Copyright
Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

. (page 83 of 165)
Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 83 of 165)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Honorably discharged January 10, 1865.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed in action July 22, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined; commission returned.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined; commission returned.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.



464



Ohio in the Wak.



DATE OF RANK,



COM. ISSUED.



1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



Wm. D. Tyler ,

James C. Crawford

Benj. R. Howell

George W. Miller ,

John Allaback

Thomas llarpster

0. C. Platter

Wm. Pittiman

Adam C. Post

Thomas M. Sellers

Wm. M. Murphey

Thomas C. Harbaugh.

Thomas H. Imes

Win. B. Rush

John W. Hays ,

Price J. Jones ,

David Kinsey

Gideon Howe

Scth Dixon

Harry C. Doddridge ...

Sumner V. Mason

Cor win B. Van Pelt ...

Wm. E. Lockwood

Wm. F. Wilcox

O. P. Irion

James W. Post

Anthony Bowsher

Caleb Ayers

Malilon G. Bailey

Noah Stoker

Timothy Shatter

James C. Crawford

Hezekiah Hoover

Robert E. Roney

Matthew A. Ferguson

Wm. A. Johnson

Win. D. Tyler

John Allaback

George W. Miller

Thomas Harpster ,

Benj. R. Howell ,

John It. Chamberlain.

0. C. Platter

Wm. Pittiman

Adam C. Post

Thomas M. Sellers

Wm. M. Murphey

Thomas C. Harbaugh.

Thomas H. Imes

Gideon Ditto

Gideon Howe

Seth Dixon

Sumner F. Mason

Cor win B. Van Pelt....
Joseph H. Harbison ...

Samuel Dotson

John T. Collier

Jacob Young

John M. Henness

Daniel Worley

(Jhas. Brennan

Joseph S. Campbell

John D. Neiswanger...
James Tucker ,



June
Aug.



Sept.
Oct.



Feb.



June

Aug.



Sept.
Oct.



March
May

Ju|y
Aug.



14
March 24
24



May



July
April



Dec.


3,


"


May


2,


April


7,


is<;l-


44


7,


July


I-"',


44


Oct.


IS.


Aug.


7,






15,
15,
19


"


2n,


«


>'


41


'.'•">,


**


•*


l.">


May


7,


44


Dec.


31,


Nov.


1«,


"


**


31


Dec.


31,


'*


Feb.


ii,


Sept.


".


■•


March


SI


Feb.


13,


1863


• 4


31


Sept.


0,


IS.L'


44


31


Feb.


20,


i.-i>:>.


April


SHJ


June


11,
14,
14,
14,


1864


June


U
14

14
14



March
May



July



May



July



Resigned January 31, 1SG5.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined promotion ; commission returned.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out May 15, 18«5.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.

Mustered out with regiment as Q. M.

Mustered out with regiment.

Sick at New bern, N. C.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as 2d Lieut.

In 22d Regiment.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Killed at Pittsburg Lauding April 7, 18*2.

Resigned July 13, 1*62.

Resigned September 30, 1S62.

Resigned Septembers, 1862.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Discharged August 24, 1S64.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned July 30, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Honorably discharged April 6, 1364.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Mustered out as Sergeant.

Mustered out as Sergeant.

Mustered out as Sergeant.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out as Sergeant.

Mustered out as Sergeant.

Mustered out as Sergeant.

Mustered out as Sergeant.

Mustered out as Sergeant.

Mustered out as Sergeant.



Eighty-First Ohio Infantry. 465



EIGHTY-FIRST OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



DURING the summer of 1861 it was allowable, by order from the War Department,
for any one to enlist men for General Fremont's command, and to have them mus-
tered either singly, or in squads, or companies, and forwarded to his head-quarters
at St. Louis. Under these orders Colonel Morton, formerly Colonel of the Twentieth Ohio, con-
tracted to raise a full regiment, which was to be armed with the best of rifles, and was to be
known as " Morton's Independent Rifle Regiment." By some bad management one company,
after having been sent to St. Louis, was incorporated into another regiment, and this loss,
together with the loss of one or two other companies, which were expected to join Morton's regi-
ment, but were prevailed upon to go elsewhere, delayed the filling up of the regiment, so that it
did not seem likely that the Colonel would fulfill his promise in the time allowed. At this
juncture the State took the independent regiment into its fold. It was denominated the Eighty-
First Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and it was agreed that the officers already appointed should be
commissioned by the Governor, and that the State authorities should use every endeavor to have
the regiment filled to the maximum.

Benton Barracks was the rendezvous of all the troops sent to Fremont's department ; and in
the ample grounds of that well-known camp the regiment entered upon its first military duties.
On the 24th of September, 1861, the detachment received marching orders, and on the following
day was taken to Franklin, Missouri, and a day or two after to Herman. Here the regiment
went into camp, and attained a tolerable degree of skill in the evolutions. It had now reached
its maximum, not the legal, but the possible, and it numbered eight companies, with an aggregate
of nearly six hundred men. In November the regiment moved against a Rebel force in Callo-
way County, but the Rebel camp was found deserted. In December the guerrillas destroyed a
portion of the Northern Missouri Railroad, and orders came for the force at Herman to march
to the railroad and drive off the troublesome bands. The troops moved in extremely cold
weather, with snow on the ground ; and the advance reached Danville, the county-seat of Mont-
gomery County, just as the Rebel rear left. Pursuit was in vain, as the Rebels were mounted.

During the next two weeks the regiment was marching through Northern Missouri, sleeping
on the ground, in rain, sleet, and snow, with no covering but blankets. At the end of that time
it was stationed at Wellsville, Montgomery City, Florence, and Danville, on the Northern Mis-
souri Railroad, with head-quarters at the latter place. While thus stationed the regiment did an
enormous amount of work, in scouting, arresting accomplices and principals in the work of
destroying the railroad, and in restoring peace and quiet in the whole country round about.

About the 1st of March, 1862, the regiment was ordered to St. Louis. It was armed with
short Enfields, was placed on board the steamer Meteor, and about midnight on the 17th it dis-
embarked at Pittsburg Landing. In a few days the Eighty-First was assigned to the Second Bri-
gade, Second Division, Army of the Tennessee. The brigade was commanded by Colonel McAr-
thur, and the division by General C. F. Smith. The regiment went to drilling earnestly, under
the direction mostly of Adjutant Evans, and attained a proficiency that was valuable in the com-
ing contest. The battle of Pittsburg Landing opened on Sabbath morning, April 6th, while the
regiment was undergoing the usual morning inspection. It was ordered across Snake Creek, and
Was placed in position until nearly noon, when it was withdrawn to its own color-line. It was
almost one o'clock when the Eighty-First saw the enemy approaching its front, but there was
Vol. 11—30.



466 Ohio in the War.

only a small cavalry force, and a volley from the two right companies put them to flight. About
two o'clock there was a lull; and General Grant ordered Colonel Morton to move toward the
center of the line of battle and then forward until he found the enemy. Starting up a ravine in
rear of the line, he proceeded thus until he could go unperceived to the front. He passed through
the line of battle at a point where General Sherman was watching the movements of the enemy,
and advancing toward the front and left, the Colonel soon found his little regiment alone far
ahead of the main line, and out of sight of it. The regiment was marching by the flank, left in
front, and as the left emerged into a clear piece of ground it was greeted with a discharge of can-
ister from a battery not more than two hundred yards away. The regiment formed line, faced to
the rear, and lying down, delivered a volley or two, which silenced the enemy's fire. Not liking
the position, Colonel Morton ordered a movement to a ravine a little further to the left. To
reach this, a road, swept, by the enemy's battery at short range, had to be passed. A company at
a time ran the gauntlet, and the whole regiment was safely re-formed in the ravine. While in
this position some Rebel cavalry commenced a movement to the regiment's rear, but before it
was completed General Grant ordered the regiment back to the main lines. Just as Captain
Armstrong, commanding the right company, gave the command, " By file right, march !" a grape
shot struck him on the head and killed him instantly. The regiment was extricated without
further loss, and upon reporting to General Grant, Colonel Morton was complimented for having
held the enemy in check until the main line could be firmly established. The regiment was then
ordered to take place in line near the right, where it remained during the rest of the day.

In the fighting on the 6th the regular brigades and divisions had in many cases become scat-
tered. On the morning of the 7th there was no time for organization, and provisional brigades
were appointed, to one of which the Eighty-First was assigned. The regiment advanced and
after crossing an open field came upon a rude breastwork of logs, manned by the enemy, and
raking the regiment from left to right. The shot and shell from two opposite batteries were also
flying through the ranks, and it was determined to withdraw. Owing to the favorable nature of
the ground this was done with but small loss. It was but a short time until the Eighty-First
found itself again alone, and closely confronting a Rebel force. Lying down, the eager boys
opened a brisk fire, which was hotly returned by the enemy, but so furiously did the regiment
ply the Enfields that at last the Rebels broke and fled. No sooner was this perceived than the
Eighty-First rose, and with yells followed the vanquished foe. So wild was the enthusiasm of
the men that they never halted until they found themselves far in advance of any support and
flanked both by infantry and artillery ; even then it was with difficulty that they were withdrawn.
In this charge the regiment captured a number of prisoners, also a battery ; and it was here, too,
that its principal loss was sustained. Resting and caring for the wounded occupied the next
day, and then followed a month of inactivity.

On the 29th of May the Second Division started toward Corinth. There was nothing of im-
portance in this advance, except that on the 31st of May the Eighty-First participated in a very
considerable skirmish, and lost several wounded. After the evacuation of Corinth the Second
Division pursued as far as Boonville. Taking into consideration the condition of the troops and
the intense heat, the march to Boonville and back to Corinth was the most severe the regiment
ever made. For some time the regiment was employed in picketing and fortifying. In July a
recruiting party was sent to Ohio with authority to obtain a sufficient number of recruits to fill
up the regiment. Companies H and G were consolidated with other companies, and this made
five minimum companies in the regiment. About the middle of August, the Eighty-First was
ordered to Hamburg, on the Tennessee River, where it remained in charge of public stores and
performing post-duty, until the middle of September, when it returned to Corinth. In a few
days marching orders were received and the regiment moved, under General Ord, against Iuka.
General Rosecrans also moved upon Iuka from the rear. General Ord waited at Burnsville for
Rosecrans to come up before he pressed the attack, but he waited too long, as Rosecrans pushed on
and fought the battle of Iuka alone. General Ord's column returned to Corinth, and the Second
Brigade took up camp in its old position, two miles south of Corinth, on the Mobile Railroad.



Eighty-First Ohio Infantry. 467

On the morning of the 3d of October the regiment moved toward Corinth, the brigade com-
manded by General Oglesby, and the division by General Davis. General Davis's division
marched out by Battery Robinett, and going a short distance into the woods was halted. The
Third Brigade went into the old Rebel works to the left, the Second (Oglesby's) moved a half
mile further to the right, with the First Brigade on its right. The Eighty-First was on the left
of its brigade, and was prolonged to its utmost capacity. The troops were hardly in position
before the Rebels opened fire and with great impetuosity rushed upon the weak line. It gave
way, but was speedily re-formed in front of the White House, and being now more compact than
at first, it held its position during the remainder of the day. The brunt of battle had fallen upon
Davis's division, and the Tishomingo Hotel, which had been converted into a hospital, gave sad
evidence of the severity of the fighting. Every room was filled with the wounded, and the
porches were crowded with men, mostly from Davis's division. In the ladies' parlor were Gen-
eral Davis's three brigade commanders — Colonel Baldwin, slightly wounded; General Oglesby,
suffering intensely from a wound, which the surgeons hardly dared to say was not mortal; and
General Heckelman dying. During the night General Davis's division was posted facing north-
wardly, its left resting on Battery Powell and its right covering Battery Richardson. About nine
or ten o'clock in the morning the Rebels rushed on Davis's division, stretched in a single line,
without reserves or intrenchments. The troops gave way, but the Rebels were checked by Ham-
ilton's artillery and Batteries Williams and Robinett, and the division rallied and killed or cap-
tured the greater portion of the assaulting column. This was the end of the battle in front of
the Eighty-First. The regiment lost eleven men killed, forty-four wounded, and three missing.
When the regiment advanced, on the 4th, Sergeant David McCall, the color-bearer, was the first
to fall. At Pittsburg Landing, though unable for duty, he left his bed and carried the flag
through that battle. He had but just recovered from his sickness and joined the regiment a
short time before he fell.

The regiment moved in pursuit of the Rebels to a point on the Tuscumbia River, near Che-
walla. It remained here a week, and then returned to Corinth. The remainder of October, and
the month of December were spent in garrison-duty. On the 19th of October five new companies
arrived, which had been organized in Ohio by the recruiting party. This made the Eighty-First
a full regiment. The reception of these recruits was made a formal matter. They slept all night
at the depot, having arrived late, and the next morning the old troops were formed and started
to Corinth, with drums beating and colors flying. When they had proceeded far enough they
halted, and formed in line in open order, and faced inward. The recruits approached by the right
flank, and when the head of the column entered the lines the old troops came to a "present
arms." When the new companies had passed through they were formed as the old troops had
been, and the latter passed through their lines, in turn receiving the salute. When this was done
the regiment formed on the color-line and stacked arms. On the 1st of November the regiment
moved within the inner defenses of Corinth, and erected winter-quarters. About the middle of
December the regiment moved on a reconnoissance through Rienzi, Blackland, Guntown, and
Saltillo to Tripoli. No enemy was found and the troops returned, bringing in numbers of mules,
horses, and contrabands, and a large quantity of cotton. Forrest's raid cut communications, and
on the 22d of December the garrison at Corinth was placed on half rations. This lasted about
three weeks, though it occasioned less suffering than many would suppose. Foraging parties
were sent out which obtained food for the animals, and limited supplies for the men. After the
battle of Parker's Cross Roads, the Eighty-First, with other troops, moved to intercept Forrest at
Clifton, but learning that he had crossed the river, they returned to Corinth. On the 26th of
January, 1863, the regiment with the Twenty-Seventh Ohio, two Illinois regiments, and a bat-
tery, started to Hamburg for supplies. Upon reaching Hamburg the force was placed on trans-
ports, with the intention of capturing the forces under Roddy, encamped near Florence. About
three miles from Hamburg it was discovered that one of the boats had injured her wheel, and
the expedition was compelled to return. The Eighty-First marched immediately for Corintb,
and reached its camp, a distance of twenty miles, in seven hours.



468 Ohio in the War.

On the loth of April the regiment moved, with almost the entire force of General Dodge, on
an expedition to Tuscumbia, to co-operate with Colonel Straight in his movement upon the
Southern Railroads. General Dodge remained at and near Tuscumbia several clays in order to
engage the attention of the Rebels. On the 28th of April there was an extensive skirmish at
Town Creek, in which the Eighty-First had a few men wounded. After keeping the enemy
engaged for two days and nights General Dodge returned to Corinth as expeditiously as possible.
This inarch was one of eighteen days' duration, yet it was the best the regiment had yet made;
and when it marched into camp at Corinth every man was in his place. On the 3d of June the
Eighty-First moved to Pocahontas, where it spent the next few months in garrison-duty. It left
Pocahontas about the last of October, expecting to join the army at Chattanooga. Upon reach-
ing Pulaski, Tennessee, the regiment was halted, and distributed to different posts, again to per-
form garrison-duty. Wales, Pulaski, Sam's Mills, and Nance's Mills, were thus garrisoned.
Regimental head-quarters were at Pulaski, where Major Evans had a few of his men mounted,
and spent a great portion of the time in scouring the country in pursuit of guerrillas.

In January, 186-4, three-fourths of the men in the regiment were willing to re-enlist, but the
Secretary of War decided that the five companies lately recruited were not entitled to the priv-
ilege of re-enlisting. This prevented the regiment from going North as a veteran organization.
The old companies furnished quite a number of veterans, and these went home on furlough in
two squads, each in charge of a Sergeant. On the 26th of April the regiment concentrated at
Pulaski, and on the 29th it moved lor Chattanooga, by way of Huntsville and Larkinsville. On
arriving it went into bivouac at the foot of Lookout Mountain. On the 5th of May the regiment
moved southward to Lee & Gordon's Mills, and entered fairly on the Atlanta campaign. Dur-
ing the fight at Resaca the regiment was brought into line several times, but was not engaged.
On the 14th the Eighty-First was withdrawn from the main battle field, and was ordered to Lay's
Ferry, to lay a pontoon across the Oostenaula. The enemy was found in force on the opposite
bank, but the boats were launched and manned in Snake Creek, and then they floated into the
Oostenaula, and were pulled rapidly to the opposite shore. The men landed, and soon captured
a portion of the enemy and dispersed the remainder. Three men of company C, Eighty-First
Ohio, took eleven prisoners in one squad, including a Captain and two Lieutenants. The order
for laying the pontoon was countermanded, and it was not put down until the evacuation of
Atlanta, when the regiment crossed and again had a slight engagement with the Rebels. On the
16th of May the regiment fought at the battle of Rome Cross Roads. The regiment cleared its
front of Rebels, and held its position until the Second Division was relieved by the Fourth. The
regiment moved by way of Kingston and Van Wert to Dallas, where, on the 28th of May, an
effort was made to draw General McPherson's corps to the left, in order to join it more closely to
the rest of the army. While the movement was in progress the Rebels made seven assaults, but
they were every time repulsed. The Eighty-First contributed its full share toward the result.

The regiment pressed on, with continuous skirmishing, to Kenesaw. During the move-
ment around that place the Eighty-First was in the front line almost all the time, and was often
on picket-duty; yet it was not called on to make an assault. The regiment advanced with the
army, and on the 21st of July closed around Atlanta. In the battle on the 22d the Eighty-First,
with three companies in reserve, was the second regiment from the right of Sweeney's division.
The command stood like a rock, and never was there made a more daring or more effective
resistance. At an opportune moment the Eighty-First Ohio and Twelfth Illinois moved forward
in a resistless charge, carrying everything before them. The Eighty-First captured a number of
prisoners and three battle-flags. Later in the day General Logan called on General Dodge for
re-enforcements to assist the Fifteenth Corps in recovering its works. Mersey's brigade, which
included the Eighty-First, was sent. It marched on the double-quick nearly two miles, and jointed
in a charge by which the lost line was recovered. The Eighty-First furnished a detail to assist
Captain DeGres in serving his guns on the retreating Rebels. Late at night Mersey's brigade
was moved to Bald Hill, and there the Eighty-First Ohio and Twelfth Illinois built a perfect
labyrinth of works. On the 28th of July, while a portion of the army was moving toward the



Eighty -First Ohio Infantry. 469

right, Hood made another assault. The Eighty-First, with other regiments, were hurried to the
assistance of the Fifteenth Corps. These regiments arrived in time to take an active part in
repelling the enemy. The regiment now settled down into the regular duties of a siege. It
marched on the flanking movement to Jonesboro', and participated in the engagement at that
place, and in the skirmish at Lovejoy, after which it withdrew to the vicinity of Atlanta. Here
the few men of the five old companies who had served three years and had not re-enlisted, were
mustered, out. They numbered about one hundred and fifty, and their withdrawal did not change
the organization of the regiment. It was not until late in December that official notice of their
muster-out was received, and even then only two companies (B and C) lost their existence. The
remaining members of those companies, veterans and recruits, were assigned to the other com-
panies of the regiment.

In September the Eighty-First was ordered to Rome, and was assigned to the Fourth Division
of the Fifteenth Corps. On the 11th of November the regiment set out for Atlanta. It arrived
on the 15th, and on the 16th it continued the march toward Savannah. It made the march with-
out any notable incident, and on the loth of December it commenced to fortify around Savannah.
On the 21st the brigade entered Savannah, and on the 23d the regiment went into camp on the
Thunderbolt Road, near the city. On the 19th of January, 1865, the Eighty-First crossed the
Savannah River to Hutchinson's Island, but, owing, to the unprecedented rain, it was found impos-
sible to proceed in that direction, and the regiment returned to its old quarters. However, on the
28th, it marched northward to Sisters' Ferry, and there crossed the Savannah into South Caro-



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 83 of 165)