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17, " Promoted to Captain by President April 11, '64.

17, " Promoted to Captain.

17, " Promoted to Captain.

17, " Promoted to Captain.

17, " Resigned May 26, 1862.

17, " Resigned March 1, 1863.

17, " Promoted to Captain.

17, " Resigned February 3, 1863.

17, " Resigned February 19, 1863.

17 " Promoted to Captain.

17, " Appointed Captain 121st O. Y. I Aug. 11, 1862.
le 20, " Revoked.

20, " Promoted to Captain.
July 28, " Resigned March 23, 1863.
Jan. 12, 1863 Promoted to Captain.

12, " Revoked.
Feb. 10, " Promoted to Captain.

10, " Resigned April 14, 1363.

25, " Promoted to Captain.
April 9, " Promoted to Captain.
March 10, " Promoted to Captain.



386



Ohio in the War



let Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

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Do.

Do.

Do..

Do.

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Do.

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Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

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Do.

Do.

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Id Lieutenant

Do.

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DATE OF BANK.



Harrison Davis

Samuel H. Hedges

.1 ames Jacoby

Joseph W. Hitt

Archie Houston

Elhannan W. Zook

T. G. Keller

Charles E. Butts

.lohn R. Organ

James 1'. Conn

James Mcllroy

Nelson Card

Win. V. Taylor

Wm. A. Brand

W. Wallace Cranston

Wm. A. Cavis

James C. Bowe

John H. Diltz

Charles A. Poffenberger.

Richard E. Plunkett

Wm. W. Jackson

C. Warren Guv

Ridgely P. Wilkins

Robert Simpson

Joseph H. Case

Silas 0. Shastall ;

John R. Clayton

Aaron Rik< r

Henry Fraley

James T. Maggs

Frank Baldwin

James A. McClain

Daniel D. Davisson

Wm. Scott

Samuel Croxton

James H. Corbin ,

John F. Morgan

J. M. Mitchell

Calvin Gibson

Elijah E. Weaver

John O. Dye

Wm. A. Sampson

D. A. McDonald

John W. Watkins

James K. Hurley

Marshall L. Dempsey

James O. Carter

Charles H. Rhodes

A. L. Sheppard

Monroe Elliott

Robert Murdock

John N. liathbone

Watson N. (lark

John T. Mitchell, jr

Archie Houston

John T. Northeutt

Samuel H. Hedges

Joseph W. Hitt

John F. Morgan

liobert H. Russell

Harrison Davis

James Jacoby

Henry S. Swisher

Elhannan W. Zook

Nelson Card

John R. Organ

T. G. Keller

Wm. Overs

Charles E. Butts

Wm. C. Flage

James P. Conn

Wm. V. Taylor

Wm. A. Brand

W. Wallace Cranston ....

Wm. A. Cavis

John L. Davis

0. Fairchild

Wm. McCorkle

Francis M. Williams

Thomas Thompson

Sylvester Rook

Orville Stokes

Jacob Houtz

Jacob Olwine

Daniel Griffin



Feb.
April

May

July

April

Jan.

April

Jan.

May
June
Aug.



19, 1

16,

16,

16,

27,

31,

20,

2, 1

1,

2,

1,

1,

9.
27,
11.
H.
II,
II.
19,
1-',
12,
12,
April 8, 1865

8, "
12,
1-',
IS,
1'-',
1-',
12,
12,
12,
31,
31,



May



July



Feb.
April
May

Aug.

Sept.

Nov.

Dec.

Nov.

Aug.

Nov.

Jan.

Nov.

Feb.

March

Jan.

Feb.

April



11,
20,
13,
13,

13,
1.
1,

14,

19,
19,

2H,
11,
H,
1".
21,
28,
21,
26,



COM. ISSUED.



April
May



Aug.
April
Jan.
April
Jan.

May
June
Aug.



Nov.
April



May
June

July

Jan.



April
June

July
Oct.
Jan.
Dec.

Jan.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.



May



July



22, '

12,

1-',

12,

15,

10,



14, 1862



March

April

May



Killed.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned Mav 5, 1864.

Killed at Dallas May 25, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned July 27, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed July 20 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged August 29, 1864.

Mustered out as Sergeant.

Resigned May 30, 1S65.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned October 20, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Revoked.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out under G. 0. 24, June 28, 1865.

Mustered out under G. 0. 24, June 28. 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.

Mustered out with regiment as Serjeant.

Mustered out witli regiment as Sergeant.

Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant Nov. 10, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant May 26, 1862.

Died August 15, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned April 26, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned April 21, 1862.

Resigned February 28, 1862.
Promoted ; resigned January 19, 1863.
Resigned November 27, 1862.
Died August 25, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



May
July



Promoted
Promoted
Promoted
Promoted
Promoted
Promoted
Promoted
Promoted
Promoted
Promoted
Promoted



to 1st Lieutenant,
to 1st Lieutenant,
to 1st Lieutenaut.
to 1st Lieutenant,
to 1st Lieutenant,
to 1st Lieutenant.

to 1st Lieutenant,
to 1st Lieutenant,
to 1st Lieutenant,
to 1st Lieutenaut.



Promoted to
Killed May 3
Promoted to
Promoted to
Promoted to
Promoted to
Promoted to



1st Lieutenant.
, 1863.

1st Lieutenant.
1st Lieutenant.
1st Lieutenant.
1st Lieutenant.
1st Lieutenant.



Mustered out with regiment as Sergeants ;
■ complimentary commissions given after
muster out.



Sixty-Sixth Ohio Infantry. 387



SIXTY-SIXTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.






UNDER the President's second call for troops an order was obtained from Governor
Dennison to raise a regiment of infantry in Champaign County. The order was dated
October 1, 1861. On the 17th day of December following the regiment was mustered
into the United States service, numbering eight hundred and fifty men. Six companies and
about fifty men of other companies were from Champaign County, two from Delaware, one from
Union, and one from Logan. From the day of muster until the day of departure for the field
the regiment received additions to the number of one hundred and thirty.

On the 17th of January, 1862, tents were struck at Camp McArthur, near Urbana, and the
regiment proceeded to join the forces of General Lander on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, in
"West Virginia. Colonel Candy reported to General Lander at New Creek, where the first field-
camp was made. The first active service of the regiment was the campaign against Romney. In
the early part of February, 1862, General Lander concentrated his troops at two points ou the
railroad, commencing his movements at nightfall. The troops marched all night, forded a deep
and rapid stream, and by daylight were fifteen miles from their starting points. General Jack-
son, however, had evacuated Romney, and retreated through the mountains upon Winchester,
while our army fell back toward the railroad and encamped on the Highlands, without tents or
blankets. The first night snow fell to the depth of twelve inches.

General Shields succeeded General Lander, and the Sixty-Sixth regiment was led along the
railroad to Martinsburg, where it was stationed as provost-guard for the space of about three
weeks. Again, at Winchester and Strasburg, it performed the duties of provost and general
guard for the immediate vicinities. Following the victorious division of General Shields to
New Market it was assigned to the Second Brigade, commanded by Brigadier-General O. S.
Terry. After a short but rapid march to Harrisonburg the division received orders to make a
long and tedious march across the Blue Ridge to Fredericksburg, on the Rappahannock. The
march occupied ten days. At Fredericksburg the Sixty-Sixth, the Fifth, Seventh, and Twenty-
Ninth Ohio regiments formed the Third Brigade, under command of General E. B. Tyler.
Remaining one day at Fredericksburg the division received orders to counter-march for the relief
of General Banks in the Shenandoah Valley, and for the protection of Washington. General
Jackson was in possession of nearly the whole Valley, and was making demonstrations against
the capital. The division marched back by way of Manassas to Front Royal, in Warren County.
From Front Royal the regiment accompanied General Shields up the right bank of the Shenan-
doah until arriving at the bridge across that river at Port Republic.

On the morning of June 9th General Tyler's brigade, with two regiments of the Fourth
Brigade, were in line of battle awaiting the attack of the enemy, numbering thirty-two thousand,
under General Stonewall Jackson. At sunrise the enemy opened with artillery, and soon made
• a general attack with heavy columns of infantry. In this battle the Sixty-Sixth acted a conspic-
uous part in defending a battery of seven guns on the left of the line. The enemy had possession
of these guns three times and as many times were driven from them by the regiment. So quickly
was the enemy compelled to abandon its ground that it had no time to turn the artillery upon
the National lines. The retreat being ordered on the right, the whole line was compelled to pass
a few rods behind the Sixty-Sixth. As the Fifth Ohio approached it deployed upon the right,
and the enemy was driven about two hundred yards. The force immediately in front of the reg-



388 Ohio in the Wae.

iment consisted of a full brigade of Virginians and Wheat's battalion of Louisianians. The
force under General/Tyler, numbering about twenty-seven hundred men, held General Jackson's
army in complete check for five hours and a half, not moving a rod, until an order for retreat was
sent by General Shields. The regiment lost one hundred and nine men of the four hundred
engaged. The division fell back to the Orange and Alexandria Railroad by way of Front Royal,
and at this place was broken up.

In July the Sixty-Sixth regiment, with its brigade, was ordered to join General Pope, and
reported at Sperryville, where it was re-enforced by the Twenty-Eighth Pennsylvania. General
John W. Geary was placed in command of the brigade, which was assigned to the Second Divis-
ion (General Augur's), of what was afterward known as the Twelfth Corps. General Banks
commanded the corps at Cedar Mountain, where the Second Division opened the ball. After
nightfall the First Brigade was ordered to move forward, and, with a handful of men, Colonel
Candy, who assumed command after General Geary had been carried from the field badly
wounded, proceeded some distance in the direction of the mountain whereon the enemy was
securely perched. In a dense wood, through which the brigade was passing, an ambuscade of
the enemy was discovered, but too late to retreat. In the manly fight which ensued one-half of
the National troops were killed outright and many wounded. The loss to the regiment was
eighty-seven killed and wounded of two hundred in arms. After the defeat at Cedar Mountain
the regiment pursued its way with the corps to Antietam, and was actively engaged in that battle.
On the 27th of December, 1862, General J. E. B. Stuart, with two thousand Rebel cavalry,
made an attack upon Dumfries, a small town on the Potomac, which was garrisoned by the Fifth,
Seventh, and Sixty-Sixth Ohio regiments. The garrison consisted of less than seven hundred
muskets. After a sharp and determined fight, lasting several hours, the enemy was driven off.
This battle was remarkable on account of the disparity of forces. In the battle of Chancellors-
ville the regiment held a position on the right of the plank road and in front of General Hooker's
head-quarters. The repeated attacks made upon the whole corps were repelled with coolness
and courage. When the Eleventh Corps was driven from its works, on the right of the Twelfth
Corps, the " White Star Division " received the charges of General Jackson upon the flank, but
stood manfully to the post of duty, and checked the Rebel army.

At Gettysburg the Sixty-Sixth regiment held a position near the right of the line. After the
battle of Gettysburg the pursuit of Lee brought the regiment again to the Rappahannock. At
this time trouble occurred in New York in enforcing the draft, and the Sixty-Sixth was one of
the regiments ordered to that city to protect the Government officers in enforcing the laws. On
the 29th of August the regiment and brigade disembarked from the steamship Baltic, and
encamped on Governor's Island, in New York Harbor. On the 8th of September they com-
menced the return trip, and reached the Rapidan River on the 17th. A few days' duty, and the
Eleventh and Twelfth Corps bade adieu to Virginia and the Army of the Potomac.

Under General Hooker they were transferred to the Army of the Cumberland, in the vicin-
ity of Chattanooga, a distance of twelve hundred miles, which they traveled in seven days.
November 24th the regiment proceeded with the division across the creek at the western foot of
Lookout Mountain. The stronghold of the enemy was attacked, and a foothold was obtained near
the crest of the mountain. After remaining in bivouac all night another advance was made, and
the Stars and Stripes were planted on Lookout Mountain at sunrise, November 25th. The resist-
ance of the enemy was not so great a difficulty to be surmounted as the rough ground and pon-
derous rocks over which the troops had to pass. The battles of Mission Ridge and Ringgold
followed. The Sixty-Sixth Ohio participated in both battles. In the latter engagement the
First Brigade of the Second Division charged up a steep and rough mountain in the face of a
strong force of Rebels, who were posted behind formidable works, Every officer save one of the
Seventh Ohio was killed or wounded. The Sixty-Sixth, under command of Major Thomas
McConnell, carried the crest of the mountain and held it against the forces on the summit.
Major McConnell sent for ammunition, but received an order to fall back to the railroad.

Returning to their camp in Wauhatchie Valley, near Chattanooga, the men of this regiment



Sixty-Sixth Ohio Infantry. 389

became enthusiastic on the subject of re-enlistment. On the 15th of December, 1863, the rollB
were completed, and the old organization was changed into the Sixty-Sixth Regiment Ohio Vet-
eran Volunteer Infantry. The Sixty-Sixth was among the first regimental organizations in the
whole army to which the term " Veteran Volunteer " was applied. A month of joys and pleas-
ures, a day of leave-taking and tears, and it was again on the road to the field. It was sent to
Bridgeport, Alabama, where it remained in camp about three months. Besides an excursion
down the Tennessee River on an old steamer, the regiment experienced little active service until
the advance on Atlanta commenced. On the 3d of May, 1864, tents were struck at Bridgeport,
and the troops in the vicinity moved forward to Chattanooga and joined the corps, which had
been consolidated with the Eleventh, and was now called the Twentieth, under command of
Major-General Joseph Hooker. The first fight of the long campaign then opening was at Rocky
Face Ridge, where the First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Corps, charged the enemy's
works on the summit, and were repulsed with great slaughter. At Resaca the regiment was kept
well to the front, but was fortunate in having no losses beyond a few wounded. In passing
around the Alatoona Mountains the Twentieth Corps traveled the Burnt Hickory Road, which
crosses Pumpkin Vine Creek a few miles north of Dallas, and leads to New Hope Church.

In the afternoon of May 25th the First Brigade was in the advance, and marched beyond
Pumpkin Vine Creek two miles, when it was suddenly attacked by a strong force of the enemy.
Deploying rapidly, it held the enemy in check until the whole division had taken position. An
advance was made, and the enemy was driven one and a half miles. The Sixty-Sixth at this
point lost several men — among them Lieutenant Joseph W. Hitt, who had been selected as a
brigade staff-officer on account of his courage. For eight days the two armies occupied works
within a stone's throw of each other, and both lost heavily in the continuous musketry and can-
nonading. On the night of June 15th the regiment was in the advance of a movement against
Pine Mountain. While moving up a ravine the enemy opened upon it with grape and canister
from heavy works. Under a galling fire of musketry and four pieces of artillery the regiment
approached to within a hundred feet of the works, and each man built for himself a little rifle-
pit. This position gave them control of the enemy's artillery at that point; and there the regi-
ment remained until the next day, when it was relieved by a new regiment. At Culp's farm, at
Kenesaw, and at Marietta, at which places battles were fought in quick succession, the regiment
acted its part, and also in the important battle of Peachtree Creek.

After the capture of Atlanta the Sixty-Sixth was placed on duty in that city, and remained
there until the army of General Sherman took up its line of march to the sea-board. The
country knows the history of the pleasant march to Savannah. Reaching the city, the regiment
took its position near the left of the line on the Savannah River, within sight of the city. The
position was not a favorable one, as the Rebel gunboats on the river could reach the line with
enfilading shot. General Geary's division entered Savannah and carried the " white-star " flag
through the streets, and received possession of the public and government buildings and the
property belonging to them. Following General Sherman the regiment proceeded northward
through South Carolina; thence to Goldsboro' and to Raleigh, it being at the latter place at the
end of the war. After the surrender of General Johnston the march was prolonged until the
regiment arrived at Washington by way of Richmond. In the march from Richmond to Wash-
ington the Twentieth Corps passed over the Chancellorsville battle-field, and had the proud sat-
isfaction of knowing that it had made the entire circuit of the Southern States. The regiment
was finally mustered out and paid off at Columbus, July 19, 1865.

The regiment received recruits at various times to the number of three hundred and seventy,
and the number of men mustered out at the end of its term of service was two hundred and
seventy-two. It lost in killed one hundred and ten, and in Avounded over three hundred and
fifty. It served in twelve States, marched more than eleven thousand miles, and participated in
eighteen battles.






390



Ohio in the War.



67th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



KOSTER, THBEE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

Do

Lt. Colonel ...
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surscon

Do

Ass't Snrgeoi

Do.

Do.

Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



OTTO BURSTENBINDER

ALVIN C. VOR1S

Alvin C. Voris

John R. Bond

Henry S. Commager

Lewis Cass Hunt......

Henry 11. West

.Iohn R. Bond

Henry S. Commaueu

Edwin S. Platt

Lewis Butler

Thomas J. Platt

Samuel F. Fokbes

James Westfall

I ames Westfall

(J. Costan

Joseph H. Van Deman

A. S. Combs

John Crabbs

Henrv S. Commager

Hyatt G. Ford

Marcess M. Speigle

Charles A. Ruwsey

Edwin S. Platt

E. D. Mason

Valentine Hickman

Iohn B. Sp.iftord

Lewis Butler

Charles C. Lewis

Henry J. Crane

Charles F. Handy

Alfred P. Girty

Charles Hennessey

it. Rudolph

Lewis Cass Hunt

Sidney G. Brock

Dewitt 0. Dewey

John B. Chapman

Uharles P. Schater

Iohn C. Albert..

leorge Emmersou

Hugh Shields

Charles L. Stevens

Win. Nixon

George L. Childs

Irove L. Heaton

Iheiiduii- .). Curtiss

Thomas Ward

Win. Kief.

Florence J. O'Snllivan

Charles E. Minor

George Ansell

Robert McMurray

Orvflle Eddy

Iohn 0. Edwards

Henry 11. Hitchcock

John S. Smith

John 1). Kennedy

kVm. Hedges

John Faskin

Henrv S. Wood

Charles F. Handy

Joseph Jacobs

Iohn B. Chapman

Charles Hennessey

it. Budolpl

Dewitt C. Dewey

Alfred P. Girty

Sidney G. Brock

Charles P. Schater

Sheldon Colton

Oustavins Takrion

George Emmersou

Alvin W. Howe

Hugh Shi-Ids

John C. Albert

Charles L. Stevens

Wm. Nixon

George L. Childs

Henry Bredt

John C. Cochran

I'heodorc J. Cnrtiss

Grove L. Heaton

Thomas Ward

George M. Ballard



Oct.



Oct.
July
Aug.
March



2, 1*6
29, 1SU2
2*, '



1862

"isi.'i



Oct.
lulv
Aug.
Jan.



1, 1801
29, 1*62



13, 1863



Ian.
Aug.
S.pt.
April



Oct.

Jan.

April

May

Nov.

Ian.

Nov.

Dec.



March
May



Aug.
Sept.
Oct. (

Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
July
Feb.



May



Hi, 1 86 1

7, 1*83

9, is
24, '

9, 18

3, '

15, 1862

111, ISn]

18, "

IS, "

18, "

18, •'

IS, "

18, "

18, "
18, "
18, "
23, 1862
26, "
13, "

26, "
28, "

1, "

2, "
5, "

27, "
13, 1863

3, "
1, "

18, 18M
18, "



Jan.
Oct.
Jan.
Feb.
May
Nov.
Jan.



April
June
Aug.
Oct.



Aug.
Sept.

Dec.

March



26, "

26, "

9, "

9, "

IS, 18H

18, "

l«i "

18, "



Dec.

Feb.
May

Aug.
FeE.

May

Aug.
Sept.

Dec.

March



May



S.pt.
Oct.



Dec.
Oct.



Jan.

Feb.



4, 18

4, '



IS,



is,

26, 1S62

2", "

2.
28,
28,

1,

2,

9,



12. is

3, '



Oct.



Feb.
May



16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,



Dismissed July 29, 1862.

Mustered out with regiment; brvt. Brig. Gen

Promoted to Colonel.

Mustered out August 28, IS62.

Mustered out for promotion Feb. 17. 1865.

Mustered out September 1, 1865. [Brig. Gen.

Mustered out with regiment; brvt. Col.; brvt.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Resigned January 13, 1863.

Discharged for promotion October 10,1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned October?, 1863.

Clustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Resigned March 6, 1*63.

Commission returned.

Mustered out May 15, 1865.

Resigned July 7, 1864.

Promoted to Major.

Killed at Winchester March 23, 18G2.

Discharged for promotion October 2, 1862.

Resigned May 26, 1*62.

Promoted to Major.

Mastered out October 5, 1862.

Died at Strausburg May 13, 1862.

Resigned February 3, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Dismissed July 14, 1863.

Mustered out January 17, 1865.

Revoked.

Honorablv discharged April 25, 1864.

Resigned December 27, 1862.

Resigned June 2S, 1*63.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out January 2, 1865.

Resigned June 24, 1863.

Resigned June 7, 1S64.

Mustered out January 17.

Killed July 18, 1863.

Killed May In, IS64.

Mustered out October 16, 1864; time expired.

Absent at Richmond, Ya.; no discharge given.

Mustered out September 1, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Captain and A. Q. M. United States Vols.

Mustered out with regiment.

Died October 24, IBM.

Mustered out September I, 1865.

Mustered out June 23, 1865, as 2d Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Lieut.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out September 1, 1885.

Trans, from 62d O.V.I.; must'd out with regt.

Trans, from 62d O.V.J.; must'd out with regt.

Trans, from 62d O.AM.; must'd out with regt.

Trans, from 62d O.V.I.; must'd out with regt.

Trans, from 62d O.AM.; must'd out with regt.

Resigned May 26. 1S62.

Resigned April 17, 1863.

Promoted ; resigned August 2, 1862.

Resigned April 26, IS62.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promot-d to Captain. [Va., March 23, '62,

Hon. dis. Oct. 9, '62 ; wounded at AVinchester.

Revoked.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged Deccmbor8, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned July 7, 1863.

Difd of wounds.

Promoted to Captain.

Promo ed to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed.



Sixty-Seventh Ohio Infantry.



391



let Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 69 of 165)