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they were to meet the enemy in the open field, and not behind formidable breastworks. At last
they were to repel an attack, not make one. Almost without waiting for the word of command,
as the attacking column drew near, they rushed at them in a counter-charge of resistless fury,
firing and fixing bayonets as they ran. In less than thirty minutes the tide of battle was turned,
and they were driving the foe before them. A halt was made to re-form ranks. The Rebels ral-
lying, renewed the fight, only to be repulsed repeatedly with great loss. At nightfall the Rebels
retreated to the inner defenses of the city. In this engagement the Seventy-Third lost eighteen
men. The next day the National army closed around the city.

During the month which followed, the regiment was constantly in the front line of works,
and day and night under fire, and continually at work skirmishing and fortifying. Each day
one or more men were killed or wounded.

At length the great flank movement toward Jonesboro' was made, the Twentieth Corps being
left to hold the line of the Chattahoochie. The Seventy-Third was stationed at Turner's Ferry,
where the enemy attacked it, but were repulsed.

At length Atlanta was evacuated, and two companies of the Seventy-Third, forming part of
a reconnoissance, were the first troops to enter the city. Thus this long and terrible campaign
was ended. Out of one hundred and twenty days' campaigning, the regiment had been under
fire one hundred and three days, and most of the remainder had been occupied in marching and
hard work. It had lost two hundred and ten men and eight officers out of less than three hun-
dred and fifty; had been repeatedly engaged with the enemy, and had never retreated before
him. The regiment now encamped near the city, recruiting and working upon the defenses of
Atlanta, until November 15th, when it started with Sherman on his "march to the sea."

The incidents of this famous expedition — the marching, foraging, destruction of railroads,
cotton, and whatever else could cripple the enemy's resources ; the plentiful provisions ; the
crowd of contrabands following; the humors and festivities of the camp and march, being so
much the same with all parts of the army— need not be repeated here. The line of march of
the Seventy-Third was through Decatur, Roxbury, and Social Circle, Madison and Eaton, to
Milledgeville, where the regiment halted and ate bountiful thanksgiving dinners. Thence
through Sandersville, Davisboro', and Louisville; past the horrible prison-house at Millen ; on
through Sylvania and Springfield to the magnificent live-oaks and rice-fields in the suburbs of
Savannah. The regiment traversed the State without firing a shot at a foe or meeting an armed
enemy.

Here the non-veterans of the regiment, eighty-five in number, and three officers— Captains
Stone, Barnes, and Madeira— were mustered out and sent home. Captain McKell and Lieuten-
ant Jackson resigned.

On January 2, 1865, the regiment crossed the Savannah River into South Carolina, and
entered upon its last campaign.

The army corps crossed Cape Fear River on the 12th, and were opposed by a considerable
force of Rebel cavalry. Early on the morning of March 16th Kilpatrick skirmished heavily
with the enemy under General Hardee, who seemed determined to dispute the advance of the



,



Seventy-Third Ohio Infantry. 425

National forces, at least until his trains could get into a safe retreat. The battle of Averysboro' waa
fought. The National soldiers waded up to their knees in the swamps and bravely attacked the
Rebel works. The enemy gave way and retreated through Averysboro' in the direction of
Smithfield. In this affair the Seventy-Third lost fifteen men wounded.

On Sunday, March 19th, the last battle of the war was fought — that of Bentonville. It was
fiercely contested on both sides, but the Rebels were compelled to succumb. The loss of the Sev-
enty-Third in this battle was five men killed and four officers and twenty-one men wounded.

Little was left to do after this engagement. Sherman's army went into camp around Golds-
boro', North Carolina. On the 10th of April, while moving out from Goldsboro', the news of
Lee's surrender was received; and, with shouts of gladness, the National army crossed the Neuse
River, and on the 13th took possession of Raleigh without opposition. On the 22d the Rebel
army under General Joe Johnston was surrendered to General Sherman, and the agreement sent
to Washington for ratification. On the 22d the Twentieth Corps (in which was brigaded the
Seventy-Third) was reviewed by General Sherman in the streets of Raleigh. General Grant
arrived with the President's rejection of the Sherman-Johnston treaty, and on the 25th the
National troops moved against the enemy. The Twentieth Corps marched ten miles on the road
to Holly Springs, while Grant and Sherman held a conference with the Rebel commander, which
resulted in the surrender of Johnston's entire army. On the 28th the National army marched
back to Raleigh, filled with gladness that at last the Great Rebellion was ended.

Then came the march to Washington, passing through the Rebel capital, Richmond, Vir-
ginia; the grand review; the transfer to Louisville, Kentucky; and finally the muster-out. On
the 20th of July, 1865, the rolls of the Seventy-Third Ohio were ready, and on that day the
regiment was mustered out of the service, and started for Camp Dennison, Ohio, where, on the
24th of July, it was paid off and finally discharged.

Colonel Smith and Colonel Hurst subsequently were brevetted Brigadier-Generals for gallant
and faithful service.

The history and character of the Seventy-Third may be summed up briefly. It served three
years and eight months, and was always in active service, never at posts or guarding communi-
cations. It marched several thousand miles, participated in twenty battles, not to speak of num-
berless skirmishes and minor affaire. On three occasions, in connection with its brigade, its
behavior in battle decided the fortunes of the day. Its conduct was frequently commended in
general orders, and never reproached. Its discipline and drill were uniformly the subject of
remark in its brigade and division. As proof of its gallantry and services, out of a little more
than twelve hundred members, including recruits, two hundred and eighty-five sleep beneath the
sod, and five hundred and sixty-eight are now bearing about the scars of honorable combat,
many of them crippled for life.



426



Ohio in the Wab.



74th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF BANK.



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

Do

Do

Do

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Do

Do

Major



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



GRANVILLE MOODY

A. VON SCHBAEDEIt.._.

JOSIAII GIVEN

K. P. FINDLEY

Al.EX. VON SCIIRAEDEH

Thomas C. Bell

Robert J? p Finoley

Cornelius McGreavy

Alex. S. Ballard

Thomas C. Bell

Joseph Fisher

ROBERT P. FlNDLEY

Cornelius McGreavy

M. H. Peters

Joseph Fisher

.1. It. Brelsfohd

Matthew W. Dickson

E. W. Steele

Wm. Arnold

A. L. Williams

Matthew W. Dickson

Wm. Hayes

C. A. Moore

Samuel Marshall

Thomas C. Bell

Stephen A. Bassford

Samuel T. Owens

\ ust in McDowell

Joseph Fisher

Walter Crook

Albion \V. Bostwick
Robert P. Fintlley ...
Joseph H. Ballard...

Patrick Dwyer

Wm. Mills

Wm. McGinnis

Wm. T. Armstrong..
Franklin J. Tedford

Thomas C. Mcllravy

Robert Cullen

David Snodgrass

Henry H. Herring

Cornelius McGreavy

John W. MeMillen

Robert Hunter

Matthew H. Peters

John Q. Hutchinson

Perry A. Weaver

Robert Hunter

Joseph Ham mill

Thomas Kir by

Wm. T. Drummond

Matthew K. McFadden....

Wm. C. Galloway

Philip W. Stumm

Martin Ryan

John N. Havnes

Thomas C. Bell

Wm. McGinnis

Franklin J. Tedford

Wm. T. Armstrong

John W. McCluug

Henry II. Herring

Matthew II. Peters

James II. Cochnower

Thomas C. Mcllravy

David Snodgrass

Henry M. Cist

Win. Mills

Robert Cullen

Robert Hunter

John. W. MeMillen

Robert Stevenson

Benj. A. Weaver

John Q. Hutchinson

George W. Bricker

Cornelius McGreavy

Wm. II. H. Moody

Joseph Hammill

Thomas Kirby

Thomas H. Adams

Wm. T. Drummond

.loh ii Scott

Matthew K. McFadden ...
Michael McGreavy



Dec.
May

July
Dec.
May

July
Oct.
Nov.
May
June
Nov.
.May
July
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
June
July
Dec.
June

March

Nov.

Dec.



1S<V.
1861

1863



1 S* 1 1
I8H2



March 28
May 22
June 2
July 12,
March 2s,
May 25
18.
July 12
March 2s
Nov. 27
May 26
Sept. 9,
Nov. 12
May 18,
July



isr,2
1863

I860
1 862
l.Si',2

l.M'..'.

isa



Match 2H,

Dec. 7,
March 28,
June 17,
July 23,
Dec. 31.
June 10,
" S,

March IS,
28,



1862

1-1,4
1862



Resigned May 16, 1S63.

Declined.

Resigned September 29, 1864.

Mustered out as Lieutenant-Colonel.

Resigned April 8, 1865.

Revoked.

Promoted to Colonel.

Mustered out as Major.

Resigned November 22, 1862.

Resigned June 7, 1863.

Revoked.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out with reg't as Adj't, rank Capt.

Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned June 4, 1862.
Resigned November 22, 1862.
Discharged December 31, 1S62.
Promoted to Surgeon



1.-63
]-r,:,
1662



Jan.
Feb.



Dec.

Sept.
Nov.
Dec.
Nov.

Feb.



Feb.
Juno



.Inly

Nov.



Jan.

May

June



July
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.



1861

1862



1864

1863



18,

28,
18,



Ian.
Dec.
fc'eb.



Dec.
Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Dec.

Feb.

Doc.

Feb.

March

June



31,
25,



April



Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

Feb.

Jan.

June

July
Nov.



Jan.
May



July
March



July

Oct.



12,



April



Dec.



Jan.

Feb.

March

Feb.

March

April 9,

March 21,

June 14,
" 14,

" 14,

14,



July
Oct.



Resigned September 8, 1SC2.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned July 28, 1862.

Resigned December 22, 1862.

Resigned February 10, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Mustered out.

Resigned November 19, 1862.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned February 20, 1862.

Resigned February 17, 1863.

On detached service.
27,' " Resigned April 26, 1864.
It, 1863 Resigned November 6, 1864.

Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Resigned September 20, 1864.

Revoked.

Resigned April 26, 1864.

13, 1864 Resigned November 8, 1S64.
10, 1861 Promoted to Major.

14, " Mustered out with regiment.
14, " Declined.
13, " Promoted to Major.
12,

12, " Declined promotion.
10, " Mustered out with regiment.
18, " Resigned as 1st Lieutenant.
18, 1865 Mustered out with regiment.
18, " Mustered out with regiment.
18, " Mustered out with regiment.

6, " Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant.
6, " Mustered out as Q. M.
16, " Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant.
12, " Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain,

Promoted to Capta

Iiesigned November 25, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain and A. A. G.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged October 26, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned as 2d Lieutenant February 10, 1863.

Discharged April 6, 1865; timeout.

Promoted to Captain. [boro\

Died Sept. 12, 1864, of wounds ree'd at Jouea-

Promoted to Captain.

Died September 28, 1864

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out October 17, 1S64.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed at Jonesboro' September 1. 1864

Promoted to Captain.

Declined promotion.



28,
28,
28,
28,
28,

4,
17,
17,
17,

4,

27,

14, 1

II,

6.
17,



12,



Seventy-Fourth Ohio Infantky.



427



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



John W. Baldwin

Richard Powell

Wm. (I. Galloway

Philip \V. Stumm

Martin Ryan

John N. Haynes

Chaa. C. Dodson

Wm. M. Snyder

John P>. Gundy

James McCann

Ohas. L. Gallaher

Robert C. Einley

Edward K. Barnett

Isaac Miller

Andrew Flannigan

Thomas C. Hook

Samuel Poland

Robert Stevenson

John W. McMillen

Benj. F. Sickley

Richard A. King

John R. Hitesman

Robert Hunter

Wm. H. Reed

George W. Bricker

Wm. H. H. Moody

Bernard J. Connaughtin ..

Wm. T. Drumniond

Michael McGreavy

Joseph Haniinill

Thomas H. Adams

Thomas Kirby

John Q. Hutchinson

John Scott

Cornelius McGreavy

James A. Worden

John B. Burrows

Edwin Ballard

John A. McKee

Matthew K. McEadden

Michael McGreavy

John W. Baldwin

Richard Powell

John W. Devoe



DATE OF RANK.



Oct.
Nov.



Jan.
May



July

Oct.



Nov.
Dec.



12, 1

12,

12,

12,

12,

Wi

6, 1

6,
11.
H,
IS,
18,
31,

6,

6,

4,
12,

in, :

24,



Feb.

Jan.

Dec.

Nov.

June

Dec.

Nov.

Sept.

Dec.

Jan.

June

Eeb.

Dec.

Feb.

April

May

Jan.

March

July



2"',



1801
k-62



lsi',3
1802
1S03
1862
1803



1864

186.



COM. ISSUED.



Oct.



Nov.



Jan.
May



12, !

12,

12,

12,

12,

IS

6, :

6,
11,
11,

18,

18,
31,

June 6,

"' 6,

" 4,

July 12,

March 10,

as,

" 28,

28,
" 28,

28,
2,
2,
4,



April



Jan.
Feb.



March 6,
May 1,

19,

June 26,

" 10,

March 19,

21,
July 9,



Declined promotion.

Mustered out May 16, 1S65.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Musterod out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.

Mustered out with regiment as Q. M. Serg't.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out as Sergeant-Major.

Promoted to 1st. Lieut.; resigned Feb. 10, '63.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned September 25, 1862.

Resigned January 23, 1863.

Resigned June 6, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned April 28, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned June 24, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Revoked ; mustered out January 12, 1865.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned May 21, 1803.

Resigned August 5, 1863.

Resigned December 16, 1S63.

Drowned.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Declined promotion.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out with regiment as 1st Sergeant.



SEVENTY-FOURTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment was organized in camp at Xenia, Ohio, in October, 1861, to the extent
of seven companies. On the 24th of February, 1862, it was ordered to Camp Chase,
where three full companies were added, making the complement, and aggregating nine
hundred and seventy-eight men.

The regiment was ordered to the field on the 20th of April, 1862, reported at Nashville,
Tennessee, on the 24th of the same month, and went into camp near that city. While here it
was thoroughly drilled, and portions of it detailed for provost-duty in Nashville. The first real
service performed by the regiment was on its march over the Cumberland Mountains with Gen-
eral Dumont, in June. Immediately thereafter it was detailed as guard to the railroad between
Nashville and Columbia, and continued to perform that duty during the month of August. It
returned to Nashville September 3d, and remained there during the blockade of September,
October, and November, 1862. During this period the regiment was engaged in several skir-
mishes in the vicinity of the city.

In December it was placed in the Seventh Brigade (Miller's), Eighth Division (Negley's),
formerly part of the center, (Thomas's), Fourteenth Army Corps, Department of the Cumberland.

When General Bosecrans made his movement on Bragg's army lying at Murfreesboro', the
Seventy-Fourth marched with its division and corps. On the 29th of December it went into the



428 Ohio in the Wak.

battle of Stone River, and remained in it until nightfall of January 3, 1S63; was hotly engaged
December 31st, and was one of the regiments selected to charge across Stone Eiver, January 2d,
against Breckinridge's Rebel corps. The Seventy-Fourth went into this battle with three bun-
dred and eighty effective men, of whom it lost, in killed and wounded, one hundred and nine, and
in prisoners, forty-six.

On the reorganization of the army at Murfreesboro', Tennessee, in February, 18G3, the
Seventy-Fourth was assigned to the Third Brigade (Miller's), Second Division (Negley's),
Fourteenth Army Corps (Thomas's), and during the stay of the army at that place assisted in
guard-duty on the fortifications. At this place several changes took place among the officers.
Colonel Moody, Major Bell, and Captains Owens, McDowell, and Ballard, resigned, which made
necessary the following promotions: To Colonel, Josiah Given, (late Lieutenant-Colonel of the
Eighteenth Ohio); to Captains, Mills, Armstrong, McGinnis, Tedford, and Mcllravy; to First-
Lieutenants, McMillen, Hunter, Hutchison, Weaver, and Bricker; to Second-Lieutenants Adams,
Scott, Drummond, and McGreavy.

On the movement toward Chattanooga, June 23, 1863, the Seventy-Fourth was in the column,
and participated in the battles of Hoover's Gap, June 24th ; Dog Gap, Georgia, September 11th,
and Chickamauga, September 19th and 20th, arriving at Chattanooga September 22, 18G3. The
regiment also participated in the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, Novem-
ber 23, 21, and 25, 1863.

While at Chattanooga a majority of the men of the regiment re-enlisted as veteran volunteers
from January 1, 1864. About the same time Captain Fisher was promoted to Major.

Entitled, as they were, to thirty days' furlough at home, the regiment left Chattanooga on the
25th of January, 1864, and arrived at Xenia, Ohio, where it was received with the greatest honors,
kindness, and hospitality, in the power of the loyal and patriotic ladies of that beautiful city
to bestow. On their way home, everywhere in Ohio, the members of the regiment were the
recipients of the most marked kindness and consideration.

The regiment reassembled at Xenia on the 17th of March, and before leaving for the field
passed resolutions returning thei* hearty thanks for the unbounded kindness with which they
had been treated, and making the utterance of the word "Xenia," by visitors to their camp in
the field, a talismanic passport to their hearts and hospitality.

The regiment being reorganized numbered, with the addition of one hundred new recruits,
six hundred and nineteen men.

- The Seventy-Fourth, once more reatly for the field, started for "the front" on the 23d of
March, 1864, and on the 12th of April rejoined its brigade,' at Graysville, Georgia. Remaining
in this camp until the 7th of May it started with the army on the Atlanta campaign — that long
and arduous march, so famous in the history of the rebellion. One day's history of this cam-
paign was that of the next. For over one hundred days the regiment was under an almost
continuous fire of Rebel musketry and artillery. At Buzzard's Roost it was specially engaged,
and in an attempt to storm that stronghold, on the 9th of May, lost sixteen men killed and
wounded; and, at Resaca, May 15th, nine men killed and wounded. In the engagement of the
27th of May the conduct of the Seventy-Fourth, and other regiments of the Third Brigade,
elicited from the division commander the following commendatory notice:

" Head-qtjakters First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps,)
"Near Dallas, Georgia, May 28, 1864. J
"Colonel: General Johnson desires to express to you his high appreciation of the gallantry
exhibited by the noble troops of your brigade in the night-engagement of the 27th instant. The
admirable spirit displayed by them on that occasion is, above all things, desirable and commend-
able. Soldiers animated by such courage and fortitude are capable of the very highest achieve-
ments. **««*««**
(Signed) "E. F. Wells, A. A. G."

At Kenesaw Mountain the regiment had a most arduous and perilous duty to perform. Fo*



Seventy-Fourth Ohio Infantry. 429

two weeks it was under a constant fire of musketry and shells. It was also engaged at the
Chattahoochie River, Peachtree Creek, and in front of Atlanta. At the hattle of Jonesboro'
it made three distinct charges on the afternoon of September 1st, and lost two Lieutenants and
twelve non-commissioned officers and privates killed, and twenty-five privates wounded. For
which gallant achievement the regiment was included in the following complimentary notice:

"Head-quarters First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps,
"Jonesboro', September 2, 1864.
"Circular.

"The General commanding the division congratulates the officers and enlisted men of the
Second and Third Brigades on the success of their splendid assault on the enemy, September 1,
1864. They charged a strongly intrenched double line, passing over swamps and tbrough
thickets under a murderous fire of musketry, dragged the enemy out of his works at some points,
and drove him from them at others. Tbe troops opposed to them were the most celebrated for
obstinate figbting of any division of the Rebel army. * * * *

The conduct of all was gratifying to our commanding General, and the day should be remem-
bered and celebrated by every soldier engaged in the battle.
" By order of Brigadier-General W. P. Carlin.

(Signed) "G. W. Smith, A. A. G."

Tbe aggregate loss of the Seventy-Fourth in this campaign was eighteen killed and eighty-
eight wounded. The battle of Jonesboro' ended the Atlanta campaign. The Rebel General
Hood's unexpected dash for the rear of General Sherman's army, for the purpose of cutting hia
communications, rendered it necessary for a movement of the National army to counteract it,
and the Seventy-Fourth, with its brigade and division, counter-marched to Kingston, Georgia.

By this time several of the officers resigned and were mustered out, viz.: Colonel Given,
Captains McMillen, Armstrong, and Baldwin, and Lieutenants Adams and Baldwin. The
Seventy-Fourth was the last regiment to leave Kingston on the new campaign through Georgia.
Thus it severed the link that connected it with the North on the 12th of November, and moved
with Sherman through Georgia, arriving at Savannah without casualties, December 21, 1864. It
left Savannah with the army on the 20th of January, 1865, on what was called the South Caro-
lina campaign.

The spirits of the men of the Seventy-Fourth were buoyant. They were about to realize a
long-cherished desire to bear in triumph the "Old Flag" over the "sacred soil" of South Caro-
lina, the hot-bed and originator of all the bloody scenes through which they had passed in the
preceding four years of the war. It struck its tents in the camp near Savannah, loaded the one
wagon allotted to each regiment, and moved out with its corps toward Sister's Ferry. Recent
heavy rains had flooded tbe swamps through which the road lay, making it almost impassable,
and rendering it necessary to corduroy the greater part of it. The labor of so doing was so
great that the corps did not reach their destination until the last day of the month. The point
reached was about forty-five miles above Savannah, where the river was much swollen and nearly
three miles wide. Laying pontoons, and corduroying Black Swamp on the Carolina shore,
occupied to the 5th of February, on which day the Fourteenth Corps was over the river, and
across the first great swamp of South Carolina.

The Seventy-Fourth was at this time detailed as train-guard, a post of danger and responsi-
bility, as the enemy were watching eagerly for a chance to capture it. Aside from the constant
skirmishing, toiling through swamps, destroying railroads, etc., nothing of special interest
occurred in passing through South Carolina. The North Carolina line was crossed, and the
Fourteenth Corps pushed directly and rapidly toward Fayetteville, which place it entered in
advance of the army on the 11th of March, driving the enemy, under Hardee, over the Cape



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 76 of 165)