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Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

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Resigned September 18, 1864.

Discharged April 18, 1863.

Pro. to Mai.; lion. dis. on account of wounds.

Resigned November 29, 1802.

Resigned September 28, 1804.

On detached service ; mustered out with reg.

Discharged February 3, 1865.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned October 11, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Honorably discharged January 11, 1865.

Teclined promotion.

Mustered out with regiment.

Blustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out October 10, 1865.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February 9, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

On detached service ; declined promotion.

Resigned February 19, 1863.

Resigned February 8, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned September 5, 1863.

Honorably discharged August 31, 1S63.

Promoted to Captain.

Declined promotion.

Resigned December 9, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain

Declined promotion.

Resigned April 3, 1864.

Resigned August 9, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed June 17, 1864.

Promoted to Captaiu.

Mustered out as 2d Lieutenant August 7, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Honorably discharged December 4, 1864.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Killed in action November 18, 1S64.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned March 21. 1805. on act. of wounds.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.



Ninety-First Ohio Infantry.



505



BANK.


NAME


DATE OF RANK.


COM.


SSUED.


EEMABKS.






Jnly

Aug.

July

Dec.
Nov.
Feb.

June
Feb.
April
Aug.

Feb.
Bay

June
Aug.

Oct.
Dec.

Jan.

March
April


29, ISi.2

23, "
22, "

24, "

25, "
22, "
29, "

5, *'
11, "

8, "
2, "

29, "
19, 1863
19, "

9, "

1, "

8, "

13, "
31, "
15, "

17, 1S64

9, "
9, "

14, "
11, "
11, "
11, "

11, "

12, "
9, "
9, "
9, "
9, "

30, "
30, "

18, 1665

15, "
18, "
29, "
29, "

26, "


Sept.

Jan.
March

Dec.

Feb.
May

June

Aug.

Oct.
Dec.

Jan.

March
April


20, 1862

20, "
20, "
2.", "
20, "
20, "
2o, "
20, "
20, "
20, "
20, 1863
20, "
30, "
30, "
30, "

17, "
27, "
27, "
27, "
27, "

17, IS64
9, "
9, "

14, "
11, "
11, "
11, "

11, "

12, "
9, "
9, "
9, "
9, "

30, "
30, "

18, 1865
18, "
18, "
29, "
29, "
26, "


Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned February 19, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned December 2, 1SG2.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.


Joel Hull


Do.


Chas. 0. Cole


Do.




Do.
Do.
Do.


Win. D. Burbage

Allen D. Grassland

.lames M. White


Do.
Do.


George P. Rogers


Do.




Do.
Do.


Alva V. Kendall


Do.




Do.




Do.


Thomas W. Hose


Do




Do.




Do.




Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out with regiment.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.


Do.




Do.




Do.


Chas X. Hall


Do


Wm 31 Belcher


Do.




Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.


Newton B. Warwick

Adolphus H. Kobinson

James 0. Freeman

Henry W. Watts


Do.






Do.






Do.


Lewis D. Hall




Do.






Do.






Do.




Cashiered May 8, 1865.
Mustered out with regiment.
Died.


Do.


A. W. Beach


Do.




Do.




Mustered out with regiment.
Declined to accept.
Mustered out with regiment.


Do.




Do.


E. B. Willard


Do.




Do.




Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.
Mustered out with regiment as Sergeant.


Do.









506 Ohio in the War.



NINETY-FIRST OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



THE NINETY-FIRST OHIO was raised in Southern Ohio, from the counties of
Adams, Scioto, Lawrence, Gallia, Jackson, and Pike. The organization of the regiment
was begun in July, 1862, and in one month it was filled above the maximum number.
During the fall of 1862 the regiment was chiefly engaged in drilling, and preparing to perform
efficiently the arduous work evidently before it. On the 26th of August it received its arms and
accouterments, and five companies were ordered to Ironton to repel a threatened raid down the
Big Sandy. On the 3d of September the remainder of the regiment joined those already at
Ironton. The next day part of it was sent to Guyandotte, Virginia, to watch the Rebel Jenkins.
On the 5th and 7th the Ninety-First was regularly mustered into the United States service for
three years; and on the 13th received orders to proceed to Maysville, Kentucky. In passing
Portsmouth a telegram was received from Governor Tod, ordering the regiment to Point
Pleasant, Virginia, to relieve Colonel Lightburn, who had been driven back by the Eebel General
Loring, and was retreating on that place. It arrived at Point Pleasant on the 14th, and
remained there till the 26th of September, when it started on its first raid up the Kanawha.
This raid was successful, in so far that a Rebel camp at Buffalo was captured, with all its con-
tents, except the occupants, who made good their escape. On the 20th October the Ninety-First
accompanied Colonel Lightburn's forces up the Kanawha to Gauley Bridge, arriving there on
the 3d of November. A few days thereafter it went into winter-quarters at Fayetteville, Vir-
ginia, and remained there until the spring of 1863. After breaking up winter-quarters the first
movement of the Ninety-First was to Summerville, which was intended to thwart the designs of
the Rebel Imboden on that place. The attack, however, was not made, and in the meantime the
Rebels concentrated under McCausland to attack Fayetteville. The Ninety-First fell back on
that place, and on the 19th of May participated in the attack and pursuit of the Rebel forces,
marching twenty miles, and driving the enemy from that part of the country.

The next duty performed by the Ninety-First was the pursuit of the Rebel John Morgan,
who was then making his raid through Ohio. July 20th the regiment landed at Racine, and
marched to Buffington's Island the same day. Morgan, however, had been defeated the day
previous, and the only duty left to perform was the capture of about thirty of the raiders, com-
ing up with them at Rankin's Point. Proctorsville was the next camping-place, from which a
part of the organization, under Lieutenant-Colonel Coates, went up the Big Sandy to Louisa, to
assist General White against a threatened attack from Humphrey Marshall. Without results the
detachment returned, and the whole regiment went back to Fayetteville, arriving there the last
of July. From this place reconnoissances were occasionally made for the purpose of keeping the
enemy apprised of their proximity. In some of these marches the members of the regiment
suffered terribly from the cold and deep snows. The regiment also spent its second winter at
Fayetteville.

The campaign of 1864 was opened by a reconnoissance in force on Summerville about the
middle of March, but finding no enemy the Ninety-First returned to its old quarters at Fayette-
ville. A great raid was now on the tapis. About the first of May an order was received from
Crook to prepare for duty at a moment's notice. On the 2d of May regiments of infantry and
artillery began to arrive at Fayetteville, and on the 3d the combined force marched on the weari-
some and hazardous raid to Dublin Depot and New River Bridge. This perilous march led



Ninety-First Ohio Infantry. 507

them into the enemy's country a distance of one hundred and fifty miles, through almost impen-
etrable forests and over rugged mountain ranges. The regiment left Fayetteville with about
six hundred men, leaving one hundred behind in hospital.

The raid was successful ; the Rebels being severely punished in their own country, the rail-
road torn up and destroyed, the great bridge over New River, depot-buildings, and supplies
given to the flames. The honor of setting fire to the New River Bridge belongs to A. D. Cross-
land, Quartermaster of the Ninety-First. On their return they encountered great hardships,
marching twenty-five miles per day, enduring the merciless pelting of a driving rain-storm for
eleven successive days, and fighting the enemy at intervals. Starting from New River on the
11th of May they reached the National lines, at Meadow Bluffs, on the 19th, and pitched their
tents for a rest. They had fought two important battles, burned the New River Bridge, cap-
tured twelve pieces of artillery, three hundred prisoners, a large amount of stores, torn up the
Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, and traveled two hundred and six miles, with slight loss of
life, but at the cost of terrible sufferings and hardships.

On the 31st of May the Army of West Virginia, under General George Crook, left Meadow
Bluffs for Staunton, to join General Hunter, who was moving up the Shenandoah Valley to that
place. The Ninety-First formed an important part of this force, being in the advance, and as it
crossed a spur of the Alleghany range, and debouched into the plains near the Warm Springs,
had frequent skirmishes with the enemy, in one of which Major Cadot had his horse shot under
him, and three of the men were wounded. Driving and flanking the Rebels out of Panther Gap
the regiment bivouacked on the night of June 5th at Goshen, on the Central Virginia Railroad.
The next day the bridge over Calf Pasture River was burned, and the railroad track destroyed
for eight miles. June 7th the regiment crossed the North Mountain, and the great Valley of
Virginia was before it. June 8th Staunton was entered, and a junction made with the Army of
the Shenandoah, under General Hunter, who, the day before, had whipped the Rebels at New
Hope. A few days of rest and the two armies began their march on Lynchburg. Reaching
Lexington, Virginia, on the 12th of June the Rebels, under General McCausland, were encoun-
tered, but after a cannonade of three hours' duration, and a successful flank movement, the enemy
retreated. After destroying the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, the columns moved
on, and on the loth of June crossed the Blue Ridge between Otter Peak and Flat Top, the two
highest points in Eastern Virginia, from whence could be seen the extensive plains of East Vir-
ginia, and the Valleys of the James and Dan Rivers. Destroying the track of the Virginia and
Tennessee Railroad on their way, the National forces reached, on the 17th of June, a point within
Bix miles of Lynchburg. At three P. M. the attack was made, the Ninety-First being in the front
line of battle, to the right of the main pike leading into the city. Its support on the second line
of battle was the Ninth Virginia; the Twelfth Ohio was on the right of the Ninety-First in the
front line. On either side of the pike there were woods to protect the troops in their advance,
except immediately on the right and directly in front of the Ninety-First. Here was an open
field, through which the Ninety-First was compelled to charge, and in which the Rebels had
built rail-pens. As the regiment emerged from the woods into this open field they found them-
selves upon an elevated part of the field, and where the Rebels used their artillery upon them
with terrible eflect; but the brave boys, nothing daunted, charged over the field, drove the Rebels
from their defenses, captured two pieces of artillery, and pressed the enemy back to their inner
lines. In this charge the commanding officer of the regiment, Colonel John A. Turley, was
severely wounded. June 18th the Ninety-First was not in line of battle. Late in the day heavy
re-en forcenients to the enemy compelled the retreat of the National forces. The Ninety-First
was the last to leave the front of the Rebels. About nine P. M. it quietly withdrew, and took up
the line of march toward Liberty, traveling all night, and arriving at that place about noon of the
next day (19th). The Rebels pursued with both infantry and cavalry. Three days and nights the
National troops were kept on the march, with but slight intervals for rest, with the enemy har-
assing their rear. Marching for two weeks almost constantly, and under fire for two days in
regular line of battle, gives a slight conception of the sufferings of the men. After the first



508 Ohio in the Wab.

three days the retreat was continued with less ardor. The last five days of the retreat the whole
National force was almost completely stripped of food, and did not meet with supplies until their
arrival at Dog Wood Gap, near New River. The route of the retreat lay west from Liberty,
through Buford's Gap, to Salem. From thence it turned northward to Newcastle C. H., across
the Alleghanies, by the Sweet Sulphur Springs, Lewisburg, Meadow Bluffs, and down the
Kanawha River to Camp Piatt, where the regiment arrived on the 29th of June.

A long rest was needed. The men were worn out by fasting and heavy marches ; but the
exigency of the service did not permit it. Nine days were all that could be granted. Many of
the men of the Ninety-First were sick, and went into hospital at Charleston. Orders to move
were received, and on the 8th of July the regiment went on board a boat at Camp Piatt and
started for Parkersburg, arriving there on the 11th, and immediately thereafter left by rail for
Martinsburg, Virginia. By the 18th of July the entire brigade, with the train, was at Martins-
burg, ready to move. The greater part of the Army of West Virginia was with General Crook,
on the banks of the Shenandoah River, endeavoring to cut off the retreat of the Rebel General
Early by the way of Snicker's Ford, while the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps were pursuing him
across Loudon County, Virginia. Early succeeded, however, in getting safely across the Shenan-
doah River, and retreated by way of Berry ville toward Winchester. When it was known that
Early had crossed that river, the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps fell back to Washington, while
Crook, with the army of West Virginia, continued the pursuit. While Crook was moving toward
Berryville, the Second Brigade left Martinsburg and moved out on the pike toward Winchester,
under the command of General Averill, arriving near Stephenson's Depot on the 20th of July,
where the battle of that name was fought. In this brilliant affair the Ninety-First, and the brig-
ade to which it was attached, played a conspicuous part. On the morning of the 20th of July,
1863, at eleven o'clock, our forces arrived within two miles of the battle-field. While a recon-
noissance was being made the soldiers partook of the noon meal. Immediately after they
advanced in line of battle. The Rebels were fully advised of the approach of the National
forces, and permitted them to come within point-blank range before they opened fire. This was
the strategy used, hoping, by it and superior forces, to utterly crush the little National brigade.
The Rebels had posted themselves upon a gentle eminence, and in rather a thick forest extending
for a quarter of a mile on either side of the pike lengthwise, and half a mile laterally. In front
of their position the meadows on either side of the pike stretched away to the distance of a mile
and a half, with no obstruction, except in a single instance, where a forest of four or five acres
upon the left flank of the enemy, served to protect the National cavalry in the first engagement.
The Rebel artillery commanded nearly the whole plain, and afforded them the best possible
chance for a defensive engagement.

At twelve M., when the National advance was within half a mile of the enemy's position,
the Rebels opened upon them with four pieces of artillery. This was a partial surprise, and
slight evidences of wavering were exhibited, but it instantly passed away, and all was determina-
tion and activity. The cavalry dashed off' to the right and left, and took a position in perfect
order. The infantry were already in line, and our artillery was making rapid evolutions to get
into position. Its music was soon heard, dashing and crashing, sounding sweet and comforting
to the weary soldier. It began with a single gun, and scarcely a minute elapsed e'er it was one
continuous roar, and in ten minutes the Rebel guns were silenced. In the meantime the infantry
had gone forward and was resting behind a stone wall. General Averill reconnoitered the posi-
tion, and informed Colonel Duval that he saw no reasons why he should not advance. The
Colonel, equally explicit, responds "Yes; and take supper in Winchester to-night." The com-
mand was given, and the National force moved forward. The Ninth Virginia and the Ninety-
First Ohio were to carry the enemy's center. The Rebel artillery had been silent so long that it
was thought by many to be disabled or removed from the field. Yet caution was exercised in
some degree, although the National line marched boldly forward until within fifty yards of the
enemy, when it instantly laid down in the grass and began to load the guns. This artifice suc-
ceeded admirably; it drew the fire of the enemy, but they invariably overshot the National line.



Ninety-Fiest Ohio Infantey. 509

At this moment the National cavalry on either flank was driven back, and things began to look
badly; but an enfilading fire from the Thirty-Fourth Ohio, posted on the left flank, and the
Fourteenth Virginia on the right, checked the Kebels, and drove them back with heavy loss.
The entire National line then rose and advanced, and the battle raged with increased fury. The
Rebel artillery hurled grape and canister into the National ranks with considerable effect.
Nothing could withstand the impetuous charge that followed. It was so vigorous, so quick, and
executed with such eclat, that the Eebels went hopelessly down before it, some of them being
clubbed over the head with the butt of the musket e'er they could rise from their hiding-places,
and many of them threw away their guns and took to flight. Four brass field-pieces were cap-
tured, two by the Ninety-First Ohio, and two by the Ninth Virginia, together with the horses
attached to the caissons. The next morning, July 22, 1863, Winchester was occupied.

When General Early discovered that the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps had fallen back on
Washington he fell on General Crook, and after a stubborn resistance by General Crook, com-
pelled him to evacuate the city and fall back on Martinsburg, which was reached in safety at
daylight on the morning of the 25th of July. From this time until August 10th the Ninety-
First, with the Second Brigade, marched and counter-marched up and down the Shenandoah
Valley, skirmishing with the enemy and enduring excessive fatigue.

Tired out with the tampering policy, General Phil. Sheridan determined to make a vigorous
effort to clear the Valley of the enemy, and for that purpose organized a force, consisting of the
Sixth Corps, General Wright; Nineteenth, General Emory, and the Army of West Virginia, under
General Crook, with a large complement of cavalry, and moved in the direction of Berryville,
with the intention of flanking General Early, who was then at Winchester. The Ninety-First,
with the exception of one or two regiments, was on the extreme left of this large army. August
12th the National forces arrived at Cedar Creek, but found that Early had evacuated Winchester
and taken up a strong position at Fisher's Hill. A reconnoissance of four days convinced Gen-
eral Sheridan that it would be useless to attack the Eebels in this stronghold, and he therefore
ordered a retreat to Berryville, arriving there August 17th, Early following. On the 18th the
retreat was continued through Charlestown to Halltown, where General Crook remained several
days. August 24th a reconnoissance was made by the Second Brigade, in which the Ninety-First
had quite a number of men wounded. From August 26th to September 19th the National army
was alternating between Charlestown and Berryville, until on that day they moved toward a
common rendezvous at the crossing of the Opequan, on the pike between Winchester and Berry-
ville. The Eebel army was there, drawn up in line of battle about two and a half miles from
Winchester, on either side of the pike. The Ninety-First lost more in killed and wounded in
this battle than in any it was ever engaged. The Eebels held a strong position behind a stone
wall. Amid a storm of bullets the Ninety-First headed a charge, and lifted the Eebels com-
pletely out of their position with the naked bayonet.

On the 20th of September General Sheridan moved in pursuit of General Early, who had
retreated toward Strasburg, and taken refuge in the breastworks at Fisher's Hill. On the 22d of
September a flank movement by way of North Mountain was executed by the Army of West
Virginia in splendid style. It executed one complete charge on the double-quick from North
Mountain to the Valley Pike, a distance of three miles. The Eebels were too fleet of foot and
escaped.

After ten days' rest the tenacious Eebel General Early moved on the National forces, and
compelled them to fall back (October Sth) to Fisher's Hill; thence to Cedar Creek, where breast-
works were thrown up. The Eebels were enterprising, and early on the morning of October 19th
surprised and drove in the National pickets, compelling them to evacuate their intrenchments,
and fall back precipitately some miles ; but the National forces were quickly rallied, and, in
turn, went at the enemy with such vigor that imminent defeat was transformed into a glorious
and complete victory.

On the 19th of October the whole National army fell back to Kernstown. December 19th
the Second Brigade was ordered to the Opequan to guard the railroad bridge over that stream.



510 Ohio in the War.

December 30th the Ninety-First was ordered to proceed to Martinsburg, where it arrived on the
31st, in the midst of a terrible snow-storm. The hardships and sufferings endured by the brave
men of this regiment in the succeeding ten days were very severe. It took them about that time
to build their barracks, being compelled to get the timber for that purpose two and a half miles
from town, and pry the stones for their chimneys from the frozen ground. Had it not been for
the kindness of the Union-loving citizens of Martinsburg the regiment must have suffered beyond
the powers of endurance. Remaining here until March 17th the Ninety-First proceeded to Cum-
berland, Maryland, where they arrived on the 18th. On the 5th of April it started by rail for
Winchester, and on the 7th was incorporated with the Army of the Shenandoah, under General
Hancock, forming a part of the First Brigade, Fourth Provisional Division.

After the surrender of Lee the Army of the Shenandoah was disorganized, the troops going
in different directions. The Ninety-First remained at Winchester until the 2d of June, when it
went to Cumberland, and remained there up to June 24, 1865, when it was mustered out of ser-
vice, and started en route for Camp Dennison, going via Parkersburg, the Ohio River, and Cincin-
nati. It arrived at Camp Dennison on the 27th of June, and was paid and discharged from the
service of the United States on the 30th of June, 1865, having been in service two years, ten
months, and eight days.

The battles and skirmishes in which the Ninety-First was engaged during their term of ser-
vice were as follows : Buffalo, West Virginia, September 26, 1862 ; Fayetteville, West Virginia,
May 19, 1863; Blake's Farm, West Virginia, May 21, 1863; Cloyd Mountain, Virginia, May 9,
1864; New River Bridge, Virginia, May 10, 1864; Cow Pasture River, Virginia, June 5, 1864;
Lynchburg, Virginia, June 17, 1864; Stephenson's Depot, Virginia, July 20, 1864; Winchester,
Virginia, July 25, 1864; Near Charlestown, Virginia, August 24 and 26, 1864; Opequan, or Win-
chester, Virginia, September 19, 1864; Fisher's Hill, Virginia, September 22, 1864; Cedar Creek,
Virginia, October 19, 1864. Its marches amounted in the aggregate to one thousand two hun-
dred and twentv-nine miles.



Ninety-Second Ohio Infantry.



511



92d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



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