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time drove the Eebels into a cornfield, where it followed and engaged them in a fierce hand-to-
hand conflict, many of the men using the butts of their guns. The conflict here was terrible,
but the enemy was at last compelled to give way, contesting every foot of the ground as they did
so. They were driven from the field into an open plain, and from thence into and through a
woods about a quarter of a mile distant. The pursuit was stopped, and the position held.

Fresh bodies of Eebels were continually coming up, and it became apparent that without
re-en forcements the Fifth Ohio and its brigade could not hold out much longer, for its whole
strength did not exceed five hundred men. Two regiments were sent to its assistance ; but, after
firing a few volleys, they broke and ran in great confusion. These flying regiments were posted
on the left, and their retreat made it necessary for the brigade to fall back to prevent its being
outflanked. The advancing Eebels were soon met by a portion of Franklin's command, who
again drove them beyond the woods. Night coming on closed the battle, the National forces
occupying the whole battle-field, having driven the Eebels, with great loss, half a mile beyond
their original lines.

During the time the Fifth Ohio was engaged in the battle its cartridge-boxes were emptied
three times, making about one hundred shots per man. On the outer edge of the cornfield men-
tioned above lay a row of dead Eebels on their faces, as though they had been dragged there
and laid in order. In the open field near no less than three hundred dead and wounded Eebels
were lying.

In this battle the Fifth Ohio lost fifty-four men killed and wounded out of one hundred and
eighty, the number with which it entered the conflict.

After various marches and counter-marches the Fifth went into camp at Dumfries, Virginia,
on the 16th of December, 1S62. On the 27th the garrison was attacked by General Stuart's
Eebel cavalry. The engagement lasted from one P. M. until after dark, when the Eebels
retreated, leaving many dead on the field. Colonel Patrick led the Fifth in this affair. Lieu-
tenants Walker and Leforce, of company G, were killed, three wounded, and five made prisoners.

The regiment lay at Dumfries through the months of January, February, March, and part
of April. On the 20th of April, 1863, it joined the general advance of Major-General Hooker's
army, skirmishing as it marched, and crossed the Eapidan on the 29th. On the 1st of May the
regiment entered the battle of Chancellorsville, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Kilpat-
rick. In this bloody battle the Fifth performed a distinguished part — now fighting behind
intrenchments thrown up at night in the face of the enemy ; again, making fruitless efforts to
arrest the retreating tide of the Eleventh Corps, which had given way on the second day ; at
another time retiring to the trenches for rest, to be aroused at midnight by the artillery, which
(by reason of the blight moonlight) could be rendered as effective by night as by day ; buffeting
the pitiless rain and northern blasts of the fourth day; now breasting the iron hail, and, finally,
abandoning their position near Chancellor House only when all our forces to the right, left, and
rear, except one regiment, had retired.

Their next great battle was that of Gettysburg. The cannonading commenced early in the
morning of the 2d of July. The Fifth lay iu the woods in front of the town nearly all of that



46 Ohio in the War.

day, and did not suffer much until about four P. M., when the shells began to fall thickly around,
several of the men being wounded while lying on the ground. At sundown they moved to the
extreme right, and acted as pickets till midnight, when they returned to their old position in the
woods; on the 3d they were engaged from daylight until eleven A. M. About four P. M. the
enemy, with parked artillery, began a terrific cannonade. The Fifth being in direct range of
this fire, the shot and shell crashed terribly among the trees of the orchard in which they were
lying. The men lay on their arms that night. On the morning of the 4th of July it was
definite] v ascertained that victory had crowned our arms, and that the Rebels were in full retreat
for Richmond, leaving thousands of their dead and wounded in our hands. Lieutenant Brink-
man, one of the heroes of Port Republic, was killed in this engagement. The Fifth participated
in the fruitless pursuit that followed.

In August, 1863, the regiment was sent from Alexandria, Virginia, to New York City, just
after the great mob there. It remained in New York until September 8th ; then returned to
Alexandria, and after a series of marches around Washington, Manassas Junction, etc., embarked
on the 28th of September via the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad for Benwood, Virginia, where it
arrived on the 30th. Thence it went by rail through Ohio to Indianapolis, Indiana, avoiding
Cincinnati, the home of nearly all the men, where they had not been for two and a half years.
A perfect ovation accompanied them through Ohio and Indiana — "their deeds had gone before
them." At Louisville they took the cars for Nashville; from thence they were rushed down to
Murfreesboro' (which place was menaced by the enemy), arriving there on the 6th of October.
They found the trenches filled with the people, and the enemy in the town. The Fifth, with
others, drove the enemy out and re-instated the citizens.

In the grand advance of Rosecrans's army toward Chattanooga the Fifth formed a part, and
and on the 14th of November, 1863, had the honor of opening the battle above the clouds, on
Lookout Mountain, under the lead of General Hooker.

On the 14th of January, 1864, the Fifth was at Bridgeport, Alabama, doing post-duty in
connection with the Seventh. It was with Sherman in his grand march toward Atlanta, and
participated in the conflicts which marked his progress. At or near Dalton, Georgia, they lost
their brave Colonel, J. H. Patrick, who fell while leading the Fifth in a charge against the
enemy, and died amid the 6houts of victory. A few days thereafter, the time of the regiment
(three years) having expired, they were ordered to the rear, in charge of prisoners. Notwith-
standing their hard and almost continual service; notwithstanding they were literally shattered
to pieces, this brave band of heroes resolved to "go in for the war." This gave them the privi-
lege of a short furlough home. Before the term expired most, if not all, "the boys" were back
"to the front," bravely and zealously following the lead of General Sherman in his "march to
the sea," participating in all the hardships of the campaign, and always on hand when fighting
was to be done. From Savannah to Goldsboro' they waded through the swamps, driving the
enemy; then came that great flood of sunlight, Lee's surrender; the triumphant march up
through the Rebel States and Richmond; thence to Washington, joining in the grand review;
thence to the Queen City of the West, their home ; and at last the muster-out at Louisville, 26th
July, 1865, and the final payment and discharge at Camp Dennison.

This gallant regiment, during its term of service, took part in twenty-eight different
en »a cements, the principal of which were : Winchester, Port Republic, McDowell, Cedar
Mountain Dumfries, South Mountain, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Lookout Moun-
tain, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, and Savannah.

During its term of service the regiment traveled one thousand three hundred and seventy-
five miles on foot and nine hundred and ninety-three on cars, and was engaged in six pitched
battles besides a great number of reconnoissances and skirmishes, and sustained a loss in the
aggregate of five hundred men, killed, wounded, and taken prisoners.



Fifth Ohio Infantey. 47

To show the fierceness of the contest around and in the vicinity of Washington at the com-
mencement of Pope's campaign, we give the following passages, copied from a diary kept by an
officer of the Fifth Ohio :

" On the afternoon of tho 25th of July, having first loaded the camp equipage, we were once
more on the move. We arrived at Warrenton late at night. General Pope, who was now in
command of the Army of Virginia, had his head-quarters here, and was concentrating his forces.
We left Warrenton on the 31st of July, arriving near Little Washington the next day. The
Twenty-Eighth Pennsylvania, consisting of fifteen companies and Knapp's Battery, were now
added to our brigade, and Brigadier-General Geary placed in command. We were now assigned
to, and formed part of, Major-General Banks's corps. We again pulled up stakes on the 5th
of August, passing through Sperryville the same day, arriving at Culpepper C. H. on the night
of the 7th. We remained in camp on the Sth under orders to turn out at a moment's notice.
During the day, reports came into camp that our troops, in considerable numbers, were drawn up
in order of battle, and that Banks's corps was intended for the reserve.

"The next morning about eight o'clock, we passed through Culpepper, all in fine spirits at
the prospect of a fight. . . . We kept on, and it now became apparent that instead of the
reserve, we had become the advance, and if any fighting was to be done we would have a
hand in it. Three miles further, and within five miles of the Eapidan, we turned into a field
under cover of a hill. Our cavalry made a reeonnoissance, and were fired upon by the enemy.
A sharp fire was kept up for some time, and our cavalry withdrew.

" The Eebels could now be seen maneuvering in our front, and shortly after opened fire with
a piece of artillery. Their fire remained unanswered for some time. , Finally, a battery was put
in position near the brow of the hill, and opened fire upon them. The shot from this battery all
fell short, while those of the rebels all overreached. Knapp's Battery of Parrott guns was after-
ward put in position and opened fire with better success, forcing the Eebel battery to change its
position. . . . The infantry was assigned its position. The Second Division, General
Augur, occupied the left of the road leading to the Eapidan; the First Division the right of the
road. The whole line, with the exception of the left-center, was heavily timbered. This posi-
tion was assigned our brigade composed of the Fifth, Seventh, Twenty-Ninth, and Sixty-
Sixth Ohio.

" The brigade was formed in two lines — Seventh and Sixty-Sixth, and Fifth and Twenty-
Ninth — and was stationed to the right and in rear of Knapp's Battery. The Eebel infantry ha.v-
ing made their appearance in our front, the first line — the Seventh and Sixty-Sixth — was ordered
forward. The infantry fire now opened, and soon after the Fifth and Twenty-Ninth were ordered
up. The ground in front of us was rolling, and, advancing about one hundred yards, we ascended
the brow of a hill, when the enemy opened upon us with canister and grape. We moved on,
reserving our fire for closer range, and then opened upon them, advancing as we did so. As we
advanced, we observed a large body of Eebels on our left flank, and the regiment changed front
to attack them, thus leaving those who were before in front, on our right flank.

" Simultaneous with our change of front a fire was opened upon us from the rear of our
right flank, our forces on the right having fallen back, and we were thus subject to three fires.
The General had ordered a retreat, but it never reached the men, or was not heard by them.
We maintained our position, subject to this cross-fire, until driven from it, which was not until
one-half of the brigade had fallen killed or wounded.

"Our regiment went into the fight with two hundred and seventy-five men, and lost one
hundred and twenty-five killed and wounded. Among the number wounded were eleven line
officers, the Major and Adjutant. We fell back about two miles in confusion, there not being
sufficient officers left to re-form the men. The Eebels did not follow, but remained in possession
of the field."



48



Ohio in the War.



6th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel... .

Major

Surgeon

Ass't Surgeon

Captain

JDo

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
2d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



W. K. BOSLEY

El.IPIlALKT LOIUNG

ALEX. C. Christopher

Starling Loving

K. W. Ames

Marcus Aurclius Westcott.

Julian White

John C. Lane

Frank 11. Ehrnian

.Samuel (Jarriek Erwin

George S. Smith

Anthony 0. Russell

Henry ft. Tinker

.lames Bense

Julius C. Guthrie

John Wilber Wilson

James Willis Wilmington.

John A. Asbury

John G. Parker

John F. Hny

Charles H.Brutton

Win. S. Gettv

John W. Morgan

Richard Southgate

Frank M. Hulhurd

Nicholas L. Anderson

Edward M. Shoemaker

Henry MeAlpin

Thomas S. Royse

Charles H. Titus

Ezekiel H. Tatem

Louis S. Worthington

Charles H. Heron

Jules J. Montagnier

Edgar SI. Johnson

Charles F. Porter

Augustus B. Billerbeck



DATE


)F BANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


April


20, ISfil


April


20, isr.i


44


20, "


44


20, 44


44


20, "


44


20, "


Hay


2, "


May


2, "


44


2, "


44


2, "


April


20, "
20, "


April


20, "

20, "


11


20. "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


11


20, "


41


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


14


20, "


**


20, 4l


44


20, "


11


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


11


20, "


44


20, "


11


20, "


44


20, 44


44


20, "


44


20, "


41


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, 44


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, 44


44


20, 44


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, l4


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, 4l


44


20, "


44


20, ' 4


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20, "


44


20. ,l


44


30, "


44


20, 44


44


20, "


44


20, "


41


20, "



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


REMARKS.




W. K. BOSLEY

NICHOL'S L.ANDERSON


Juno

Aug.
June


12, 1861
P.I, I8fi2
12, 186]


Juno
Oct.
June


12, isr.i

8, 1802
12, ISM


Honorably discharged August 19, 1862.


Do


Mustered out with regiment.




Promoted to Colonel.


Do


Alex'r C. Christopher


Aug.


19, 1862 Oct.


8, 1862


Mustered out with regiment.




Alex's C. Christopher....


June


12, 1861 June


12, 1661


Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.


D(


Anthony 0. Russeli


Aug.


19, 1862


Nov.


is, 1862


Resigned February 20, 1862.


I)o.


Samuel C. Erwin


Feb.


20, 1863


April


1ft, 1863


Killed inaction November 25, 1862.


Do


J A M Eg BENSE


Nov.


2a, "


Jan.


20, 1864


Mustered out with regiment.




Si ai; ling Loving


June


IS, 1861


June


18, 1862


Resigned October 20, 1861.


Do. ...»


A. II. Stephens


I'C.


20, "


Julv


7, 1362


Mustered out with regiment.




F. W. Ames


Juno


18, 1861


June


IS, 1861


Resigned June 12, 1803.


Do.


Wm. W. Fountain


May


6, 1863


Mav


fi, 1863


Resigned August 8, 1863.


Do.


Israel Bidell


Aug.


11. "


Aug.


11, 1863


Mustered out with regiment.




Marcus A. Westcott


June


12, 1861


Juno


12, lSiil


Resigned March ft, 1863.


Do


Joseph A. Andrews


44


12, "


44


12, "


Resigned April 22. 1862.


Bo


James Willis Wilmington.


44


12, "


44


12, "


Resigned Julv 6, 1802.


D<

Di




44


12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, 4 '


44


12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "


Killed by railroad July 19, 1862.


Samuel C. Erwin


Promoted to Major.


Do


Resigned January 14, 1862.




Promoted to Major. [with regiment.






Wounded at Chickamauga ; mustered out


Do




Promoted to Major.


Do


Charles M. Clark


Resigned September 8. 1S02.


Do




April


22, 1862


May


ft, 1862


Died of wounds ree'd ai Stone River Jan. 10, 63.


Do


Win. S. Getty


July


6, "


Nov.


S, "


Resigned February 21, 1863.


Do

Do




Aug.

July


8, "
19, "

1ft, "


Dec.


IS, "
is, "

Hi, "


Mustered out with regiment.


Charles B.Russell


Mustered out with regiment.


Do


Mustered out with regiment.

W'nded and disch'd Feb. lft,Y,4. [with n«f.


Do




Jan.


lo, 1863


Jan.


1ft, 1863


Do


Justin M. Thatcher


44


14, "


Feb.


13, "


Wounded at Mission Ridge; mustered out


Do


Wm. S. Getty ,


March


L "


April




Mustered out with reg't; wounded at Resaca.


Do




44


ft, "


44


10, "


Served in S. C. since Jan. 26, 't>2; in. o. with r.
Honorably discharged December 21, 1863.


Do


Charles Oilman

Benjamin F. West


Feb.
April


20, "
1, 1864


ti


l! 1804


Do


Mustered out with regiment. [r*e t.


Do




44


1. "


44


1, "


Wounded at Stone River ; mustered out with



Sixth Ohio Infantry.



49



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM.


SSUED.


REMARKS.




Henry C. Choate


May
July

Aug.
Dec.

Feb.

April
July
Aug.
Sept.
Aug.
Nov.
July-
Dec.
Jan.

Feb.

March

Oct.

April

May
June

Aug.
Dec.

Feb.

April

July

Sept.
Aug.

Sept.

July
Dec.
Jan.

Feb.
March

June
Oct.


9, 186-1
12, 1861
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "

3, "
12, "
20, "
28, 1862
1+, "
22 "

•>! "

10, "

8, "
li "

20, "

19, "
31, "
11), 1863

28, "

14, "

20, "

9, "
22, "

29, "
1, 1864
1. "
1, "
9, "

12, 1861
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
3, "
12, 1862
20, "
28, "

15, "
14, "
22 "
111 "

6, "

11. "
19, "

1, "

8, "
19, "

19, "

10,' 1863
14, "

28, "
22, "

20, "

9, "
1, "

1(), "
25, "

29, "


May

Jl lv


9, 1864
12, 1861
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, J|

12* "

20, "

28, 1862
20, "
9, "

8, "
18, "
18, "

18, "
20, "
16, "

19, 1863

19, "
3, "
3, "

10,' "
111, 1861
10, "
1, "
1. "
1, "

9, "
12, 1861
12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "

12, ;;

12, "
12, "
12, "
12, "
3, "
12, 1862

20, "
28, "
20, "

1, '"
3, "
25, "

18' "

15, "
18, "
18, "

18, "

16, "

19, 1863
19, "

3, 'J

12! ||

li)' "
22, "

25, "
*, "

10, 1804


Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain. [Oct. 12, 1862.

Promoted by President Sept. 25, '62 ; lion. dig.

Resigned February 14, 1862.

Resigned February 14, 1862.

Resigned August 1, 1862.

Resigned October 22, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned September 11, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned October 26, 1861.

Promoted July 19, 1862. [regiment.

Detached at own request; mustered out with

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain. [regiment.

Detached at own request ; mustered out with

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.










'


Do.




Do.




Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.


John F. Hoy








Do.
Do.




Sept.
Dec.

Feb.
March

May
Nov.

Dec.
Jan.

Feb.

April

Jan.

April

May
June

Aug.
Dec.

Feb.

March

May

June

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.
Jan.

Feb.

Jan.

April

July
Dec.


Do.


Charles C. Peck


Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.
Do. *




Do.




Do


Albert G. Williams


Do.




Detached at own request.
Promoted to Captain.


Do.


Frank S Scheitt'er


Do




Do.




Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out with regiment.
Honorably discharged January 29, 1864.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned October 29, 1863.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.


Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.


Jesse C. La Bille


Do.




Do.




Do.


J. F. Graham


Do.




Do.








Do.




Resigned April 14, 1S64.

Promoted April 22, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned February 15, 1862.

Promoted February 14,1862, to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted July 19, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted July 6, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.


Frank S. Seheift'er


Do.




Do.




Do.




Promoted February 28, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.




Do.




Appointed by President September 19, 1862.
Promoted September 8, to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.




Do.




Do.






Do.




Resigned September 11, 1862.
Resigned July 11, 1862.


Do.




Do.


Albert G. Williams


Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.


C. H. Foster


Killed December 31, 1863.


Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.
Do.
Do.


J. F. Graham „


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.




Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.






Do.




Resigned 25, 1863.


Do.


Wm. 11. Glenn




Do.


W. R. Goodnough


Mustered out with regiment.


Do.


Win. C. Perkins




Do.


F. Mellen




Do.




Mustered out with regiment.













Vol. II.— 4.



50 Ohio in the War.



SIXTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE nucleus of this regiment was an independent military organization of the city
of Cincinnati, known as the Guthrie Gray Battalion, from which the regiment was
first organized in April, 1861, and mustered into the three months' service, about eight
hundred strong, upon the 18th of the same month, at Camp Harrison, Ohio, by Captain Gordon
Granger, United States Army, afterward Major-General Volunteers. Shortly after muster-in it
was transferred to Camp Dennison.

Under the call for three hundred thousand men, the regiment was reorganized for the three
years' service, recruited to the maximum, and mustered in June 18, 1861, by Captain Walker,
United States Army, with an aggregate of one thousand and sixteen.

Immediately after the muster-in and equipment, the regiment was ordered to Western Vir-
ginia. Leaving Camp Dennison on the 30th of June, 1861, it traveled by rail to Grafton, West
Virginia, where it arrived on the 2d of July, and reported for duty to Brigadier-General Mor-
ris, then in command of that district. On July 4th it marched to Philippi, and thence, on July
6th, to Laurel Hill, then fortified and held by the Rebels under General Garnet.

The regiment took part in the operations before that place, and in the subsequent pursuit
of the Rebels, ending in the affair of Carrick's Ford, July 10th.

On the 20th of July it marched to Beverly, went into camp there, and remained till August,
when it was ordered to Elkwater, and went into camp at the foot of Cheat Mountain. Colonel
Bosley was left in command of the post at Beverly, and Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson took
command of the regiment.

Here it remained, making several reconnoissances to the front, among the defiles of the
mountains, holding the fortifications with the rest of the division then under the command of
Brigadier-General J. J. Reynolds, against the advance of General Lee, with some skirmishing,
but no serious fighting. During the advance of General Lee, an advance picket post from the
Sixth, consisting of Captain Bense, Lieutenants Scheiffer and Gilman, with forty men from com-
pany I, were cut off from the main army and taken prisoners. They were exchanged in the fall
of 1862, and joined the regiment near Nashville, Tennessee.

Upon the 19th of November, 1861, the camp at Elkwater was broken up; and leaving the
Second Virginia Infantry in the works, the regiment marched through Beverly, Bnckhannon,
and Clarksburg, to Parkersburg, and thence moved by steamer to Louisville, where it joined
the Army of the Ohio, then concentrating at that point under General Buell.

In the organization of the Army of the Ohio, the Sixth was placed in the Fifteenth Brigade,
Colonel M. S. Hascall, Seventeenth Indiana Volunteers, commanding, and in the Fourth Divis-
ion, Brigadier-General William Nelson commanding.

The division marched to Camp Wickliffe, some sixty miles south of Louisville, and went
into a camp of instruction for the winter, where it remained, drilling daily, until February 14,
1862, when the camp was broken up, and the division marched to West Point and there embarked
on steamers, and sailed down the Ohio River, with the intention of re-enforcing General Grant,
who was at that time besieging Fort Donelson. When the fleet reached Evansville the news of



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