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The Seventy-Fifth was hotly pressed by the enemy on the afternoon of the 30th of August, when
Longstreet hurled his whole corps against the left, made weak by the withdrawal of Porter's
corps. For a time the fighting was bfoody in the extreme, and the Seventy-Fifth lost heavily,
having one color-bearer killed and another mortally wounded, and twenty-one men killed and
ninety-two wounded. All the killed, and a portion of the wounded, were left on the field where
they fell in the hands of the enemy, when the National army fell back on Centerville. It was
observed, as an evidence of the severity of the fire, that ninety odd shots took effect on the colors
of the Seventy-Fifth during this battle.

The National army fell back to Washington, and from thence was led by General McClellan
in pursuit of the Rebel army in the direction of Maryland. General Sigel's corps (in which was
the Seventy-Fifth) was left encamped on Arlington Hights, for the protection of the Capital from
any sudden dash that might be made from the direction of Richmond.

When the Army of the Potomac returned from the battle-fields of South Mountain and
Antietam, Sigel's corps again joined it, and was present, but not engaged, at Fredericksburg. At



436 Ohio in the Wak.

that place, it will be recollected, the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps formed the grand reserve divis-
ion of the army under Siegel. After the second attempt on Fredericksburg, the Eleventh Corps
went into camp at Brook's Station, Virginia, and spent their time in drills and reviews. Presi-
dent Lincoln reviewed it while there in the spring of 1863.

Nothing of importance occurred in the history of the Seventy-Fifth, until the 2d of May,
18G3, at Chancellors ville. The Eleventh Corps (now under command of General Howard)
broke camp on the 27th of April, and, on the 30th, took up its position on the extreme right flank
of the Army of the Potomac at Chaneellorsville. The history of that battle is well known. The
Eleventh Corps surprised and overwhelmed by the impetuous Rebels, fell back in almost complete
demoralization. Yet McLean's Ohio Brigade, a part of that corps, merited the highest praise for
the bravery of its officers and men, and the cool, steady manner in which it received the enemy
under the most trying circumstances. Owing to the peculiar formation of the line and nature of
the ground at the point of the attack, but few troops could open on the enemy at a time. The
Seventy-Fifth changed front under this severe fire, and received the enemy in the most gallant
manner. But the odds were too great, and to keep from being surrounded and captured, the
brigade fell back in the direction of the Chaneellorsville House. In the short space of half an
hour the Seventy-Fifth lost one hundred and fifty men killed and wounded. It was in this battle
that the brave and patriotic officer, Colonel Robert Reilly, of Cincinnati, fell mortally wounded
and died on the field. At the same time fell Adjutant Jacob Gano and Captain Mathias, both
dangerously wounded.

After this battle the Seventy-Fifth returned to its old camp near Brooks's Station, where it
remained until about the 12th June following, when it again took the field with its brigade and
division, and formed a part of the forces confronting the enemy at Gettysburg on the 1st of July,
1863. The regiment was again placed in the reserve division, but when the battle became gen-
eral it was thrown to the front, and, under command of Colonel Harris, made a successful charge
upon a ledge of rock held by the enemy. This position was not gained, however, without serious
loss. Just at this time the head of Ewell's corps arrived from York, and made an effort to get in
the rear of Howard, who was now commanding the First and Eleventh Corps, all of the National
army that were then on the ground. This caused Howard to fall back hastily to the town of
Gettysburg, rendering the situation of the Seventy-Fifth very embarrassing, as all connection with
the brigade was severed and no chance left to receive orders. As a dernier resort the regiment
fell back, though not without adding greatly to its list of killed and wounded.

The regiment was under fire every day of the battle until its termination. Of sixteen officers
that went into the engagement, Captains Mulhaner and Briggs, and Lieutenant Wheeler were
killed ; Lieutenant-Colonel Benjamin Morgan, Captains W. J. Rannells and L. R. Montfort, and
Lieutenants D. Miller and George Russell dangerously, and Colonel A. L. Harris and Alonzo Force
severely Avounded; and Lieutenants W. D. McCaulley, Caldwell, Potts, and Mendenhall, taken pris-
ioners; and out of two hundred and ninety-two enlisted men, sixty-three were killed, one hun-
dred and six wounded, and thirty-four prisoners. The loss in other regiments of the brigade
was about equal in proportion to that of the Seventy-Fifth.

On the 6th of August, 1863, the Ohio Brigade was sent to Charleston, South Carolina, where
it arrived on the 12th, and on the 18th went into the trenches on Morris Island, and remained
there until after the fall of Forts Wagner and Gregg, which took place on the morning of the
7th of September following. The duty on this Island was terribly severe, owing to the extreme
heat and the impossibility of even temporary relief; the hot sun beating pitilessly on the heads
and bodies of the devoted troops. Large numbers died from this cause. Disease killed more
than the enemy's shells. In fact, only two men were killed and five wounded of the Seventy-
Fifth during the siege.

Soon after the fall of Morris Island the Seventy-Fifth, together with its brigade, was sent
down to Folly Island, where it remained until the 22d of February, 1864 (just after the battle of
Olustee). It was then sent to Jacksonville, Florida, and shortly thereafter mounted. From that



Seventy-Fifth Ohio Infantry. 437

time the regiment was designated in orders as the Seventy-Fifth Mounted Infantry, and performed
all the duties of a regular cavalry regiment.

On the 25th of April, 1S64, General Birney, commanding the District of Florida, sent Colo-'
nel Harris with the Seventy-Fifth on a raid to the head-waters of the St. John and Kissinnee
Rivers, for the purpose of breaking up a system of blockade-running carried on in the Rebel
cause along the Indian River. The regiment proceeded as far as Lake Harmer when it was
divided into two parts; one division was sent to Smyrna, on the coast, where it captured two
schooners loaded with cotton, and sent them, together with their crew, safely to St. Augustine.
The remainder of the regiment continued their march southward, captured and destroyed five
hundred bales of cotton, destroyed three salt furnaces and burned a large lot of resin, tar, and
turpentine stored by the Rebels at Sand Point, on the Indian River, from which place blockade-
runners received and carried it to Nassau, New Providence. From this point the detachment made
its way to the head-waters of the Kissinnee River, and captured a large lot of cattle driven there
by the Rebel owners to prevent them from falling into the hands of the National army. The
detachment brought in about five thousand head of fine beef cattle, an article just then much
needed by the National forces in Florida. This was accomplished without the loss of a man.

The regiment had scarcely time to rest and recruit its horses, when it was again dispatched to
the head-waters of the St. John, for the purpose of protecting the Unionists of that locality from the
barbarous cruelty of the Rebel cavalry. This expedition, though made with great rapidity, was
only partially successful. Rapidly following this, the Seventy-Fifth was ordered to Jacksonville
to assist in repelling a threatened attack of the enemy. On its arrival, the regiment was placed on
outpost duty, and hardly a day passed without a skirmish with the enemy — the Second Florida
Cavalry — from whom a number of prisoners were taken, but not without loss on the part of the
Seventy-Fifth.

On the 12th of July, 1864, General Birney, tired of the constant and, in the main, fruitless
skirmishes with the enemy, determined to get in their rear, and, if possible, force them to
abandon their strong position at Baldwin Crossing of the Florida Railroad by the Cedar Keys
Railroad. The Seventy-Fifth was detached to do the work. It was sent up the St. John's River
in steamboats to Black River, and there secretly disembarked and marched across the country to a
point, where the Florida Railroad crosses the St. Mary's River. Here it burned the railroad
bridge and a long range of trestle-work, and on the night of the 16th of July, 1864, burned two
thousand barrels of resin, near the enemy's lines. The flanking movement proved entirely suc-
cessful. The Rebels abandoned their works, and on the 17th of July the Seventy-Fifth took
undisputed possession. This point being of great importance to the enemy, General Birnej -
determined to hold it, and accordingly brought up his infantry force, while the enemy took up
his position on the bank of the St. Mary's, a distance of only eight miles. Here, again, the
Second Florida Rebel Cavalry tried its strength with the Seventy-Fifth in almost daily skirmishes,
with slight loss to either side, excepting in the expenditure of horseflesh and excessive fatigue
of constant duty night and day.

On the 10th of August, 1864, General Birney was relieved as commander of the District of
Florida, by General Hatch. That General, as it turned out unfortunately for the Seventy-Fifth,
sent it on an expedition to the rear of the enemy and into the interior of Florida. The horses of
the Seventy-Fifth, by constant duty, without proper feed, were in bad condition for such service —
so much so that but two hundred of the command could be mounted at all. With this little band
Colonel Harris started from Baldwin on the morning of the 14th of August, 1864; at daylight
succeeded in getting in the rear of the enemy's right flank, took a few prisoners, but was met by
a much superior force, compelling him to ride night and day in order to keep out of the enemy's
hands. On the morning of the 17th of August the regiment halted at Gainesville to rest, think-
ing it had distanced the enemy by several miles during the night. Before the regiment was
ready to move the enemy attacked with a force of about fourteen hundred men. No chance was
left but to fight, as retreat was impossible. The fight was kept up for two hours and a half, until
the ammunition of the Seventy-Fifth giving out, no alternative was left but to surrender or cut



438 Ohio in the War.

their way through the enemy. The latter was tried, and partially succeeded, about half of the
command getting through, and by swift marches reached Jacksonville. The Seventy-Fifth lost
in this affair fourteen men killed, and two commissioned officers and about thirty men wounded,
who, together with about sixty men and twelve officers, were taken prisoners, nearly all of whom
were held by the enemy until the spring of 1865.

On the 26th of September, 1864, the Seventy-Fifth was dispatched on a secret expedition to
the head-waters of the St. John's River, and, on the night of the 29th, captured an entire company
of the Second Florida Cavalry, together with their horses, arms, etc., and returned with them to
St. Augustine, without the loss of a man.

In October, 1864, companies A, B, and C, were sent to Columbus, Ohio, for muster-out, and
in November companies D, G, anil F, were also sent to the same place for the same purpose, their
term of service having expired.

On the 8th of December, 1864, Colonel Harris, with the four remaining companies of his
regiment and the One Hundred and Seventh, was sent from Jacksonville, Florida, to Hilton
Head, South Carolina ; and from thence to join General Hatch's forces, then essaying to make a
diversion in favor of General Sherman by threatening the Charleston and Savannah Railroad.

After the fall of Savannah the Seventy-Fifth was sent to Jacksonville, Florida, to prepare
the muster-out rolls and organize the veterans and recruits into a Veteran detachment. This was
accomplished on the 15th of January, 1865, and thereafter the Seventy-Fifth Ohio was known as
the Veteran Battalion, under the command of Captain W. J. Rannells. This battalion per-
formed valuable and arduous service at District Head-quarters, Jacksonville, Florida; and during
the summer of 1865 it was stationed at Tallahassa. In August of 1865 it was mustered out of
the service, thus ending the career of the Seventy-Fifth Ohio, and completing a record alike
honorable to its members and to their State.



Seventy-Sixth Ohio Infantry.



439



76th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



BANK.


NAME.


DATE OF BANK.


COM. ISSUED.


BEMABKS.




CHARLES R.WOODS. ,. ,

WM. B. WOODS

EDWARD BRIGGS


Oct.
Aug.
July
Nov.
Sept.
Oct.
July
Dec.

June
J uly

Feb.
Nov.
\ug.
Dec.
Feb.
June
Dec.
Nov.

Dec.
Jan.


12, 1861

22, 1863

13, 1865
■1, 18M

10, 1863

12, 1864

13, 1865
28, 1861
10, 186-1
16, 1865
13, "

9, 1862
16, 1863

6, 1861
21, 1862

23, "

16, 1863
18, "

17, 1861
1, "

12, "
4, "
16, "
16, "

18, "

7, 1S62

24, "
27, 1861

7, 1862


Oct.

Sept.

.Inly

March

Dec.

Oct.

July

March

June

July

March

Feb.

March

Sept.

Feb.

June
Dec.
Feb.


12, 1861
9, 1863

13, 1865
22, 1862
N, 1863

12, 1864

13, 1865
24, 1862
10, 1864
16, 1865

24, 1862
16, 1863
24, 1862
4, "
10, 1S63
16, "
IS, "

15, 1861
6, 1S62
6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "

24, "
22, "
28, "
31, "
19, 1863
in, 1864
10, "
10, "

10, •'

11, "

13, "
18, 1865
18, "
18, "

18, "
10, "

16, "

15, "
13, "

13, "
6, 1862
6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "
6, "

12, "
24, "
24, "
24, "

14, "
24, "

16, '•
28, "
28, "
31, "
31, "

19. 1863
10, 1864
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "

10, "

11, "

13, "
6, 1865
6, "

18, "

15, "


Promoted to Brig. Gen. August 22, 1S63.


Do


Promoted to Brigadier-General.


Do










Do






Do






Do




Mastered out with regiment as Major.
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.


WlI.LARD WaBNEB


Do


Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.


Do .




Do. .








Andrew Sahin


Died January 28, 1863.


Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.


Mustered out with regiment.




Died October 2, 1862.


Do.






Do.










Resigned October 3, 1862.








Do






Do




Resigned January 21, 1863. [War.
Resigned May 23, '63; dis. removed by Sec'y of
Mustered out.
Resigned January 21, 1863.


Do


Do. .,

Do

Do


Joseph C. Well ill-

Strew. M. Emmons


Do




Nov.
Feb.
July
Sept.
Oct.
Jan.
March

April
Jan.




Do


Kdward Briggs










Do




22, "

30, "
1. "

11, 1863
10, 1864
10, "
10, "

10, "

11, "

13, "
18, 1865
18, "
18, "
18, "

10, "
16, "

15, "
13, "

13, "
1, 1861

12, "
4, "

16, "
16, "
18, "

7, 1862
25, 1861
24, 1862
27, 1861

14, "
21, 1862

7, "
27, "
3D, "

31, "

3o| "

30, "

1, "

11, 1863
10, 1864
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, •'
10, "
10, "
10, "
10, "

10, "

11, "

13, "

6, 1865
6, "

15, "
18, "


July
Nov.
Dec.
Feb.
March

April
Jan.

Feb.
June

July-
Fob.

March

April
June
Sept.
Nov.

Dec.

Feb.
March

April
Jan.


Re-instated ; promoted.


Do


Ir;i B. French


Do


Beverly W. Lemert




Do

Do


James M Blackburn

Jehiel F. Wintrode


Honorably discharged October 11, 1864.
I'm. to Maj.; declined ; must, out with regt.
Murdered at Nashville. (1864.
Mustered out at expiration of service Nov. 18,


Do




Do


Charles D. Miller


Do




Do


Richard W. Burt




Do






Do


Zebulon P. Evans




Do


John J. Metzgar


Feb.

June

July
Nov.
Dec.

Nov.
Jan.




Do




Do






Do. ,






Do






Do


Frank Bracket t




Do. ,






Do.










Do.


Ira B. French




Do.






Do.




Resigned March 27, 1862.


Do.


Michael P. Maher


Honorably discharged August 7, 1864


Do.




Do.

Do.
Do.


Jerome N. Rappleyed

John A. Dili


Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.


Do.
Do.


James M. Blackburn

Henry D. Wright


Nov. .
Oct.


Promoted to Captain.
Resigned February 22, 1864.


Do.


S. Sylvester Wells




Do.


David R. Kelley


Feb.

March

May

Auz.

Sept,

Oct.
Jan.




Do.
Do.
Do.


John R.Miller

Charles D. Miller


Killed November 27, 1863.
Promoted to Oaptain.
Killed November 27, 1863.


Do.
Do.
Do


John H. Hardgrove


Died May 24, 1863.

Declined ; commission returned.

Promoted to Captain.


Do.




Do.


Richard W. Burt




Do.
Do.
Do.
Do


Frederick II. Wilson

Zebulon P. Evans

Wm. H. Darlington


March

April
Jan.


Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Discharged December 29, 1864.


Do.
Do


George W. Jeremy


Promoted to Captain.


Do






Do






Do






Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.


Miles Arnold

Frank Bracket t

Norman II. Steffa

Robert B. Williamson

L. W. Humphrey

Wm. Held


Discharged November 4, 1864.
Promoted to Captain.
Killed July 22, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.



440



Ohio in the War,



DATE OF RANK



com. issrrii.



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.
" Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Lewis Follett

Win. II. Gale

Samuel Hupp

Alcenas Richardson....

Virgil W. Graves

Win. F. Focke

Jabez L. Rhodeback....

James Kelley

Leonard Holloway

John R. Miller

Simeon B. Wall

John W. Gray

Reason C. Strong

Charles Luther

Freeman Morrison

Richard W. Burt

Lucian H. Wright

John H. Hardgrove......

Calvin G. Wells

Mark Sperry

M. S. Moore

Frederick H. Wilson...,

John A. Lemert

Wni. II. Darlington

John M. Hart

John J. Metzgar

Joseph M. Ward

A. A, Batter

George W. Jeremy

Jacob A. Jury

John Riser

Carey M. Marriott

Jarius G. Evans

Frank Brackett

Miles Arnold

Lyman W. Humphrey.,

Norman H. Stella

Zehulon P. Evans

Lyman W. Humphrey.,



Feb.
June

July

Oct.

Nov.
Dec.



Jan.
Out.
Nov.
Feb.

March
Aug.



10,
1,



Feb.
June



July
Feb.



April
Sept.



Oct.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Sept.
Oct.
Jan.

Nov.



May



7,
30,
31,
3D,

1,
11,

1,
24,
2*i
21,
24,
24,
24,
24,



Nov.
Dec.



Feb.
Aug.

Feb.



May



1«6S Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.
" Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
18, " Honorably discharged.
10, " Mustered out with regiment.
16, " Mustered out with regiment,
lii, " Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out as Sergeant- Major.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Honorably discharged October 14, 18fi2.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned February 2t>, isr.2.
12, " Promoted ; honorably discharged Dec. 12, 63.
20, " Deceased May 2*, 1S<>2.
24, " Resigned February 2fi< 1SK3.

Resigned October 31, 1S62.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
2s, ISliL' Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Died December IS, 18ti2.
2s, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
31, " Dismissed March 5, 1803.
31, " Died July 30, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
1803 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
18f>4 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
7, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
7, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
7, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
7, " Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



19,



SEVENTY-SIXTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



CAPTAIN CHARLES R. WOODS, of the Ninth United States Infantry, having
been authorized to raise a regiment for the three-years' service, recruited and organized
the Seventy-Sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry at Newark, Ohio, on the 9th of February,
1862. The regiment left Newark, and, proceeding via Paducah, Kentucky, to Fort Donelson,
took an active part in the engagement at that place. On the 6th of March it moved to the Ten-
nessee River, and then up the river to Crump's Landing, where it remained until the 31st, when
it marched to Adamsville, and took position in General Lew. Wallace's division, in the right
wing of General Grant's army. The division made a forced march to Pittsburg Landing on the
6th of April, and was in line of battle by dark, and during the entire engagement was constantly
exposed to the enemy's fire. In the latter part of April the regiment formed a part of a recon-
noitering party toward Corinth, charging the Rebels, driving them from their position, and
destroying their camp equipage. It formed a part of the grand reserve during the advance on
Corinth, and, after the evacuation, moved to Memphis, arriving on the 17th of June, having
marched one hundred and thirty miles with wagon supplies. The Seventy-Sixth moved down
the river on the 24th of July, and encamped near Helena, Arkansas.

In the reorganization of the Army of the South-West the Seventy-Sixth was placed in the
Second Brigade, commanded by Colonel C. R. Woods, and in the Third Division, commanded by
General P. J. Osterhaus. On the 16th of August the regiment, forming a part of an expedi-
tion of observation, moved down the Mississippi, landed at Milliken's Bend on the 18th, sur-
prised the Thirty-First Louisiana Regiment, and captured all its camp and garrison equipage.



Seventy-Sixth Ohio Infantry. 441

The enemy was followed nine miles, and forty prisoners were captured. The fleet dropped down
to the mouth of the Yazoo, and a detachment, comprising a portion of the Seventy-Sixth, pro-
ceeded up the Yazoo, surprised Haines's Bluff, and captured four siege-guns, two field-pieces,
and a large quantity of fixed ammunition. The expedition returned to Helena on the 27th.
The regiment embarked for St. Genevieve, Missouri, early in October, and, remaining a week,
moved with the division to Pilot Knob, where it encamped for rest and reorganization. It
became very healthy and efficient during its stay here, and on the 12th of November returned to
St. Genevieve and embarked for Camp Steele, Mississippi. On the 21st of December it formed
a part of General Sherman's expedition for Vicksburg. The fleet arrived at Johnson's Landing,
on the Yazoo, on the 26th, and the division, then commanded by General Steele, disembarked ;
and Hovey's brigade, of which the Seventy-Sixth was a part, made a feint on Haines's Bluff,
and then took position on the extreme left of the army. On the 29th the division moved to the
main army at Chickasaw Bayou ; and, during the battle, the regiment was held in reserve.

General Sherman having abandoned the assault on Vicksburg, the troops re-embarked and
proceeded up the Mississippi, landing at Arkansas Post on the evening of the 10th of January,
1863. That night the regiment marched six miles through mud and water, and by two o'clock
next morning the troops occupied the cantonments of the enemy. Shortly after daylight they
moved upon the enemy's works, and about one o'clock the Seventy-Sixth charged within one hun-
dred yards of the rifle-pits, halted, opened fire, and held the position for three hours, when the
enemy surrendered. On the 14th, after burning the cantonments of the enemy, it returned to the
river, and, embarking on the 23d, the troops landed at Young's Point, Louisiana. On the night
of the 14th of February two non-commissioned officers of company B were killed and four dis-
abled by lightning. During the entire month heavy details were made from the regiment to
work upon the canal then in progress across the neck of land opposite Vicksburg. On the 2d
of April the regiment, with Steele's division, proceeded on transports up the river to Greenville,
Mississippi. The command marched down Deer Creek after the Rebel force under Colonel Fer-
guson, and on the 7th made an attack and routed them. The command returned to Greenville
after destroying a million dollars' worth of corn and cotton, and bringing off a large number of
cattle, horses, and mules. About three hundred negroes followed the troops on their return, and
were enlisted in colored regiments.

On the 24th the Seventy-Sixth returned to Young's Point, and on the 26th moved to Milli-
ken's Bend, and prepared to march with the grand army southward. On the 2d of May the Fif-



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