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DATE OF BANK.



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2d



N. H. VAN VORHES

BENJ. D. FEARING

Benj. D. Fearing

Douglas Putnam, jr

John C. Morrow

Dioclesian A. Smith ,

Douglas Putnam, jr

Elmer Golden

John C. Morrow

J. D. Colton

N. B. Sisson

J. D. Howell

Edwin Booth

A. M. Beers

Washington M. Grimes..

Elmer Golden

James M. Cooper

John C. Morrow

Wm. Wheeler

Edwin G. Dudley

Wm. Thorn ley

Francis H. Lonug

Alex, lliggins

Augustus B. Dickey

Thomas Wilson

Edward Grosvenor

John Brown

Wm. B. Whittlesey

Milton Patton

Hamilton Middleswartb...

James W. Merrill

Albert G. Hughes

Joseph Stephenson

Wm. Priestley

Hiram Rosser

Thomas W. Morris

Bradley B. Stone

David Putnam

James C. Bowers

Edward Grosvenor

George Hatch

.Milton Patton

Hamilton Middleswarth..

Douglas Putnam, jr

Jaines W. Merrill

Joseph Stephenson

John Brown

Wm. C. Okey

Wm. Priestly

Albert G. Hughes

Lorenzo D. Evans

David E. Putnam

Hiram Rosser ,

Wm. B. Whittlesey

Thomas W. Morris ,

George B. Turner

David Putnam ,

Wm. M. Hudson

Kiley M. Merrill ,

John G. Rounds ,

James M. Joseph ,

Bradley B. Stone

John Kirk

Keasoti A. Bull

Wm. Gibson

George W. Cooper

Charles A. Brown

(.'utler W. Goodrich

James M. Cooper

James H. McK.ee

I. Carmicha'l

Wm. It. Kirk

Arthur T. Okey

Lorenzo D. Stevens

Lorenzo D. Evans

Wm. B. Whittlesey

Thomas Day

Benj. G. Alden

James M. Joseph

Thomas W. Morris

Hiram Rosser

John D. Smith

Hugh Townsend

Bradley B. Stone

David Putnam

George B. Turner

Isaac N. Lloyd

John Kirk

Wm. M. Hudson

Wm. Gibson



Aug.
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May
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May 20, 1863



Nov.
July



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Nov.

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May
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1 -62



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23,



1862' Resigned March 22, 1863.
Mustered out May 19, 1865.
Promoted to Colonel.
Honorably discharged April 11, 1864.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned February 1, 1862.
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Resigned December 8, 1863.
Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned August 15, 1864.
Resigned April 29, 1863.
Never mustered.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned September 9, 1&63.
Promoted to Major.
Resigned December 8. 1863.
Promoted to Major.
Resigned October 15, 1S64.
Resigned November 3, 1864.
Resigned April 9, 1863.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned May 9. 1863.
Resigned July 12, 1.S63.
Resigned July 20, 1863.
Died November 27, 1864.
Died October 2, 1863.
Died November 25, 1863.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Honorably discharged May 24, 1861.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Declined commission.
Mustered out with regiment.
Discharged tor physical disability Nov. 6, 1864.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Resigned November 20, 1862.
Piomoted to Captain.
Resigned September 29, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Major.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned May 28, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Resigned August 10, 1S63.
Honorably discharged November 24, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Promoted to Captain.
Died of wounds December 1, 1863.
Promoted to Captain.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustereil out with regiment.
Resigned April 27, 1865.
Resigned— date unknown.
Promoted to Captain.
Commission returned.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Colored command — returned commission.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment
Resigned December 24, 1863.
Resigned May 9, 1S63.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned February 17, 1863.
Resigned October 14, 1868.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Honorably discharged January 6, 1864.
Killed November 23, 1863.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Resigned October 13, 1863.
I'i charged Septembers, lS' - 4.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
l864|Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



lS.'-.3



1S64



In.:'



512 Ohio in the Wae.



NINETY-SECOND OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTKY.



THE NINETY -SECOND OHIO was organized at Marietta, Ohio, during the
months of August and September, 1862. It rendezvoused at Camp Marietta, then in
command of Colonel W. B. Putnam. N. H. Van Vorhes, commissioned Colonel, reported
and assumed command on the 1st of October, 1862. As an officer of volunteers he had been on
active duty at the front since April, 1861; and while the regiment was organizing he was still
on duty with General Mitchel in Alabama. B. D. Fearing, the Lieutenant-Colonel, had seen
service ; was at Manassas as a private ; had served on the staffs of Generals Slemmer and Crook
in Virginia, and evinced soldiership at Shiloh, in command of one of the regiments of General
Sherman's division. All the other officers were gentlemen of experience and courage.

The men were the pick of the district — young, active, quick to learn, eager to do their best
at all times, and proud of the good name and character of their regiment.

The first service performed was before the Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel, or Major had
reported, or the regiment had been mustered. Adjutant Putnam, with companies A, B, and D,
was ordered to move to Gallipolis, Ohio, and garrison that post, at the time the Rebels were
driving Lightburn out of the Kanawha Valley. While there they made two expeditions into
Virginia. These companies soon after rejoined; when the regiment, numbering nine hundred
and forty-nine, rank and file, was mustered into the United States service, uniformed, and armed
with Austrian rifled muskets. On the 7th of October, 1862, it was ordered to Point Pleasant,
Virginia, by General Q. A. Gillmore, and assigned to Colonel Gilbert's brigade. Soon after it
was transferred to the brigade of Colonel Toland, one of the brigades of Lightburn's Kanawha
Division. The regiment took part in the expeditions (under General Cox) that drove the Rebel
army out of the Valley of the Kanawha and beyond the mountains. At Gauley Bridge, where
the regiment rested from pursuit of the enemy, it was transferred to the brigade of General
Hugh Ewing, and was stationed at Camp Vinton to guard the approaches from Loupe and
Alexander Creeks.

January 1, 1863, it was assigned to the brigade of General George Crook, and moved to
Tompkins's Farm, on the New Eiver, occupying the outposts of the army. Soon after, it marched
to Colesworth, West Virginia, and from thence it moved (January 7) for Nashville, Tennessee.
The trip from the Kanawha to Nashville was over two weeks in duration, during which the men
suffered greatly from being crowded on miserable boats. It camped at Nashville until the 17th
of February, 1863, when it was ordered with Crook's Brigade, to Carthage, Tennessee.

Ee-embarking on transports, worse, if that were possible, than those the last trip was made
on, they moved up the Cumberland. During the seven days the regiment was on these boats
many of the men were compelled to sleep in the hold. Within two months ninety-six of the
men were buried. There were no sanitary stores in the command, and the medicine-chests were
empty, for a short time, of some of the most essential preparations.

A general order (No. 78), dated "Carthage, Tennessee, May 9, 1863, after announcing a
speedy move to join the army beyond the Cumberland, and deploring the loss of many of their
brave comrades by death, concludes by ordering :

" That the commandants of companies make proper details to secure the cemetery from
invasion and beautify the grounds by sod, and flower, and evergreen, and bush, making it a fit
resting-place for the noble fellows that there are laid.

(Signed) "D. B. Fearing, Colonel."



Ninety-Second Ohio Infantry. -313

The regiment was no sooner south of the Cumberland than it had a sharp skirmish with
General Morgan's cavalry, after whom, on the 5th of June, it set out on a fruitless chase. After
this it joined, with the brigade, the main army at Murfreesboro'. General Crook was assigned
to General Reynolds's division, Fourteenth Army Corps. He took with him his old troops — the
Eleventh, Thirty-Sixth, Eighty-Ninth, and Ninety-Second Ohio, and Eighteenth Kentucky
Infantry, and the Twenty-First Indiana Battery. His brigade was the Third, of the Fourth
Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. It moved from Murfreesboro' on the 24th of June, support-
ing Colonel "Wilder's mounted infantry, going south on the Manchester Pike. The Ninety-Sec-
ond was moved rapidly to the assistance of Wilder, who had carried by storm Hoover Gap, and
driven the enemy through and beyond it, but was now hard pressed by fresh troops sent to
recover the valuable ground lost and to punish Wilder for his audacity. The enemy was soon
driven back with much loss. The Eighteenth Kentucky Infantry and the Twenty-First Indiana
Battery, reporting to Colonel Fearing, he, with them and his own (Ninety-Second Ohio) regi-
ment, relieved Wilder's troops, having received instructions to hold the gap at all hazards.
Early on the morning of the 25th the enemy made a determined struggle to repossess the gap,
but the battery and regiments maintained their ground until the Fourteenth Corps, under Gen-
eral Thomas, moved from the gap, deployed in the valley beyond, and swept everything before
it. Though actively engaged most of the day in a sharp skirmish, yet the regiment had but one
man killed, Lee West, company A, and a few wounded. In pursuit of the enemy the Ninety-
Second participated with the brigade in its movements at Tullahoma and in the advance to Elk
River. At Big Springs, near the Elk, the regiment encamped, awaiting supplies and the bag-
gage abandoned to facilitate the pursuit. While here General John B. Turchin assumed the
command of the brigade.

In July the command moved to pleasant camps on the mountain tops, by the springs
at University Place. From here they made frequent forays along the mountain-ranges and into
the valleys beyond. In August the regiment, with the brigade, moved over the mountain and
down through Sweden Cove, stopping a few days at Blue Springs to gather the abundant crop of
delicious peaches and sweet corn. Moving through Battle Creek, they encamped in the
Sequatchie Valley, near Jasper, Tennessee. On the 2d of September, at Shellmound, in flat-
boats, the regiment made the crossing of the Tennessee. On the 3d it led the advance of the
brigade and the army over Sand Mountain, clearing the way for the encampment of the troops
in Lookout Valley. After a little skirmish on the next day, toward Chattanooga, it moved south
to Trenton, Georgia. Marching from there to the base of the Lookout range, the brigade placed
ilself, after a severe struggle — baggage, commissary, ordnance trains, and artillery — on the moun-
tain's top. It did not seem possible to execute it; but severe fighting in the valley bevond, and
the need of the brigade there, was stimulant enough to overcome every obstacle of' the pass.
Passing over Lookout, from which it descended, through Cooper's Gap, into McLemore's Cove,
but too late to join battle, the regiment, on the 8th, moved up the valley and took the lead of
the brigade, passing Pond Spring and driving the Rebels from the Chattanooga and Lafayette
Pike, and beyond Lane's Church into Catlett's Gap, in Pigeon Mountain. Here a sharp skir-
mish ensued, and the regiment gained control of the head of the gap, but, by a mistaken order,
it abandoned the gap and took up its post at the church. Later in the day, when the regiment
essayed to establish itself in the gap, it was roughly handled by a brigade of Hindman's, sent
to dislodge them and hold the gap. That evening the Ninety-Second, at Lane's Church, was
relieved by the Eleventh Ohio. Major-General Reynolds at this point covered the concentra-
tion of the army about Pond Springs. The Ninety-Second Ohio being a part of this mask, was
busy skirmishing with the enemy, some of these skirmishes rounding into the proportions of a
battle. On the night of the 18th of September the memorable march to Chickamauga was made.
The regiment was with Turchin in the white heat of the fight, on the 19th and 20th, forming a
part of the rear guard that heroically devoted itself to save the army.

The noble part taken by the Ninety-Second is given in detail in the admirable report of
Lieutenant-Colonel Douglas Putnam, dated from head-quarters, Chattanooga, Tennessee, Septem-
Vol. II.— 33.



514 Opiio in the War.

ber 26, 1863. On the 19th Colonel Fearing was wounded and carried from the field. The com-
mand then devolved upon Lieutenant-Colonel Putnam. On the same day Captains Putnam and
Brown and Lieutenant Okey were severely wounded. There were five men killed, fifty wounded,
and five missing. " The smallness of the loss," says the report, " was due to the very skillful
management of Colonel Fearing, and his coolness and bravery while under fire and in command.
On Sunday, the 20th, the regiment, with its brigade, led the charge on the right (now the left),
driving the enemy in utter confusion across the field, and compelling him to abandon his artil-
lery. Several prisoners were brought off by the regiment after this charge, among whom were
a Colonel and several officers. The loss of the regiment was three commissioned officers and
fifteen men wounded, and fifteen men missing."

The wound of Captain John Brown, company D, proved mortal. He was formerly a soldier
in the famous Havelock (English) Brigade, and in the service of the United States proved him-
self a model soldier and an accomplished officer.

Lieutenant Merrill was wounded severely and captured, and sent to our lines under flag.
Lieutenant Hudson, captured, went to Libby, but escaped after a long confinement, and served to
the end of the war.

Returning under Thomas, the brigade went into line, covering Chattanooga. The suffer-
ings and trials of the beleaguered army have been often told. The men of the Ninety-Second
bore them all with patience and without a murmur. During the siege the brigade made several
reconnoissances that were most important and hazardous. On the 26th of October Turchin'3
brigade, with Hazen's, was selected to take a point on the river on the further side of Lookout
Mountain, known as Brown's Ferry. This movement was to co-operate with General Hooker,
destroy the blockade, and relieve the beleaguered army. A detachment of expert boatmen, dar-
ing fellows, under chosen officers, reported from the Ninety-Second to Colonel Stanley,
Eighteenth Ohio, to man the pontoon-boats that were to run the gauntlet of the Rebel pickets
and batteries that lined the bank and mountain side. The regiment, under Turchin, marched
over the Tennessee, then over the neck of land known as the Moccasin, to the ferry, and were
taken over in the boats that brought Hazen's men down the river. This move was made under
cover of night. It was a complete success, reflecting credit on all engaged in it. The Ninety-
Second garrisoned the point captured until relieved by a force from General Hooker's army,
when it returned to Chattanooga in time to take part in the initiative to Mission Ridge.

General Turchin's brigade had been maneuvering in front of the Rebel position from the
21st until the 25th of November; now spectators of the grand fight of Hooker for Lookout on
the right; now on the left, with eager expectancy, watching the mortal struggle of their com-
rades of the Army of the Tennessee, under Sherman, with the army of the same name under
Bragg. Bracing themselves for the perilous feat of scaling the ridge, the Ninety-Second,
Thirty-Sixth, and Eleventh Ohio moved to the assault in double column, half distance, sup-
ported by the Thirty-First Ohio and Eighty-Second Indiana.

Companies A and B, of the Ninety-Second, under Captain Middleswarth, with the skirmish-
ers of the Thirty-Sixth and Eleventh Ohio, did a handsome thing in clearing the rifle-pits in the
woods and the works at the foot of the ridge of the enemy's advance. Moving over the plain
and through the woods, with a disciplined steadiness that was admirable, the brigade deployed,
swept over the abandoned works at the foot, and made straight for those at the crest. No posi-
tion could have been more difficult to carry, as the Rebel lines, bending back around the head
of a ravine that pierced the assaulting lines, breaking them and destroying their impetus, had
their ends terminated in batteries on the advanced knobs. The batteries and their supports, as the
storming parties rose higher and higher, changed from a front to a flanking fire ; and, as the
line struggled under the crushing fire of grape, canister, and musketry, through the entangle-
ments near the top, those batteries made fearful gaps in it, taking them in reverse. Under this
pitiless fire they were compelled to take breath from sheer exhaustion, so steep was the ascent.
Midway the regiment's commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Putnam, fell. Near him Lieutenant



Ninety-Second Ohio Infantey. 515

Townsend fell dead. Color-Sergeants and guards were all shot away. Rallying the men by the
colors, young Captain Whittlesey, a brave and noble officer, fell dead.

But the men went on — they needed no leaders then. Mingling their cut and tattered ban-
ners with those of the Thirty-Sixth Ohio, they swept over the works, enveloping guns and
defenders. Leading the storming party over the crest, young Turner, the Adjutant, received
his death-wound. Wheeling to the left, the men eagerly rushed along the ridge, rolling up the
enemy's lines, and staying not in the pursuit till the recall was sounded at nightfall. The loss of
the Ninety-Second was very severe, losing, in twenty minutes, thirty-three per cent, of the officers
and ten per cent, of the men engaged. The regiment took many prisoners and two guns.

On the morrow the regiment, under Captain Wheeler, moved, with the brigade, southward
in pursuit of the retreating enemy. The pursuit ended, they returned to Chattanooga, where
they remained on active duty until the 22d of February, 1864, when, with the First Brigade
(Turchin's), Third Division (Baird's), Fourteenth Army Corps, under Palmer, the regiment
joined the expedition to meet the Rebels, under Johnston, at Dallas, Georgia. Major Golden
having resigned soon after Mission Ridge, Captain J. C. Morrow was in command of the regi-
ment, Fearing and Putnam still absent on account of wounds.

At Rocky Face Gap the brigade had a desperate but indecisive struggle with the enemy.
In the fight the Ninety-Second lost very heavily, some of the wounded being burned in the
blazing woods. Captain Edward Grosvenor, company A, was complimented in general orders
for gallantry in this action.

After a diversion to relieve other divisions, General Baird moved to Ringgold Gap, where
the Ninety-Second, with this division, did outpost-duty till the spring campaign opened in May.
Here (at Ringgold) the regiment was in splendid camps, under the command of Lieutenant-
Colonel John C. Morrow, promoted, vice Putnam, mustered out on account of wounds. Colonel
Fearing returned in March, and Lieutenant B. B. Stone was appointed Adjutant.

On the 7th of May the regiment marched to and through Tunnel Hill, and sat down before
Buzzard's Roost, Georgia. On the 12th it moved, with its brigade, along the base of the Johns
Mountain range and passed through Snake Creek Gap. On the 13th it had some skirmishing
as it advanced toward Resaca. On the 14th it was in line of battle on the left of the front line
of the brigade, and through the day was engaged as sharp-shooters, losing but two men killed
and two wounded. On the 16th the regiment entered Resaca, and without delay followed the
retreating Rebels south of the Oostenaula River, and to the banks of the Etowah. On the 23d
the Etowah was forded ; but the regiment returned from Raccoon Creek to escort supply-trains
from Kingston to the army in the field. The regiment, with its brigade, joined the division near
Dallas, Georgia, acting as guard for the corps trains until the 11th of June, when it went to the
front, taking an active part in the movements that forced the enemy to evacuate his works on
Pine Knob. Swinging forward through the blinding rain and dense thickets on the morning of
the 18th of June, in reserve to the brigade, it saw the enemy driven from their last line of works
north of Kenesaw Mountain. It took an active part, on the 19th and 20th, in forcing the enemy
from the valley, to take shelter among the rocks on the side of Kenesaw, losing one officer
wounded, one man killed, and one wounded.

On the 3d of July the regiment, in pursuit of the enemy, moved over his works through
Marietta, Georgia, finding him some four miles south-west of that place, strongly posted ; and
when he was forced from this position to the new line on the north bank of the Chattahoochie,
it followed in close pursuit, and again found him confronting the army in formidable works.
Here the regiment took an active part, with the brigade, in the operations that forced the enemy
from his position, compelling him to abandon all the territory north of the river.

After a few days' rest the line of march was resumed ; crossed the Chattahoochie at Poce's
Ferry on the 17th, and went into line on the 22d in front of Atlanta, losing but one man. On
the 3d of August it supported the assaulting column that forced the passage of Utoy Creek ; it
also participated in the affair of the 6th.

On the 27th of August, 1S64, the Ninety -Second, with the First Brigade, then in command of



516 Ohio in the Wae.

Colonel Walker, Thirty-First Ohio, withdrew from the enemy's front near Atlanta, and, joining
the main army, took part in the movement south that gave us Atlanta, sharing in the glory
gained by the Fourteenth Army Corps in the magnificent charge at Jonesboro', Georgia.

During the month of September the regiment was encamped south of Atlanta, on the Macon
Railroad. On the 4th of October the regiment broke camp and marched north over the Chatta^
hoochie in pursuit of the Rebel army under Hood, who was tampering with the communications
of the army at Atlanta; passing over the Nicqjack; through Marietta; by the Kenesaws; through
the Allatoona; over the Etowah; through Kingston to Rome; up the Oostenaula to Resaca; over
the Johns Mountain; through Ship Gap into Alabama; over the Coosa, through Rome, and back
to Kingston by the 1st of November.

Here all the sick and feeble were carefully disposed of in the hospitals, all incumbrances
destroyed or sent to the rear; while the able-bodied stored plenty of seven-thirties and green-
backs in their belts to buy yams, sweet potatoes, peanuts, sorghum, chickens, fresh pork, oysters,
and other delicacies. On the 12th of November, with light hearts, the men followed the eagles
southward to solve the Sherman problem, over the Etowah and through the Allatoona Pass,
destroying the railroad and bridges in their rear. On the 16th, leaving Atlanta, they were off



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