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tinued their murderous fire, and the crew were afraid to expose themselves to make the boat
fast. All was looked upon as lost, as the boat was on fire, and fast swinging out into the stream,
when Sergeant Richard Mains and private Samuel Nickels, of company G, seized the line,
jumped ashore, rushed up the bank, and made it fast, amid a shower of bullets, miraculously
escaping without a scratch. Two tin-clads were seen coming to the rescue, but they soon shared
the fate of the John Warner, and were riddled by cannon-balls and burned. Colonel Raynor,
of the Fifty-Sixth, was wounded and taken prisoner, the enemy having crossed in small boats
and taken possession of the wounded left on the bank. The loss of the Fifty-Sixth in this affair
was about fifty, including all the officers but seven. The remainder of the regiment took up the
line of march down the river, determined to reach the Mississippi River, even if they had to
fight every step of the way. Some twelve miles below the scene of their disaster a gunboat was
met ; the weary men got on board and were taken to the mouth of the river, and thence by
transports to New Orleans, arriving there destitute, having lost almost everything.

Captain James C. Stimmel, of the Fifty-Sixth, who started down the river two days before
the regiment, on a steamer, was also captured by the enemy, but before reaching the Rebel prison
at Tyler, Texas, he managed, with others, to make his escape, and, after traveling by land and
river over seven hundred miles, and enduring almost incredible hardships, reached New Or-
leans. Lieutenant Ben. Roberts, taken on the John Warner, also made his escape, and ran the
gauntlet through to Little Rock, Arkansas. The other prisoners of the regiment were kept con-
fined in Rebel prisons until exchanged, thirteen months afterward.

On the 22d of May, 1864, the Fifty-Sixth sailtd from New Orleans to New York on the
steamship Cahawba, where they arrived and took the cars for Ohio. On arriving at Columbus
the men received individual furloughs for thirty days, with orders to report at Camp Chase at
the end of that time.

After enjoying themselves among friends, at the appointed time all reported but two. (They
were afterward arrested as deserters and forwarded to New Orleans under guard.)

The regiment was again ordered to the Department of the Gulf, and, on arriving at New
Orleans, was attached to the force guarding the defenses of that city, under command of Briga-
dier-General T. W. Sherman. Lieutenant-Colonel Varner commanded the regiment while it was
on this duty. In November, 1864, all the members of the regiment who had not re-enlisted
were discharged and sent home. The remainder were consolidated into three companies, and
but seven line officers retained, all others being honorably discharged. Later in the season a full
company of twelve-months' men were assigned by the Governor of Ohio, which entitled them
to a field officer, and the senior Captain, H. E. Jones, was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel.

The rest of the term of the Fifty-Sixth was filled in performing guard-duty in the city of
New Orleans, a service full of responsibility and hard work. It was kept on duty there until
March. 1866. when the remaining members were honorably mustered out and returned to Ohio.



340



Ohio in the War.



57th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

Do

Do

lit. Colonel ....

Do

Do

Do

Maior

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Do

Do

Asa't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



WM. MUNGEN

AMERTCUS V. RICE...

.SAMUEL R. MOTT

Wm. Mungen

Americus V. Rice

Samuel R. Mott

George D. McClure

Silas B. Walker

John McClure

Squire Johnson

John P. Haggett

Wm. D. C arlin

N. C. Messenger

ROBERT H. MlI.LlKF.N...

Lafayette Woodruff.

N. C. Messenger

Jacob W. Knouff

S. D. Starr

Robert II. Mii.likkn...

D. M. Frazer

Joseph Hawkins

Americns V. Rice

Philip Faulhaber ,

Samuel R. Mott

Patrick Kilkenny

Samuel Morrison

James Wilson

John B. May „.

Charles A. Junghans. ....

lames C. Gribben

Daniel N. Strayer ,

Alva S. Stilton

Abner J. Sennett

John McClure

Hiram E. Henderson...

John A. Smith

John W. Underwood

John W. Wheeler

Daniel Gilbert

George D. McClure

Kobert W. Smith

Wm. M. Newell

Jacob A. Tussing

Edmund W. Firmin

Hubbard D. Stone



James A. Dixon

Squire Johnson

lohn D. Marshall

Edward E. Root

Edward A. Gordon

David Baker

Benj. B. Heaton

George Trirhler

James McCauley

David Ayres

Wm. II. Kellison

James C. Gribben

Daniel S. Price

John McClure

Samson Switzer

Inhn W. Underwood..
Hiram E. Henderson.

Andrew J. Banks

John AV . Wheeler

Daniel Gilbert

Abner J. Sennett

George D. McClure

John A. Smith

George P. Blystone

Ogden Meader

Robert W. Smith

Oliver Mungen

Wm. S. Bonnell

John A. Hardy

Wm. M. Newell

Jacob A. Tussing

Edmund W. Firmin...

Hubbard D. Stone

George M. Rogers ,

Edward E. Root

John Doncvson

James A. Dixon



Dec.

April

Aug.

Sept.

Feb.

April

Aug.

Oct.

April

Aug.

Oct.

May

Dec.

Nov.

April

May

June

JViy

March

Nov.

Sept.

Oct.

Dec.

Jan.



April



Aug.
April
Dec.
Jan.
April
May



16, 1861
1C, 1863
10, 1865

27, 1861
8, 1862

16, 1863
10, 1865

2, 1.861
26, 1S£
16, 1865

3, 1861
26, 1862
26, "
14, 1864
14, 1861

28, 181'

7, 1863
24, "

4, 1861
14, 1865
12, 1864

2, 1861
4, "

20, "
1, "

14, "
4, 1862
10, "

21, 1S62

8, "
10,
1<>,



19,

16, 1863

31, 1862

30, 1863

26,
9, 1864
9, "
9.

1'',

1",



Feb.
May

Sept.
Feb.



May 6

Sept. 4

Feb. 7.

1 une 26

Sept. 4

Feb. 17

March 26
Feb



Dec.

Feb.

May



July 24,

May 4,

March 14,

Nov. 12,

Feb. 17

" 17,
17,



1>65



March

April

June



Sept.

Oct.
Dec.
Jan.

Feb.



March
April



Squire Johnson.



\ug.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Aug.
April



Aug.
May



10,
10,
18,

8,
16,
16,
16,
10,
10,
10,
10,

2, '
21,
27,

4,
20,

1,
14,

4, 1862
10, "
24,

8.
1".
1",
29,

6,
22,



May



Feb.

May 6,
Feb. 17,
March 13,
Jan. 29,
May 9,



Feb. 10,

10,
March 18,
April 8,
June 16,
16,
16,



Sept.



May



June
Doc.
Feb.
May

June
Aug.
May

Juno

Aug.

May



1862 Resigned April 16, 1863.

186.', Appointed Brigadier-General.

1865 Mustered out with regiment.

1862 Promoted to Colonel.
Promoted to Colonel.

1863 Promoted to Colonel.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned April 26, 1863.
Mustered out December 21, 1864.

1865 Mustered out with regiment.

1862 Resigned April 30, 1862.
Died December 26, 1862.

1863 Honorably discharged November 23, 1864.

1864 Mustered out with regiment.
1862 Resigned April 28. 1862.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Honorably discharged April 4, 1S64.

Never on duty with regiment.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Mustered out with regiment.
1864 Mustered out with regiment.
1862 Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Killed at Vicksburg, Miss., Dec. 31, 1862.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Resigned April 22, 1862.

Deceased.

Honorably discharged April 12, I860.

Resigned January 3D, 1863.

Killed at Pittsburg Landing April 6, 1862.

Killed at Pittsburg Landing April 6, JS62.

Mustered out August 19, 1862.

Honorably discharged April 13, 1865.

Honorably discharged March 29, 1S65.
20, " Promoted^o Major.
34, " Honorably discharged August 31, 1863.
17, 1S63 Mustered out with regime

Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged March 28, 1864.

Honorably discharged November 18, 1863.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colouel.

Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged as 1st Lt. Nov. 18, 1861.

Declined; returned commission.
16i " Declined; returned commission.

16, " Honorably discharged as 1st Lt. Oct. 26, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to Major.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to Captain.
Died April 6, 1862.

17, " Promoted to Captain.
17, " Resigned April 27, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.
17, " Promoted to Captain.
17, " Resigned April 27, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned April 6, 1863.

Resigned February 3, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February 9, 1863.
20, " Revoked.
24, " Resigned August 3, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.
12, " Mustered out.
12, " Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.
20, " Resigned July 12, 1864.
12, " Promoted to Captain.
12, " Declined.
29, " Promoted to Captain.
25,
9, 1864 Promoted to Captain.



Fifty-Seventh Ohio Infantry.



341



DATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Bo.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Stephen H. Carey

John M. Jordan

John D. Marshall

W. Cramer Good

George M. Pattou

David Ayres

Edward A. Gordon

Lewis L. Parker

Owen Francis

David Baker

Benjamin B. ileaton

George Berger

James McCauley

George Trichler

Wm. A. Armstrong

Win. Dalzell

David Ay res

John N. Bicketts

Wm. H. Kellisou

Israel L. Cramer

Daniel B. Miller

Joseph McCrate ,

Andrew Dirtt'enbaeher...

Charles L. Brown

Jasper T. Rickets

Charles M. Hathaway...

Charles Wessinger

Solomon Good ,

George D. McClure

Wm. S. Bonnell

Oliver Mungen

John Doncyson

Ogden Meader

John Adams

Edmund W. Firmiu

John Steinmets

James A. Dixon

Lucius Cane

Edward E. Boot

Hubbard D. Stone

John A. Hardy

Wm. M. Newell

Squire Johnson

Stephen H. Carey

John M. Jordan

David Avres

John D. Marshall

Marcellus B. Dickey

W. Cramer Good

George M. I'atton

David Ay res

John A. Plumb

Lewis L, Parker

Edward A. Gordon

Owen Francis

David Baker

Joshua Collar

Jacob Baker /.

John Woosley

David W. Martin

Samuel T. Winegardner

Marion Beemer

John J. Thompson

Ezra Hipsher

Aaron Glott heart

Albert Woodruff.



May



April
■June



Sept.
Oct.



Dec.
Jan.



Feb.



March

April

Aug.

Sept.
Nov.
Feb.
April

Jan.

April

Feb.

Aug.

Feb.

Dec.

Aug.



9, 1864

9, "

9, "

9, "

9, "

16, "

16, "

16, "

19, "

18, IS65

IS, "

IS, "

18, "

IS, "

10, "

10, "

15, "
IB, "

16, "
16, "
16, "
16, "
16, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "

2, 1861



14,

4, 1862
10, "

21, "
8, "

16, "

10, "

29, "

22, "
19, "

19, "

11, "
27, "

3, 1S63
16, "
6, "

30, "
26, "

3, "
3, "

20, 1864
29, 1S63
16, 1864
16, "
10, 1865
10,
1(1,
10,
10,
10,
10,
10,
10,
10,



May



April
June



May
Dec.



Jan.
Aug.
May



Aug.
Fib.



Aug.
Sept



16,

4,
4,



Honorably discharged December 2, 1864.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Commission returned; declined.

Commission returned; declined.

Honorably discharged January 4, 1865.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined.

Mustered out May 15, 1865.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined.

Declined.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mastered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieut.; resigned March 27, 62.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned April 27, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Honorably discharged December 12, 1S63.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Honorably discharged September 11, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

lie-entered below.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned April 27, 1864.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Killed at Besaca, Ga.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.



342 Ohio in the War.



FIFTY-SEVENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



N the 14th day of September, 1861, Governor Dennison gave authority to recruit a regi-
ment of infantry, to be designated the Fifty-Seventh Regiment, and to rendezvous at
Camp Vance, Findlay, Hancock County, Ohio. Recruiting commenced on the 16th day
of September, and was pushed forward rapidly. The regiment was partially organized at Camp
Vance, from where it moved on the 22d of January, 1862, to Camp Chase, where it was com-
pleted on the 10th of February, numbering nine hundred and fifty-six men and thirty-eight
commissioned officers. The localities in which the different companies were recruited are as
follows: Company A, in Putnam County; B, in Hancock, Seneca, and Wood; C, in Auglaize,
Mercer, and Sandusky; D, in Hamilton; E, in Hamilton, Allen, and Van Wert; F and G, in
Hancock; H, in Hancock and Seneca; I, in Crawford, Shelby, and Sandusky; K, in Logan
and Sandusky.

The regiment left Camp Chase on the 18th of February, 1862, under orders to report at
Fort Donelson. When it arrived at Smithland, Kentucky, the order was changed, and it reported
at Paducah, Kentucky. Here the regiment was assigned to the Third Brigade, Fifth Division
of the Army of the Tennessee. On the 8th of March, 1862, the regiment left Paducah, on the
steamer Continental, and arrived at Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River, on the 9th. From here
it proceeded to Savannah, Tennessee, where it arrived on the 11th. On the 14th six gunboat9
and sixty-five transports went up the river to the mouth of Yellow Creek, where the troops dis-
embarked, and attempted to strike the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, at Iuka, Mississippi,
nine miles distant, but failed in consequence of exceedingly high water. They returned to the
transports, embarked, and went to Pittsburg Landing, where they arrived on the 16th. On the
following day the Fifth Division made a reconnoissance to Pea Ridge, toward Corinth, about
nine miles from the Landing. On the 19th it went into camp at Shiloh Chapel, three miles south-
west of the Landing. The 22d and 24th of March were spent in making reconnoissances in the
direction of Corinth. On the 1st of April the regiment, in company with other troops and two
gunboats, went to Eastport, Mississippi, about thirty miles distant. The Fifty-Seventh was on
the foremost transport. The gunboats threw a number of shells into the town of Eastport,
but elicited no reply. The boats moved up the river to Chickasaw, Alabama, and shelled
both the Rebel works and the town. The Rebels having left, the Fifty-Seventh was ordered
ashore to scout the hills surrounding the village. It captured a few prisoners, men and boys,
and then returned to camp.

The regiment suffered much from sickness, and on the morning of the 6th of April there
were but four hundred and fifty men for duty. The regiment was posted with its right resting on
the Corinth Road, immediately south of the Shiloh Church. About six o'clock on the morning
of the 6th the Fifty-Seventh formed and advanced until it reached the little eminence upon
which the Shiloh Church stood. The regiment held this position until ten o'clock, and success-
fully withstood three Rebel regiments — the Mississippi Rifles, the Crescent Guards, from New
Orleans, and the Fourteenth Tennessee, from Memphis. These regiments left seventy-eight dead
in front of the Fifty-Seventh. The regiment was ordered to fall back upon the Hamburg and
Purdy Road, and it executed the movement in good order. The battle continued with great fury,
and the line was pressed back three-quarters of a mile further. Here the fighting was terrific,
but the enemy was forced to give way a little, and by five o'clock in the afternoon the firing had



Fifty-Seventh Ohio Infantry. 343

almost ceased in front of the Fifty-Seventh. The regiment lay on its arms in a drenching rain
all night, and at daybreak again went into action. The enemy was driven back, and by four
o'clock in the afternoon the regiment occupied its old position. Everything was destroyed except
the sutler's tent, which General Beauregard had used as his head-quarters, and in which he had
written his dispatches to the Rebel Secretary of War. The regiment lay on its arms another
night in the rain and mud, and on the morning of the 8th moved about seven miles toward
Corinth, and near to Pea Ritlge, where it encountered Forrest's cavalry and about fifteen hundred
Rebel infantry. Two companies of the Fifty-Seventh and Seventy-Seventh Ohio were thrown
out as skirmishers. Forrest's cavalry charged, the National cavalry gave way, and the four
companies of skirmishers were captured. The Fifty-Seventh did not dare to fire into the Rebels
lest it should kill its own men. It fixed bayonets and charged on the double-quick against the
cavalry. As it advanced it received a volley, but at the command, "Guide center — steady, boys!"
it closed up, and pressed forward. The cavalry gave way. The captured companies rushed to
their comrades or laid down, and the regiment halted and poured a volley into the retreating
Rebels. The enemy's stores were burned, and then the troops returned to camp, arriving about
ten o'clock P. M. The men in the Fifty-Seventh had eaten scarcely anything since the evening
of the 5th, but that night there was some mule steak broiled on the coals, and it was pronounced
"tolerably good." In these three days the regiment lost twenty -seven killed, one hundred and
fifty wounded (sixteen mortally), and ten captured.

From this time until the 29th of April, the regiment remained in camp near Shiloh Church,
engaged in drilling and preparing for the coming campaign. On the 29th it began the advance
to Corinth, and until the evacuation of that place the regiment, day, and night, was marching,
picketing, skirmishing, or building breastworks. At Camps Six and Seven and at the Russell
House it was warmly engaged. During the advance the regiment was assigned to the First
Brigade of the Fifth Division. After the evacuation the regiment was engaged in repairing the
Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and in making reconnoissances. On one of these, from
La Grange to Holly Springs, the men suffered intensely for water. While the regiment lay at
Moscow, near the Mississippi line, a detachment of two hundred and twenty men were ordered to
accompany a train to Memphis for supplies. The detachment marched through Macon, and
struck the Memphis and Nashville Road near Morning Sun. Here the train was attacked by
about six hundred Rebel cavalry. They charged the train three times, but were repulsed each
time, and at last were driven off, with a loss of eleven killed, twenty-six wounded, and some
prisoners, horses, and arms captured. The detachment lost four men wounded. The trip was
completed successfully. The regiment moved to Memphis on the 18th of July, and on the 29th
of August it was ordered to Raleigh to look after Burrows's Rebel cavalry. The cavalry fled
after exchanging a few shots, but the regiment captured a number of horses. Again, on the 8th
of September, the regiment was ordered on a scout into Mississippi. It was absent four days,
was engaged with the enemy six different times, and marched one hundred and ten miles. The
regiment was ordered into camp on the Randolph road, north of Memphis, and was placed in
charge of the road, and especially of the bridge over Wolf Creek. On the 23d of September a
detachment of Burrows's cavalry attacked the post, with the view of burning it. The Rebels
were repulsed with a loss of one killed and six wounded; two horses were captured. The regi-
ment sustained no loss. On the 12th of November it was assigned to the First Brigade, First
Division, Fifteenth Army Corps. During the stay at Memphis the regiment was drilled very
thoroughly in the skirmish-drill and the bayonet exercise.

On the 26th of November the regiment, with quite a large force, moved against General Price,
on the Tallahatchie River, near Wyatt, Mississippi. The Rebels delayed the inarch by obstruct-
ing the roads, and Wyatt was not reached until the 2d of December. The Rebels evacuated and
the march was continued toward Grenada. The regiment camped near Bowls's Mills, Little Hur-
ricane Creek, in Lafayette County, until the 9th of December, when the Fifteenth Corps returned
to Memphis, arriving on the 13th. Here the regiment received one hundred and eighteen volun-
teers and two hundred and five drafted men, which made the aggregate force of the regiment six



344 Ohio in the War.

hundred and fifty men. Soon after this the regiment embarked on the Omaha, and. with the
Fifteenth Corps, moved down the Mississippi. Young's Point was reached on the 2Gth of
December. From here the troops moved up the Yazoo, and disembarked on Sidney Johnston's
plantation. The next day they marched to Chickasaw Bayou; where, for five dnys, the Fifteenth
Corps, in trying to effect a crossing, was engaged with the enemy. The Fifty-Seventh was
engaged all the lime, and brought up the rear when the troops returned to the transports. In
this action the regiment lost thirty -seven killed and wounded. On the 2d of January, 1863, the
corps moved down the Yazoo to the Mississippi, up the Mississippi to White River, up White
River to the "cut-off," through the "cut-off" into the Arkansas, and up the Arkansas to within
two miles of Arkansas Post, disembarking on the 10th. The First Brigade was ordered to attack
the Rebel pickets, which it did, and drove them within six hundred yards of Fort Hindman.
The Fifty-Seventh Ohio and Sixth Missouri were ordered to drive the Rebels from their bar-
racks, in front of their lines, and about half a mile fmther to the west. This also was done, and
by twelve o'clock M. on the next day preparations were completed for the assault. The Fifty-
Seventh led the brigade in the charge on the works, and after a desperate battle of three hours,
during two hours of which time the regiment was within ninety yards of the Rebel parapet, the
enemy surrendered. It lost in this action thirty-seven killed and wounded.

On the 13th the regiment was ordered on an expedition to the Clay Plantation. Here it
engaged and defeated some Rebel cavalry, burned forty thousand bushels of corn, a large amount
of fodder, a splendid residence and all its furniture, and then returned to the fleet and moved for
Vicksburg. It disembarked at Young's Point on the 21st of January, and went to work in the
canal. It continued digging for about two weeks, exposed to the shot and shell from a Rebel gun
known as Whistling Dick. On the 12th of February it moved up the river on the Chancellor
on a foraging expedition. It returned on the loth with one hundred and seventy-five head of
cattle, twelve thousand bushels of corn, and numerous chickens. The latter were not turned
over to the Government, but were appropriated to private use. On the 17th of March the
regiment started on the expedition to Haines's Bluff. The march was very laborious; and
navigating, swimming, and wading, the brigade came up with two of the gunboats, in a bayou
near the Sunflower, completely hemmed in by fallen trees, and exposed to the fire of the Rebel
sharpshooters. The Fifty-Seventh being in the advance, became engaged in a severe fight, in



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 61 of 165)