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capture of Jackson the regiment returned to Vicksburg, and remained until October, 1863, when
forming a part of the Fifteenth Army Corps, it ascended the Mississippi River to Memphis, and
from there proceeded to Chattanooga. It was engaged in the battle of Missionary Ridge, Novem-
ber 2Gth, and the next day marched to the lelief of the garrison at Knoxville, Tennessee. It
pursued the enemy's wagon-train from Knoxville through the south-eastern portion of Tennessee
and a short distance into North Carolina, and then returned to Chattanooga, and moved thence
to Larkinsville, Alabama, where it went into winter-quarters, January 12, 1864.

The regiment was mustered into the service a^ a veteran organization on the 22d of Janua-
ry, and at once started to Ohio on furlough. It returned to camp in April, with an addition of
two hundred recruits, and entered on the Atlanta campaign on the 1st of May. It participated
in a general engagement at Resaca, and at Dallas, and in a severe skirmish at New Hope Church,
June 6th and 7th. It was in the general assault upon Kenesaw Mountain, June 27th, losing
twenty-eight killed and wounded ; was engaged in a severe skirmish at Nicojack Creek, July 3d,
losing thirteen killed and wounded, and was in a battle on the east side of Atlanta, July 21st and
22d, sustaining a loss of ninety-four killed, wounded, and missing.

The Fifty-Fourth lost eight men killed and wounded at Ezra Chapel on the 28th of July,
and from the 29th of July to the 27th of August it was almost continually engaged in skirmish-
ing before the works at Atlanta. It was in a heavy skirmish at Jonesboro', August 30th, and in
a general action at the same place the two days immediately following. After resting a few
weeks in camp near Atlanta, the regiment started in pursuit of Hood, and followed him within
sixty miles of Chattanooga, and from there to Gadsden, Alabama, when it returned to Atlanta,
and prepared for the march to Savannah. The Fifty-Fourth started on that wonderful march on
the 15th of November, and on the 15th of December was engaged in the assault and capture of
Fort McAllister, near Savannah. The regiment assisted in the destruction of the Gulf Rail-
road toward the Altamaha River, and on the 7th of January, 1865, marched into Savannah.
After a rest of several weeks it moved with the army on the march through the Carolinas, skir-
mishing at the crossing of the South Edisto and North Edisto Rivers, on the 10th and 12th of
February, respectively. It was closely engaged in the vicinity of Columbia, and participated in
its last battle at Bentonsville, North Carolina, March 21, 1865.

The regiment marched to Richmond, Virginia, and from there to Washington City, where it
took part in the grand review of the Western Army. On the 2d of June it was transported by
railroad and steamboat to Louisville, Kentucky, and after remaining two weeks there it proceeded
to Little Rock, Arkansas, and there performed garrison-duty until August 15, 1865, when it was
mustered out. The regiment returned to Camp Dennison, Ohio, where it received final pay, and
was disbanded, on the 24th of August, 1865.

The aggregate strength of the regiment at muster-out was two hundred and fifty-five — twenty-
four officers and two hundred and thirty-one men. It marched during its term of service a dis-
tance of three thousand six hundred and eighty-two miles, participated in four sieges, nine
severe skirmishes, fifteen general engagements, and sustained a loss of five hundred and six men
killed, wounded, and missing.



Fifty-Fifth Omo Infantry.



329



55th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTEE, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF BANK.



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

Do

Do

lit. Colonel.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Major

Do



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Do

Captain



Do
Do
Do
Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



JOHN C. LEE

CHARLES B. GA3TBEE
EDWIN H. POWERS....

GEORGE H. S afford

Charles B. Gambee

James 31. Stevens

Edwin H. Powers

Charles P. Wickham

John C. Lee

Daniel F. Dewolf

Charles B. Gamree

James M. Stevens

Kudolphus Bobbins

Charles P. Wickham...

Hart well Osborne

Jay Kling ,

Joseph Kebrle

Henrv K. Spoonek

J.L. Morris

Joseph Hebble

James C. Myers

John G. W. Cowles

Alfred Wheeler

Charles B. Gamb-e

Augustus M. Bm?nt

Horatio N. Shipman

David S. Brown

Frederick A. Wildinan..

James M. Stevens

Rudolphus Bobbins

Ira C Terry

Horace Robinson

Edwin H. Powers

Benj. F. Eldridge

Charles P. Wickham

Henry Miller

Albert E. Peck

Frank W. Martin

Robert Bromley

Franklin J. Sauter

Charles D. Bobbins

Henry W. Persing

Hartwell Osborne

Frederick H. Boalt

Robert W. Pool

Francis H. Morse

Butler Case

Charles M. Stone

Butler Case

Charles M. Smith

Augustus M. Wormley..

Thomas W. Milkr

Henry H. Moore

John R. Lowe

lesso Bowsher

Wm. S. Wickham

1. B. Gould

Russell H. Bever

Benj. F. Evans

Joseph H. Gallup

John If. Boss, jr

Robert G. Pennington...

B nj. F. Eldridge

Wm. D. Sherwood

Henry W. Persiug

Jacob Thomas

Charbs P. Wickham

Rudolph Eastman

Henrv Miller

Albert E. Peck

Frank W. Martin

Richard F. Patrick

Robert Bromley

Raymond Burr

Benj. C. Taber

Charles D. Robbins

Franklin J. Sauter

Frederick H. Boalt

Robert W. Pool

Francis H. Morse

Hartwell Osborne

Thomas O'Leary

Bu tier Case

Charles M. Smith

Charles M. Stone



Nov.
May-
June
Sept.
March
May
June

Sept.

Nov.

Oct.

31 arch

May

June

Oct.
Nov.
Oct.
July
Feb.
Jan.
Dec.
Sept.

Oct.



25, 1861

8, isa

ti, 1865
11, 1861
4, 1863

8, "
27, 1864

fi, "
11, 1861
25, "

2, "
4. "
8, "

27, 18154
6, 1865

3, 1861
1, lll&i

3, 1*61

4, 1862
23, 1864
25, 1869
Ilk 1861
15, 1862

3o, 1861

in, "



Nov.
Dec.



Feb.
March



May

June
Aug.
June
Aug.
March

April

-May



16,

lli,
20,
24,
21,

7,
Mf
20,

2,

3,
12, 1863

6. "
10,
16,

4,

8,

6,

4,

1,

1,

ly, lsii4
ly.



July

pt.

Nov.
Ipril

July

Vug.
Sept.
Oct.



Nov.
Dec.



April
July



Dec.
Feb.
31a rch



2, "
13, jj

V, "

27, "

27, "

27, "

25, "

26, "
26, "

3, "
24, 1861
24, "



1861



10,
22,
30,
>l,
16,
16,
20,
24,
21,
21,
1,



4, IS
1", '
23, '
16, '

2, '

3, '
23, "
12, 1863

6i "
Wi
l«i

4,



Jan.

3Iay

June

Jan.

April

May

June

Jan.

Nov.
April
31 ay
June

Jan.
Nov.
Jan.
July
Feb.
Jan.

Dec.
Jan.



20,
23,
23,
25, 186

20, 1*2
19, "



I -r, |



Dec.
April



3Iay
June
Jan.

Feb.

31a rch

April
May
June

Tub-
Sept.

Nov.
April

July
June



July
Dec.



Feb.
April



20,
20,
20,
20,
20,
20,
20,
20,
20,
2(1,
31,
31,
22,
22
22|
22,

25,

2y,
10,
10,

IT,
1^.
ly,

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13,

y,

9

27,
27,
27,
25,
26,
2»i,

3,

24, ]
24,
10,
22, 1
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
22,
28,
31,
31,
31,
31,
10, 1
22,
22,
22,
22
12,



Resigned 31av 8, 1863.

Killed 31ay 15, 1864.

Mastered out with regiment as Lieut. Col.

Resigned March 4, 1SG3.

Promoted to Colonel.

Resigned.

Promoted to Colonel.

Mastered out with regiment as Major.

Promoted to Colonel.

Resigned October 2, 1861.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Killed May 15 1864.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out as Captain.

Resigned ; expiration of term of service.

Mustered out with regiment.

Appointed Surgeon 61st Regt. Nov. 14, 1S63.

Not mustered ; did not report to regiment.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Mastered out.

Resigned July 21, 1862.

Resigned August 15, 1863.

Promoted to 3Iajnr.

Resigned Jlarch 16, 1863.

Resigned March 10, 1863.

Resigned March 6, 1863.

Resigned February 12, 1863.

Promoted to 31ajor 3Iarch 4, 1363.

Promoted to 3Iajor.

Resigned October 31, 1S62.

Killed at Chancellorsville.

Promoted to 3Iaior.

Resigned December 28, 1S63.

Promoted to 3Iajor.

Resigned September 28, 1S64.

Killed May 15, 1864.

Resigned June 6, 1863.

Resigned August 4, 1863.

Killed at Chancellorsville.

Resigned 3Iarch 29, 1864.

Appointed Captain and A. Q. M.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned September 13, 1861.

Resigned August 29, 1864.

Resigned April 20, 1864.

Declined in favor of C. 31. Stone.

Killed in action 3Iarch 16, I860.

Resigned as 1st Lieutenant.

3Iustered out with regiment.

3Iustered out with regiment.

Commission returned.

Resigned January 15, 1865.

3Iustered out with regiment.

Mastered out with regiment.

Mastered out with regiment.

3Iustered out with regiment.

3tustered out with regiment.

3Iustcred out with regiment.

3Iustered out with regiment.

3Iustered out as 1st Lieutentant and R. Q. M.

Resigned July 23, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned March 20, 1SG2.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned July 17, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned December 23, 1862,

Promoted to Captain February 12, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned June 10, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Appointed A. Q. M.

Mustered nut.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned December 28, 1S63.

Resigned April 10, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.



330



Ohio in the War.



DATE OF RANK



COM. ISSUED.



REMARKS.



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Augustus M. Wormley..

Thomas \V. Miller

Charles ML Stillman

Henry H. Mooro

John R. Lowe

J' j sse Bowsher

Wm. 8. Wickhlm

0. B. Gould

Russell H. Bever

Benj. F. Evans

James P. Jones

Philetus C. Lathrop

Pliney E. Watson

Thomas T. Pettit

Adam Cramer

Joseph II. Gallup

John H. Boss, jr

Lewis Peck

Alviu B. Chase

Wm. E. Childs

Wm. H. Ht-ssinger

Henrv B. Warren

Frederick Resser

James T. Boyd ,

John Bellman

Robert Fewson

Thomas S. Hosier

John Bnrk'-t

Henry J. Pelton

Wm. II. Long

Kudolphus Bobbins

Franklin J. Sawcer

Arthur Cranston

Charles D. Bobbins

Frederick 11. Boalt

Albert E. Peck

Ira C. Terry

Robert W. Pool ,

Horace Robinson

James K. Agnew

Francis II. Morse

Hartwell Osborne ,

Charles SI, Stone .....

Walter W. Thomas

Benj. C. Taber

Thomas 0' Leary

Charles M. Smith

Augustus M. Wormley..

Butler Case

Nelson Crockett

Henry II. Regan

Charles Stillman

Henry H. Moore

Edward Bromley

O.B. Gould

Henry W. Crosby

John R. Lowe

Jesse Bowsher

Wm. S. Wiekham

Russell H. Bever

Benj. F. Evans

James P. Jones

Philetus C. Lathrop

Plin'-y E. Watson

Theodore M. Wuod

John Lam bright

David Warr n

Alpheus J. Peck

Moses Pugh ,

George II. Clark



M.iv 8,

Aug. 24,

June I,

1,

March 19,

If,

" l'.t,

19,

19,



April

May
June

July



27,
2-">,
2:>,
19,
111,
2rt,
3,
IS,
18,

April 2o,

20,

21,

" 21,

" 21,

July 10,



S 'pt.
Nov.
Jan.



Sept.
Oct.



May
Aug.
June



April

May

Jan.
July



S»pt.
Nov.
Jan.

April



July
Jan.



1863
I8JM



March l.j,
April R,

July 17,



July 23
lfi

Oct. 3

D"c. 23
March 2(
April 4
Feb.
March



12,



May
Feb.

April

July



ism

1863



April
July



Feb.
April



Hay

A pril
July



1864

lSlij



Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out at expiration of term, Jan. 4, 'fi5.

Revoked ; resigned as 2d Lt. ; com. returned.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out March 12, lSiv>.

Honorably discharged October 27, 1354.

Mustered out June 6, lriti">.

Declined.

Declined ; commission returned.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out May lo, 1SKS.

Declin'd ; mustered out with regiment.
Declined ; mastered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out witli regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mastered out with regiment.
Mastered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned August 17, 1S62.
Promoted to Captain.
Promote.il to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned March 15, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned July 16, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Di"d April ti, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned.

Ri signed March 24, 1803.

Resigned.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Deceased March 24, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Revoked.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Honorably discharged October 27, 1S64.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



Blustered out with regiment as 1st Sergeants ;
• complim -ntary commissions given after
muster out.



Fifty-Fifth Ohio Infantry. 331



FIFTY-FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE FIFTY-FIFTH OHIO went into camp at Norwalk, Ohio, on the 17th of
October, 1861. On the 25th of January, 1862, it left Norwalk for Grafton, Western
Virginia, and after a short stay here it moved to New Creek. From this point it made
two severe marches, one to Eomney, and the other to Moorefield ; at the latter place it participated
in a slight skirmish. The regiment returned to Grafton on the 19th of February. Here it suf-
fered greatly from the measles and other diseases, by which more than twenty men lost their
lives, and many more were rendered unfit for field-service. At one time over four hundred men
in the regiment were unfit for duty. On the 31st of March the regiment was ready for service
again. It moved by rail to Green Spring Rivet, near the junction of the North and South
Branches of the Potomac, and from thence advanced by slow marches to Eomney. Here it
joined General Schenck's brigade, moved to Moorefield, and went into camp at a ferry on the
Potomac, three or four miles north of the town.

In the latter part of April seven companies of the Fifty-Fifth moved with the brigade to
Petersburg, and on through Franklin to McDowell, leaving the three companies D, E, and G, at
Moorefield. In the battle of McDowell, or Blue Pasture Mountain, the regiment constituted the
reserve, and served as support to a battery, which, owing to the nature of the ground, could not
be brought into action. After the battle the troops fell back to Franklin, in order to avoid being
cut off by a flank movement. On this march, and during the stay at Franklin, the regiment suf-
fered severely on account of the scarcity of rations. On the 26th of May the army at Franklin
broke camp and moved rapidly by the way of Petersburg, Moorefield, and Wardensville, to Stras-
burg, a distance of ninety miles, a large portion of which had been passed over before Stonewall
Jackson knew that the army had left Franklin. Jackson was moving for the Baltimore and
Ohio Railroad, but finding his line of communications now seriously threatened, he commenced
a retreat, and the National army followed in pursuit. The National advance and the Rebel rear
were frequently skirmishing, and many prisoners were captured. The regiment was present at
the battle of Cross Keys, but was not engaged. Jackson crossed the Shenandoah at Port Republic
and destroyed the bridge. At this point the river was so wide and rapid that it was impractica-
ble^, if not impossible, for the National army to cross, and the next morning the troops retraced
their steps. About the 20th of June the army arrived at Middletown, near Winchester, Avhere it
was allowed a short rest. Here the Army of Virginia was organized. The Fifty-Fifth was
brigaded with the Twenty-Fifth, Seventy-Third, and Seventy-Filth Ohio Regiments, and was
attached to General Schenck's division.

On the 7th of July the regiment, with the corps, left Middletown and marched by way of
Front Royal and Luray, through a gap in the Blue Ridge, to Sperryville. Here it remained
until the 8th of August, when it moved in the direction of Culpepper C. H.; and at three o'clock
A. M. on the 10th arrived on the battle-field of Slaughter Mountain. On the morning of the
14th the regiment marched about five miles and encamped on Robertson's River, near the
Rapidan. Here the regimental band was mustered out, and a detail of officers, commissioned
and non-commissioned, returned to Ohio on recruiting service. On the morning of the 19th the
army commenced a retrograde movement. The Fifty-Fifth, with its brigade, covered the retreat,
marching in such a manner as to receive an attack either on the flank or in the rear. The march
was through Culpepper C. H., and northward toward White Sulphur Springs, at which point the



332 Ohio in the War.

Rappahannock was crossed. For several days the regiment was engaged in guarding the various
fords of the river, in order to prevent the Rebels from crossing. On the night of the 25th the
regiment moved by a circuitous route to Warrenton, and thence marched northward to intercept
Jackson in his efforts to join Lee's army. Shortly before sunset on the 28th the regiment was
pushed forward, partly deployed as skirmishers, to discover Jackson's position. This was upon
the old Bull Run battle-ground. On the 29th the two armies were engaged the greater portion
of the day. neither party gaining any decided success. The Fifty-Fifth was under severe artil-
lery fire, but was not engaged with the enemy's battle-line. During the 30th the regiment lay
in close column, by division, behind a swell of ground, upon which was, posted a battery of six
steel guns. About an hour before sunset the enemy appeared suddenly on the flank. The regi-
ment deployed under fire, but after giving a few volleys it returned to the main line, which was
about one hundred yards in the rear. Here the regiment was re-formed, and it continued to
engage the enemy until near dark, when, with the brigade, it gradually moved to the rear, and
when night closed it fell back to Centerville.

At midnight on the 1st of September the regiment marched from Centerville to Arlington
Heights, and after a few days it encamped on Munson's Hill. On the 22d of September the regi-
ment again returned to Centerville. In the early part of October the Fifty-Fifth, with other
regiments, under Colonel Bushbeck, of the Seventy-Ninth Pennsylvania, made a reconnoissance
as far as Bristoe Station, and from there, during the forepart of the night, a portion of the regi-
ment went on a quick march to Brentville, with the expectation of surprising a company of Rebel
recruits. The recruits were not to be found, 60 the detachment returned to the Station, and the
next morning the troops retraced their steps to Centerville. Immediately upon arriving the
regiment resumed the march over the same ground, accompanied by a larger body of troops and
a section of artillery. The column proceeded as far south as Catlett's Station, near which there
was a skirmish with a small body of Rebels, and then returned to Centerville, where the Fifty-
Fifth remained until the 2d of November, when it proceeded to Manassas Junction, and from
there, through Hopewell Gap, to Hopewell. The regiment remained here, in camp, until the
20th of November, when it moved via Groveton, Bull Run battle-ground, and Centerville, to the
neighborhood of Chantilly.

On the 10th of December the regiment broke camp, and after a series of severe marches
arrived at Stafford C. H. on the 17th. On the 20th of January, 1863, General Burnside moved
his army with the intention of attacking the enemy at Fredericksburg, and the regiment, with
the division, was sent to Belle Plain Landing to defend that point. Heavy rains and bad roads
arrested the movement of the army, and the regiment marched to Brook's Station and went into
winter-quarters. The time was employed in inspections, drills, and picket duty. On the 27th of
April the Army of the Potomac commenced its movement- upon Fredericksburg, by way of the
Wilderness and Chancellorsville. The Eleventh Corps, to which the regiment was attached,
marched by way of Hartwood Church, up the Rappahannock to Kelly's Ford where it crossed,
and continued the march to the South Branch of the Rappahannock, which was crossed at Ger-
mania Ford. From here the regiment moved on the Plank Road to Chancellorsville, arriving
on the 30th. The next day the army went into position. The Eleventh Corps occupied the
extreme right, and the Fifty-Fifth was in the second brigade from the right. The entire corps
was posted either on or parallel to a pike leading westward into the Wilderness, and affording
excellent facilities for a flank movement by the enemy. On the 2d of May scouts and skirmishers
reported that the enemy was in heavy force upon the right. About five o'clock P. M. the battle
opened. It was not preceded by skirmishing or picket-firing, but volleys of musketry and
rapid discharges of artillery announced the conflict. The National troops, at the time of the
attack, were engaged in preparing and eating supper, and the first regiment on the extreme
right fled, leaving three hundred and fifty guns in stack. The next regiment was unable to with-
stand the shock, and so it fell back. These, were the only two regiments that were facing toward
the light. The remainder of the brigade, fired into from flank and rear, retreated in confusion
toward the left. The Twenty-Fifth Ohio, which constituted a part of the reserve, was deployed,



Fifty-Fifth Ohio Infantry. 333

faced to the right, and the Fifty-Fifth formed a few yards in the rear. The Twenty-Fifth was
soon compelled to fall back. The Fifty-Fifth stood its ground until the enemy was discovered
sweeping around its flank, when it, too, was compelled to fall back. The retreat became general,
and was only checked by other troops and darkness. In this engagement the Fifty-Fifth lost
one hundred and fifty-three men killed, wounded, and missing. On the morning of the 3d the
line was re-formed, and the troops maintained the position until the night of the 5th, when the
army retreated, and the regiment went into its old camp near Brook's Station.

About the middle of May the regiment was transferred to the Second Brigade of the Second
Division, and it remained in this brigade during the remainder of its term of service. The reg-
iment marched into Pennsylvania with the army, and was present at the battle of Gettysburg.
The division was ported first on Cemetery Hill, but was moved subsequently to the left of the
Baltimore Pike. The battle-line of the regiment was not engaged, but the skirmish-line was sub-
ject, most of the time, to a severe fire. The Fifty-Fifth lost in this battle about fifty men. The
regiment followed the retreating enemy, and at last went into camp on the 25th of July in the
vicinity of Catlett's Station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Here the regiment per-
formed very heavy picket-duty.

On the 24th of September the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps broke camp, took cars at Manassas
Junction, and moved over the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and through Columbus, Indianapolis,
Louisville, and Nashville, to Bridgeport, Alabama, arriving on the 30th. On the 25th of Octo-
ber the troops moved for Lookout Valley, and encamped on the 28th near the Tennessee River,
in full sight of Lookout Mountain. The enemy attacked the troops in the Valley, but the Fifty-
Fifth being on picket was not in the early part of the engagement, and sustained no loss. The
regiment moved to Chattanooga on the 22d of November. In the battle of Mission Ridge the
corps formed line to the left and front of Fort Hood, and moving forward rapidly, drove the
Rebel skirmish-line beyond the East Tennessee Railroad. On the afternoon of the 25th the reg-



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