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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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Resigned August 2, 1S02.


Do


Killed.


Do


ROBERT KIRKUP

John II. Patrick

Hakkv G. Armstrong

Harry G. Armstrong

R. L. Kn.r-ATRicK

Robert Kirk up

Krewson Yerkks

William Gaskili

Harry G. Armstrong

John Collins

Krewson Yekkes


Mustered out with regiment.


Lt. Colonel ....

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do


Promoted to Colonel August 2, 1S62.
Mustered out by nribr of War Dep. Jan. 8,'03.
Reinstated ; revoked Feb. 17, '03, S. 0.71.W.D.
Honorably discharged August 17, 1804.
Pronii ted to Colonel.
Musteied out with regiment.
Resigned January 27, 1802.


Do


Resigned. [promoted.


Do


Recom missioned by order War Department;


Do

Do


Resigned March 29. 1803.

D 'ceased ; wounds receive 1 in battle.


Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain


Promoted to Lieutenant-Cjionel.


A. Ball

A. E. Jenner

Curtis J. Bellows

0. G. FlKI.D

J. D. JUNKIN

S. L. YOURTKK

Theophilus Gaines


Mustered out.

Mastered out with regiment.

Dismissed Sept 10, 1802.

Resigned September 27, 1804.

Resigned October 15, 1803.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out.

Commissioned by the President of U. S.

Resigned May 20, 1862.


Do

Do


Resigned August 21, 1801.


George B. Whitcom


Killed at Winchester, Va., March 23, 1S62.


Do

Do

Do


Charles H. Jackson


Resigned December 5, 1802.


lohn V. Fletcher

R. L. Kilpatrick


Dismissed April 27, 1803.


Do

Do


Promoted Jan. 8, 1863, to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted March 29, 1803, to Major.


Do


Waldo C. Booth


Resigned November 15, 1801.


Do

Do

Do

Do.


Frederick W. Moore

I'lieophilus A. Startzmau.


Void ; having resigned before appointed.
Honorably discharged January 23, 1803.
Resigned July 23, 1802.
Resigned March 29, 1863.


Do

Do


Thomas W. Heflferman


Mustered out August 13, 1S02.
Resigne 1 April 30, 18(5-1.


Do.


J D McDonald




Do.






Do

Do

Do


Thomas W. lleiternian

Austin J. Bnirer

William M. Dick

William V. Neeley

R. Egbert Fisher


Deceased.

Commission returned.
Mustered out.


Do


Died May 24, 1803.


Do


Resigned May 23, 1803.


Do


Resigned Julv 5, 1804.


Do


Promoted to Major.


Do




Do


Benjamin Jelleff, jr

Joseph M. Jackaway

lohn M. Paver

William II. Thomas


Resigned January 30, 1861.


Do

Do


Resigned February 17, 1854.
Declined promotion.


Do




Do






Do






Do




Resigned April 9, 1S05.


Do




Do


Hiram R. Treher




Do

Do

Do. .:

Do

Do






Wilson B.Gaither

Henry C. Koogle


Feb.

May

Juno
July

May
June

Sept.
Jan.


Mustered out with regiment.

Returned commission ; declined promotion.

Cashiered July 19. 1805.


Alexander Mott


Mustered out with regiment.


Do


Morton Barringcr

Henry A. Fortmau

Thomas W. Scott

Charles B. Jacobs


Mustered out with regiment.


Do

Do


Died of diarrhea September 28, IS64.
Mustered out with regiment.


Do. ..
Do


Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.


Do






Do


Joseph L. Gaul

Robert B. Broiuwell


.Mustered out with regiment.




Resigned January 22, 1862.


Do.
Do.


Robert S. Logan

Waldo 0. Booth


Resigned March 11, 1802.

Promoted September 14, 1801, to Captain.


Do.
Do.


Lewis C. Robinson


Promoted April 20, 1862, to Captain.
Resigned March 11, 1802.


Do.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.


(J. C. Whitson

Thomas W. Helferman

George N. C. Frazier

George II. Whitcanip

1. 0. McDonald

T. G. Swart/.inan

Frederick W. Moore

Robert Kirkup

Dolin F. McKcnzio


Transferred to Invalid Corps June 1G, 1S63.
Promoted May 20, 1802, to Captain
Resigned December 27, 1801.
Rosigned April 20, 1*62.
Promoted August 13, 1802, to Captain.
Promoted March 19, 1862, to Captain. [1R62.
Res'd Jan. 2, '02; disability removed March 13.
Promoted August 2, 1802, to Captain.
Resigned October 3, 1362,



•The Roster of three months' service is not on record.



Fifth Ohio Infantry.



41




,8t Lieutenant James K^kaid



Do.
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id Lieutenant
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..Jan. 22, 18fi
..Feb. 8,
„| March l'J,

11, "



ICharles W. Smith.

Wm. M. Dick

Win. M. Neely I „

Hush Marshall ..

Austin J. Shirer AP" 1

IJohn M. Paver

Lramefl 'limmons \,.,L



June
Aug.



March



May



May



R. Egbert Fish .

[Alexander L. Little

IGeorge Sharp..

iKrewsou Yerkea

[Frederick Fairfax

Wm. II. Thomas

Morgau S. Shaw

HenrvC. Brinkman

Benjamin Je'.lefi, jr

Edward R. Anthony

James L. Thompson

Charles Friedeborn

Charles S. Jossup

Stephen Coddington

Hiram B. Treher

Lewis B. Stevens

James Clark

Edward L.Quinton

[Joseph Plaisted

John B. Heal

iW'iison B.Gaither

Henrv C. Koogle

Jeremiah Robinson

Alexander Mott

Edward L. Qiuiiton

Martin Barrmger

Henry A. Fortuiau

Thomas W. Scott

Charles B. Jacobs

Herman Belnier

Joseph L. Gaul

Peter A. Cozine.

George Heintzelberger

Joseph Grunkeymeyer.

Albert M. Towsley

Stephen Mosier

Herman Striek'.er

Thomas Hussey.

Matthias Schwab

James Richey |July

Michael Ward

Andrew J. Barr

Christian Knauft

Donald McLeod..

Benjamin E. lord

James Kinkaid

Robert Kirkup

Frederick W. Moore....

William M. Dick

Harry 6. Armstrong..

Charles W. Smith

William M. Neely

Robert H. Barrett

Hugh Marshall

.John M. Paver

\ustin J. Shirer |SePt.

Augustus J.Moonert..

James Timmons

P. 31. McCann

Alexander L. Little....

,11. Egbert Fisher

George Sharp

Robert Graham

lvrewson Yerkes

Frederick Fairfax

Josenh W. Jackaway

William H. Thomas

Morgan S. Shaw

Henry Brinkman

Joseph Miller

Ephriam B. Stout

Charles A. Walker

Benjamin Jelleff, jr

Edward R. Anthony

Charles Friedeborn

James L. Thompson

Charles S. Jessup

Hiram U. Treher

Stephen Coddington

Win. i'. Jackson

Edward L. Quinton

Joseph Plaisted

A. Lemoin ••

Harvey Woodward

Wilson B. Gaither

Henrv C. Koogle

Jeremiah Robinson

Philip Nunn

Martin Barnuger

John B. H-al

Charles B. Jacobs

Herman Behmer

Joseph L. Gaul

Peter A. Cozine



March 20, 1SR2
I " 20,

20,
May 1,



June
July
Oct.

Dec.

Feb.
April



3, 1864
3,



May



23,



Promoted December 5, 1862, to Captain.
Resigned January 9, 1862. .___.._
Promoted January 8, 1863, to Captain.
Promoted March 29, 1863, to Captain.
Resigned February 11, 1863.
Promoted May 29. 1862, to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned April 7, 1S63.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned April 4, 1S63.

Resigned. .

Promoted to Captain.

Died May 3, 1863.

Mustered out June 28, 1S64.

Promoted to Captain.

Deceased July 3, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned January 31, 1S64.

Promoted to. Captain.

Deserted ; dismissed.

Resigned April 4, 1864.

Resigned.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned July 13,1864.

Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Declined; commission returned.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.



?, "|Sept.
24,
28,
y, IS62[Jan.

22, "



28,



March 20,
20,
20,

May 29,



18R5



26,
March 2f>,



Sept



i Feb 23, 1 Sfi.-> Promoted to Captain.
■' 'promoted to Captain.
Promoted. to Captain.
Cashiered July 17, 18C5.
Discharged. .

Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out. _ .

Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.



Mustered out with regiment.
" IMustered out with regiment.
•JMu.tMed out with regiment
1861 Promoted J a 2 1^-., to * ir Lieateaant .
Pp no e &pt"7l861, to First Lieutenant.
Promoted Maich'l9, IS6Z, to First Lieutenant.
Promoted to majonty. Lie utenant.

KotH March' 11?U62, to First Lieutenant.

P^iol'ted Marrh 11,1862, to First Lieutenant.
Promoted \m-il 2rt,W,2, to First Lieutenant.
Promoled April V>\ \W, to First Lieutenant.
Promoted May^,^, to First Lieutenant.
Resigned July 9 1662. Lieutenant.

Promoted to Firs. ^^M JMatmM u
Promoted Feb. 11, W, w r tictcnant.
Koled March' 29, l'0? to First Lieutenant.
Resigned June 11, 1863.

- liSSES^'^ to First Lieutenant.
23 " Promoted to First Lieutenant
§: " Promoted to First lieutenant.
I ' 1863 Promoted to F rst Lieute . it.
9(1 "Promoted to First Lieutenant.
2 °' >-ooed to First Lieutenant

~*S Promoted to First Lieutenant.
* '• Deceased May 3, 1» ; 3.

<£' " Promoted to First Lieutenant.

£•• '• pJSSloted to First Lieutenant.

2.V " Refnsed to muster.

9V " Refused to muster.

9-,' " Promoted to First Lieutenant.

£? •• Promoted to First Lieutenant

|jj " Promoted to First Lieutenant.

g :: |p^;ot:rto'V'iV;VLieutenant.

I-' •• Promoted to Eirst Lieutenant.
K'l864Promot«.ltoFirst.Leutenant.
% "Promoted to First Lieutenant.
I' •• Promoted to First Lieutenant.
» » Promoted to First Lieutenant.



June
July



Sept.
Oct.



29,

20, 1863



23,



April



May
Sept.



42 Ohio in the War



FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS was originally one of the three-months' organizations, and was made up of young
men from Cincinnati and the vicinity. It went into Camp Harrison, near Cincinnati,
April 20, 1861, and was mustered into the United States service May 8th. On the
23d of May it was sent to Camp Dennison. Before, however, the regiment was completely
equipped, the call for the three-years' troops was issued, and on the 20th of June the Fifth Ohio,
by unanimous consent of the men, was mustered for three years. On July 10, 1S61, the regi-
ment left Camp Dennison and went by rail to Bellair, where it crossed the Ohio River to Ben-
wood, Virginia, and from thence to Grafton and Clarksburg, Virginia.

On the afternoon of the 13th of July orders were received to move, but the cars were not
ready until the night of the 14th, when the regiment was taken to Oakland, Virginia. It
marched from that place on the same day, under Brigadier-General Charles W. Hill. This was
the first march of the regiment, and was especially severe, on account of their total inexpe-
rience. Its route lay up and over a spur of the Alleghany Mountains. After failing in this
attempt to intercept the flying Bebel forces of General Garnet's defeated army, the regiment
returned to Oakland. The first death in the regiment occurred at this place, a private being
accidentally shot by one of his comrades.

Parkersburg was the next camping place, where the regiment lay until the 5th of August,
most of the time engaged in guard-duty and drill.

On August 5th the regiment again took up the line of march for Buckhannon. It lay here
until the 3d of November. Near this place, at French Creek, companies A, B, and C had an
engagement with a band of Bebels, killing six or seven of them, and losing one man killed.
From thence it went to New Creek, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. On the 7th of Novem-
ber it was at Komney, Virginia. The duties at this place were very arduous, companies being
sent out daily on scouts. The picket-force alone amounted to nearly one thousand men, por-
tions of whom were stationed six and seven miles from camp.

While at Romney General Kelly, then in command of the National forces, was disabled by
the wound he had received at Philippi, and was superseded by Colonel S. H. Dunning, of the
Fifth Ohio. Learning that a force of Rebels, fifteen hundred strong, was stationed at Blue's
Gap, sixteen miles from Romney, Colonel Dunning determined, if possible, to surprise and cap-
ture it. Selecting the night of the 6th of January, 1862, he started at midnight, during a driving
snow-storm, and, reaching the enemy's outpost picket-line, captured it, and moved on until
within a mile of the Rebel camp. At this point the expedition was discovered by the Rebel
pickets, who fled to the main body and gave the alarm. The National troops pushed on. and up
the steep mountain side, the men being compelled to drag themselves up by the aid of the under-
brush and roots. Arriving at the top, the men opened fire and charged the enemy, driving him
out of his intrenchments, killing twenty, capturing a number of prisoners and two pieces of can-
non. The residence of Colonel Blue, his outhouses, and mill were burned to the ground. This
was the commencement of the reputation of the Fifth Ohio for bravery and thoroughness in
dealing with Rebels. The Rebel papers of that day contained notices and anathemas against
the regiment, headed, as they said, " by a butcher," and advising the Rebel commanders to
show the members of it no quarter.

The Fifth returned to its camp at Romney the same day of the fight, having marched thirty-
four miles and disjiersed and defeated fifteen hundred Rebels inside of fourteen hours.



Fifth Ohio Infantry. 43

On January 10, 1862, the regiment left Romney and fell back to Patterson Creek. General
Lander was now in command. Thence the Fifth went to New Creek, and remained there up to
the 3d of February ; then returned to Patterson Creek. From this date until the 13th of Feb-
ruary it was engaged in a series of arduous marches and counter-marches, often camping in the
snow without tents or blankets, and suffering intensely from the fierce winds of that wild country.

On the 13th of February the Fifth and Eighth Ohio, with a force of cavalry, made a recon-
noissance on Bloomery Furnace, the whole under command of General Lander. The cavalry,
led by General Lander, had a skirmish with a body of Rebels, killing and wounding a number,
and taking some thirty prisoners, including a Colonel, Major, Adjutant, and twelve officers of
the line.

The regiment returned to camp at Pawpaw on the 14th of February. At this place, on the
2d of March, General Lander died, and was succeeded in the command by Colonel Nathan Kim-
ball, of the Fourteenth Indiana.

From this time until the latter part of March nothing of material interest occurred. On
the 18th of March the command, under General Shields, made a reconnoissance to Strasburg,
the Fifth Ohio in the advance. Some shots were exchanged with a force of Rebels, but no casual-
ties occurred. The enemy was followed to a point seven miles beyond Mount Jackson, when the
command returned and marched to Winchester, reaching that place on the evening of the 20th
of March.

On Saturday, the 22d of March, the long-roll was sounded and the whole force ordered out.
The Fifth went through Winchester on the double-quick, cheering, and eager for the fight.
Some slight cannonading occurred that afternoon, during which General Shields was wounded
in the arm. The Fifth performed picket-duty on the Romney Road that night, to prevent sur-
prise from that direction.

On the morning of the 23d of March the Fifth marched out to Kernstown, four miles from
Winchester, and took position in support of Daum's Indiana battery. At nine o'clock A. M.
the battle of Winchester was opened. The Fifth continued in support of Daum's battery until
late in the afternoon, when companies A, B, C, D, and E, under command of Colonel Kilpatriclc,
moved up, under orders, and passing through a clump of underbrush emerged into an open field,
where it received the first fire of the enemy. This little band, although faced by overwhelming
numbers, returned the Rebel fire with interest. The Eighty-Fourth Pennsylvania, on its right,
attempted to follow, but quailed and fell back in disorder. Colonel Murray, of that regiment,
in attempting to rally them, lost his life. The Fifth Ohio poured its volleys into the enemy at
Bhort range, and stubbornly maintained its position until re-enforcements came up. It then
advanced and drove the enemy in disorder. In this fierce encounter five of the color-bearers of
the regiment were shot down in succession. Captain George B. Whitcom, of Cincinnati, was one
of these, and lost his life while waving the colors over his head. A bullet struck him just above
the eye, and buried itself in his brain.

When the Eighty-Fourth Pennsylvania fell back in confusion General Sullivan, commanding
the brigade, exclaimed that the army was whipped ; but on looking again he observed the Fifth
Ohio still fighting, and exclaimed: "No, thank God; the brave Fifth Ohio is still standing its
ground, and holding the Rebels." The Fourteenth Indiana moved forward at this critical
moment, and the tide was turned. The enemy, beaten at all points, turned and fled. The dark-
ness of the night alone prevented the most vigorous pursuit. The loss of the Fifth Ohio was
forty-seven killed and wounded. The entire loss of the National force did not exceed five hun-
dred. The Rebel loss was believed to be more than double that number. The regimental colors
were perforated with forty-eight bullet holes, and the State flag with ten.

The dead were buried and the wounded properly disposed of, and again, on the 24th of
March, the regiment resumed the march. The first camping-place was five miles beyond Stras-
burg. On the 1st of April the regiment passed on through Woodstock, again encamped near
Edinburg, near the bank of the Shenandoah River. The progress of the National force was
checked at this point by the burning of a bridge which spanned the river, and by Ashby'a



44 Ohio in the War.

cavalry, which had taken position on the opposite side. Shots were exchanged, but no damage
resulted. A few days thereafter a dash was made by the Fifth Ohio and some Vermont cavalry
into Mount Jackson, but the enemy had flown. After making sundry marches up and down the
valley the regiment went into camp at New Market, Colonel S. II. Dunning in command of the
brigade. It remained at New Market two weeks, drilling, reviewing, etc.

On May 3d marching orders were received, and an advance was made to Harrisonburg.
General Banks's force was falling back. General Shields's force now also fell back about eight
miles and took a position in which the General declared he could easily whip Jackson, but that
renowned Rebel kept out of the way. Before leaving Harrisonburg (on the 7th of May) the
Fifth Ohio was presented with a beautiful stand of colors, sent to them by the City Council of
Cincinnati, as a token of the appreciation of the people of Cincinnati for its bravery and efficiency
in the battle of Winchester.

Marching was resumed on the 12th of May, and continued until Falmouth was reached, a
distance of one hundred and fifty miles. After lying here until the 25th of May the regiment
marched to Front Royal, where, halting a few hours, it again pushed on through the driving
rain and muddy roads. The night of the 3d of June found the regiment on the banks of the
Shenandoah, having marched two hundred and eighty -five miles to no purpose, and with scarcely
half-rations. The same history was repeated until, on the 8th of June, the regiment reached
Port Republic. The next morning the battle was opened. This was a hot and well-contested
affair, and the regiment conducted itself with its usual bravery and dash. After firing a couple
of volleys it was ordered to charge on a fence behind which a couple of Rebel regiments were hid.
The charge was a success, the Rebels fleeing before them into the woods, where they rallied.
Again the Fifth charged, and captured one piece of artillery. Immediately thereafter it marched
to the left and repulsed a charge made by the enemy on a battery. The Rebels were too strong
however, and retreat became necessary. The order was finally given, and the Fifth was desig-
nated to cover the movement, in doing which it lost one hundred and eighty-five men taken
prisoners. The total loss of the regiment was two hundred and forty-four in killed, wounded,
and prisoners.

Many incidents of personal valor and cunning occurred in this affair. Lieutenant Kirkup,
of Cincinnati, who had been taken prisoner, escaped from bis guard, but had not proceeded far
when he came in contact with two Rebels. He claimed them as prisoners — they yielded, and
conducted him safely out of the mountains. The colors were saved by the Color-Corporals,
Brinkman and Shaw, by wrapping them around their persons, swimming the Shenandoah, and
joining General Fremont's command four days thereafter.

The retreat was continued until the evening of the 10th, when a halt was made near Luray,
where it was allowed to rest until the 21st of June. It then marched through Thoroughfare
Gap to Bristow Station, reaching that point about five P. M. of the 24th.

From the 24th of June the regiment was on the march every day for five successive weeks ;
those days of sullen gloom and confusion, when the enemy, under Jackson, was worrying them
with his swift and uncertain movements. In these marches they traversed a distance of more
than five hundred miles, and when at last they were halted at Alexandria, the men were nearly
naked, without shelter, and completely worn out. After being recruited in health, on the 25th of
July they went by rail to Warrcnton, Virginia, where they remained until the 31st; thence
marched to Little Washington, arriving on the 1st of August. While at this place General
Tyier took leave of the brigade, and of the Fifth in particular, as they were mutually endeared
to each other by reason of "floods and perils" together. The successor of General Tyler took
command in the person of General Geary, of Mexican fame.

On the 9th of August, 1862, then lying at Culpepper C. II., the Fifth marie a forced march
of eight miles, to reach the battle-field of Cedar Mountain, in which engagement they partici-
pated under command of Colonel J.H.Patrick. Re- enforcements failing to arrive in season,
overwhelming numbers forced the troops to fall back. The loss of the Fifth in this battle was
eighteen killed, thirteen commissioned officers and eighty-nine men wounded, and two missing,



Fifth Ohio Infantey. 45

out of two hundred and seventy-five with which they entered the battle. In this engagement
Lieutenant-Colonel H. G. Armstrong was so badly wounded as to disable him from further field-
service. Then came the retrogade movements of Pope's army; those fierce, sanguinary battles,
fighting over almost the whole territory from Cedar Mountain to the intrenchments around
Washington City. In all this the Fifth bore a brave and bloody part. After a brief respite it
joined the forces in pursuit of the Rebel army.

Passing through Frederick City, Middletown, and Boonsboro', the field of Antietam was
reached on the night of the 16th of September. At daylight the regiment marched on the bat-
tle-field. The Twenty-Eighth Pennsylvania had the right, followed by the Fifth Ohio, in com-
mand of Major John Collins, Colonel Patrick being sick. The Fifth Ohio proceeded in column,
by company, until within the range of the enemy's fire. About fifty yards in front was a belt of
woods, occupied by the Eebels. The regiment advanced to the edge and opened fire, and in a short



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