest guns on inspection.

Thus, prepared at all points for a vigorous campaign, the regiment and brigade started
south at dawn of the morning of the 20th of August, 1863. Their course lay toward Brentwood
and Franklin. By the 23d Spring Hill, beyond Franklin, was reached, and on the 24th the
camp was pitched at Carter's Creek, six miles from Columbia. The ostensible object of the
movement seemed to be the building and repairing of the bridges on the Nashville and Decatur
Railroad, and preparations were made accordingly. Before operations were commenced, how-
ever, orders were received (August 25th) for the Fifty-Second and One Hundred and Twenty-
Fifth Ohio Regiments to march to Columbia, Tennessee, where (on the 29th of August) they
were joined by the other regiments of the brigade.

In the evening of the 30th of August Lynnville, Tennessee, was reached, and on the follow-
ing morning, immediately after reveille, at which call the jacket companies had been ordered to
rejoin their respective regiments, company E, of the Fifty-Second Ohio, then about leaving its
picket-lines, was fired upon by a squad of bushwhackers concealed in the woods near a spring.
Two men of the company were wounded by the fire. These cowardly murderers had been
heard of the day previous, and the citizens of Lynnville, to which place they belonged, had



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