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which the Rebels were driven off. The gunboats were unable to advance, and so the expedition
returned to Young's Point.

On the 29th of April the regiment, with a large body of troops, moved upon Snyder's Bluff,
to engage the attention of the Rebels, while General Grant attacked Grand Gulf. On the 30th
the regiment participated in a severe battle, which lasted until noon the next day, when the
troops retired and moved down the Mississippi to Grand Gulf, which had been captured by
General Grant. The regiment advanced upon Vicksburg, participating in the battles of Ray-
mond, Champion Hills, and Black River. At Champion Hills it suffered severely. The regi-
ment reached the works around Vicksburg on the ISth of May. It participated in a general
assault on the 19th, and advanced, under a terrific fire, to within seventy yards of the Rebel line.
It held this position until two o'clock of the morning of the 20th, when the entire brigade was
withdrawn to a position three hundred yards in rear of the line of fortifications. At nine o'clock
on the 22d the bugle again sounded the advance, and the Fifty-Seventh moved forward in the
front line. The attempt was more stubborn, the fighting more desperate, and the casualties
greater than on the 19th; but the assault Avas no more successful. The regiment advanced to
within sixty yards of the enemy's works; but on the evening of the 23d it fell back to its old
position and commenced fortifying. On the 26th of May it accompanied the division on a recon-
noissance between the Big Black and Yazoo Rivers. It had an engagement with the enemy at
Mechanicsburg, and routed him. The expedition returned to Vicksburg by way of Haines's
Bluff, on the 3d of June, having marched seventy-eight miles. From this time until the sur-
render it was continually engaged, either on the picket-line or in the trenches.

On the 5th of July the regiment marched upon Jackson, which was then held by the Rebels



Fifty-Seventh Ohio Infantry. 345

under Johnston. The troops reached Jackson on the 8th, and drove the Rebels into their works.
The National forces intrenched, and skirmishing continued until the 17th, when the Rebels
evacuated. The Rebels were pursued to Pearl River. Here the Fifty-Seventh had one man
killed and several severely wounded by torpedoes. After this the regiment moved toward Vicks-
burg, and on the 25th it pitched its tents four miles west of Big Black River, at Camp Sherman.
Here it remained until the 27th of September, when it moved to Vicksburg, embarked on the
steamer Commercial, and proceeded up the Mississippi to Memphis, where it arrived on the 4th
of October. On the Sth it marched for Chattanooga, and on the 22d of November it arrived at
the mouth of North Chickamauga Creek, ten miles north-east of Chattanooga. The march was
long and fatiguing, and skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry was frequent. The regiment now
formed a part of the First Brigade, Second Division, Fifteenth Corps. On the night of the 23d
of November the Brigade embarked in boats on the North Chickamauga Creek, floated down the
creek into the Tennessee, crossed the river with muffled oars, landed, captured the Rebel pickets,
secured their countersign, and with it relieved the whole line. By daylight a line of rifle-pits
was thrown up, and the position was secured. On the 24th a pontoon was laid, and Sherman's
army crossed the Tennessee, and drove the Rebels two miles. On the 25th the regiment partici-
pated in the battle of Mission Ridge, with heavy loss. It pursued the Rebels to within two miles
of Ringgold, and rested there one day, and on the 29th it started with the corps to the relief of
Burnside, at Knoxville. The corps marched one hundred and four miles in four days, over bad
roads, and arrived within striking distance, when Longstreet raised the siege and retired with his
forces into Virginia. On the 7th of December the corps returned to Chattanooga, where it
arrived on the 18th, and drew "hard tack" for the first time in fifteen days. On the 19th it was
again on the march, and on the 29th of December it arrived at Bellefonte, Alabama. By this
time the regiment was almost exhausted by fatigue, privation, hunger, and exposure. The men
were hatless, shoeless, and half naked ; yet, notwithstanding all this, the regiment re-enlisted
on the 1st of January, 1864, being the first regiment to re-enlist as veterans in the Fifteenth
Army Corps.

The regiment started for Cincinnati on the 4th of February, and on arriving received a fur-
lough for thirty days. On the 16th of March the regiment, with two hundred and seven recruits,
rendezvoused at Camp Chase. It arrived at Nashville on the 29th of March, and was detained
there until the 4th of April, when it marched through to Larkinsville, Alabama, and at that
point rejoined its brigade on the 17th. On the 1st of May it moved on the Atlanta campaign.
It arrived in the vicinity of Chattanooga on the 6th, and advanced through Snake Creek
Gap to Resaca. The Fifty-Seventh participated in the battle of this place, May 13th and 14th.
On the 14th it was posted in an important position, and received three successive charges from
an overwhelming force of the enemy, but it held its ground firmly. This was one of the most
severe contests in which the regiment ever engaged, and its loss was fifty-seven killed and
wounded. The regiment pursued the retreating foe, crossed the Oostenaula, and advanced
through Kingston to Dallas. Here the enemy made a stand, and fighting continued for three
days. The regiment lost fifteen men.

On the 1st of June the regiment moved to New Hope Church, where it engaged the enemy,
with a loss of four men. The Rebels were driven back on Kenesaw Mountain, and the regiment
followed through Acworth and Big Shanty, skirmishing and fighting almost every day. On the
27th it participated in an assault on the enemy's lines at Kenesaw. The regiment gained a
position very near the Rebel works, but was compelled to abandon it. In this engagement it lost
fifty-seven killed and wounded. On the 5th of July it reached the Chattahoochie, and skirmish-
ing continued almost incessantly until the 9th, when the enemy crossed the river. The regiment
moved on through Marietta, Rosswell, and Decatur to Atlanta, where it arrived on the 20th, and
drove the Rebels inside their fortifications.

On the 22d the Rebels attacked the lin,e furiously. The fighting was desperate, and the
works in the immediate front of the Fifty-Seventh were captured by the enemy and recaptured



346 Ohio in the War.

by the regiment three times. The Rebels were forced buck at last, and the regiment held its
position. The Fifty-Seventh was in the heat of the engagement, and lost ninety-two men. On
the 24th the regiment moved to the extreme right of the army, and on the morning of the 2Sth
again met the enemy. The engagement lasted seven hours, and the Rebels were repulsed. At
this time the Fifty-Seventh belonged to the First Brigade, Second Division, Fifteenth Army
Corps ; and in this battle the enemy left on the field, in front of the brigade, four hundred and
fifty-eight of their number dead. The regiment lost twelve men killed and fifty-five wounded.
The regiment continued to press the enemy until the 20th, when it again moved to the right,
and struck the Augusta and Atlanta Railroad ten miles from East Point. A portion of the
road was destroyed, and on the 30th the regiment moved for the Macon Road, and, after march-
ing all day, reached it at eight o'clock, P. M. The battle of Jonesboro' was fought on the 31st.
The Rebels massed and advanced in four line.-; of battle upon the Second Division. They were
protected by the ground until within sixty or seventy yards of the division, and they advanced
Bteadily and well closed up ; but when the division opened fire their line was shattered. They
advanced three times, but to no purpose. They were driven back with fearful slaughter. The
number of killed and wounded in front of the Fifty-Seventh nearly equaled the number of men
in the regiment. On the 2d of September the Rebels evacuated Jonesboro'. It was occupied
by the National troops, and the regiment advanced about eight miles and found the enemy in
position. The division was ordered to destroy the railroad, and the regiment assisted in the
work all night and until ten o'clock of the next day. On the Cth the Fifty-Seventh was ordered
to Jonesboro', and on the 7th it marched toward Eastport, where it arrived and went into camp
on the 8th.

Here it was engaged in drilling most of the time until the 4th of October, when it
started after Hood. It moved by way of Kenesaw, Marietta, Kingston, Centerville, and Resaca,
and on the 15th attacked the Rebels at Snake Creek Gap. The Rebels were repulsed, and the
regiment followed to Taylor's Ridge, where another fight occurred, and the Rebels were defeated.
The regiment moved on through Lafayette, Somersville, Gaylesville, Little River, Cedar Bluff,
Cave Spring, and Cedartown, skirmishing and fighting, marching and counter-marching, and
tearing up railroad track, until the 13th of November, when it arrived at Atlanta.

The regiment left Atlanta with Sherman's army on the 15th of November on the march to
the sea. On the 21st it was engaged with the Rebel cavalry near Clinton, and on the 25th it
participated in cpuite a severe fight at the crossing of the Oconee River. On the 3d of Decem-
ber some of the regiment's foragers were captured, and on the 4th it engaged the Rebels at
Statesboro' and lost heavily. It engaged in the assault on Fort McAllister on the 13th. The
fort was carried at the point of the bayonet, and in the attack the regiment lost ten killed and
eighty wounded. On the 17th it moved with its division on an expedition to the Gulf Railroad,
and, after destroying about fifty miles of track, returned to camp.

On the 1st of January, 1865, the regiment moved two miles south-west of Savannah, and
went into camp until the 14th, when it started by land for Beaufort, South Carolina. The regi-
ment was detained by high water, and on the 25th was compelled to embark on the steamer
George Leary. It arrived at Beaufort on the same day, and overtook the remainder of the
forces on the next day, three miles from town. Here it remained until the 30th, Avhen it started
on the campaign of the Carolinas. It passed through Pocotaligo, and on the 3d of February
fought the Rebels at Duall's Creek. It passed through Bramburg, on the Charleston Railroad ;
crossed the South and North Edisto, skirmishing with the Rebels at both crossings ; crossed the
Saluda and Broad Rivers, and, after heavy skirmishing, entered Columbia on the 17th. It also
assisted in the destruction of the railroad buildings, and again took up the line of march. It
crossed the Wateree River on the 22d, and on the 23d recrossed the river near Liberty Hill,
passed two miles to the left of Camden, and struck Lynch's Creek twenty-two miles from
Camden.

The Fifty-Seventh moved five miles down the creek to a bridge, but could not cross on



Fifty-Seventh Ohio Infantry. 347

account of the high water. It remained here until the 2d of March, when the march was
resumed, and on the 12th the regiment arrived at Fayetteville. Pontoons were laid over the
Cape Fear River on the 13th, and on the 14th the regiment was on the march again. It skir-
mished heavily on the 15th at Black River, which it crossed at Mickey Bridge. When within
about twenty-five miles of Goldsboro' it was ordered back to re-enforce the left wing of the
army, then menaced by General Joseph E. Johnston. The regiment was engaged severely on
the 19th, and on the 20th and 21st there was sharp skirmishing. On the 22d the enemy retired
across Mill Creek, and, after passing a short distance, it was ordered toward Goldsboro'. The
regiment moved on to Raleigh, and, after the surrender of General Johnston, the march was
continued through Petersburg and Richmond to Washington City.

The Fifty-Seventh participated in the grand review, May 24th ; and on the 2d of June it
was ordered to Louisville, Kentucky, where it arrived on the 7th. On the 25th of June the
regiment started for Little Rock, Arkansas, and arrived at that place on the Gth of August. On
the 14th it was mustered out of the service, and on the 25th was paid and discharged at Camp
Chase, Ohio.

The Fifty-Seventh traveled by railroad, steamboat, and on foot, more than twenty-eight
thousand miles.

The names of one thousand five hundred and ninety-four men had been on its muster-rolls,
and of that number only four hundred and eighty-one were alive at its muster out.



348



Ohio in the War.



58th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Do

Do

Major



Do.

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Chaplain
Captain
Do.



Do. ...
Do. ...
Do. ...
Do. ...
Do. ...
Do. ...
Do. ...

Do

Do

Do. ...
Do. .„,

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



VAL. BAUSENWEIN

Ferdinand F. Rempel.....

Peteh Disteb

Ezka P. Jackson

Wm. S. Friesner

Vai.. Bausenwein

Peter Disteb

Ezka P. Jackson

Samuel M. Moiuuson

Andrew Gali.fy

Kainer Schallern

Christian Forster

Eugene Ringler

A. M. McElwee

Nathan J. Baruer

Eli Dayton

E. C. DkForrest

Fred. W. Rkhman

Andrew Gratify

Joseph N. Biown

Latin tz Barentzen

Andrew lluber

Albert Stepley

John Bun/.

i>sc;ir Brabender

Ezra P. Jackson

Samuel M. Morrison

Charles A. Barker

Wilf'ord Steirs

Joiin C. Anderegg

Ferdinand Fix

Baptist Benkler

Alexander Miller

E. J. Brumiis

Christopher Kinser

Win. S. Friesner

Peter Kaufman

Jacob Haering

Wm. Rode

Joseph Dieter

Charles Kette

Wm. H. Hulls

Henry Odeifeld

loseph S. Krause

Wm. Roby

Lewis Keller

John T. Morrison

Wm. Gellhauseu

Philip Froebe

Oscar Brabender

Launtz Barentzen

Theodore Dichmen

( 'harles Stroedeter

E. J. Brunnis

Henry Boehl ,

August Bris worth

Wilibrd Steirs

Romaiue Lujeane

Peter A. Bishop

Jacob Haering

Christopher Kinser ,

Wm. Koby ,

Wm. S. Friesner

Harlan P. Christie

Peter Kaufman ,

Frederick Teuscher

Theodore Scliied

Wm. H. Hulls

Wm. Rode „.

Henry Odeifeld

Harlan P. Christie

Joseph Dist'-r

Henry Oclerfeld

John T. Morrison

Charles Stoppel

Stephen Miller

H.nry H. Sibert

Win. Gellhauseu ,

Frederick Riegelman

Philip h'roebe

Henry Buchring

Lewis Keller

Charles Kette

John Schmidt

John Hanson



date of rank



Oct.
Dec.
Oct.
Dec.
.May
Sept.
Aug.
Oct.
Jan.
Oct.

Nov.
Jan.
Oct.
Jan.
Dec.
June
Slay
Jan.



Feb.
Nov.
Dec.

March

April

Sept.
Oct.
Sept.
Oct.



IS6I

l.Sii2



COM. ISSUED.



Jan.

Oct.
Aug.
May
Sept.

Oct.
Feb.
Oct.
Feb.



Oct.
Ian.
Eeb.
June
1SH2 May
Jan.



Jan.

March

Jan.



Jan.
Nov.
May



Sept.
Oct.
Jan.



7,
86,

13,
16.

27.
19,
22,

4,

3,
21,

2,

3,

1, '

15,

1,

1,

1,
15,
29,

1,
18,

3, 1

3|

21, :



Dec.
Oct.
Jan.
Nov.
Dec.



Feb.
March

Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Oct.
Nov.
Jan.
Sept.
Ian.
May



Jan.
May



Jan.

April

Jan.



ISO.'',
1864



1862
1863

1862



1869

1802



May



Sept.
Oct.



Nov.
Dec.
Aug.
M arch
Feb.



Feb.
Nov.
May



Sept.
Oct.
Jan.



19,

3,
2,
2,
29,
31,
8,
16,
2,
2,
2,
15,
29,
2,
18,
3,

3!

21,
21,
8,




Discharged.

Resigned August 11, 1S02.

Killed December 29, 1602.

.Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Discharged as Captain August 26, 1864.

Mustered out.

Resigned April 6, 1802.

Mustered out.

Resigned Slay 3d, 1862.

Resigned December 8, 1S62.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Honorably discharged October 3, 1862.

Promoted to Major.

Cancelled; commission returned.

Resigned April 19, 1862.

Resigned September 4. 1862.

Resigned Octobers, 1802.

Resigned March 27, 1862.

Resigned April 22, 1862.

Promoted to Major.

Promoted to Major.

Discharged October 3, 1862.

Resigned.

Mustered out.

Honorably discharged September 30, 18C2.

Resigned January 30, 1S03.

Resigned September 21, 1802.

Resigned March 30, 1804.

Killed December 27, 1862.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Killed at Fort Morgan, Miss., Dec. 29, 1862.

Mustered out as 1st Lieut. Dec. 22, la03.

Mustered out.

Blustered out.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Mustered out January 10, 1865.

Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.

Blustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned December 8, 1862.

Discharged on account of wounds, Dec. 4, '02.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned November 28, 1862.

Resigned March 1;\ 1802.

Promoted to Captain March 27, 1862.

Resigned February 7, 1862.

Discharged April 9, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged November 13, 1S62.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned.

Honorably discharged.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February 8, 1863.

Resigned April 27, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Mustered out.



Fifty-Eighth Ohio Infantky.



349



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Stephen Defenbaugh

John H. Price

David Jenkins

Leonard Krimm

Jacob Kinser

Enoch E. Parish

Michael Holler

Henry Oderfel 1

Ehrhard Gouhl

Wm. Rode

Peter Kaufman

Fred. Teuscher

Conrad 13. Krausse...

Wm. H. Hulls

Stephen Defenbaugh
Leauder E. Hodges...

Joseph Dist"r

Theodore Sihied

Peter Leonhardt

Charles Kette

Thaddeus II. Ream...

Robert Specht

Elias L. Dodrow

Lewis Keller

Charles Stoppel

Ehrhard Goehl

Fred. Riegelman

Jolm 11. Price

Wm. Larimer

George W. Sherlock..

John Stuber

Jolin Kriun



DATE OF HANK.



Jan.
May



Nov.
Dec.



Oct.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.

Sept.
Jan.

May



1863
1865



COM. ISSUED.



Feb.
May



March

April

May

July

Dec.



Feb.
Sept.
Jan.

May



ISfil

ISiiO



Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Blustered out with regiment.
Resigned.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Honorably discharged February 8, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned March 4, 1*63.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Honorably discharged December 29, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Revoked.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned January 17, 1863.
Resigned December 2ti. 1S63.
Killed December 29. 1S62.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Declined promotion.
Revoked May 3, 18B5.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
-Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.



FIFTY-EIGHTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



E COGNIZING the urgent necessity for an increase of the National forces in the
field, in order to cope successfully with the armies raised by the Rebel authorities,
the President called on the different States for an additional contingent of three hun-
dred thousand men. Ohio, always foremost in responding to the calls of the Government, took
hold of the matter with energy. Among a number of regiments projected at that time was the
Fifty-Eighth Ohio. Under authority from the Governor, the regiment was organized by the
appointment of Colonel Valentine Bausenwein as Colonel, and the full complement of line and
field officers.

The regiment remained at Camp Chase, near Columbus, perfecting itself in the "school of
the soldier," until February 10, 1862, when, an urgent call being made for troops, the Fifty-
Eighth was at once placed under orders, and transported by rail to Cincinnati, arriving in that
city on the 11th of February. Embarking on the steamers Tigress and Dictator, the regiment
left on the same day, en route for Fort Donnelson, Tennessee, and arrived there on the morning
of the 13th of February.

Tarrying only long enough to prepare their coffee, the regiment, then within four miles of
the fort, pushed on with energy, impelled by the sounds of the conflict resounding through the
woods. After making a fatiguing march of twelve miles over rough and circuitous roads, in
order to get into a proper position, it went into camp late in the evening in sight of the fort.
Tired and exhausted by the excessive fatigue of the day, the men threw themselves on the
ground and were soon sound asleep, utterly oblivious of what might befall them the next day.
They awoke in the morning surprised to find themselves covered by a fall of snow three inches
in depth. The regiment was assigned to Thayer's brigade of Lew. Wallace's division.



350 Ohio in the War.

Preparations were at once made to take part in the assault on the fort. The Colonel (V.
Bausenwein) being ill, the second officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Ferd. Eempel, took command.
This officer led the regiment at once toward the enemy. After moving a short distance a furious
attack was made by the enemy, but the shock was met with coolness, and ended in the Rebels
being hurled back into their intrenchmcnts. This ended the active work of the day, although
the regiment remained in line of battle until late in the evening, when it returned to camp.
Early on the morning of the 16th the regiment was marched to the center of the line, where it
remained until the announcement of the surrender of the fort. The Fifty-Eighth was imme-
diately marched into the fort, and Lieutenant-Colonel Rempel, with his own hands, hauled down
the first Rebel flag the members of the regiment had ever gazed upon.

At the battle of Fort Donelson the Fifty-Eighth supported Taylor's Illinois Battery, placed
on the Nashville Road, and successfully held that important position against the Rebel division
under Bushrod Johnston. The Rebels, on their repulse, reported to Johnston that it was impos-
sible to take the Nashville Road, as it was filled with regular soldiers. This mistake occurred
from the fact that the men of the Fifty-Eighth Ohio wore hats with the regulation feather and
dark blue uniforms.

Remaining near Fort Donelson until the 7th of March, the regiment left for Fort Henry,
and arrived there the same day. On the 15th of March it moved up the Tennessee River to
Crump's Landing and went into camp.

The Fifty-Eighth went into the battle of Pittsburg Landing on the morning of the 7th of
April, its position being on the right, in Taylor's brigade, General Lew. Wallace's division, and
was under fire until four P. M., at which time the enemy retreated. The Fifty-Eighth was
highly complimented for its conduct in the battle by General Lew. Wallace and other officers in
command. Its loss was nine killed and forty-three wounded.

After the battle Lieutenant-Colonel Rempel was detailed as Provost-Marshal of the army,
in post at Pittsburg Landing.

Then came the tedious, exhausting march on Corinth, creeping with snail-like pace toward
that miserable town. On May 8th Corinth was evacuated by the Rebels, and the Fifty-Eighth,
with the rest of the army, took possession. Our forces lay quiet here until the 1st of June,
when a portion of them were ordered to different quarters. The Fifty-Eighth received orders
for Memphis, where it arrived on the 17th of June. It remained but a short time at Memphis,
orders being received to move down the river to Helena, Arkansas. It arrived there on the 27th
of July, and remained until the 5th of October. During the time the regiment was at this
place several reconnoissances were made down the Mississippi on transports, convoyed by gun-
boats, for the purpose of attacking and dispersing the guerrillas along the shores of that river.
In one of these expeditions a Rebel steamer, the Fair Play, with five thousand stand of arms
and two pieces of artillery, was captured near Milliken's Bend, Louisiana. A brisk skirmish



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