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Fear River in confusion. At this point, for the first time since leaving the Savannah River,
news from the outside world was received, brought by two Government transports laden with
supplies. The Rebel arsenals and work-shops at Fayetteville were destroyed ; and once more



430 Ohio in the War.

the National forces tamed their faces northward, again cut off from all communication. The
Rebel Capital was rapidly approached, and opposition from the enemy grew stronger every day.
Heavy skirmishing was encountered at Averysboro', and at Bentonville the last battle of the
army was fought, March 22, 1865.

In coming up to this point the First Division of the Fourteenth Corps led the column. It
kept well in advance, driving back a strong force of Rebel cavalry, until confronted by the whole
Rebel. army under Johnston, and within fifty yards of his intrenchments. A desperate fight
ensued. The Rebels came out of their works en masse, to attack the audacious little band, but
the veterans of the "Red Acorn" were equal to the emergency. Although driven back by over-
whelming numbers, they were able to hold the Rebels in check until the main column came up
and formed its line, and then advanced with it, driving the Rebels back into their works. The
Rebel General, finding himself pressed on all sides, made a hasty retreat toward Raleigh, leaving
his dead and wounded in our hands. From this field of victory the National army moved
directly to Goldsboro', arriving at that place on the 23d day of March. Making a halt of ten
days, for clothing, rations, ammunition, etc., the regiment and division again moved in pursuit
of the enemy, who were then rapidly retreating. On the morning of the 13th of April the First
Division, Brigadier-General C. C. Wolcott, being in the advance, took peaceable possession of
Raleigh, the Capital of North Carolina. Before this time the glorious news of Lee's surrender
had been received, and now the Rebel General Johnston begged permission to surrender his
army to Sherman.

The Twenty-Third Corps was left in North Carolina, and the Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and
Twentieth Corps were at once started toward home via Richmond and Washington, by two
routes. The Fifteenth and Seventeenth were to march to Richmond via Petersburg ; the Four-
teenth and Twentieth on a route farther to the west, via Oxford, Boydton, and Nottoway C. H.
These two corps were to march on parallel roads. On the 30th of April the friendly race to
Richmond began. The First Division, under Brigadier-General C. C. Wolcott, was the victor,
arriving on the bank of the James River at Manchester, opposite Richmond, on the morning of
May 7th, having averaged thirty-two miles per day. The Seventy-Fourth was the third regiment
to arrive on the bank of the river, where they stacked arms, with but one man absent from the
ranks. Thus ended what, in the language of Major-General Hitchcock, "is the most wonderful
march on record, and exhibited in these veterans of many battles unparalleled powers of endur-
ance in marching." On the arrival of all the troops, on the 11th of May, the march to Wash-
ington began. In passing through the Rebel Capital the men of the Seventy-Fourth who had
been prisoners in Libby, Castle Thunder, and Belle Isle, pointed out to their comrades the places
they occupied. Washington was reached on the 23d of May, 1865.

This was the first time tli£ Seventy-Fourth had been at Washington as a regiment, and but
few of its members had ever been there before. The soldiers were tired, and the three days
before the review were spent in cleaning their guns and accouterments, and in necessary rest.
Before nine A. M. of the 24th of May the regiment had marched five miles, and was in its
place in the column for review. This was a proud day to the veterans of the Seventy-Fourth.
They had seen the rebellion crushed — their record during the war was without a stain. They
could look back upon Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, South and North Carolina, with all their
cities and towns, brought back into the Union by the prowess of "themselves and their comrades
of the armies of the Cumberland and Tennessee.

A few days after the review the soldiers of the Fourteenth Corps were formed in line to
meet their old commander, Major-General George H. Thomas, whose duties had called him on a
visit to the Capital. The men of this corps had learned, under his long and faithful leadership,
to love and trust him. As the brave old veteran rode through their serried lines he betrayed the
emotions of a warm and tender heart, and received their heartiest cheers. %

The Western troops were sent to Louisville, Kentucky, under command of Major-General
John A. Logan, for muster-out. The Seventy-Fourth traveled by railroad to Parkersburg, and
from thence by boat down the Ohio River to Louisville, where it arrived on the 20th day of



Seventy-Fourth Ohio Infantry. 431

June. On the 4th day of July the troops were formed by brigade for the last time, to meet and
receive the final farewell of their trusted and honored chief, Major-General Wm. T. Sherman,
■whose fortunes they had followed to the very end with firm and unshaken confidence.

The muster-out rolls of the Seventy-Fourth were made out, bearing date July 10, 1865, and
signed by the mustering-officer of the First Division, and on the 11th of July the regiment
received the farewell addresses and thanks of their corps, division, and brigade commanders
and the warm and affectionate good-by's of the members of the regiments with which they had
served so long, and started for Camp Dennison, Ohio, on the 11th of July. The friends of the
regiment at home wished to give it a reception before the men were disbanded, and permission
was granted them to go to Xenia on the 16th of July for that purpose. An immense crowd was
gathered in the little city. Congratulatory addresses were delivered, and tables loaded with all
the choicest delicacies were spread by the fair daughters of Xenia. Boquets and wreaths of
flowers were profusely showered through the ranks. Everything was done that could in any way
express the unbounded joy and gratitude of fathers, mothers, wives, sisters, and friends.

On the 17th of July the regiment returned to Camp Dennison, and on the 18th received pay
and final discharge-papers. That evening the veteran Seventy-Fourth Ohio Regiment was no
more. The parting of these veterans was a sad one. Nearly four years' service had made them
as brothers, and as they turned toward their homes it was no slight sorrow that was mingled with
their joy. At the closing scene the thoughts of many naturally reverted to those comrades who
did not return — whose bones were left to bleach on the far-off battle-fields of the South. The
remains of some have since been carefully gathered up and deposited in the different National
Cemeteries, while others have been brought by loving hands and buried with their people
at home:

"Rest on, embalmed and sainted dead.

Dear as the blood ye gave ;
No traitor's footsteps e'er shall tread

The herbage o'er your grave :
Nor shall your glory be forgot

While Fame her record keeps,
For Honor mourns the hallowed spot

Where- loyal valor sleeps."



At the outset the Seventy-Fourth was noted for being commanded by a well-known Method-
ist minister and popular orator. Between him and the Lieutenant-Colonel a coolness sprang up,
which promised to lead to injurious results. So handsome, however, was Colonel Moody's conduct
at Stone River, that, on the field, the Lieutenant-Colonel dashed up to him and held out his hand,
saying he could not remain at variance with so gallant an officer.



432



Ohio in the War.



75th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER. THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Lt.



IDATE OF KANK.



Colonel

1)0

Do

Do

Colonel...
Do.

Do

Do

Major

Do

Do

Do

Do

Surgeon

Do

Do

Aas't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain ,

Captain

Do! ;.t."!
Do

Do

Do.

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



NAT. C. McLEAN

It. A. CONSTABLE

ROBERT KEILY

ANDREW L. HARRIS

It. A. Constable

Robert Reily

Charles W. Friend

Ben J. Morgan

Robert Reily

Charles W. Friend

Andrew L. Harris

Benj. Mougan

George B. Fox

Samuel Hart

Charles L. Wilson

John Ingram

Charles L. Wilson

Henry W. Owen

John Hili

D. B. Wren

John A. Javkne

John W. Weakly

Charles \V. Friend

Horace W. Deshler

Ben Morgan

.lames VV. Swope

Win. S. Metcalf

George Fry

James D. Foster

Thomas M. D. Pilcher

lames A. Johnson

Jscar Minor

Theodore K. Keckeler

Andrew L. Harris

Jscar Deshler

JeoTge B. Fox

lolnf C. S. Miller ,

Jasper N. Watkins

Henry L. Morey

Mahlon Briggs

James Mulhaien

Elias R. Monfort

Phineas B. Hascall

Thomas Wheeler

Wm. J. Rannells

David McCully

Joseph H. Potts

David B. Caldwell

Joseph B. Alters ->..

Thomas H. Davenport

David C. Ballentine

Oscar. D. Ladley

Alonzo Ford

James Stover

Daniel J. Flemming

James A. Johnson

Oscar Deshler

Harvey Crampton

Franklin J. Raikes

Ephraim C. Wayman

Judson W. Caldwell

Ahraham W. Thomas

Joseph M. Goodspeed

Wm. G. Ross

Henry B. Lacy

George W. Hopper

Benj. F. Metcalf

Henry L. Morey

Elias R. Monfort

Theodore K. Keckeler

Oscar Minor

George B. Fox

Jasper N. Watkins

Wm. J. Rannells

John C. S. Miller

Mahlon Briggs

Oscar D. Ladley

Samuel C. Ruckinan

James Mulharcn

George A. Russell

l'hineas B Hascall

Thomas Wheeler

Jacob \V. Gano

Thomas H. Davenport

David McCully



Sept.
Dec.
Jan.
May
Dec.

Jan.
June
Sept.
Dec.
Ian.
May
June
Jan.
May
Nov.
Dec.
July
Nov.
June
Vug.
Oct.
Sept.
Dec.



Dec.

Sept.

Nov.
May
Dec.



Feb.
Jan.
Juno



July
April



Jan.

April

Oct.

Feb.

July

Oct.

Dec.



COM. ISSUED.



REMARKS.



i <i-.r,



30,

zi,

7, 1
9, !

\:>, i
la!

12, 1

11,

»8,

IV

12,

2,
11,
10,

1,

13, :

13,
13,
13,

in,

13,

12,
6,
10,
10,
11,



1861 Jan. 11, 1862lAppointed Brig. Gen. by Pres't. Nov. 29, 1862.
i2 Dec. 31, " Resigned January 12, 1863.
■3 j March 11, 1863 Died May 5. 1863.
June 10, " Mustered out January 15, 1SC5.
1861 Jan. 11, 1862 Promoted to Colonel.
Dec. 31, " Promoted to Colonel.
March 13, 1863 Resigned January 9, 1863.
June 15, " Mustered out March 15, 18(55.
Jan. 11, 1862 Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Dec. 31, " Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
March 13, 18!i3 Promoted to Colonel.
June 10, " Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Aug. 25, " Mustered out March 19, 1865.
March 24, 1862 Appointed by President May 15, 1663.
June 5,1863 designed October 2, 1863.
Nov. 23, " Mustered out.
March 24, 1862 Promoted to Surgeon.
July 24, " Honorably discharged November 28, 1862.
Nov. 28, " Resigned in 1863.
June 29, 1863 Resigned July 29, 1S64.
Aug. 29, 1864 Never mustered.
Oct. 14, 1861 Resigned March 24, 1S63.
Jan. II, 1862 Promoted to Major.

Resigned January 11, 1S63.
Promoted to Major.
Resigned September 21, 1862.
Resigned January II, 1863.
24, " Resigned June 10, 1863.
24, " Resigned December 19, 1862.
24, " Resigned Mav 15, 1862.
24, " Died September 7, 1862.

' Appointed Captain by the President.
12,' " Resigned January 2, 1863.
14, " Promoted to Major.
14, " Honorably discharged January 18, 1863.
20, 1863 Promoted to Major.
20, " Resigned February 19, 1863.

Honorably discharged October 2, 1863.

Mustered out.

Killed July 4, 1863.

Killed July 1, 1863.

Honorably discharged December 29, 1SG3.

Mustered out.

Deceased.



1861
4, 1862

29,' 1S63
2>\ 1864

11, loUi

23, 1S61
14, "
14, "
14, "
16, "



March 24,
24,

-1,



June
Dec.

Nov.



Jan.



20,

March 1.1,
" 13,

June
July '
Aug.



Oct.
Dec.
March
May

Dec.

Nov.
Sept .
May
Sept.
Oct.



Dec.
Jan.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Sept.
Jan.



, 1863
, 1862
, 1863



10,
25,
25,



April



25

13, 1864

13,

13,

13,

10,

13,

12,

6, 1865
4, "

10, 1861



Jan.
April
Oct.
Feb.

Sept.
Oct.
March 24, 1S6S

24,

24,

21,

21,

21,



May

June



24,
24,
5,
24,
24,
12,
14,
14,
31,
31,
31,
31,
31,



Jan. 20, 1863



Feb. 10,
March 13,



13,

13,



Deceased June 15, 1.864.

Mustered out as 2d Lieut. January 17, 1865.

Mustered out as 2d Lieut. January 17, 1865.

Mustered out March 16, 1865.

Mustered out March 12, 1865.

Blustered out.

Mustered out.

Blustered out.

Declined promotion.

Mustered out as 1st Lieut. Sept. 22, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned.

Resigned October 31, 1862.

Resigned March 24, 1862.

Resigned October 6, 1S62.

Resigned Oetober 6, 1862.

Resigned October 6. 1862.

Resigned September 21, 1862.

Promoted by President September 12, 1S62.

Resigned February 9, 1863.

Resigned January 11, 1S63.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned May 23, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Discharged as 2d Lieutenant December IS, 1863

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged November 6, 1S63.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.



Seventy-Fifth Ohio Infantry.



433



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Eo:

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



Wm. H. H. Dumont

Joseph H. Potts

David H. Miller

David C. Ballentine

David B. Caldwell

Joseph B. Alters

James A. Crezett

James A. Mendenhall...

Resin F. Hall

James F. Kempton

Isaiah C. Price

Barnes' Sprung

Conrad Bryant

Mark A. Knowlton

Daniel J. Cline

Martin V. Strader

James M. Malambra....

James Stover

Daniel J. Flemming

AlphonsoC. Davis

Elias E. Monfort

Henry L. Morey

James W. Whaley

George B. Fox

Jasper N. Watkins

Benj. F. Metcalf.

Wm. J. Kannells

John C. S. Miller

Mahlon Briegs

Oscar D. Ladley

John H. Frsseiiden

James Mulharen

Samuel C. Ruckman....

Thomas Wheeler

David B. Caldwell

Thomas H. Davenport.

Wm. H. II. Dumont

Phineas B. Hascall

David McCully

Alonzo Ford

Caleb Parent

George A. Russell

Joseph H. Potts

David C. Ball'iitiue

James A. Crezett

David H. Miller

James A. Mendenhall...

Kesin F. Hall

Emanuel M. Shultz

James F. 'Kempton

Isaiah C. Price

Barney Sprung

Conrad Bryant

Mark A. Knowlton

Daniel J. Cline

Martin V. Strader

James O. James

James M. Townsend....



DATE OF HANK



May
June



April



Feb.

Oct.



Nov.
Dec.



March

May

Oct.

Nov.

May

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Jan.

Dec.
March

Dec.

Sept.
Jan.



Feb.
.Fan.
May
June
Nov.
July
Aug.
Feb.



12, 1863

12, "
23, "
10, "

10, "

11, "

2, "

13, 1864
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "
13, "

13, "
27, "
27, "
27, "
27, "
27, "

6, 1865

8, 1861

18, "

23, "

5, "

14, "
Hi, "
22, "

25, "

24, "

15, "
4, "

9, "
15, "
21, "

(i, "

26, "
1. "

21, "

6, ISC
6, "
1, 1863

31, "

3, 1862
30, 1863

19, 1862

12, 1863
II, "
12,
12,
12,
19,
12,
23,

2,
17,

13, 1S64
19, "

6, 1865



COM. ISSUED.



June 15,

Aug. 25,

25,

" 25,

" 25,

" 25,

25,

April 13, 1864
13, "
13,



June



13.

27,

27,

" 27,

27,

" 27,

Feb. 6,

March 24,

" 24,



May
Oct.
Nov.



1*.

;. 31,

31,

31,

i. 20,

20,

June 10,

" 10,

March 13,

May 12,

Feb. 10,

March 13,

13,

June 10,

Aug. 25,

25,

25,



April
July
Aug.
Feb.



REMARKS.



Revoked.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged January 22, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Mustered out March 11. 1865.

Mustered out March 12, 1865.

Mustered out March 11, 1S65.

Mustered out.

Mustered out March 12, 1865.

Discharged April 16, 1864.

Mustered out.

Mustered out March 17, 1S65.

Died July, 1864.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Dismissed November 26, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Honorably discharged November 22, 1862.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned May 25, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Commission returned.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Deceased.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out.



Vol. II— 28.



434 Ohio in the War.



SEVENTY-FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE SEVENTY-FIFTH OHIO was organized at Camp John McLean, near Cin-
cinnati, on the 18th day of December, 1861. N. C. McLean, son of the late Judge John
McLean (afterward promoted to Brigadier-General), was commissioned Colonel ; R. A.
Constable, of Athens, Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel, and Robert Reilly, of Cincinnati, Major.

Western Virginia was its first field of duty. The regiment arrived at Grafton on the 29th
day of January, 1862, and immediately went into camp. On the 17th day of February it left
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and on the 1st day of March joined General Milroy's brigade
at Huttonsville, at the foot of Cheat Mountain. This march fairly initiated the men into the
hardships and privations of a soldier's life, as it was made over the most wretched roads and in
the most wretched weather.

On the 6th day of April, 1862, General Milroy put his brigade in motion toward Staunton.
Owing to the terrible condition of the roads over Cheat and Alleghany Mountains, the march was
slow, and the advance was finally compelled to halt at Monterey C. H. until the rear regiments
and transportation could be extricated from the deep and sticky mud of the mountain roads.
While at this point, on the 12th of April, 1862, the enemy made a spirited attack with the
purpose of driving Milroy back to Huttonsville. The Seventy-Fifth being in the advance,
received the Rebels in gallant style, and punished them so severely that they seemed to be fully
convinced that General Milroy meant to hold his ground. For full two hours the fighting was
very severe, and the enemy, finding that Milroy was constantly gaining ground, concluded to
give way and leave the road clear to the " Old War Eagle," as the men styled General Milroy.
In this engagement the Seventy-Fifth displayed bravery, and gave evidence of the fine discipline
to which it had attained under the teachings of the officers of the regiment.

A few days thereafter General Milroy led his forces over the Shenandoah Mountains, near
Buffalo Gap, with his rear threatening Staunton. Stonewall Jackson, who was then in front of
Banks, immediately turned his attention to Milroy, compelling that General to fall back over the
Shenandoah Mountains to McDowell, a little village at the foot of Bull Pasture Mountain, where
he established his head-quarters resolving to protect the stores accumulated at that place. It was
a desperate resolve, as his combined force did not amount to quite three thousand men, while
Jackson had near twenty thousand under his command.

On the morning of the 8th of May, 1S62, Jackson appeared in force on the high grounds
overlooking McDowell, exulting in his supposed ability to crush Milroy's small force before that
General could retreat to a place of safety, or receive re-enforcements from General Schenck, who
was then at the town of Franklin, thirty-five miles distant. General Milroy awaited the attack
of the enemy until three o'clock P. M., but it was sullenly refused as the Rebels had everything
to gain by the delay, while Milroy's forces had all to lose; for, if Jackson should succeed in
surrounding Milroy's position, surrender would be compelled. Without hesitation, therefore,
Milroy took the offensive and attacked Jackson with the Seventy-Fifth and Twenty-Fifth
Ohio Infantry, opposing with them a whole division of the enemy, and persistently held their
ground until dark, when, under cover of the night, Milroy retreated in the direction of
Franklin. This battle was very severe for the number of National troops engaged in it. The
Rebels made charge after charge, but each time were met and cut down by the continued and
destructive fire of the National troops. So severe was the loss of the enemy that he reported



Seventy-Fifth Ohio Infantry. 435

it as the " bloodiest of the war for the number engaged, and that no prisoners were taken on
either side."

The Seventy-Fifth added new laurels to its former good name, under the immediate eye of
Milroy, who warmly congratulated Colonel McLean on the gallantry of his regiment.

Captain A. L. Harris was severely wounded, and eighty-seven men killed and wounded.
Among the killed were Color-Sergeant E. M. Gordon, and Sergeant-Major L. L. Stewart, two
brave and noble young men. The last named was a printer, and like so many others had
volunteered from the purest patriotism, having left a comfortable home and a young wife whom
he wedded immediately before joining the ranks.

General *Milroy fell back to Franklin closely followed by Jackson. The National force,
under General Schenck at Franklin, was soon joined by a division from the Army of the Poto-
mac, and General Fremont the commander of the Mountain Department. For ten days the
enemy tried Fremont's lines in force, each attack resulting in brisk skirmishing, but slight loss.
Finally Jackson left Franklin and returned to the Shenandoah Valley, encountering and driving
General Bank's forces before him in the direction of Harper's Ferry.

General Fremont was ordered to get, if possible, in the rear of Jackson's army, and prevent
him from returning up the Valley. With that purpose General Fremont crossed the Shenandoah
at Strasburg, but Jackson was too fleet for him and had already passed that point. Fremont pur-
sued and overtook him at Cross Keys, on the 10th of June, 1862, when Jackson stood at bay, and
a brisk but decisive battle was fought. General Schenck's Ohio Brigade, consisting of the
Fifty-Fifth, Seventy-Third, Seventy-Fifth, and Eighty-Second Ohio Infantry Regiments were,
during a portion of the day, in reserve, and were not called into action until late in the afternoon.

A change of commanders occurred immediately after this battle. General Fremont was
relieved, his army reorganized and named Army of Virginia, Major-General Pope commanding.
In this organization General Schenck was assigned to a division, and Colonel McLean, of the
Seventy-Fifth, to his brigade.

The next affair in which the Seventy-Fifth faced the enemy was at Cedar Mountain, Vir-
ginia, on the 8th of August, 1862, but as Bank's corps did nearly all the fighting before General
Sigel's forces arrived on the ground, the loss of the Seventy-Fifth was slight. Jackson fell back
beyond the Rapidan, where he remained until Lee withdrew his forces from Richmond and opened
the campaign which closed with the battle of Antietam. As soon as the advance of Lee's army
reached Jackson he again took the offensive. General Pope fell back beyond the Rappahannock
and took position to prevent Jackson from crossing. For a week the north bank of the river was
closely watched, and at every point that Jackson attempted to cross he found himself too strongly
opposed to succeed. During this week the Seventy-Fifth was frequently engaged, and at Free-
man's Ford iQst heavily. Jackson finally flanked Pope, got in his *rear, burnt his wagon-trains
and three trains of cars, and was again attacked by General Pope at Groveton, near the old Bull
Run battle-field on the evening of the 28th of August, 1862. The fighting was very severe.



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