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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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17,
17,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
17,



All mustered out with regiment.



Adjutant.

Quartermaster.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant



Orderly-Sergeant.



ROSTER, SIX MONTHS' SERVICE.



DATE OF BANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


July


11, 1863


July


17, 18K


*'


8, "


44


17, "


11


14, "


44


17, "


H


10, "


44


17, "


Ct


3, "


41


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Sept.


20, ' 4


44


20, "


IS, ,l


Nov.


20, 44


July


24, ' 4


July


24, "


J u lie


16, "


Juno


17, "


July


7, "


July


17, "


ti


9, M


44


17, "


4t


13, 4l


44


17, "


"


13, 44


41


17, "


**


14, 44


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14, ' 4


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17, "


44


14, "


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17, "


-


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1, "


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17, "

17, "


**


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June


16, "


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17, "


44


9, 44


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17, "


44


13, "


**


17, "


44


13, "


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17, "


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Oct.


2, "


Nov.


27, "



Colonel

Lt. Colonel....

Major

Surgeon

Ass t Surgeon
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



WILSON C. LEMERT..

ROBEKT W. Mcl'ARLAND...

Wm. Kraus

Wm. R. S. Clark

Wm. C Catlin

John Hill

Wm. B. Heooks

Chas. Reynolds

Wm. Kraus

J. W. Eield

\aron K. Lindsey

John H. Reid

Thomas Yeager

Joab Squire.

Wm. V. Milliken

E. W. Briggs

Robert Lysle

James W. Owens

Seth Truesdale

Rufus P. Manning......

Henry E. Parrott

Seth Truesdale

Ulysses D. Cole

Wm. W. Cockley

Josiah B. Sanford

Samuel Wood

Thomas J. Sterling ....

Allen P. Steel

Marion Losnre

Wm. L. Myers

Erskine B. Fullerton.

Louis N. Pollock

James T. Langstroth .



Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned September 17, 1863.
Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regimont.
Promoted to Major July 14, 1863.



Quartermaster.
Adjutant.
Promoted to Captain.



Resigned October 2, 1863.



Eighty-Sixth Ohio Infantry.



487



HARK.


NAME.


DATE OF BANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


BEMABK8.






June lti, 1862

July 17, "
[i Qj u

13, "
" 13, "
" 14, "
" 14, "

14, "
" 14 T "
" 14, "
" 14, "


July


17, 1863
17, "

17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, ".
17, "


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant


Do.




Do.


John B. Welch




Do.






Do.






Do.




Resigned October 2, 1862.


Do.




Do.


A. A. Wood




Do.






Do.






Do.













EIGHTY-SIXTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THERE were two organizations of this number ; the first, or three months' organization,
was one of several called out by Governor Tod, then the Executive of Ohio, in response to
a call from the President for seventy-five thousand men, in May, 1862, to serve for threa
months. General Banks had retreated down the Shenandoah Valley, and the Eebel General
Jackson was menacing the Northern States, therefore the urgent call for three months' men.

It was designated the Eighty-Sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was organized at Camp
Chase on the 11th day of June, 1862.

On the 16th of June the regiment left Camp Chase for Clarksburg, West Virginia, arriving
there on the night of the 17th, via Grafton. It was stationed at this point for the purpose of
guarding the railroad and protecting Grafton, that town being the base of supplies for the troopa
at Weston, Buckhannon, and Beverly. On the 27th of July, companies A, C, H, and I, under the
command of Lieutenent-Colonel Hunter, were ordered by Brigadier-General Kelley to Parkers-
burg, in anticipation of a raid upon that point. On their arrival there they found the citizens
in a state of great excitement, caused by rumors of a hostile force approaching the town. The
arrival of the troops soon allayed all fears. While this detachment remained here, company H
was distributed at different points on the railroad east of this place, while the other companies
performed guard and provost duty.

On the 21st of August this detachment was ordered back to Clarksburg, in consequence of
the whole regiment having received orders from Brigadier-General Kelley to proceed to Beverly,
to prevent a Eebel force under Jenkins from crossing Cheat Mountain and making a raid on the
railroad and invading Ohio. Jenkins not making his appearance in that direction, after going
as far as Huttonsville, the Eighty-Sixth was ordered back tq Clarksburg, the Eighty-Seventh
Pennsylvania remaining at Beverly, to be in readiness in case he might appear before that place.
The detachment reached Clarksburg about the 26th of July. Jenkins succeeded in crossing
the mountain at another point, and coming down French Creek, attacked Buckhannon. A few
troops at this place made a gallant resistance, losing a number of men killed and wounded, but
the town was captured, and over one hundred thousand dollars worth of Government stores des-
troyed. From Buckhannon, Jenkins proceeded to Weston, marching all night, and meeting wi>!i
feeble resistance, captured that place also, destroying Government stores to a large amount. Con-
tinuing westward, traveling rapidly, he reached the Ohio River, crossed it, stole a few horses,
and returned into the mountains of West Virginia.

While Jenkins was in the neighborhood of Buckhannon, it was supposed it was his inten-
tion to attack Clarksburg, allured by the templing chance to destroy a large amount of Govern-



488 Ohio in the War.

nient property in store at that place. In anticipation of such an attack, the stores were trans-
ferred to Fairmount and Wheeling. The force at Clarksburg consisted of the Eighty-Sixth Ohio
and a detachment of the Sixth Virginia, placed at different points around the town for the pur-
pose of making a vigorous defense. Jenkins's spies, of which the town and surroundng country
was full, doubtless apprised the wary guerrilla of these precautions against his premeditated
attack, and he very wisely avoided the town, and continued on toward Weston and the Ohio
River.

The term for which the Eighty-Sixth was enlisted having expired, the regiment was placed
under orders for Camp Delaware, Ohio, starting for that camp on the 17th of September, and
arrived there the next day. On the 25th of September, 1862, the regiment was paid, and mus-
tered out of the service of the United States.



The Sixth Months' Organization.

The Rebels still manifesting their purpose to invade the Northern Border States, it was
decided by the authorities that a certain number of troops should be called out for the term of
six months, whereupon some of the old officers of the Three Months' Eighty-Sixth conceived
the idea of reorganizing the regiment. The former Major, Wilson C. Lemert, of Bucyrus, being
authorized by Governor Tod, commenced and completed the organization, Camp Cleveland being
the rendezvous selected for that purpose.

About the time the organization was completed, the Rebel guerrilla, John Morgan, was
making his raid through Southern Ohio. The regiment had been ordered to, and was then at,
Camp Tod, near Columbus. Governor Tod immediately placed it under orders to join in the
chase of the invaders. The Rebels having been defeated by our forces at Buffington's Island, on
the Ohio River, and prevented from crossing there, had turned in a north-west direction, and
were then near the Muskingum River, below Zanesville. The Eighty-Sixth was ordered to
Zanesville, and on its arrival a detachment under Lieutenant-Colonel McFarland, of two hun-
dred men, embarked in a boat for Eagleport, on the Muskingum River, as it was supposed Mor-
gan would attempt to cross in that vicinity. Our force arrived just in time to witness the crossing
of the rear-guard of the Rebels, but not being strong enough to attack, Lieutenant-Colonel
McFarland only attempted to detain them as long as possible, by skirmishing, until the force in
pursuit should come up. Having executed his orders the Lieutenant-Colonel returned with his
detachment to Zanesville. In the meantime Major Kraus had been ordered to Cambridge,
Ohio, with the remainder of the regiment to intercept Morgan at or near that place, but meeting
with some delay, he arrived at Washington, on the turnpike, eight miles from Cambridge, a few
minutes after the Rebel force had passed through the town. Pursuit was continued, however, in
conjunction with the command of Colonel Shackelford, resulting in the capture of Morgan's
forces near Salineville, Columbiana County, Ohio.

The Eighty-Sixth returned to Camp Tod, and after remaining there a few days, was, on the
8th of August, ordered to proceed to Camp Nelson, Kentucky, there to join an expedition organ-
izing for the capture of Cumberland Gap, East Tennessee.

The regiment arrived at Camp Nelson August 11, 1863. The expedition, under command
of Colonel John De Courcy, left Camp Nelson August 17th, and by easy marches arrived in front
of Cumberland Gap on the 8th of September. The force under the command of Colonel De Courcy
consisted of the Eighty-Sixth and One Hundred and Twenty-Ninth Ohio, detachments of the
Ninth and Eleventh East Tennessee Cavalry, and Captain Neil's Twenty-Second Ohio Battery.
At Pittman's Cross Roads, near Loudon, Kentucky, Colonel De Courcy, in order to magnify his
forces in the eyes of the Rebel spies, divided each regiment, making, apparently, two -of one.



Eighty-Sixth Ohio Infantry. 489

This ruse had the desired effect, as the strength of his command was greatly exaggerated to the
enemy who held the Gap, it being represented to them as a force of from ten to twelve thousand
men, whereas it did not exceed three thousand.

Simultaneously with the arrival of Colonel De Courcy in front of the Gap, on the Kentucky
side, Major-General Burnside arrived with his forces on the opposite, or Tennessee side, thus
completely investing the Rebel garrison under General Frazier. On the 9th of September the
Eighty-Sixth Ohio was placed on the Harlem road, leading into the Gap from the north, and
formed in line of battle, with skirmishers in advance, in front of Racky Fort ; two pieces of NiePs
Battery on the left, occupying an elevated plateau, and the One Hundred and Twenty-Ninth
Ohio in supporting distance to the rear. The remainder of Niel's Battery was in position in
front of the Gap, and the Cavalry on the Barboursville road. This disposition being made, in
conjunction with the National force under Burnside on the Tennessee side, a formal summons
was sent to the Rebel commander for the surrender of the place. This demand was acceded to
by General Frazier, thus doubtless saving great loss of life, as the Gap could have been stoutly
defended if the Rebel General had so willed. The Eighty-Sixth Ohio immediately marched
into the Fort and took possession, hoisting the Stars and Stripes in place of the Rebel bunting.
Two thousand eight hundred men, five thousand stand of arms, thirteen pieces of artillery, and
large quantities of ammunition, quartermaster's and commissary stores, were the fruits of this
affair.

The Eighty-Sixth Ohio remained at the Gap, as a part of the garrison, until its term of ser-
vice expired. The great distance from the base of supplies — one hundred and fifty miles, over
bad roads — the force that garrisoned the Gap were compelled to subsist off the surrounding
country, with the usual results of meager fare and scanty forage. The scarcity of subsistence
in the immediate vicinity made it necessary to send foraging parties to a great distance, and the
country being rough and mountainous, encounters with Rebel guerrillas were of almost daily
occurrence.

On the 16th of January, 1864, the regiment started for Ohio for the purpose of being mustered
out of the service. After seven days of hard and fatiguing marching it arrived at Nicholas-
ville, on the 23d of January. From thence it proceeded to Cleveland, Ohio, arriving there on
the 26th of January. The second, or six months' organization of the Eighty-Sixth Ohio, was
mustered out of the United States service February 10, 1864.



490



Ohio in the War



87th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE MONTHS' SERVICE.



DATE OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel....

Major

Surgeon

Ass't Surgeon

Chaplain

Captain

D>

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
2d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



HENRY B. BANNING

John Faskin

Samuel L. Leffingwell...

Robert N. Barr

Orlando C. Miller

George I). Oviatt

Henry H. Otis

Charles Calkins

John L. Straughn

Samuel II u her

DaviJ H. Moore

Edward K. Allen

John F. Herrick

Jacob L. McVey

Varnura Janson

Thomas V. Cooper

Wm. T. Johnson

Thomas J. McDowell

Robert Shearer

Philip Ford

Edward S. Alesiiire

Andrew D. McClure

George W. Pease

Wm. A. Gage

John S. Oir

George W. Bianhaiu

Jacob L'Hommedieu

A. Bailes Carter

James H. Landis

George W. Johnson

Daniel Wilson

Christopher Keary

Jo-iah H. Jenkins

Paulding B. Silvis

Wallace A. Pinney

James Evans

Martin H. Ilamblin

Charles Mitchiner, jr



27, 1SH2

1", "

2ti,

23,

23,

30,

10,

12,

12,

12,

St,
10,
II.
12.
25,
2-5.
10,
12,
12,
12,

9,
10,
11,
12,
13,
25,
23,
23,
10,
12,
12,
12,

9,
10,
11,
12,
13,
25,



25, 1SR2

17, "

30,

23,

23,

30,

1".

17,

17,

17,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

17,

17,

17,

17,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

17,

17,

17,

17,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,

30,



Quartermaster.



EIGHTY-SEVENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INEANTRY.



THIS was a three months' organization. It was recruited from almost every county in
the State, and was ready for service in June, 1862. Columbus was its point of rendez-
vous. June 12th it received orders to repair to Baltimore and report to Major-General
Wool, commanding that post. Arriving in Baltimore on the 15th of June, it was assigned to a
camp north of and near the city, where, for some weeks, Colonel H. B. Banning, its commander,
drilled and disciplined the men.

In the latter part of July it received orders to report to Colonel Miles, at Harper's Ferry.
On its arrival at that place it was stationed on Bolivar Heights, where, again, it was subjected to
the most rigid drill. It remained at Harper's Ferry until the siege of that place by Jackson's
Rebel army, and although its term of service was ended, was so unfortunate as to be included in
the surrender of the National forces on that occasion. When, however, the circumstances of the
case were made known, the men were released from their paroles, and the regiment sent home
from Annapolis, and mustered out of the service, at Camp Chase, on the 20th of September, 1862.



Eighty-Eighth Ohio Infantry.



491



88th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



BANK.


NAME.


DATE 01' RANK.


COM.


ISSUED.


BEMABKS.




GEOKGE W. NEFF


July 29, 1863

25, "
Dec. 31, 1S62
July 29, 1863

24, "
March 21, 1865
July 20, 1863
Dec. 17, "
March 21, 1865
May 2, "
April 14, 1864
" 22, 1865
Sept. 24, 1862
ft 24, "

24, "
Jan. 1, 1S63
July 20, "

22, "
June 26, "
July 27, "
June 22, "
July 27, "
Oct. 6, 1864
April 8, 1865

8, "
Sept. 24, 1862
Oct. 8, "
8, "
Jan. 1. 1863
July 20, f

" 22' "

" 23, "

" 24, "

• - 7, "

June 22, "

July 27, "

Aug. 19, "

May 9, 1S64

" 9, "

June 27, "

.Oct. 6, "

April 8, 1S65

" 8, "

" 8, "

" 21, "

Aug. 13, 1862

Oct. 8, "

Nov. 12, "

Jan. 1, 1S63

July 20, "

22, "

June 27, "

27, "

July 27, "

June 30, "

July 27, "

Aug. 19, "

May 9, 1864

" 9, "

" 9, "

June 27, "

Aug. 24, "

Oct. 6, "

April 8, 1865

8, "

8, "

18, "

" 24, "


July

April
July

March

July

Dec.

March

May

April

Oct.

May
July

Aug.

Oct.
April

Oct.

Dec.
May
July

Aug.

May

June
Oct.
April

Oct.

Dec.
May
July

Aug.

May

June
Aug.
Oct.
April


29, 1863
25, "
29, "
29, "
24, "
21, 1865

20, 1863

17, "

21, 1865
2, "

14, 1864

22, 1S65
16, 1862
16, "
16, "

18, 1863
20, "
22, "
27, "
27, "

1, "
1, "
6, 1S64
8, 1865

8, "
16, 1862
27. "

4, "

18, 1863

20, "
22, "

22, "

23, "
27, "
27, "

1. "
1. "

19, "

9, 1864
9, "

27, "
6, "
8, 1862
8, '•

8, "

21, "
16, "
27, "

4, "
18, 1863

20, "

22, "
27, "
27, "
27, "

1, "
1, "
20, "

9, "
9, "
9, "

27, "

24, "
6, "
8, "
8, *'
8, "

18, "
24, "


On detached duty; promoted to Brig. -Gen.
Mustered out with regiment.










Do




Mustered out July 26, 1865.
Die d.






Do




On special duty.

Honorably discharged April 17, 1865.

Promoted to Surgeon.






Do.




Do.




Do.




Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned April 27, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel U. S. C. T.






Do.


Rev. David H. Coyner....


Do




Do




Mustered out with regiment.


Do




Do




Honorably discharged April 7, 1S5J.
Mustered out with regiment.
Honorably discharged August 17, 1S65.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.


Do


Walter D. McPherson


Do


Do




Do


Edward K. Allen


Do


Waldo F. Davis


Do




Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged August 17, 1865.

Mustered out, with regiment.

Resigned June fi, 1864.

Promoted to Major 27th U. S. C. T.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.


Do




Do








Do.


Wm. G. Neilson


Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.
Do.


John V. Cluxton


Do.




Appointed A. Q. M.of vols, by Pres. Aug. 5, '63.


Do.




Do.




Discharged December 24, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Discharged to accept promotion April 20, 1865

Honorably discharged August 17. 1865.

Mustered out with regiment as R. Q. M.

Honorably discharged August 17, 1865.


Do.


E. W. Green


Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.








Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.


Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.








Do.




Promoted to Captain.
Discharged January 14, 1864.


Do.




Do.




Do.






Do.






Do.


Wilson S. Taylor




Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.

Do.


Charles C. Bunker


Mustered out with regiment.


Do.


D. W. C. Patrick


Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Declined ; commission returned.
Mustered out with regiment.


Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.




Do.
Do.




Do.




Do.




Mustered out with regiment.







492 Ohio in the War.



EIGHTY-EIGHTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS regiment was organized in the latter part of July, 1862, its nucleus being four
companies, called the "First Battalion of Governor's Guards, Ohio Volunteer Infan-
try." It was mustered into the service of the United States by Captain A. E. Drake,
United States Army, October 27, 1862, and was at once placed on duty at Camp Chase, near
Columbus, then filled with Rebel prisoners. The duty here was very arduous. The prisoners
were confined in three different tenements, and it required the whole strength of the regiment to
fill the details. In a few months the service became exceedingly monotonous to both officers
and men, and all were clamorous for orders to the field.

While acting as Governor's Guards on duty at Camp Chase, under the command of Major
Peter Zinn, the Kirby Smith raid was made on Cincinnati. Major Zinn asked and obtained leave
of Governor Tod to take his battalion to the field. Arriving at Cincinnati the command was
marched across the Ohio River on the pontoon bridge, and stationed within supporting distance
of Fort Mitchel and other fortifications erected in the rear of Covington and Newport. In this
position the battalion performed all the duties of troops in presence of an enemy, and, although
not called upon to engage in the deadly conflict, the officers and men were constantly on the alert,
and prepared for an instant "call to arms." The battalion received not only the thanks of Gov-
ernor Tod, but those of the commanding officer in front of Cincinnati, General Horatio G.
Wright, U. S. A.

After repeated solicitations the Secretary of War, through Governor Tod's influence, granted
authority to recruit the battalion up to a maximum regiment. The order was promulgated June
26, 1863, and by the 2'9th of July the regiment was completed.

George W. Neff, Lieutenant-Colonel of the Second Kentucky Infantry (recently released
from a thirteen months' imprisonment in Rebel prisons, part of the time held, with Colonels
Corcoran, Wilcox, Woodruff, and others, as hostages for the lives of Rebel privateersmen), was
relieved from the command of Camp Dennison, and appointed by Governor Tod Colonel of the
new regiment, the Eighty-Eighth Ohio.

Colonel Neff at once placed his regiment under the strictest discipline, and soon had it
drilled up to the highest point of efficiency; and the hope was cherished by the officers and men
that they would be afforded a chance to display their acquirements at " the front." This hope
was soon dissipated, orders having been received for the regiment to remain on duty at Camp
Chase. A small detachment only was permitted to visit West Virginia and Maryland. It was,
however, soon brought back to aid in the capture of John Morgan and his guerrillas, then on a
raid through Ohio.

When Morgan's forces reached the Ohio line at Harrison, twenty-one miles from Cincinnati,
it was surmised by Governor Tod and General Burnside, then in command of the Department of
Ohio, that he would attempt the destruction of Camp Dennison, one of the most important posts
in the West. The Governor ordered Colonel Neff, then in command of the post, to hold himself
in readiness, and take every precaution against being surprised or overcome by the enemy. The
Colonel, in obeying these orders, armed the little force of invalids and a few of the Governor's
Guards on duty at head-quarters, and stationed them in appropriate positions. He also called
upon the citizens of the surrounding country to take their axes and obstruct the roads over which
Morgan's troops would be compelled to pass. The citizens performed their work so faithfully
that Morgan was compelled to make a wide detour, and was thus materially delayed in his move-



Eighty-Eighth Ohio Infantry. 493

ments. One small squad did find its way to within about a mile of Camp Dennison, but was so
roughly handled by a force of invalids under Captain Von Doehn, that they hastily withdrew and
joined the main column of freebooters.

Again the regiment resumed its monotonous guard-duty at Camp Chase, and continued it up
to October, 1863, when Colonel Neff succeeded- in obtaining orders to move his regiment to Cin-
cinnati, as a relief to the One Hundred and Fifteenth Ohio, then performing provost-duty in tbat
city. This change, though not so welcome as would have been orders for the field, was gladly
received by all, as some relief from the excessive monotony of Camp Chase.

A detachment of the Veteran Reserve Corps took the place of the Eighty-Eighth Ohio at
Camp Chase, but, from looseness of discipline and a strong disgust for the duty, a complete
failure was made ; so much so, that the commandant of that important prison depot informed
the War Department that he should decline to be held responsible for the safe custody of the
prisoners. Many of them had already escaped through the negligence of the guards.

Again the Eighty-Eighth was ordered to resume its old place at Camp Chase, and the 20th
of December, 1863, found it inside its detested limits. Nothing but the most perfect discipline
prevented serious disturbance on receipt of this order, so great was the antipathy of both officers
and men to returning to Camp Chase.

The regiment remained on the same duty until July 3, 1865, when it was formally mustered
out of the service.

The Eighty-Eighth Ohio was a complete and well-drilled regiment, and, if given a chance,
would have undoubtedly performed good service in the field.



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 87 of 165)