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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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494



Ohio in the War.



89th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Do

Do

Lt. Colonel
Do.

Major

Do

Do

Do

Burgeon

Do

Do

Ass't Surge
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Do

Captain

Do! '.'.'.'.'.

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutent

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
3d Lieu ton

Do.

Do.



JOHNC. MARSHAL
JOSEPH D. HATKIK
CALEB H. CARLTO

i AMES ROWS

Wi. H. Glenn

Joseph D. Hatfield

Wm. H. Glrnn

Wm. Hayes

JOHN H. JOf.LV

Henry Bradley

Alfred Taylor

B. Crew

_ B. Crew

Colin Spence

E. F. PURDAM

Alfred U. Beall

John Siiinn

Win. H. Glenn

Wm. A. Tonnsk'Y

Win. Hayes

Allison L Brown

John H. Jolly

Marcelhus A. Leeds —

Win. Haight

Elani Day, ir

David M. Barrett

Wesley R. Adams

•p\\ II. Muluix

Oliver C. Gatch

David V. Pearson

Isaac C. Nelson

Thomas II. B. Nonas...

John S. Laid n

James R. Vickers

lames W. Patterson...

Stewart Edmesoli

Elijah Hicks

Otbo. P. Fairfield

Samuel A. Glenn

Charles E. Harrison....

George H. Del.olt

Joseph H. Mnlnix

Reuben W. Sparger

James W. Patterson....

N'eamiah Green

John W. King

Joseph R. Dixon

Thomas H. B. Noriis...

George W. Penn

Oliver C. Gatch.

Stewart Ed meson

Andrew J. Tinnnons...

Thomas Beverage

James R Vickers

Samuel A . Glenn

David V. Pearson

Elijah Hicks

Otho P. Fail-field

Isaac G. Nelson

John B. Gamble

Stephen V. Walker

Granville Jackson

John S. Lakin

George II. Debolt

Charles E. Harrison....

Harrison Beard

Charles W. Borland....

Milton May

Joseph B. Eoreaket

John JT. Gamble

John S. Robinson

John V. Baird

Edward A. Scott

Dudley King

John Mallow

Francis M. Creakbaun

Solomon Stookey

Joseph C. Oliver

Wm. G. Hall

Sylvester Prentice

John W. Glenn

John W. Redman

Samuel A. Glenn

Clement Thomas

David V. Pearson



L....
LD.



Aug.

Oct.

June

Aug.

Feb.

Aug.

Oct.

Feb.

Jan.

Aug.

April

May

Aug.

July
Aug.
May

inly



DATE OF RANK,



»,
II,
25,
13, :

2,
2a,

1,
19,
21,

19,
24,
2l ; ,
9,
II,
12,



Oct.

A pril

Feb.
May

Feb.
Aug.
Feb.

March

May
Jan.
Aug.
Nov.
July



Sept.

Dec.
June

Sept.

May
Sept.
Dec.
May
'" b.
Sept.
April
lune

Sept.

Inly
Dec.
May

Sept.



Dec.

May



18.3
1864



Oct.
Ian.

Pec.
Jan.

May

April
Feb.
Mav
Feb.
In no



ran.

Feb.



15,



23,
25,
27,
18,



l'S



COM. ISSUED.



Ian. 10,

Feb. I,

March 19,
19,
May 9,
March 3n,
Aug. II,
Nov. 26,
Sept. 13,



Dec. 31,

31,

March 30,



May



July

Jan.



April
May



Aug.

Sept.



July



lune 8,
s,
10,
H',

29,

Feb. II,

11,
II,

March 19,

19,

19,

19,

April 7,

May 9..



REMARKS.



Aug.
Sept.



Sept.



Dismissed October 7, 1S62.

Dismissed June ii, 1863.

On detached duty at Paducah, Ky.

Resigned February 25, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Colonel.

Pioinoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Resigned January 16, ISM.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned March 28, 1866.

Drowned May 23, 1863.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Surgeon.

Resigned May 28, 1863.

.Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned September I, 1S63.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Major.

Dismissed August 5, 1S03.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned May 2, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned May 22, 1863.

Resigned April IS, 1863.

Mustered out May 15, 1865.

Mustered out May 15, 1865.

Appointed Colonel 175th 0. V. I. Nov. 16, 186*.

• {"signed January 24, I8i : .3.

Mustered out May 15, 1865.

Revoked ; resigned as 1st Lieut. May 22, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged July 23, 1S6L

Resigned April 19, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined.

Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant Mi»7 16, 1865.

Resigned April 19, 1864.

Mustered out May l. r >, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned May 21, 1863.

Resigned August 4, 1864.

Resigned January 27, 1863.

Resigned January 23, 1863.

|)ied December IS, l.s<i2

Promoted to Captain.

Died January 21, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned June 12, 1863.

Resigned October 21.1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned May 22, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned December I . 1*63.

Killed September SI, IW3.

Killed September 20, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Revoked.

Revoked.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned as 21 Lieutenant April 15, 1861.

Declined; commission returned.

Mustered out as 21 Lieutenant May 15, 1866.

Mustered out with regiment.

Died August 13, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Discharged September 6, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned February 80, 1*63.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



Eighty-Ninth Ohio Infantry.



495



2d Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



George II. Debolt

Ezekiel Slade

Milton May

Elijah Hicks

Granville Jackson

James R. Vickers

Isaac C. Nelson

Charles \V. Borland

John J. Gamble

J'>hn .J. Bartou

Stephen V. Walker

Harrison Beard

Joseph B. Foieaker

John Lakin

John S. Kubinson

John V. Bair.1

Edward A. Scott

Joseph R. Elliott

Dudley King

Francis M. Oreakbanm

John Mallow



1A.1T. OF RANK.



COM. ISSUED.



July 24, 186:



A us



Dec.
Oct.
Jan.
Dec.
Feb.
Jan.



May
Feb.

May
Jan.
June



15,
20,
21,

zi,

26,
3,



Sept. 15, 1S62
15, ""

" IS.

15,



Dec. 3,
31,

May is.,
March ti,
30,
May 12,
March 30,
3n,
May 18,
18,
25,
8.
10,
12,



Juno
Feb.
July



Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned January 27, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. [13, 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant; dismissed Jan.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

[tesigned April 15, 1864.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned July 19, 13'".3.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Declined promotion.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Died May 20. 1863.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



EIGHTY-NINTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE EIGHTY-NINTH OHIO was enlisted chiefly from the rural districts in the
counties of Clermont, Highland, and Ross, under the call for volunteers of 1862. The reg-
iment went into quarters at Camp Dennison by companies, from the 10th to the 20th
of August, and was fully organized and mustered into the service on the 26th of that month. It
numbered one thousand, including officers and men. The field and staff officers were selected
from the several counties in which the regiment was raised. John G. Marshall, of Brown
County, was commissioned Colonel; James W. Eowe, of Ross, Lieutenant-Colonel; and Lieuten-
ant-Colonel Joseph D. Hatfield, of Clermont, Major ; Lieutenant Spargur, of Highland, Adju-
tant ; H. Bradley, of Clermont, Surgeon ; S. B. Crew, of Clermont, First Assistant Surgeon ;
Colin Spence, of Clermont, Second Assistant Surgeon ; Bev. A. W. Beall, of Clermont, Chaplain ;
and James W. Patterson, of Highland, Quartermaster.

On the 3d of September the Eighty-Ninth marched through the streets of Cincinnati, and
halted on Third Street to listen to a short, patriotic speech from Governor Tod, delivered from
the steps of the Burnet House. Crossing the Ohio River on a pontoon bridge, the regiment went
into camp three miles in the rear of Covington, Kentucky. The enemy, under Kirby Smith,
having fallen back without making an attack on Cincinnati, the Eighty-Ninth was ordered to
Western Virginia and arrived at Point Pleasant, at the mouth of the Great Kanawha, on the 5th
of October. After remaining in camp a few days at this place, the regiment was brigaded with
the Thirty-Seventh Ohio and Eighth Virginia, and, under the command of Colonel Sieber of the
Thirty-Seventh, marched up the valley of the Great Kanawha, expecting to find the enemy
posted in some strong position ready to give them battle; but meeting with no resistance, the
regiment passed on reaching the Falls of tne Great Kanawha, at the foot of Cotton Mountain, on
the 3d of November. After remaining at this point two weeks, the Eighty-Ninth ascended the
mountain and went into winter-quarters five miles from Fayetteville C. H. During the time the
regiment lay at this place it suflered with camp fever, causing the death of some and disabling
of others.

Shortly after the battle of Stone River the Eighty-Ninth, with the Ninety-Second Ohio, was
ordered to Nashville, Tennessee, to re-enforce General Rosecrans. Two gunboats joined the
fleet of nine steamers at Cincinnati, and passing ahead arrived at Louisville on the night of the



496 Ohio in the War.

30th of January, 1862. On the 3d of February, at eight o'clock at night, the fleet arrived at
Dover, on the Cumberland River, two miles above Fort Donelson. The Eighty-Third Illinois
was in Dover almost surrounded by the Rebel General Forrest's cavalry, three thousand strong.
The Rebels had twice charged the works, been repulsed, and were getting into position to
make the third attempt when the gunboats hove in sigbt. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith of the
Eighty-Third Illinois passed quickly aboard, gave directions where to aim, and the astonished
Rebels were greeted witb the bursting of shell in their midst, causing a hasty retreat under cover
of the night, leaving their dead on tbe field. The arrival of our forces saved the post, as the
ammunition of the Eighty-Third Illinois was exhausted, and they expected at the next charge of
the Rebels to be compelled to either surrender or be massacred. The Confederate Colonel,
McNary, and two hundred of Forrest's men were found dead on the field the next day, while the
loss of the Eighty-Third was thirteen killed and fifty wounded. This was the first battle-field
the regiment had seen, and it was amply sufficient to impress it with the realities of war.

After remaining at Dover two days, the fleet passed on to Nashville, arriving at that city on
the 7th of February. On the 9th the troops were landed and went into camp on the Franklin
Pike, some five miles from the city. While here the weather was rainy, and the regiment suf-
fered severely from measles and influenza. Lieutenant Clement Thomas was one of the victims.
While at this camp Lieutenant-Colonel Rowe was, on account of failing health, obliged to resign
his commission. Colonel Marshall having also resigned. Major J. D. Hatfield was promoted to
Colonel and assumed command of the regiment.

On the 22d of February, having been organized with the Thirty-Sixth, Eleventh, and Ninety-
Second Ohio, and Eighteenth Kentucky, into what was known as Crook's division, the Eighty-Ninth
broke camp and marched back to the city where, embarking on transports, it arrived at Carthage,
Tennessee, on the 25th, and went into camp. The object of this expedition was to prevent the
enemy from making inroads into Kentucky, and to drive the guerrillas from that section of the
State. Crook's division was joined by Colonel Stokes's cavalry and General Spear's division of
Tennessee troops, and after various scouts and skirmishes with John Morgan's guerrilla cavalry
marched, on the 5th of June to join Rosecrans's main army at Murfreesboro'. It arrived there on
the evening of the 8th of June and went into camp one mile from the city. After remaining at
Murfreesboro' until the 24th of June, the Eighty-Ninth, with its brigade, under General Reynolds,
joined in the movement against Bragg at Tullahoma. The regiment met with sturdy opposition
from the enemy the first day out. At Hoover's Gap it supported Wilder's brigade of mounted
infantry in a sharp encounter, in which the enemy lost over one hundred killed and wounded;
National loss fourteen killed and forty-five wounded. This was the first time the Eighty-Ninth
had advanced under fire and witnessed the scenes of a battle-field strewn with dead and wounded.
That night the rain poured down in torrents, but the skirmish-line was held all night, next day,
and far into the night ensuing, when the enemy fell back under cover of the darkness The
Eighty-Ninth, with the rest of Rosecrans's army, suffered terribly in this campaign from (he
incessant rains, which flooded the whole country and made it almost impossible to supply the
army with rations.

By the 8th of July the enemy had been driven to Chattanooga and beyond. The whole army
halted; Reynold's division (in which was the Eighty-Ninth), went into camp near Decherd, a
station on the railroad some fifty miles from Chattanooga. During this campaign the Eighty-
Ninth was commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Glenn, who entered the service as
Captain of company A, and had been regularly promoted up to the position of Lieutenant-Col-
onel of the regiment. Colonel J. D. Hatfield had been dismissed from the service by court-
martial, for expressing disloyal sentiments. The position of Colonel was tendered to Lieutenant-
Colonel Glenn, but was declined by him, on account of not being possessed of a military educa-
tion. Thereupon General Crook had Captain C. H. Carleton, of the regular army, and a grad-
uate of West Point, appointed and commissioned Colonel of the Eighty-Ninth.

About the middle of July, 1S63, while the Eighty-Ninth was in camp, near Decherd Station,
in Tennessee, Colonel Carleton took command, and commenced a thorough course of drilling of



Eighty-Ninth Ohio Infantry. 497

both officers and men. "While in this camp, General Crook was transferred to the army in the
Shenandoah Valley, and General Turchin took his place in command of the brigade.

About the middle of August, the Eighty-Ninth was detached from the Fourteenth Corps and
sent up to Tracy City, in the Cumberland Mountains, six miles from Cowen Station, to guard
that point and destroy the enemy's saltpeter works, at Nicojack Cave, while the main army moved
forward to Chattanooga. After remaining at Tracy City three weeks, orders came for the regi-
ment to rejoin the command without delay. On the 10th of September it moved, and on the 12th,
meeting with Granger's reserve corps at Bridgeport, was temporarily attached to one of his bri-
gades, and on the 13th started on a forced march to join the main force under Rosecrans, at Ross-
ville, Georgia.

On the morning of the 19th the Eighty-Ninth moved out in Granger's corps to the skirmish-
line, and engaged in the great and bloody battle of Chickamauga. During the afternoon, ten of
the regiment were wounded while advancing the skirmish-line. At nine o'clock on Sunday
morning, September 20th, the battle commenced, and raged for seven hours. During the after-
noon the Eighty-Ninth went into the hottest of the fight, and with the Twenty-First Ohio and
Twenty-Second Michigan, held its position until darkness began to settle like a pall upon the
ground, when a division of the enemy came up in its rear, surrounded and captured it entire.

Lieutenant Walker, of company D, was shot through the heart and left on the field, and
Granville Jackson, of company G, fell and died amid the strife, a Minie ball passing in at his
mouth and out at the back of his neck. Sergeants Benjamin L. Pratt, J. "W. Phillips, John
Kehner, Corporal Wesley Bragdon, and privates John Mahany and J. Blackstone, were known
to be killed. Lieutenants Mallow, of company E, and Barton, of company B, and fifty-two
privates were wounded and sent to the rear, and a number of others were left mortally wounded
on the field, to perish in the hands of the enemy. Colonel Carleton, Lieutenant-Colonel Glenn,
Assistant Surgeon Purdam, Captains S. A. Glenn, Day, Gatch, Barrett, Adams, and Lieutenants
Fairfield, Harris, Prentiss, Beard, and Scott were captured and sent to Libby Prison. Colonel
Carlton managed to be exchanged in a few months ; Captain Adams and Lieutenant Scott made
their escape through Colonel Straight's underground passage, and got safely within our lines;
Lieutenant-Colonel Glenn was sent to Charleston, South Carolina, and placed under the fire of our
guns, and was exchanged ten months after his capture. The non-commissioned officers and
privates were sent to Belle Isle, and from there to Andersonville, where a majority of them died
of starvation and exposure.

Falling back on Chattanooga, our army went into the intrenchments. Monday morn-
ing at nine o'clock. Surgeon Crew of the Eighty-Ninth, sick with jaundice, and just able tc
ride on horseback, found himself half a mile in front of our line of battle, with forty wounded,
twenty sick, and seventy-five well men, all that was left of the Eighty-Ninth. No other com-
missioned officer being present, the command devolved on the Surgeon. With two ambulances
and a few stretchers, at ten, A. M., he started for Chattanooga, five miles distant, passed
through our line of battle, and arrived there at two, P. M., leaving the wounded in hospital, and
reporting the men to the officer in command. For a few days this remnant of the Eighty-Ninth
was attached to the Ninety-Second Ohio, but becoming dissatisfied, Captain Harris, of the Thirty-
Sixth Ohio, took command, and the Eighty-Ninth resumed its own name and organization.

Captain Jolly, who had been at home recruiting, arrived at Chattanooga the day after the
battle with the sick who had recovered. He was promoted to Major, and took command of the
regiment, Major Hays having resigned on account of physical disability. The Eighty-Ninth
soon mustered two hundred men, and, under Major Jolly, established a respectable standing.
For six weeks it lay in camp in the marble quarry at Chattanooga, with shell bursting over its
camp, from Lookout Mountain, subsisting on half rations, scantily clothed, and braving the
rigors of winter. It witnessed Hooker's charge up the steeps of Lookout Mountain, and joined
in the shout of victory as the enemy gave way and fled. The next day, when the charge was
made on Mission Ridge, Major Jolly, at the head of hi3 little band of two hundred men, led them
to victory in the front of the attacking column.

Vol. II.— 32.



498 Ohio in the War.

After the battle of Chattanooga, or Mission Ridge, the Eighty-Ninth remained in camp at
Chattanooga until the 22d of February, 1864, when the Fourteenth Corps made a reconnoissance
and demonstration on the enemy's works at Dalton, Georgia. The First Brigade of Third Divi-
sion made a partial charge on the enemy's works at Rocky Face, on the 25th, in which the
Eighty-Ninth had two men killed, ten wounded, and two captured.

On the 13th, 14th, and loth of May, the Eighty-Ninth was engaged in the fight at Resaca,
but without loss. Near Kenesaw, Colonel Carleton rejoined the regiment and took command ;
thereafter the Thirty -Ninth bore its part in the almost constant fighting for four months, up to
and into Atlanta. While at Atlanta Colonel Carleton got leave of absence, was detailed in
charge of the post at Chattanooga, and never returned to the regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel
Glenn, who had returned from his captivity, having been in prison one year, took command of
the Eighty-Ninth, which he continued to hold up to the end of the war.

After participating in the expedition against Hood, in his mad attempt to capture Nashville,
the Eighty -Ninth was at its post in Sherman's grand march to the sea. It was at the taking of
Milledgeville, Georgia, and supported General Kilpatrick in the cavalry fight at Waynesboro'.
It was also at the capture of Savannah on the 21st of December.

The regiment remained in camp at Savannah over a month ; crossed the Savannah River
thirty miles above the city on the 5th of February, 1865, into South Carolina, and participated in
the thorough destruction of the plantations, cities, and towns of that seditious State. It was at
the crossing of the Cahawba River with the Fourteenth Army Corps, when the pontoons gave
way twice from the force of the swollen and raging stream, and engaged in the fight at Averys-
boro' and Bentonville, North Carolina, on the 18th and 19th of March; was at the capture of
Raleigh, the capital of North Carolina, and at the surrender of Johnston on the 27th of April,
1865.

On the 30th of April the Eighty-Ninth with the Fourteenth Corps left Holly Springs, eight
miles from Raleigh, and marched to Richmond, Virginia, reaching there on the 7th of May,
having made one hundred and eighty miles in eight days. Remaining three days in Richmond
the march was resumed, and Arlington Heights, overlooking Washington City, reached on the 19th
of May. On the 23d the Eighty-Ninth witnessed the grand review of the Army of the Potomac,
and on the 24th participated in the triumphal pageant of Sherman's army, marching down
Pennsylvania Avenue and past the White House.

After two years and nine months' service the remnant of the Eighty-Ninth was mustered
out at Washington City on the 7th of June, 1865, and ordered to report at Camp Dennison, Ohio,
there to receive pay and final discharge. Proceeding out west, via the Baltimore and Ohio
Railroad, the regiment reached Parkersburg, West Virginia, on the evening of the 9th, crossed
over into Ohio and took cars on the Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad at twelve o'clock, and
from thence made a triumphant procession to Camp Dennison, receiving the cheers, refreshments,
and plaudits of the grateful and patriotic people of Ohio.

On the 13th of June, 1865, the Eighty-Ninth was mustered out and paid in full.



Ninetieth Ohio Infantey.



499



90th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTEH, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Do

Do

Lt. Colonel...

Do.

Do.
Major



Do

Do

Do. ...
Do. ...
Do. ...
Surgeon
Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Chaplain
Do. ,
Captain
Do. ..



Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do.

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.



ISAAC N. ROSS

CHAS. H. KIPPEY"
SAMUEL N. YEOMAN ...

Chas. H. Rippey

Samuel N. Yeoman

Nicholas F. Hitchcock

Samuel N. Yeoman

Alvah Perry ,

George Angle

John S. McDowell

Nicholas V. Hitchcock

James F. Cook

Richard N. Tipton

Henry W. Carpenter...

J. L. Wiley

J. P. Coates

C. P. O'Hanlon

George L. Kalb

Wm. C. Holliday

Francis M. Black

John S. McDowell

R. D. Caddy

Alvah Perry

George Angle

Thomas J. Watkins

Thomas W. Gardner

Nicholas F. Hitchcock ...

Lewis R. Carpenter

Morris B. Rowe

Wm. A. Denny

Samuel L. Weidner

Thomas Raines

Thomas E. Baker

) oli 11 S. Witherspoon

John M. Sutphen

Augustus R. Keller

James F. Cook

Samuel L. Weidner

Alouzo W. Black

George R, Crow

James K. Jones

John D. Nicely

Samuel W. Stuckey

Wm. Felton

Jacob B. Orman

John D. Nicely

Edward A. Elliott-

John S. Witherspoon

Daniel N. Kingery

Jacob B. Orman

John M. Sutphen

Daniel J. Nunemaker

Wm. A. Denny

Thomas Raines

Augustus R. Keller

Jacob Freeman

James F. Cook

Ah. iizo W. Black

Thomas E. Baker

George R. Crow

George Ritchie

George W. Welsh

Andrew J. Willoughbv...

Wm. J. Webb

Samuel L. Weidner

James K. Jones

John L. Hatfield

John D. Nicely

Samuel W. Stuckey ,

Wm. I). Hudson

Wm. Felton

Henry F. Leib

Edward A. Elliott

An hibald M. Rogers

lohn Elder

Hugh Fergusou

A. M. Mosure

Chas. E. Keck

John N. Arehart

John S. Beck

J. C. Batem.in

Jonathan Ell:s

Betij. F. Yoakum

Joshua C. Gibson

George W. Welsh ,



DATE OF RANK



Aug.

April

Oct.

Aug

April

May

Aug.

April

Nov.

Aug.

Sept.

Mav

Aug.



22, 1862
14, 1863
2(1, "

9, 1862
14, 1M53

18, 1865
1(1, 1862
14, 1863

23, "

11, ism

8, "

30, isr.

19, 1862
19,



COM. ISSUED.



June
Nov.
Sept.
Dec.
July
Aug.
July



Dec.



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 88 of 165)