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Sixth Ohio Infantry. 51

the surrender of Fort Donelson was received ; and, after cruising up and down the Ohio for sev-
eral days, the fleet proceeded to Smithland, and then up the Cumberland River to Nashville.

On the 25th of February, 1862, first of all the Army of the Ohio, the Fourth Division
reached Nashville ; the remainder of the army, marching across the country from Louisville
arrived later. The Sixth Ohio was the first of the division to march through the town • and
their regimental flag was the first National flag hoisted over the State house in that city. The
Fourth Division went into camp on the Murfreesboro' 'pike ; and while here, the Sixth was
assigned to the Tenth Brigade, Colonel Ammen, Twenty-Fourth Ohio Volunteers, commanding.
On the 17th of March the Army of the Ohio moved southward from Nashville, the Fourth
Division taking the advance. Crossing Duck River at Columbia, Tennessee, and goino- into
camp at Savannah, Tennessee, April 5, 1862. The next morning the battle of Pittsburg Land-
ing opened, and the division marched across the country Sunday afternoon to the field. The
Tenth Brigade, composed of the Ninety-Fourth Ohio, Thirty-Sixth Indiana, and Sixth Ohio,
was the advance ; and these were the first troops of Buell's army that crossed the river at Pitts-
burg Landing. The crossing was effected under fire, and the two regiments first mentioned,
with the right wing of the Sixth, were thrown into line just in time to repel the last charge the
Rebels made upon the National left that day. The next morning the division advanced at day-
light, and was soon actively engaged with the enemy. The Sixth was held in reserve, support-
ing Captain TerrilPs Battery of the Fifth United States Artillery, and, except the companies on
the skirmish line, was not actively engaged with the enemy, although under a heavy artillery
fire during the entire engagement. The army camped upon the field of battle till May 24th,
when the advance against Corinth commenced. Colonel Bosley joined the regiment from sick-
leave while in camp on the battle-ground, but shortly returned to Cincinnati on renewed
6ick-leave.

The Sixth bore its part in all the operations before Corinth, and in the subsequent pursuit
of the Rebels for sixty miles south of that place, when the Fourth Division returned, marching
through Iuka, Mississippi; Tuscumbia, and Plorence, Alabama, to Athens, Alabama, where they
went into camp till July 17, 1862, when the entire division was ordered to Murfreesboro', Ten-
nessee. Remaining at this point but a week, they were ordered to McMinnville, Tennessee,
where they went into camp. While at McMinnville the Sixth was detailed as provost guards,
and was quartered in the town. General Nelson being relieved from the command of the
division, General Ammen succeeded him, and Colonel Grose, of the Thirty-Sixth Indiana, took
command of the brigade.

Upon the 17th of August the movement of the Army of the Ohio, from its advanced posi-
tion in Tennessee to Louisville commenced, and the Sixth marched with its division, via Nash-
ville, Gallatin, Bowling Green, and West Point, to Louisville. The army reached the latter
place on the 26th of September, 1862 ; and in the reorganization of the Army of the Ohio the
Sixth was placed in the Third Brigade, Colonel Grose commanding ; Second Division, Briga-
dier-General W. S. Smith commanding; of the Fourteenth Army Corps, Major-General T. S.
Crittenden commanding. The Sixth, in its place in the brigade and division, marched across
the State of Kentucky, in pursuit of Bragg, to within thirty-five miles of Cumberland Gap. It
went into camp near Nashville, November 23d, and while here, General Smith was relieved
from command, and Brigadier-General J. W. Palmer succeeded him.

The regiment marched with its brigade in the advance upon Murfreesboro', which com-
menced December 28, 1862, taking its share of all skirmish and picket duty. On Wednesday,
December 31st the division was heavily engaged ; the regiment losing, out of three hundred and
eighty-three officers and men, one hundred and fifty-two killed, wounded, and prisoners. Only
six of these were prisoners, taken when the brigade was driven back from its first line. On
Friday the regiment was again actively engaged, losing, however but seven killed and wounded.
The regiment went into camp in front of Murfreesboro', and afterward moved out on the McMinn-
ville road to Cripple Creek, eight miles from town. While in camp at these places, several
reconnoissances were made to the front, as far as to Woodbury and Shelbyville. In the move-



52 Ohio in the War.

ment against Tullahoma, which commenced June 24, 1863, the regiment had hard marching,
but no fighting ; and after the evacuation of that point and the retreat of the Rebels to Chatta-
nooga, it went into camp at Manchester on July 7th, and remained till August 16th, when the
campaign against Chattanooga commenced.

The Sixth was assigned, temporarily, during this advance, to the Second Brigade, under Brig-
adier-General Hazen, and with this brigade crossed the two ranges of the Cumberland Mount-
ains into East Tennessee ; then was ordered back, and joined the Third Brigade again at the
crossing of the Tennessee, below Chattanooga. The brigade marched up the south bank of the
river, over Lookout Mountains, past the town of Chattanooga, and out to Rossville and Gor-
don's Mills. In the battle of Chickamauga, on the 19th and 20th of September, the regiment
was actively engaged, losing, out of three hundred and eighty-four officers and men, one hun-
dred and twenty-five killed, wounded, and missing. Colonel Anderson was wounded on the
19th and the regiment was under the command of Major Erwin until October, when Lieuten-
ant-Colonel Christopher joined the regiment from recruiting service, and remained in command
till January 18, 1864.

After the army fell back to Chattanooga, the Twentieth and Twenty-First Corps were consoli-
dated as the Fourth Corps, under Major-General Gordon Granger, and the regiment became a
part of the Second Brigade, Brigadier-General Hazen's ; Third Division, Brigadier-General T.
J. Wood's, of that Corps. The shutting up of the army in Chattanooga, after the battle of
Chickamauga, and the scarcity of rations, consequent upon the partial severance of the lines
of communication, was a severe test of the endurance of both officers and men. The affair
of October 25th, known as the battle of Brown's Ferry, was fought by picked men from the
brigades of Generals Hazen and Turchin, of whom the Sixth furnished its due proportion.
This battle relieved the pressure as to supplies, and enabled the army to hold Chattanooga.
When active operations commenced in front of Chattanooga, the Fourth Army Corps occupied
the center, and this regiment was in the advance on Orchard's Knob, November 23d, and in the
charge up Mission Ridge, on November 25th. Although actively engaged in skirmishing on
the mornino- f the 25th, when Major Erwin was killed, and in the first line of battle in the
charge on the afternoon of the same day, the regiment lost, out of two hundred and sixty-five
officers and men, only thirty-three killed, wounded, and missing.

On the 28th the regiment, with its division, marched to the relief of Knoxville, Tennessee,
then threatened by Longstreet, and reached that town and went into camp near it on the 7th of
December. On the 16th of December the regiment marched north to Blair's Cross Roads, and
then to Morristown, Dandridge, Rutledge, and other points, seldom camping more than one week
in a place the entire winter, till February 14th, when the division marched south of Knoxville and
went into camp at Lenoir ; afterward, northward to Morristown, Rutledge, and New Market
again, until April 6th, when the division was ordered to Cleveland to join the main army. The
campaign of East Tennessee was the most severe service the regiment ever saw. From Novem-
ber 28th till February 14th the troops were without their baggage, both officers and men living
in shelter tents, and subsisting, for the most part, off the country already twice passed over.

The regiment went into camp near Cleveland on the 12th of April, and when the campaign
against Atlanta opened it was left, with another regiment, to do garrison duty in the town, they
having the shortest time to serve of any regiments in the division. Upon the 17th of May it was
ordered to join the main army, and accordingly marched to Kingston, Georgia, and reported to
General Thomas, who ordered it back to Resaca, to guard the railroad bridge over the Ooslc-
naula at that point, where it remained till June 6th, when it was released from duty and ordered
home to be mustered out of the service.

The regiment arrived at Cincinnati on June 15th, and after the public reception given by the
citizens, went into quarters at Camp Dennison, where it was mustered out of the service June
23, 1864, with an aggregate of thirty officers and four hundred and ninety-five enlisted men.
Several of the non-commissioned officers held commissions, but could not be mustered in, as
the companies in which the vacancies occurred were below the minimum.




A SCENE ON LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN.



Sixth Ohio Infantry. 53

The Sixth carried to the close of its s«rvice a beautiful stand of colors, which had been pre-
sented by the ladies of Cincinnati in December, 1862, and a regimental banner received at the
same time from the City Council. The pledges which Colonel Anderson made for the regiment
on the occasion of these presentations were, within three weeks, fully redeemed by the part borne
by the Sixth in that deadly conflict in the cedars of Stone River, where its percentage of killed
and wounded is claimed to have been heavier than that of any other regiment engaged, with the
exception of the 21st Illinois.

Colonel Anderson was three times wounded — slightly, by a spent ball at Pittsburg Landing •
painfully, by a flesh wound through the thigh on the first day of Stone River, which, without
leaving the field, he had bound up, remaining on active duty till the battle was over ; and severelv,
in the left arm, at Chickaniauga. Many of the Sixth, after their muster-out, re-enlisted in Han-
cock's Corps.

During the term of service the regiment marched, in round numbers, three thousand two
hundred and fifty miles; traveled by steamboat and railroad, two thousand six hundred and
fifty miles, making a total of five thousand nine hundred miles. The regiment was in four
pitched battles, losing a total of three hundred and twenty five killed, wounded, and missing.
And in addition it shared in some half dozen skirmishes and lesser engagements. A large num-
ber of enlisted men, at least seventy-five, received commissions in other regiments, and eleven of
these were in the regular army. It was in the front from the time it was first ordered to the
field till May 2, 1864; and a remarkable feature of the regiment was its uniformly health y
condition, the reports showing but sixteen deaths by disease during the entire three years ; and,
including officers and enlisted men, there were at least two hundred who never lost a day's duty.
As there were a large number of men possessing a business education in the ranks, the details for
duty in the Quartermaster's and Adjutant-General's departments of the army were unusually
large; at one time over two hundred men being on duty in these departments; so that, notwith-
standing the excellent health, there were never, after the first year's service, more than five
hundred officers and enlisted men present for duty at any one time ; and the regiment went into
action, usually, with from three hundred and fifty to four hundred men. It was in a good
state of discipline from first to last ; and in the personal neatness of the men, cleanliness of its
camp, and condition of arms and accouterments, it was fully equal to the majority of volunteer
regiments. The men were always cheerful, willing, and obedient, and were at all times ready
for duty.

The record does not show much hard fighting, but it does show that which, in the judgment of
experienced minds, tests the true qualities of a soldier — marching and duty of the most severe
kind. Deeds of heroism and endurance belong to all the regiments of the Army of the Repub-
lic; and comparisons are, generally, as unjust as they are unnecessary. It is sufficient to say,
that both officers and men enjoyed the fullest confidence of their brigade, division, and corps
commanders, and earned a reputation in the Army of the Ohio, and in the Army of the Cum-
berland, with which their native city may be well satisfied.



54



Ohio in the War



7th REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



EOSTEK, THREE MONTHS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel....

Major

Surgeon

As't Surgeon.

Captain

Do



Do

Do

Do

Dr

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

t)o.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



ERASTUS B. TYLER.

Wm. R. Creighton

John S. Casement

Hrnry K. Cushing

F. Salter

Win. R. Creighton

Charles A. DeVilliers.,

Giles W. Shurtliff.

John N. Deyer

John W. Sprague

John Morris

Fred A. Seymour

Joel F. Asper

W. R. Stirling

John J. Wiseman.

Win. Stedman

Orrin J. Crane

James T. Sterling

Orrin J. Crane

James T. Sterling ,

H. Kinaston

Benj. F. Gill

Ralph Lockwood

John B. Rouse

W. H. Robinson

George L. Wood

Samuel McClelland.....

John F. Sehute

Albert C. Burgess

Thomas T. Sweeney....

Judson N. Cross

Albeit C. Burgess

Thomas T. Sweeney....

Stephen Cole

Andrew F. Williams...

Arthur T. Wilcox

Isaac N. Wilcox

Elliott S. Quay

James B. Cleveland....

Edwar.l T. Fitch

Oscar W. Sterl

Dudley A. Kimball

Ephraim H. Baker



DATE OF RANK.



May 7, IS61



April



May
April



May

April



May
April



2,
19,
22,
22,
22,
2-1,
23,

as,

24,
24,
21),
M,
11,
15,
19,
22,
22,
22,
23,
2.°.,
23,
24,
21,
20,
14,
14,
29,
29,
22,
22,
22,
23,
23,
23,
24,
24,
20,
H,
29,



COM. ISSUED.



May



Apr



May
April



May

April



7, 1361



May
April



2,
2,
15,
22,
22,
22,
23,
23,
23,
24,
24,
20,
14,
14,



22,
22,

22,
23,
23,
2.3,
-'4,
24,
20,
14,
14.
28,
29,
22,



23,
23,

-'I,
24,
20,
14,
29,



REMARKS.



Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Resigned.



Promoted to Captain
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned.



Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



RANK.


NAME.


date ok rank.


COM. ISSUED.


REMARKS.




ERASTUS B. TYLER,
WM. R. CREIOHTON


June

May

June

May

Nov.

March

Dec.

June

May

March

Aug.

Pec.

Sept.

Nov.

March

A mil

June

July

Jan


19, 1661

20, 1SK2

19, 1861

20. 1862
2, "
2, 18113

1, "
19, "
25, 1862

2, 1863

13, "

10, 1861
1, 1862
9, 1861

11, 1862

12, lSfi.3

14, "
29, "

15, "
11, 1862

3, 1861

13, "

14, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "
17, "


July

June

July

June

Dec.

March

Dec.

July

Oct.

June

Aug.

Sept.

Dec.

Sept.

Nov.

March

April

June'

Julv

Jan.

July


25,
ltl,

1^',

10.

4,
12,
27,
25,
fi,
22,
13.
7,
4,
9,
2o,

re,

14,
29,

!>*,
11,

as,

25,
25,

25,

25

25


1861
1862
1861
1862

18R3

18«
1802
1863

1861
1862
1861
1862

1803

1862
1861


Appointed Brigadier-General May 20,

Killed at Mission Ridge, November 27

Promoted May 20, 1862.

Resigned as Captain.

Revoked.

Killed at Mission Ridge November 27,

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned May 25, 1863.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Revoked.

Resigned March 29, 1864.

Resigned November 2, 1862.

Mastered out with regiment.

Resigned November 1, 1862.

Resigned June 2, 1863.

Declined ; returned commission.

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined ; returned commission.

Promoted to Surgeon 56th regiment O.

Resigned January 9, 1863.

Promoted ; resigned May 19, 1862.

Mustered out for promotion May 21, 1-

Kesigned.

Resigned March 18, 1S63.

Killed at Battle of Cross Lanes Aug.2i

Appointed Colonel 63d O. V. I.

Mustered out July 6, 1861.

Died from wounds received August 22


862.


Do


1863.






Do






Do






Do




1863.


Do


Samuel McClelland

John S. Casement




Do. .




Do


Frederick A. Seymour

Frederick A. Seymour




Do








Dm

Ass't Surgeon
Do.


Curtiss J. Bellows

Charles E. Denig




Do.
Do.


Wm. E. Thompson




Do.






Do.




V. I.


Chaplain

Captain






J. F. Asper,


June




Do






Do

Do


Giles W. Shurtliff.

John N. Deyer


>, MO.


Do




Do


Wm. R. Sterling




Do




18(1.



Seventh Ohio Infantry



DO



DATE OK BANK.! COM. ISSUED.



Captain

Do!
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Bo.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

1)0.

Do.
Do.
Lieutenant
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.



2d



James T. Sterling June

Dei court B. Clayton.

George L. Wood Nov.

Albert ('. Burgess.

Judson N. Cross

Charles A. Weed Feb.

Samuel McClelland May

Arthur T. Wilcox July

Joseph B. Molyneaux Sept,

H. Day Nov.

Merrill Clark Sept.

Marcus S. Hopkins March

Wm. A. Howe S

E. J. Kreiger Feb.

1;. K. Davis....

Wm. D. Braden March

Stephen P. Looniis.

George A. McKay..

Harlow N. Spencer.

Christian Nesper....

George D. Lockwood June

Seymour S. Keed Nov.

George L. Wood June

Albert C. Burgess

M m. H. Robinsou

Judson Is'. Cross

Charles A. Weed

Arthur T. Wilcox

Samuel McClelland....

C. T. Kitchelm

Joseph B. Molyneaux.

John B. Kouse

Louis G. DeForrest....

John Morris

Joshua G. Willis Oct.

Halbert B. Case Nov.

Ralph Lockwood-

E. Hudson Baker.

Elliott S. Quav

Oscar W. Sterl Feb.

H'-nry Z. Eat'

Dudley A. Kimball March

April

March

April



18, 1861 July

19, "

25, " |Nov.
23, " "
25, "
S, 1862 Feb.

20, " June
9, " Dec.
1. " "



1, 1862

IS, 1863

12, 186:
9, 1863

19, '*
8,

19, 1864
19, "
19. "

13, "
7, "

2, 1862

3, 3tsr.!.

13, "

14.
1",



A. H. Day-
Frank Payne

E. J. Kreiger

Wm. B. Sheppard

Seymour S. Reed

Leicester King

Marcus S. Hopkins

Mervin Clark

Wm. A. Howe

L. R. Davis

Wm. D. Braden

Stephen T. Looniis

Henry W. Lincoln

George D. Lockwood

Morris Baxter

George A. McKay

Charles A. Brooks

Harlow N. Spencer

Christian Nesper

Edward H. Bohn

Henry M. Dean

Dwight H. Brown

George C. Ketchum

Halbert B. Case

E. Hudson Baker

Andrew J. Williams

Ralph Lockwood

Edward F. Fitch

Oscar W. Sterl

Henry Z. Eaton

Dudley A. Kimball

A. H. Dav

Elliotts. Ouay

Ezra H. Witler

Wm. B. Sheppard

Frank Payne

Seymour S. Reed

Leicester King

James P. Brisbine

Marcus S. Hopkins

Mervin Clark

Frank Johnson

Wm. A. Howe

L. R. Davis

Joseph II. Ross

Wm. D. Braden

Stephen T. Looniis

Harlow N. Spencer

George D. Lockwood

Henry W. Lincoln

Geoige A. MrKav

Wm. H. Howk...'.

Christian Nesper

Joseph Crayne

Isaac C. Jones

Edward II. Bohn

Morris Baxter

Henry M. Dean

Dwight H. Brown



May
June
July



July-
Sept.
.Nov.

Dec.
Jan.
May

iov.



March
June



18,
19,

19,
19.
3i,

25,

■2T>,
30,

5,

m,

i,
i,

i,

13,
H,
20,
10,
25,
23,
12,

2,

9 t

1,

0,

I,

1, 18(13

23, "

'» "

1. "

1, "

L "

1, "

30, 1864

3, 1861

17, "



Oct.
Nov.



April



17,
17,
17.
19,
19,
19,
1,
2.">,
25,
12.
17,
20,



March
April
May
Aug.



Nov.
June
July



Sept.
Jan.



10, "

25, "

23, "

6, "
2, "

12, "

1, "

7, 1863



May-
June
Mav
Feb.

May
March



: uno
Dee.
July



Oct.
Nov.



March

April

May

June
Dec.



Jan.
May



March
July



Oct.
Nov.



April
May



Sept.
Oct.



Nov.
Dec.



Feb.
May



18f.l Discharged and app'ted Lieut. Col. Sept.l. '62.

Resigned August 18, 1861.

Honorably dis. Nov. 12, 1S62, acct. of wjuu'Js.

Resigned July 9, \tf-2.

Honorablv discharged February 9, 1863.
1862 Resigned February 19, 1863.

Promoted to Maior.

Mustered out July 6, 1864.

Mustered out as 1st Lieutenant Dec. "!, 1863

Resigned January 18, 1863.
18*'3 Mustered out July 6, 1864.

Revoked.

Mustered out Julv fi, 1864.

Mustered out July 6, 1864.

Mustered out December 19, 1S64.

Mustered out July 6, 1864.

Declined promotion.

Mustered out July 6, 1854.

Mustered out July 6, 1864.

Mustered out July 6, 1864.

Mustered out July fi, 1864.

1862 designed January 18, 1863.
llifi] Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.
Died.

Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned April 13, 1862.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned August 8, 1861.
Resigned March 1, 1862.
Resigned December 5, 1861.
Resigned July 23, 1862.
Resigned January 30, 1862.
Honorably discharged November 12, 1802.
Resigned July 25, 1862. .

Promoted -by President.
Resigned April 14, 1862.
Resigned November 6, 1862.
Resigned April 13, 1862.
Honorably discharged November 12, 1862.
Resigned June 10, 1862.
Promoted tn Captain.
Resigned March 23, 1863.
Mustered out November I. 1S62.
Dismissed December 22, 1863.
Resigned Julv 2, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Declined promotion.
Honorably discharged January 7, 1363.
" IPmnioted to Captain.
1864 Killed November 27, 1863.

1863 Promoted to Captain.
Killed.

Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out July 6, IS64.
Mustered out Julv 6, 1864.
Mustered out July 6, 1864.
Mustered out July 6, 1864.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned September 6, 1861.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned November 28, 1861.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted February 20, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted March 1, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted April 1, 1>62, to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned April 13, 1862.
Promoted April 14,1862, to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted March 1, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted May 20, 1862, to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Killed Aug. 9, 1S62, at battle Cedar Mountain.

1S62 Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Killed Aug. 9, 1862, at battle Cedar Mountain.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Killed Aug. 9, 1862, at battle Cedar Mountain.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Honorably discharged January 7, 1-J63.
Promoted to 1st Lietiteuant.
Died June 21, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out July 6, 1864.
Mustered out July 6, 1864.
Mustered out Julv 6, 1864.
Mustered out July 6, 1864.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



56 Ohio in the War.



SEVENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THIS organization may be termed one of the representative regiments of Ohio. The
first Eebel gun fired on Fort Sumter was the signal for its assemblage. Its echo
had scarcely died out in the North ere the seventy-five thousand men first called
for by President Lincoln were in camp, eager to be led against the rebellious foe ; and among
these enthusiastic patriots were those composing the Seventh Ohio. Its ranks were filled
by the sturdy citizens of Northern Ohio. The city of Cleveland furnished three companies,
Oberlin one, Warren one, Painesville one, Youngstown one, Norwalk one, and Franklin one,
all of whom rendezvoused at Camp Taylor, near Cleveland; and on the 30th of April,
1861, they were mustered into the service of the United States as the Seventh Ohio Volunteer
Infantry.

On a beautiful Sunday morning, early in May, this regiment, more than a thousand strong,
marched into Cleveland, and down Euclid street to the railroad depot, where the cars were in
readiness to transport them to Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati. It was there, in that then
wretched camp, that the men of the Seventh Ohio experienced their first real practice of field
service. The grounds were in their original state, cut up by baggage wagons, whose wheels had
sunk deep into the miry mud, and left great fissures, filled with thick, gummy water, mixed



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