Copyright
Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

. (page 85 of 165)
Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 85 of 165)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


trenches or on the picket-line until the morning of the 7th, when the army commenced to retire;
and at seven o'clock P. M. the Eighty-Second reached its old camp near Stafford.

The regiment was assigned to the Second Brigade of the Third Division, and was engaged
in ordinary camp duties until the 10th of June, when it moved on the Gettysburg campaign.
The Eleventh Corps marched by way of Catlett's, Manassas Junction, Centerville, Goose Creek,
Edwards's Ferry, Middletown, and Frederick to Emmettsburg, where it arrived on the 29th.
On the 1st of July the march was resumed, and at twelve o'clock M. the corps came in sight of
Gettysburg. Without any halt the troops were formed in order of battle, and the Eighty-Sec-
ond was placed in support of a battery. In about an hour the battery was withdrawn, and the
regiment prepared to join in a general advance. It moved over an open plain swept by the
Rebel artillery, and before the regiment fired a shot ifr lost twenty men killed and wounded.
The gaps were filled promptly, and the Eighty-Second advanced to within seventy-five yards of
the Rebel lines. The Rebels were in force in overwhelming numbers, and the Eighty-Second
was compelled to retire. It was assigned a position near the entrance of the now famous Get-
tysburg cemetery. It went into this action with twenty-two commissioned officers and two hun-
dred and thirty-six men ; and of these, nineteen officers and one hundred and forty-seven men
were killed, wounded, and captured, leaving only three officers and eighty-nine men. This little
band brought off the colors safely. It was not engaged seriously during the remainder of the
battle.

On the evening of the 5th the Eleventh Corps moved in pursuit of the Rebels, passing
through Emmettsburg, Middletown, Boonsboro', and Sharpsburg to within a few miles of Ha-
gerstown, where it arrived on the 11th. At this point the Eighty-Second was assigned to a new
brigade, which was denominated the First Brigade of the Third Division. The brigade was
commanded by General Tyndal. The Eleventh Corps continued the pursuit as far as Warren-
ton Junction; and soon after arriving there the Third Division was assigned to the duty of
guarding the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. The Eighty-Second was ordered to Catlett's



Eighty-Second Ohio Infantry. 475

Station, and there it performed very arduous guard and patrol duty until the 25th of September,
when the Eleventh Corps left Catlett's Station to join the Army of the Cumberland.

On the 1st of October Tyndal's brigade arrived at Bridgeport, Alabama. On the 3d it
crossed the Tennessee River, and was engaged in patrolling the adjacent country. On the 27th
the Eleventh Corps, under Hooker, moved up the left bank of the Tennessee, and on the after-
noon of the next day, as the column emerged from the defiles of Raccoon Mountain, it drew the
lire from a Rebel battery on Lookout Mountain. After a lively skirmish the Rebel outposts
were driven in, and by five o'clock the troops were encamped quietly in Lookout Valley. About
ten o'clock P. M. firing was heard in the rear, and it was found that Longstreet had occupied
Wauhatchie Heights, and had descended into the valley. Detachments were at once sent out
from the Eleventh Corps, and Tyndal's brigade was directed to recapture Wauhatchie Heights.
The brigade moved out on the double-quick ; and, upon reaching the point where the assault
was to be made, the Eighty-Second deployed two companies as skirmishers, and the remainder
of the regiment supporting them, led the advance up the steep and rugged slope, and drove the
Rebels from the summit without difficulty. Tiie position thus gained was held by the Eleventh
Corps until the 22d of November, when the corps moved down the valley, crossed the Tennessee
twice, passed through Chattanooga, and bivouacked under the guns of Battery Wood. The
corps was held in reserve during the engagement at Orchard Knob, but it moved up under a
heavy fire from the batteries on Mission Ridge, to the left of the Fourteenth Corps, and assisted
in the skirmishing which followed the engagement, and in building the intrenchments. On the
25th the Eleventh Corps marched to join Sherman's forces. The movement was completed by
ten o'clock P. M. Sherman was still engaged on Mission Ridge, and the Eleventh Corps was
ordered to support the assaulting column. The Third Division took position on the southern
face of the ridge, and there proceeded to intrench. A party from the different regiments of the
First Brigade reconnoitered the front and drove in the enemy's flankers. By night the intrench-
ments were complete and the position secure. The Eleventh Corps moved in pursuit of Bragg's
army as it fell back from Chattanooga, to within seven miles of Ringgold. From this point an
expedition was sent from the corps to destroy the railroad connecting Cleveland and Dalton.
The enterprise was entirely successful.

On the 28th of November the corps moved to the relief of Knoxville. When it arrived
near the town of Louisville, only eighteen miles from Knoxville, a courier arrived from General
Burnside with the information that Longstreet had raised the siege. Then commenced the return
march ; and, after many hardships, the troops half naked and half starved, arrived at their old
encampments in Lookout Valley on the 17th of December. The Eighty-Second had scarcely
recovered from the effects of the Knoxville campaign, when it declared anew its devotion to the
country by veteranizing. Out of three hundred and forty-nine enlisted men present, three hun-
dred and twenty-one were mustered into the service as veteran volunteers on the 1st of January,
1864. On the 10th of the same month the regiment started to Ohio on veteran furlough. It
arrived at Columbus on the 21st, and was furloughed for thirty days from the 24th. It ren-
dezvoused on the 23d of February with two hundred recruits. It started for the front on the
26th, and on the 3d of March joined its brigade at Bridgeport, Alabama.

The Eleventh and Twelfth Corps were consolidated, forming the Twentieth, and the Eighty-
Second was assigned to the Third Brigade of the First Division of this corps. On the 30th of
April marching orders were received, and the regiment entered upon the Atlanta campaign. It
marched by way of Whitesides, Lookout Valley, Gordon's Mills, Grove Church, Nice-jack Gap,
and Snake Creek Gap, to Resaca. Toward evening, on the 14th of May, the Twentieth Corps,
under Hooker, was shifted to the left, in order to envelop the enemy's right. Robinson's brig-
ade (the third), of Williams's division (the first), reached the Dalton Road just as a division of
the Fourth Corps was being forced back in great confusion. Robinson's brigade at once charged
and drove back the Rebels in gallant style. The Eighty-Second participated in the charge, but
sustained little loss, as the enemy was too much surprised and embarrassed to fire effectively.
On the next day Butterfield's and Geary's divisions advanced and captured the enemy's first



476 Ohio in the War.

line. Williams's division was then thrown forward, and took position on the left, with Robin-
son's brigade on the left of the division, constituting the extreme left of the army. The flank
" hung in air," and, being without breastworks, was much exposed. The enemy seeing this,
moved two divisions into position for an attack. Robinson's brigade was posted behind a low
rise of ground, with an open field in front. The enemy charged gallantly across the open space,
and advanced to within fifty yards of Robinson's position, but a terrible fire forced him to retire.
In twenty minutes the enemy renewed the attack, but with the same result ; again he advanced,
and again was forced back with fearful slaughter. Throughout the engagement the Eighty-Sec-
ond held an important position, but had a slight advantage in being protected by a breastwork.
It lost one officer killed. Darkness ended the conflict; and during the night parties were
employed caring for the Rebel wounded.

The Rebels withdrew by night, and in the morning the National army started in pursuit ;
and on the evening of the 19th the enemy was found in position near Cassville. The enemy
evacuated without a battle, and the National army was allowed a few days to rest. On the 23d
the march was resumed. Hooker's corps crossed the Etowah, and marched by way of Stiles-
boro' to Burnt Hickory. On the 25th, while the three divisions of the Twentieth Corps were
advancing by different roads, General Geary encountered the enemy on a high wooded ridge,
four miles north-east of Dallas. Williams's division, which had arrived within three miles of
Dallas by another road, at once about-faced and marched to the support of Geary. Upon
arriving it was determined to attack the Rebels, and Williams's division was formed in column
of brigade, with Robinson's in front. At the sound of the bugle the column advanced, and fire
was opened immediately. The troops moved with great steadiness and in almost perfect order,
sometimes, even in the midst of the firing, halting for a moment and dressing the line. General
Hooker accompanied the column, and, turning to Colonel Robinson, said : " Your movement is
splendid, Colonel— splendid." The Eighty-Second held the center of the line, and behaved
with conspicuous gallantry. After advancing about half a mile Robinson's brigade was relieved
and Ruger's brigade took the lead. General Ruger advanced within two hundred yards of the
Rebel parapet, and maintained his position until the ammunition failed, and then Robinson's
brigade again moved to the front. The brigade was exposed to a severe canister fire, and by
sunset almost every cartridge was gone. The cartridge-boxes of the dead and wounded were
searched, and a straggling fire was kept up until night, when Robinson's brigade was relieved.

During the 26th and 27th Williams's division was in reserve. About midnight on the 27th
Robinson's brigade was detailed to escort a supply-train for ammunition to Kingston and back.
This duty was performed successfully. On the 1st of June the army began to move toward the
left. On the 6th Robinson's brigade arrived at a position near Pine Knob, where it remained
until the loth, when the line was advanced about two miles and to within a stone-throw of the
Rebel parapet. The enemy was forced back upon Kenesaw, and in the operations around that
place Robinson's brigade was held in reserve, and only engaged the enemy in skirmishes. After
the evacuation of Kenesaw the Twentieth Corps went into position near Nicojack Creek. The
corps crossed the Chattahoochic at Pace's Ferry on the 17th of July, and pressed forward toward
Atlanta. On the 20th it crossed Peachtree Creek and found the Rebels in their works four miles
from Atlanta. About ten o'clock P. M. the Rebels made a determined attack. Williams hurried
his brigades into position. While Robinson's brigade was forming it received a volley which
would have disconcerted any but veteran troops. The Eighty-Second was the second regiment in
position, and it was hardly formed before the Rebels were upon it. The combatants became
mingled with each other, and for some time the issue seemed doubtful ; but at last the Rebels
were forced to yield. In this engagement the Eighty-Second lost not less than seventy-five in
killed and wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Thompson was struck by a bullet, but it was turned
aside by a pen-knife in his pocket, and only inflicted a slight wound.

During the siege of Atlanta the Eighty-Second held an important and an exposed position
on a hill adjoining Marietta street. It was within range both of artillery and musketry, and on
one occasion a cannon shot carried awav the regimental colors and tore them to shreds. On the



Eighty-Second Ohio Infantry. 477

night of the 25th of August the Twentieth Corps withdrew from the intrenehments, and before
daylight it was fortifying a new position along the Chattahooehie. At this point General Slocum
assumed command of the corps. The rest of the army in the meantime moved southward.
During the night of September 1st loud explosions and a bright light were seen in the direction
of Atlanta. Early on the next morning a reconnoitering party was sent toward Atlanta. About
noon the Eighty-Second joined another party moving in the same direction. The city was found
evacuated. The entire corps moved up, and the regiment went into camp in the suburbs, near
Peachtree street.

The regiment remained in camp at Atlanta, engaged in work on the fortifications and occa-
sionally moving on a foraging expedition, until the loth of November, when it started with
Sherman's army for Savannah. The Eighty-Second met with nothing worthy of particular note
until the 25th, when Wheeler's cavalry was encountered at Buffalo Creek. One company from
the Eighty-Second Ohio, with one company from the Thirty-First Wisconsin, was sent forward
to dislodge the enemy. The work was well done. Wheeler was forced from his position and
driven back about a mile. Robinson's brigade was en the front line about Savannah, for a time,
but it was moved to the rear, and was formed, facing outward, in order to cover the trains. Here
it remained until the city was occupied by the National army.

On the 17th of January, 1865, the Third Division, commanded since leaving Atlanta by
Geneial N. J. Jackson, crossed the Savannah, and on the 19th arrived at Pureysville, South
Carolina. Here the command was detained by high water until the 27th, when the march was
resumed, and on the 29th Robertsville was reached. Here again the column was delayed until
the 2d of February, when communications were abandoned and the march through the Carolinas
commenced. The Eighty-Second performed its full share of marching, foraging, and corduroying.
Upon one occasion three " bummers " from the Eighty-Second, with only a carbine, unexpectedly
encountered a Rebel patrol of twelve cavalry fully equipped; the bummers put on a bold front,
and calling out "forward, boys, here they are!" started for the Rebels, who betook themselves to
flight. A swamp impeded their progress, and accordingly they dismounted and fled on foot,
leaving their horses and equipments to the bummers.

On the 18th of February the Twentieth Corps crossed the Saluda four miles above Columbia;
Broad River was crossed near Alston on the 20th, and on the 21st Winnsboro' was reached. On
the 23d Wateree River was crossed near Rocky Mount Post-office, and on the 27th some foragers
from the Eighty-Second captured, at Lancaster, a beautiful silk banner, inscribed upon one side,
"Our cause is just : We will defend it with our lives;" and upon the other side, "Presented by
the ladies to the Lancaster Invincibles." The march was continued by way of Chesterfield and
Cheraw, and on the 11th of March the Twentieth Corps reached Fayetteville. On the 14th the
march was resumed up the left bank of the Cape Fear River, and on the lGth the enemy was
encountered three miles below Averysboro'. Robinson's brigade arrived on the field about ten
o'clock A. M. The Rebels were gradually forced back, and toward evening they occupied a
fortified line at the junction of the roads leading to Averysboro' and Bentonville. Here they
made an obstinate stand and held the position until nightfall, when they withdrew. In this affair
the Eighty-Second lost two officers and eight men wounded.

On the 18th the column crossed Black River and advanced twelve miles toward Cox's Bridge.
At ten o'clock A. M. on the 19th cannonading was heard in front, and at one o'clock P. M. orders
were received for the troops in the rear to hasten to the front. As soon as Robinson's brigade
arrived it was thrown forward to fill the vacancy in Carlin's division, of the Fourteenth Corps.
The men were without intrenching tools, but with their hatchets they at once commenced build-
ing a breastwork. Skirmishers were thrown out, and an effort was made to gain possession of
some buildings, but the skirmishers were driven back by a murderous fire, and the enemy moved
forward to the attack. The assault was made on Carlin's left, and in five minutes all the troops
to the left of Robinson's brigade were swept away, and the enemy was coming down upon the
flank in irresistible masses. The brigade immediately changed front but it was now enveloped



478 Ohio in the War.

both on front and flank, and orders were given to withdraw. The line was re-formed and again
Robinson's brigade was enveloped on front and flank, but witu the aid of artillery the Rebels
were repulsed. No less than six assaults were made on this line during the afternoon, and every
time the enemy was repulsed handsomely. The firing ceased shortly after nightfall, and Robin-
son's brigade was relieved and permitted to drop to the rear. The next day the enemy was con-
tent to assume the defensive, and on the 21st he retired. In the battle of Bentonville the Eighty-
Second lost two officers and nine men wounded and fourteen men missing.

The whole army now turned toward Goldsboro', where it arrived on the 24th. On the 9th
of April, and while still at Goldsboro', the Eighty-Second and Sixty-First Ohio were consolidated.
The new regiment was denominated the Eighty-Second, and a few surplus officers were mustered
out. On the 10th the troops moved to Raleigh, where they remained until after the surrender
of Johnston's army. On the 30th of April the corps marched for Washington City, by way of
Richmond, and on the 19th of May arrived at Alexandria. The regiment participated in the
grand review in Washington on the 24th of May, and then went into camp near Fort Lincoln.
When the Twentieth Corps was dissolved the Eighty-Second was assigned to a provisional division
which was attached to the Fourteenth Corps. On the 15th of June the corps moved to Louisville,
Kentucky. At Parkersburg the troops embarked on transports. Upon reaching Cincinnati the
boats carrying Robinson's brigade, of which the Eighty-Second was still a part, stopped a short
time, and General Hooker came down to the wharf. He was greeted enthusiastically by his old
soldiers, and in retwrn made a brief speech. On arriving at Louisville the regiment went into
camp on Speed's plantation, five miles south of the city. Here it remained until the 25th of
July, when it proceeded to Columbus, Ohio, where it was paid and discharged on the 29th.



Eighty-Third Ohio Infantry.



479



83d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



BANK.


NAME.


DATE OF RANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


REMARKS.




FRED. W. MOORE


Aug.

Sept.

March

Aug.

Sept.

April

Sept.

Oct.

July

Aug.

Nov.

Feb.
May
April
Feb.

July
Feb.
Nov.

May
July

Aug.
July
Aug.
July

Sept.
Aug.

Nov.

July

Sept.

Feb.

March

Feb.

May

April

Feb.

April
July

Feb.

March

Nov.

May

June
July


22, 1S62

16, "

20, "
19, "

21, "

11, 1S63
15, 1862
15, "

4, 1S63
13, "

12, 1864
11, 1862
15, "
25, "

25, "
29, "
29, "
11, "
19, "
19, "

22, "
7, "

7, "
9, 1S63

8, "

13, "
18, 1864
18, •'
18, "

18, "

11, "
21, 1863

1, "
1, "

1, "

2, 1S65
21, 1862

21, "

26, "
15, "
26, "

14, "

8, "
28, "

12, "
'•'. "

19, "

12, "
7, "

25, "

7, "

22, 1S63

3, "

9, "

8, "
8, "

13, "

17, "

15, 1S64

18, "
18, "
IS, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
18, "

15, "
18, "
11, "

11, "

21, 1863
1, "
I, "
1, "
1, 1864

12, 1865
12, "

16, "

22, 1862
15, "

26, "
26, "

8, "


Sept..


25, 1862
25, "
25, "
25, "

21, "


Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out to accept promotio
Transferred from 48th 0. V. I.
Resigned August 31, 1863.
Promoted ; trans, to 182d 0. V. I
Transferred from 48th 0. V. I.
Resigned May 3, 1863.
Commission returned.
Resigned February 9, 1863.
Resigned November 7, 1862.
Resigned November 7, 1862.
Resigned December 15, 1862.
Discharged April 13, 1863.
Resigned January 2, 1*64.
Discharged March 8, 1863.
Mustered out with regiment.
Died.

Resigned August 2, 1863.
Resigned August 2, 1863.
Resigned July 26, 1863.
Resigned July 29, 1863.
Detached as Engineer 2d Divisioi
Killed in action.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Killed in action.
Blustered out with regiment.
Trans, from 48th O. V. I.; lion. (
Trans, from 48th O. V. I. ; must.
Trans, from 48th 0. V. I. ; must.
Trans, from 48th 0. V. I. ; must.
Trans, from 48th 0, V. I. ; must.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned August 1, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned June 12. 1863.
Discharged March 8, 1863.
Killed in action.
Resigned June 7, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned February 22, 1863.
Resigned February 18, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned March 31, 1863.
Resigned August 7, 1863.
Resigned August 21, 1863.
Resigned December 16, 1863.
Resigned August 2, 1803.
Promoted to Captain.
Died April 17, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned January 8, 1865.
Mustered out January 8, 1S65.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regimeut.
Resigned January 8, 1*65.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Died in liosp. April 26, 1865, of wo
Declined : commission returned.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out with regiment.
Trans, from 48th 0, V. I.; must
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment as S
Resigned March 30, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.






Wm. H. Baldwin




Major


S. S. L'HOMMEDIKU, JR

John S. McGrkw




1)0




Do






Ass't Surge-on
Do.


Sept.

April
Nov.
Oct.
Sept.

Nov.
Dec.
April
June

Feb.

July

March

Jan.

May
Sept.

Dec.
April

June

Aug.
Feb.

April
July

March

Jan.

May

June
Sept.


25, 1862
25, "

4, 1S63
20, "
12, 1864
25, 1862
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "

17, "

24, "
9, 1863

15, "
15, "

18, 1864

isj "

"! "

25, 1863
25, 1864
25, "
27, "

2, 1865
25, 1862
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "

24, "
9, 1863
9, "
9, "

15, "
15, "
15 "

25, "
IS, 1864
IS, "
18, "
18, "

15, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
18, "
11, "

11, "
25, isa3

h] 1864
25, "
29, "
2, 1865

12, "

16, "
25, 1862
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "






as Surgeon.


Do.










Do








Dewitt W. C. Shockley




Do




Do






Do


Gilbert W. Dover




Do




Do






Do






Do






Do






Do






Do.






Do






Do


Wm. H. Windeler




Do




), 13th A. C.


Do




Do.






Do






Do






Do. ,




Do




[1S65.


Do.


Do.




out with reg.
out witli reg.
out with reg.


Do




Do.




Do










Do.


John W. Birch




Do






Do






Do.


Wm. H. Wiiideler




Do






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.


Wm. Phillips




Do.


John T Tulbott




Do.






Do.
Do.






Do.






Do.


Henry M. Gastrell




Do.






Do.






Do.


Jedidiah Hill




Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do




Jin action.


Do.




Do.






Do.






Do.


Wm H. H. Rvke




Do.




out July 31,


Do.




Do.
Do.






Do.






Do.




erg. Major.


2d Lieutenant
Do.


Albert Furhman


Do.
Do.
Do.


Henry M. Gastrell





480



Ohio in the War.



RANK.


NAME.


DATE OF BANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


BEMABKS.


2d Lieutenant
Do.


.John S. Taylor, jr


July
Sept.

Aug.

July
Nov.

Feb.

March

Feb.

April
May
A pril


31 , lSfi2

12, "
y, "

11, "

16, "

13, "

17, "
24, "

IS, IM3

30, "
13, "

it,
22, "
13, "

8, "
13, "
13, "


Sept.

Xov.

Dec.

June
May
June
May
June

July


25, lSfi2
25, "
25, "
25, "
25, "
13, "
17, "
24, "

24, "
11, 1063

25, "
15, "

^ *

15, "

15, "
15, "

10, "


Resigned February 1, 18f>3.


Do.


Jedidiab Hill




Do.


A 1 fred Sheaf, ir


Dismissed April 13, lsr.3.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Dismissed August 6, ldfl&


Do.
Do.

Hi).


Win. L. Kobinsou

Matthew Whilldeu


Do.






Do.
Do.

Ho.




Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.
Do.
Do.


James J. Sherman

Win. A. Beasley


Mustered out.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 85 of 165)