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been notified that for every gun fired by these wretches upon the National troops while they
remained in that vicinity, they would be held strictly to account, and an equal number of dwell-
ing-houses burned to the ground. Accordingly, the Colonel commanding directed a detail .to
fire five buildings in the village, and the order was promptly obeyed. This righteous example
was productive of good results, as no further murderous attempts were made upon the forces
then stationed there, or to the thousands of other National troops that afterward passed through
that portion of Tennessee.

Continuing south by easy marches, the afternoon of September 2d found the regiment in
camp at Athens, Alabama. On September 4th it marched from Athens to Huntsville, a distance
of twenty-five miles. Keeping close along the line of the Mobile and Charleston Railroad, it
reached Stevenson, Alabama, on the 8th of September. During this march, on the morning of
the 6th of September, the command passed the house of the murderer of General Robert L.
McCook. So soon as the brigade had reached a point beyond the bounds of the farm, Colonel



Fifty-Second Ohio Infantry. 317

Dan. McCook selected a detachment from his regiment and sent it back, with instructions to make
the place a desert and a desolate waste, leaving only sufficient shelter for some half-dozen negroes
who still clung to the doomed place. This order was literally fulfilled. The firebrand and the
deadening ax speedily destroyed all save the spot and its accursed memory.

.On the 11th of September the Tennessee River was crossed at Bridgeport, and on the 12th
the regiment had reached Shellmound. The following night the wagon-road over Lookout
Mountain was climbed, and the regiment went into camp in Chattanooga, near the head-quarters
of General Roseerans. Moving six miles out to Rossville, Georgia, it remained quietly in camp
at that place until the evening of the 18th, when it, along with the brigade, was moved four or
five miles up and to the left of the Lafayette Road. Having reached the position intended after
nightfall, the men lay on their arms until dawn the following morning, when the enemy was
discovered in heavy force directly in front. A spirited skirmish began, and a brisk strife kept
up for some little time as to which party should possess a bubbling spring of water lying between
the combatants. This skirmish, it is claimed, -was the beginning of the battle of Chickamauga.

From its position on the left of the Lafayette Road, and from the immediate presence of
the enemy, the regiment was withdrawn early in the forenoon. The roar of opening battle
began on the right and in front of the previous night's position. The brigade then belonged to
what was known as the Reserve Corps, and, acting in that capacity, moved to the Rossville Gap
about noon, taking position on the Ringgold Road. On Sunday morning, the 20th of September,
the regiment and brigade were assigned a new position two miles toward the front, near McAfee's
Church, which covered both the Greysville and Ringgold Roads. This position was the extreme
left of the National army on that morning. The tide of battle at noon having drifted, owing to
an attempt made by the enemy to turn our right flank (which in the end was measurably suc-
cessful), the brigade was ordered into position about two miles to the right of McAfee's. A few
moments before reaching the position, and while the brigade was marching by the flank, the
enemy opened upon it with solid shot, shell, grape, and canister at short range, but, by reason of
the smoke of burning fences, houses, etc., no great harm was done.

After the brigade had reached its position, a few yards from where the first fire opened, the
Rebel artillerists were unable to inflict upon it any serious injury, although their missiles
whizzed and hurtled very close to the heads of the men. The Rebels, on the contrary, must
have suffered severely from the rapid and precise firing of Barnett's battery.

The fight lasted until dark. At that time the army retreated along the whole line, and that
night at eight o'clock the Fifty-Second, one of the last to leave the battle-field, moved into
Rossville.

On Monday, the 21st of September, the position of the regiment and brigade was on the
right of the Rossville Gap, going south, and was under fire from two o'clock in the afternoon
until night, its skirmishers, a few yards in front, being constantly engaged by those of the
enemy. At dark the National forces were withdrawn to Chattanooga, and placed in position
behind the second line of defenses around that then besieged city. On the 15th of September
the regiment crossed the Tennessee and took position at Caldwell's Ford, four mile3 above Chat-
tanooga. In a few days another movement was made to the mouth of Chickamauga Creek,
where the regiment rested after its long march and harassing battle.

On the 29th of September two regiments of the brigade were ordered to report to General
Hooker in Lookout Valley. The Fifty-Second Ohio and the Eighty-Sixth Illinois Infantry
were detailed, reported to General Hooker, and were temporarily constituted the Third Brigade,
Second Division, Eleventh Army Corps. This service proved the most severe of any the regi-
ment had ever performed. For seven days of the most wretched weather it was constantly on
duty, without relief, and under the almost incessant fire of the Rebel batteries on Lookout
Mountain. It fell to its lot to be stationed in two of the gaps through the range of low hills
that skirt the base of the mountain. It was the daily practice of the enemy's gunners stationed
on Lookout Mountain to shell troops and trains while passing these gaps. The range was about
two miles, yet they would drop their plunging shots through these gaps with the greatest ease.



318 Ohio in the War.

/

Although very annoying, no great damage was effected, attributable, as the Rebels said, to the
fact that their ammunition was bad. Many of their shells did not burst at all. There were,
however, two notable exceptions to tills rule, both of which burst in the midst of four companies
of the Fifty-Second Ohio, and yet, strange as it may seem, without serious harm to any one. So
accustomed did the men become to the programme that the puff of the. discharge from the Rebel
guns would be followed by the cry : " Lookout ! " which would place each individual on the alert
to seek shelter. Then would come the scream of the shell, and, immediately after, the explo-
sion, which, if harmless, would call forth lusty cheers.

On the 6th of November the regiment returned to the camp at Chickamauga Creek. In the
reorganization of the Army of the Cumberland under General Thomas, early in October, the
Reserve Corps was dispensed with, and the brigade to which the Fifty-Second was attached
became the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps.

At daylight on the morning of the 24th of November the Fifty-Second Ohio reported at
Caldwell's Ford, at which point, under cover of'darkness, General Slierman had just finished
throwing a bridge across the Tennessee. General Jeff. C. Davis's Second Division had been
selected to support General Sherman's corps, both in crossing the river and in attacking the
north-eastern extremity of Mission Ridge. At noon on the 24th the Second Division crossed
the river, while Sherman moved up Chickamauga Valley and seized the point of the ridge. On
the following day Mission Ridge was carried by storm.

At one o'clock in the morning of the 26th of November the troops commenced their move-
ment from the foot of the ridge down the Chickamauga Valley, crossing the mouth of Chicka-
mauga Creek, in pursuit of the flying Rebels. Nothing of moment occurred during the day, but
at sunset, the rear of Bragg's forces being hotly pursued, they (the Rebels) made a stand at Shep-
herd's Run, three miles below Chickamauga Station, near the village of Greysville.

When the fight opened the National troops in the rear began to come up to the front on the
double-quick. The Fifty-Second Ohio moving at this gait, passing over logs and through the
swamps and bushes, fixed bayonets, and, coming forward into line with a shout, took its place on
the left of its brigade. The fight was quickly over, and the troops were directed to bivouac on
the spot. On the 27th of November two companies from each of the regiments of the Third Bri-
gade acted as skirmishers on the march between Shepherd's Run and Ringgold, and captured one
hundred and fifty prisoners. It was on the 27th that General Hooker gained possession of Ring-
gold and Ringgold Gap. The Rebel army had been drawn off beyond White Oak Mountains.
From this place, passing through McDaniel's Gap in Taylor's Ridge, the regiment and brigade
started, on the 29th of November, for East Tennessee or Knoxville. This march was under-
taken for the relief of General Burnside's beleaguered forces in and around Knoxville. The
march was a forced one, and made at a time when the weather was very inclement, and the men
badly off for clothing, shoes, rations, etc. It was an occasion, therefore, of keen suffering.
Passing through or near the towns of Cleveland, Charleston, and Loudon, the Fifty-Second
crossed the Little Tennessee at Morgantown on the 6th day of December, en route for Knoxville.
When within fifteen miles of that place it was learned that Longstreet had raised the siege, and
was in full retreat in the direction of Richmond, Virginia. The Fifty-Second did not, there-
fore, proceed any further. Re-crossing the river, it went into camp at some mills near Colum-
bus, Tennessee, for the purpose of providing rations that could not otherwise be obtained.

On the 15th of December the entire division commenced the return march to Chattanooga,
and the Fifty-Second reached its old camp on Chickamauga Creek on the night of the 19th of
December. The recollections of this arduous march are not very pleasant among the members
of the Fifty-Second and of other regiments that participated in it. These men in their early
youth, and even in their more mature years, had read with sad and sympathizing hearts of the
sufferings of their patriotic forefathers at Valley Forge, under the immortal Washington; but
little did they dream that they, too, would be called upon to "repeat history;" that ragged,
shivering, hungry, and footsore, they, too, would leave the imprint of their shoeless feet in blood
upon the biting snow.



Fifty-Second Ohio Infantry. 319

On the 26th of December the regiment moved to McAfee's Church, Georgia, and went into
camp near the ground it occupied on the Sunday morning of the battle of Chickamauga. On
January 28, 1864, the regiment went oh a reconnoissance to Ringgold, returning the following
day. On the 14th of February it moved to Chickamauga Station, and on the 23d again returned
to Ringgold to witness, on the next day, the flanking and taking of Tunnel Hill. At dusk of
that day the regiment bivouacked in front of Buzzard's Roost, four miles from Dalton, Georgia.
The enemy's artillery had given warning that the passage of the gap would be warmly disputed.
Heavy skirmishing was continued through the 25th and 26th of January. In the afternoon of
the 25th the Fifty-Second Ohio was moved to the support of a battery which had been freshly
opened on the enemy's works, and lay in range of the Rebel sharpshooters until the night of the
26th, when the entire corps fell back to Ringgold, the main object of its advance having been
accomplished.

The Fifty-Second Ohio returned to McAfee's Church on the 27th, and on the 6th day of
March received orders to report at Lee & Gordon's Mills, thirteen miles from Chattanooga, where
the Lafayette Road strikes Chickamauga River. At this place the regiment lay in camp until
the commencement of the Atlanta campaign in May, 1864. At Dalton, the opening struggle of
the campaign, it took a marked position, and was skillfully fought. At Resaca, also, on the 14th
of May, the Fifl^y -Second performed a prominent part, making a charge with success, but at a
sad cost of life.

At Kenesaw Mountain the brigade was ordered to carry the works opposite it. A terrible
struggle ensued. The enemy's position was proof against the assault, and the National column
was hurled back with a heavy loss of life. Among the severely wounded was the leader of the
brigade and Colonel of the Fifty-Second Ohio. He was borne from the field, and from thence
to the residence of kind friends in Cincinnati. Atone time it was hoped he would' overcome
the hurt, but the hope was fallacious, and the soldier went to his rest. On his death-bed his gal-
lantry was fitly acknowledged by the War Department, by conferring upon him the full rank of
Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

The Fifty-Second was busily engaged through all the movement up to Atlanta, and main-
tained throughout its fine reputation for discipline, courage, and endurance.

From Atlanta the Fifty-Second moved with the rest of Sherman's army to Savannah, and
thence, with small loss, through Georgia and the Carolinas northward.

Then came the march to Washington, the review before the President and Cabinet, the mus-
ter-out at Washington, June 3, 1865 ; the railroad ride to Columbus, Ohio ; the final payment
and dispersion of the men to their homes; and the Fifty-Second Ohio ceased to exist as a mil-
itary organization.



320



Ohio in the Wae,



53d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK.



com. issued.



Colonel

Do

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Bo

Major

Do

Do

Surgeou

Do

Ass't Surgeon

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Chaplain

Do

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Dc

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



JESSE J. APPLER

WELLS S. JONES

Robert A. Fulton

John I. Parrell

Preston R. Galloway

Harrison S. (-'ox

Ephkaim 0. Dawks

Preston R. Galloway

Wm. 31. Take

John A. Lair

James P. Bing

John A. Lair

Rob't L. Van Harlingen

Samuel Mathers

W. F. Home

Thomas McIntyrf.

Frederick J. Griffith....

Frederick J. Griffith

Wells S. Jones

John I. Parrell

Henry C. Messenger

Samuel W. Baird

James R. Percy

Lorenzo Fulton

David H. Lasley

George K. Host'ord

David T. Harkins

Preston R. Galloway

Robert A. Starkey

Jacob W. Davis

loseph W. Fulton

Frank 31. Lewis

(has. K. Cruinit

F.ustace H. Ball

rge H. Cake

Robert Curren

James H. Bovce

Joseph M. Long

Wm. W. Gilbert

Thomas J. Bradlev

John W. Earles

Joshua E. Bailey

Elias J. Gorby

31. G. McNeal

George W. Eddy

David M. Burchlield

lac.. I, W. Davis

Robert A. Starkey

Joseph W. Fulton

Calvin D. Brooks

Eustace 11. Ball

Chas. K. Crumit

George K. Hosford

Harvey L. Black

Kphraim 0. Dawes

Joseph W. Fulton

George E. Cutler

S. B. Messenger

Stafford McMill.n

Robert Curren

Kendall D. Lindsay

George 11. Cake

Frank 31. Lewis

Wm. B. Stephenson

Edward G. Morrison

Robert E. Phillips

James 11. Boyce

George W. Cavett

Samuel P. Gorby

Joseph 31. Long

Wm. W. Gilbert

Thomas J. Bradley

Frederick Stabler

Samuel N. 31isner

John W. Earl's

Joshua K. Bailey

Elian J. Gorbv

31. G. McNeal

John D. Moore

George W. Eddy

David 31. Burchlield

Samuel R. Betts

Bartlett Bovce

Wm. Worrell

Wm. B. Irwin ,

Thomas S. Harkins

Henry Foreman

Patrick L. O'Donnell

.lames D. Roberts

John W. fierce

Nathan S. Elliott



Sept.
April
Sept.
Dec.
June

Feb.

Nov.

31 arch

Oct.

Nov.

Oct.

Aug.

Feb.

Nov.

June

Dec.

July

Oct.

Nov.



16, ISfd
is, 1862
IB, 1861
30, 1864
2d, lstw
hi, 1861

1, 1 Mi-
ls, I860
3, I Shi

17, 1864

3, 1861
19, 1862
15, 1.S.S3
17, 1864
26, 186S
13, 1861

8, 1862

4, 1861
4, "
6, "

17, "
26, "
1, 1862



Feb.

.May

Feb.

Dec.

June

Feb.

Jan.

March

Feb.

Nov.

Feb.

Sept.

Feb.
Nov.
June
Dec.
July
Feb.



17, 1863



Feb.

Jan.

April
July

Aug.

April

March

Sept.



Nov.
Jan.
April

Oct.

Nov.
Jan.

Sept.

Web.



April
July
May
Sept.

Nov.
Jan.
Aug.
Sept.

April

31 arch



May

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.
April



19,

2«',
IS,
8,
19,

17, 1863
28, '

V. 1864
8, "
8, "
26, "
26, "
26, "

18, "
IS, "
IS, tS6£



26,



26, "

1, 186:



26, 1861

6, "
19, 1862

S6,

18,

8,
26,
23,

1,

17, 1863
19, 1862
21,
28,
1",

1, 1S64

9, "

y,

9,

9,

8,

8,

*>t

S, "
26, "
12, "
12, "
is, "
IS, "
26, 1-60
26, "
26,



June

Sept.
Feb.
Sept.

31arch
Sept.



19,
24,



1863
1864



Nov.
Jan.
April

Feb.



June

Sept.



Sept.
31 arch

.May
Sept.

Oct.
Nov.
April



26,

is, :

13,
13,
13,
13,
13,
13,
13,
13,
13,

iy,

iy,

19,
24,



10,

10,
4,
10,
1(1,
1,
1,
1.



26,
26,
26,
26,
26,



Mustered out April 18, 1862.

Mustered out with regiment.

Uustered .nit November 3d, 1S64.

Mustered onjt.

Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged November 1, 1862.

Honorably discharged October 2.% 1864.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Resigned September 20, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned August 31, 1862.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Promoted to Surgeon 70th O. V. I.

3Iustered out witli regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned 31 ay 23, 1-62.

Honorably discharged September 29, 1864.

Appointed Chaplain.

Promoted to Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Died April 28, 1863.

3lustered out.

Killed August 18, 1864.

Resigned February 16, 1S62.

Mustered out at exp. of service, Dec. 23, 1864.

Discharged August 19, 1862.

Resigned April 17, ls63.

Promoted to 3Iajor.

Resigned May 17. 1864.

Killed August 11. 1864.

Resigned September 27, 1864.

Mustered out April 6, 186.1.

Mustered out December 31, 1864.

Resigned as 1st Lieuteuaut April 13, 1864.

Declined.

Mustered out with regiment.
Killed August 31, 1864, as 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Declined to accept.

3Iustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

31usteied out with regiment.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Died September 21, 1862.

Promoted to Captain ; resigned April 13, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captaiu.

Died May 26, 1862.

Promoted to 3Iajor.

Resigned December 11, 1862.

Discharged December 31, 1862.

Honorably discharged September 23, 1862.

Killed August 3, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Died November 1, 1863.

Mustered out December 24, 1S64

Promoted to Captain.

Resigued May 14. 1864.

Died April 2. r >, 1864.

Colonel colored regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Blustered out December 31, 1864.

Mustered out December 24, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out December 24, 1S64.

Mustered out.

Dec lined.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned April 1, 1865.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Blustered out with regiment.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.

Mustered out with regiment.



Fifty-Thikd Ohio Infantey.



321



BANK.


NAME.


DATE OF BANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


REMARKS,


1st Lieutenant


David H. Lasley


April
Oct.


26, 1865


April

Eeb.




Mustered out with regiment.




2d Lieutenant


Robert Cur ren


4, 1861


13, 1A.2




Do.


Robert E. Phillips


44


13, "


"


13, "


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.




Do.


Spencer McLead


Nov.


0, "


11


13, 4l






Do.


Kendall D. Lindsay


44


12, "


"


13, "


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.




Do.


Francis B. Gilbert


44


211, "


M


13, "






Do.


George W. Cavett










Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.




Do.


George E. Cutler




7, "


"


13, "




Do.


Jonathan H. Lasley




8, "


11


13, "


Honorably discharged September 11


1862.


Do.


Elijah J. C'opelaud


Feb.


19, "


44


19, 44


Resigned January 11, 1n3.




Do.


George X. Gray


Jan.


9, "


"


19, 4l


Resigned January 19, 1863.




Do.


\\ in. Shay


Oct.


5, 44


41


19, "


Resigned January 22, 1863.




1>0.




April
July




June
Sept.


2-1, 44
4, "
■*, "


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.




Do.








Do.


Joseph M. Long




8, "




Do.


lunulas J. Bradley


Sept.


11, "


Feb.


1U, 1863


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.




Do.


U in. \V. Gilbert


Ang.


18, "


*•


10, "


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.




Do.


James C. Poster


sept.


21, "


44


in, "


Captain colored regiment.




Do.
Do.


Jesse M. Slioop




23, "


"


10, ,l


Resigned September 2'i, 1864.




John \\ . Earl en


Jan.


11, 1863


41


19, "






Do.


h rederick Stabler


Doc.


31, 1862


44


19, 44


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.




Do.


Samuel N. Mishit


Jan.


19, 1863


44


22, "


Honorably discharged December 23,


1864.


Do.


Joshua E. Bailey




22,


March


13, "


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.





FIFTY-THIRD OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment was authorized by Governor Dennison, September 6, 1861, and the ren-
dezvous established at Jackson, Ohio. The organization was completed in January,
1862, and the regiment was ordered to prepare for the field.

On the 16th of February the regiment embarked on a steamboat at Portsmouth, Ohio, and
proceeding to Paducah, Kentucky, reported to General ~\V. T. Sherman, and was assigned to the
Third Brigade of Sherman's division. The division moved on transports to Savannah, Ten-
nessee, and, remaining a day, started on an expedition to destroy the Memphis and Charleston
Railroad, near Iuka, Mississippi. Upon their return they disembarked at Pittsburg Landing,
and after making reconnoissance of about ten miles and finding no enemy, went into camp
near the Landing, and the next day moved near to Shiloh Church. On account of being confined
so long on transports, sickness increased very rapidly, and on April 6th the Surgeon's report
showed over three hundred men and half the officers of the Fifty-Third unfit for duty.

The regiment maintained itself tolerably during the battle of Pittsburg Landing, sev-
eral of the companies keeping in almost perfect order all the time. After the close of the
struggle, on the morning of the 8th, it pursued the retreating enemy, and when about five miles
from camp was deployed to support a battalion of cavalry. The enemy made a charge, routed
the cavalry, and captured many prisoners. The Fifty-Third, in turn, charged the enemy, drove
them from the field, and rescued most of the prisoners. Here the regiment halted, assisted in
destroying the late camp of the enemy, in collecting arms, in carrying off the wounded, and in
burying the dead, and then returned to its old camp near Shiloh Church.

The regiment remained in camp, engaged in drilling, until the 29th of April, when it
advanced on Corinth. The regiment suffered much from sickness, and the fatigue duty was very
heavy. Mile after mile of earthworks and intrenchments were thrown up, and skirmishes
between the outposts were constant, occasionally swelling almost to the proportions of a battle.
In everything of .this kind the regiment bore its full share, and won the confidence and com-
mendation of its commanding officers. About the 15th of May the Third Brigade was reorgan-
ized and placed under the command of Brigadier-General J. W. Denver. After the evacuation
of Corinth the Fourth and Fifth Divisions of the Army of the Tennessee, under Major-General
Sherman, started westward along the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. The march was a very
severe one on account of the intense heat and the dustv condition of the roads. The Third
Vol. 11—21



322 Ohio in the War.

Brigade remained a week at Moscow, then moved to Lafayette, then back to Moscow, then to
Holly Springs, and, after a short skirmish, occupied the town on the first of July. Remaining
about a week the brigade returned to Moscow, and in a few days received orders to march for



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