Copyright
Whitelaw Reid.

Ohio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) online

. (page 98 of 165)
Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 98 of 165)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


receiving the praises of its brigade and division commanders, and losing several men. It fol-
lowed in pursuit of the Rebels, and at Lancaster, Kentucky, had a pretty severe skirmish with
their rear-guard. Its march was continued, passing through Crab Orchard, Danville, Lebanon,
and Bowling Green, and thence to Nashville, Tennessee. At Nashville General Jeff. C. Davis
took command of the division, and on the 26th of December it marched with the Army of the
Cumberland, General Rosecrans commanding.

On the afternoon of the same day (December 26th) the enemy was met and a lir.e of battle
formed. The brigade (Second Brigade, Jeff. C. Davis's division, consisting of the Twenty-First
and Thirty-Eighth Illinois, Fifteenth Wisconsin, and One Hundred and First Ohio Regiments of
Infantry, and the Second Minnesota Battery) soon engaged the enemy with spirit, sustaining a
sharp fire until he was dislodged. Notwithstanding the day was fast waning, and little was



550 Ohio in the Wae.

known of the precise nature of the ground over which the armies were moving, General Davis
resolved to follow up his advantage. The enemy retreated about two miles to a rugged hill, the
road passing through a defile known as Knob Gap. Deploying on either side of the road, with
one section of their artillery in the defile, and other pieces on the crest of the hill, they waited
another encounter. The line advanced in the order of battle of the first collision — Post's brigade
moving up the road and to the left of it, and Carlin on the right. The enemy opened upon Car-
lin with artillery at long range. Hotchkiss and Pinney moved up and went into action quickly,
while Carlin charged up the hill with the One Hundred and First Ohio, carried the crest and
captured two bronze field pieces. Post had also carried the heights on the left, driving the
enemy out of position, but missing the guns. "Woodruff performed his duty on the right by
driving the Kebel skirmishers. The One Hundred and First Ohio, being a new regiment, was
particularly signalized, the men behaving like veterans ; one of the guns captured by it had on
it the word "Shiloh," and belonged to Georgia troops.

On the 30th of December this brigade was the first of the army to arrive on the battle-field
of Stone Eiver. It at once engaged the enemy's outposts, and drove them back on his main line,
and just at night became briskly engaged. The regiment lay on its arms all night, and was fully
ready to receive the shock of battle that came with daylight on the 31st of December. The bri-
gade stood firm, repulsing every attempt to b?eak it, until Johnson's division and Post's brigade
of the First Division on the right being driven from their positions, the enemy appeared on the
right flank and rear of the brigade, when, in obedience to orders, it fell back and took up a new
position, holding the enemy in check until he again threw a force on the flank and rear. , The
regiment continued in the hottest of the fight, taking up six different positions and stubbornly
maintaining them during the day. Colonel Leander Stem and Lieutenant-Colonel Wooster were
both killed on the front line on the right of the army. Both of these officers died as brave men
should, leading on their men to deeds of daring. The regiment was held on the front line on
the right of the army until the afternoon of January 2d, when disaster was threatening the left.
It was one of many regiments that were then transferred to the left, and with the bayonet helped
to turn the tide of battle. It remained there until the close of the battle, losing seven officers
and two hundred and twelve men killed and wounded.

During the remainder of the winter the One Hundred and First Ohio was engaged constantly
on expeditions through the country surrounding Murfreesboro', suffering very much from fatigue
and exposure. It was no uncommon thing to see as many as fifty men of the regiment marching
without shoes on their feet, and so ragged as to excite both the sympathies and risibilities of their
companions. This marching up and down the country — the purposes or utility of which were
oftentimes wholly unknown — lasted until April, 1863, when the regiment was allowed to go into
camp at Murfreesboro' for rest, and for the purpose of perfecting the command in drill.

On the 24th of June the Tullahoma campaign was inaugurated. The One Hundred and
First moved with that portion of the army that demonstrated in the direction of Liberty Gap,
• and was engaged with Cleburne's Rebel division for two days at that place. It followed the for-
tunes of the army up to Chattanooga, and at the close of that campaign was with Davis's division
at Winchester, Tennessee. On the 17th of August the regiment marched on the Chattanooga
campaign, crossing the Tennessee River atCaperton's Ferry. From thence it marched o^r Sand
and Lookout Mountains to near Alpine, Georgia. It then counter-marched over Lookout Moun-
tain, up "Wills's Valley, and recrossed Lookout Mountain to the field of Chickamauga, where it
participated in that battle on the 19th and 20th of August, displaying great coolness and gal-
lantry. During the heat of battle on the second day the One Hundred and First retook a
National battery from the enemy, fighting over the guns with clubbed muskets.

After retiring to Chattanooga the army was reorganized, and the One Hundred and First
Ohio became a part of the First Brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, and on the 28th
of October this brigade marched to Bridgeport, Alabama. It remained in camp at that place
until January 16, 186-4, and then marched to Oldtawah, Tennessee.

On the 3d of May, 1861, it marched with the army en the Atlanta campaign, meeting the



One Hundred and Fiest Ohio Infantry. 551

enemy's outposts at Catoosa Springs, on which occasion the One Hundred and First Ohio was
thrown forward as skirmishers, and drove the enemy steadily up to Tunnel Hill. A reconnois-
sance being ordered to ascertain the enemy's position in the Pass of Rocky Face Ridge (known as
Buzzard's Roost), the One Hundred and First pushed forward as skirmishers, compelling the
enemy to haul away one battery posted in a detached work, and pushing its way to within thirty
or forty yards of the enemy's main line of works, met with such an overwhelming and murderous
fire that the men were compelled to take shelter under the overhanging rocks, and remain in
their hiding-places until nine o'clock P. M. before they could be extracted from their perilous
position.

As the Atlanta campaign progressed the One Hundred and First was actively engaged in the
almost constant fighting of that arduous march. It moved with the army around Atlanta, fight-
ing at Jonesboro' and Lovejoy, and back to Atlanta. In the sudden change of tactics adopted
by the Rebel General Hood, it was actively employed with other National forces in pursuing,
fighting, and heading off the enemy in his designs on the railroad communications of the Na-
tional army. It marched from Atlanta to Pulaski, Tennessee, and from there on the retreat
to Nashville.

At the battle of Franklin, just at nightfall, the One Hundred and First was ordered to retake
an angle of the works held by the enemy, which it did with the bayonet, and held the position
until ten o'clock, P. M., notwithstanding the Rebels were almost within bayonet reach during all
that time.

The One Hundred and First was engaged in the battle of Nashville, December 15th and
16th, and participated in the assault on the enemy's center on the 15th. After the battle and
rnut it followed in pursuit of Hood to Lexington, Alabama, and marched thence via Athens to
Huntsville, where it went into camp. It lay in camp at Huntsville until the 12th of June, 1865,
when with other regiments it was mustered out of the service. It was then sent home by rail to
Ohio, placed in camp Taylor, near Cleveland, paid off and discharged.



552



Ohio in the War.



102d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



Colonel

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Do.

Do

Major

Do

Do

Surgeon

A6B't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain

Do



DATE OF RANK.



Do

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
3d Li-u tenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



WM. GIVEN

Absalom Baker

George II. Bowman

Ionas D. Elliott

John Huston

George H. Topping

Jonas D. Elliott

John Huston

Alex. V. Patterson

Wm. S. Patterson

James II. Estep

George Wayland Savers.

George Mitchell

Aaron J. Irwin

Hugh L. Parrish

John Huston

John McNaull

George II. Bowman

Aaron E. Zody -

Augustus W. Lobach

John W. Stout

Isaac Harps ter

Jonas D. Elliott

James E. Robinson

John St. Sloan

Jot-eph R. Folwell

Harrison H. Rowe

Aaron Waits

Benton Beerbower

Wm. C. Scott

Edward W. Bradley

Emanuel Hade

John Castor

•Wm. A. Beer

Win. II. McMonigal

Joseph R. Folwell

Gay lord Thomas

John W. Buekman

Emanuel Hade

luhn Castor

James H. Vonbrochlin

Edward W. Bradley

lease Y. Ross

Simon B. Kenton

Wm. A. Beer

James Riddle

lolm Stattsgaber

Wm. H. McMonigal

Aaron Waits ,

Holiday Ames

Silas B. Johnson

Wm. U. Scott ,

Gustavus Woolf.

Benton Beerbower

Elias A. Palmer

Isaac C. Martin

De Witt Connell

David Hinkle

Samuel B. Donel

John T. Roberts

Robert Sands

Edwin Farmer

James P. Pougal

Wm. H. Butter

Holiday Ames ~

Wm. C. Scott

Gustavus Woolf.

John Eberhart

Harrison H. Rowe

Aaron Waits

Benton Beerbower

James McNulty i

Jerome Potter

Samuel B. Donel

Elias A. Palmer

John T. Roberts



Ang.

March

April

hVb.

Aug.

March

April

Aug.



Sept.
Aug.

.March

Sept.

July



All!

Dec.

Jan.

March

April

March



April

Oct.

Nov.

April

July



Aug.
July

Sept.
Dec-.



18, 1862

11, "
6, 1863

23, 1864
10, I860

14, 1862
6, 1863

23, 18t>4
25, 1862

19, "
IP, "

12, "
9, "

30, 186.3
6, 1862

15, "

21, "

22, "
22, "

22, "

23, "
2.3, "
23, "

25, "

5, "

20, "
19, 1S6
19, "
17, "

6, "
6, "

2.3, 1864
12, "

26, "
8, 186.

21, 1S62

22, "
23,
23,
23,
23,

23!

29,
24,
25,



20, "

22, "

!, 1863



COM. ISSUED.



Sept.
April

Feb.

Sept.
April

Sept.



March

Jan.

Sept.



Dec.
Feb.
May-



April

Oct.
Nov.
April
Sept.



16, 1861



March
May

April

Inly

April



Sept.
Oct.
April

July



Nov.
Dec.



23, "
8, "

12, "
8, 186
8, "

21, 1862

22, "
22,
23,
22,
23,
23,
23,
20,
24,
17,
20,



March
April
J a ne

Sept.
April

Sent.
Oct.
April



29, 1
23, 1
10, 1
16, 1

29, I
23,

15, 1
16,
16,

6,'

30, 1
27,

16, 1
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
26,
19, :

6,

6,

6,
29,
23,
12,
26,

8,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
16,
10,
16,
16,
26,
26,
19,
19,
19,
12,
29,
29,
29,
16,
23.
23,



8, 186.5



Sept. 16, 186!
16, "

16, "



Dec.
Feb.



Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned March 6, 1863.

Discharged March 4, 18(54.

Died of wounds October 13, 1S64.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned March 25, 1863

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Mustered out with regiment.

Declined.

Declined.

Died December 26, 1862, at Bowling Green.Ky.

Promoted to Surgeon 187th O. V. I. L,I nft -

Must, out April 19,'64; prom. to Surg. 2d Tenn.

Resigned January 4, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned December 20, 1862.

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

Died of wounds February 21, 1865.

Mustered out with regiment.

Resigned January 19, 1863.

Resigned March 19, 1863.

Promoted to Major.

Resigned April 17, 1863.

Mustered out with regiment.

Discharged October 20, 1S64.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Musi .red out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Appointed A. Q. M. U. S. V. February 29, '64.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February I, 1863.

Appointed Major 120th O. V. I.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned December 19, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Resigned February 24, 1863.

Resigned December 22, 1862.

Promoted to Captain.

Died September 25, 1863.

Resigned February 1, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment.

Promoted to Captain.

Mustered out with regiment

Mustered out with regiment.

Discharged August 1, 1864.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Must -red out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment.

Mustered out with regiment as Adjutant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned February 22, 1863.

Promoted to Captain.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Resigned November 17, 1862.

Discharged July IS, 186.3.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.



One Hundred and Second Ohio Infantry.



553



RANK.


NAME.


11 ATE (


)V RANK.


COM. ISSUED.


REMARKS.






Doc.
Jan.
Feb.

April

May
Dec.

Sept.


19, 1862
19, 18fi3
1, "
1, "

22, "
25, "
2.S, "
17, "
19, "
1. "
1, "
8, "


Feb.

March

April
June

March

Sept.


19, 1863

19, "
19, "
19, "
86, "
IT, "
2>, "
29, "
29, "
29, 1864
29, "
S, "


Fromoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
Mustered out as Sergeant.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment.
Mustered out with regiment as Serge




Do.






Do.






Do.






Do.


Wm. H. Butter




Do.


DeWitt ConnelJ




Do.






Do






Do.






Do.


Thomas B. Bird




Do.






Do.

















102d OHIO VOLUNTEER IWFAOTS.Y.



|HIS regiment was organized under the President's call of July 1st, 1862, for three
hundred thousand three-years' troops, and was recruited in the counties of Wayne,
Richland, Ashland, and Holmes. Recruiting for the regiment commenced July 23d,
1862, and it was organized with one thousand and forty-one, rank and file, on the 18th of August,
and went into Camp Mansfield. It received arms and ammunition on the night of the 3d of Sep-
tember, and left for Kentucky on the morning of the 4th. Crossed the Ohio River at Cincin-
nati by daylight on the morning of the 5th. It was mustered into service on the 6th at Coving-
ton, and was ordered immediately into the works around the city ; first in the Licking Valley,
and finally on the heights in the rear of Covington, where it intrenched and remained in line of
battle until the 22d, when it left in two divisions by boats for Louisville, Kentucky, where, after
delays occasioned by low water, it arrived on the 24th. It immediately went into the trenches
in defense of the city, where it remained until the 5th of October, when it was ordered to Shelby-
ville, Kentucky, in charge of a division supply-train, arriving on the morning of the 6th.
Thence it moved by way of Frankfort to Perryville, where it lay in line within hearing of the
battle at that place, but was not taken into the fight. Thence it proceeded to Crab Orchard, and
thence to Bowling Green, Kentucky, arriving on the 30th of October.

Tents had been issued at Louisville and enjoyed by the command for two days, after which
the regiment was without shelter until December 16th, 1862, when bell tents were issued.

On the 19th of December the regiment moved to Russellville, thence to Clarksville, Tennes-
see, arriving on Christmas night, where it remained for nine months, having been assigned to
the Reserve Corps, commanded by General Gordon Granger. Here it attained a high degree of
drill and discipline. It was engaged in collecting and forwarding supplies for Rosecrans's army,
building a railroad bridge eighty feet high and three hundred feet long over Red River, and also
other bridges along the line of communication.

On the 23d of September, 1863, the regiment left Clarksville and moved to Nashville ; thence
proceeded by rail — the left wing under command of Major Elliott — to Elk River, and the right,
under Lieutenant-Colonel Bowman, to Cowen, Tennessee: Colonel Given at this time command-
ing brigade, with head-quarters at Cowen. On the 26th the right wing, with the brigade, under
Colonel Given, marched to Shelbyville, Tennessee, to aid in repelling the raid made by General
Wheeler.

On the 30th of October the regiment went into winter-quarters at Nashville, Tennessee, and
was assigned to General Ward's brigade, Kousseau's division, Twentieth Army Corps. It pre-



554 Ohio in the War

pared to move to the front with the brigade, but at the special instance of General R. S. Granger
it was retained with the Eighteenth Michigan for duty in the city, where it remained six months.

On the 26th of April, 1864, the regiment was transferred to Tullahoma, Tennessee, where it
relieved a brigade, and guarded the railroad from Normandy to Decherd until the 6th of June.
Here Colonel Given was relieved of the command of the brigade, and with his regiment only
marched across the Cumberland Mountains to Bellefonte, Alabama, arriving on the 10th of June,
the left wing, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Elliott, continuing its march to Dodson-
ville, fifteen miles further down the river. Here the regiment was employed on the defense of
the line of the Tennessee River from Stevenson to the foot of Seven Mile Island, a distance of
fifty miles, every part of which was patrolled four times every twenty-four hours.

On this line the regiment erected twelve superior block-houses and one fort. For more than
two months scouting parties were kept out every day, traveling at least twelve miles before
returning, and keeping a complete journal, as required by army regulations. The object of
maintaining the line of the Tennessee was to prevent the enemy, then in large numbers on the
south side of the river, from crossing and destroying the Memphis and Charleston Railroad; and
although the enemy frequently attempted to do so, yet they never succeeded in damaging, or even
reaching any line of communication guarded by the regiment. During this summer different
parts of the regiment had frequent engagements with detachments of the enemy, and were always
successful ; and at one time literally executed an order to destroy all the habitations in Jones's
Cove — a guerrilla rendezvous on the south side of the river; at the same time killing and cap-
turing a number of the enemy. Many prisoners and Rebel deserters — a number of whom were
sent from Dodsonville — were forwarded from the head-quarters of the regiment at Bellefonte to
Decatur, then district head-quarters.

On the 1st of September, at Bellefonte, the regiment went on board the cars and remained on
them fourteen days, patrolling the Tennessee and Alabama Railroad from Decatur, Alabama, to
Columbia, Tennessee, and on the 15th of September went into camp at Decatur.

On the night of the 23d of September Colonel Given, in command of the post, was ordered
to send four hundred men to re-enforce the fort at Athens ; which was done by taking about equal
numbers from the One Hundred and Second Ohio and the Eighteenth Michigan, the re-enforce-
ment being put under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Elliott, of the One Hundred and Second.
The next morning this force met the enemy, under Forrest, near Athens, and by persistent fighting
drove him about four miles, and twice cut their way through two brigades of the enemy; pressing
for the fort and arriving in sight of it witnessed the humiliation of our flag, and the hoisting of
the Confederate banner — the fort having been cowardly surrendered, and the guns, manned by
Rebels, turned upon the troops under Colonel Elliott. They were surrounded by an overwhelm-
ing force of the enemy, a large number of men were killed and wounded, and the remainder
captured. The officers were taken to Selma and the men to Cahawba, Alabama. The officers
were afterw t - d transferred to Enterprise, where they remained until paroled, and returned to the
regiment about six months after theii; capture. The men were paroled and placed on board the
ill-fated Sultana at Vicksburg, and as nearly as can be ascertained eighty-one of the One Hun-
dred and Second were lost by the disaster to that boat.

It is but just to say that the officers and men of the Eighteenth Michigan deserve the same
credit for their conduct in the fight at Athens that is due to the One Hundred and Second Ohio.

On the 24th day of October Hood, with thirty -five thousand men and one hundred and eight
pieces of artillery, attacked the garrison at Decatur, Alabama, consisting of less than one thou-
sand men for duty and seventeen pieces of artillery. This force was thus disposed : The right
under the command of Colonel Doolittle, the left under command of Colonel Given, and the
whole commanded by General R. S. Granger. The enemy attacked the left, but soon extended
their lines around the whole works. During this siege, which lasted four days, and at which the
enemy were repulsed with the loss of fifteen hundred men, as reported by Hood himself, the One
Hundred and Second here a conspicuous part, and was publicly complimented on the field by



One Hundred and Second Ohio Infantry. 555

the General commanding for its bravery in the action, and Colonel Given has since been brevetted
Brigadier-General "for gallant conduct at Decatur."

After the siege of Decatur the regiment was frequently engaged in sharp and severe conflicts
with the enemy left by Hood to guard his rear, in which they drove the Rebels, at different times,
from four to ten miles. It is but due to the men to say that at all times they were willing to meet
the enemy, and no officer or man was ever known to quail, or attempt to avoid a conflict when the
enemy was within reach. This regiment was composed of an excellent class of men, and such
was their discipline and correct deportment that, while rigidly enforcing the claims of the Gov-
ernment, they secured the respect of the citizens of the rebellious States with whom they came
in contact.

In obedience to orders Decatur was evacuated on the 25th of November, and the regiment,
with other forces, marched one hundred miles to Stevenson, Alabama, where they labored inces-
santly in building forts to cut off Hood's retreat, should he be driven back that way. On the
23d the regiment returned by transports from Stevenson to Decatur, Alabama, arriving on the 1st
of June, 1865.

After this and until the collapse of the rebellion, detachments of the One Hundred and
Second were engaged in frequent conflicts with squads of the enemy's cavalry.

On the 30th day of June, 1865, it was mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee. It proceeded,
with thirty officers and four hundred and sixty- seven men, to Columbus, Ohio, and was there
discharged on the 8th of July, 1865.



556



Ohio in the War.



103d REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE.



DATE OF HANK,



COM. ISSUED.



REMARKS.



Colonel

Do

Lt. Colonel....

Do

Do

Major

L)o

Surgeon

Do

Ass't Surgeon
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Chaplain

Captain

D



Do

Do

1>

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

D.,

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

Do

1st Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.
2d Lieutenant

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.



TOHN S. CASEMENT..

PHILIP C.HAYES

Tames T. Sterling

Philip C. Hayes

Henry S. Piokands

Dewitt C. Howard

Henry S. Pickanus

L. D. Griswold

D. H. Brinkerhopf

D. H. Brinkekhoff

George Butler

It. S. Stansbury

M. Andrews

Jacob B. C.vseiieer

G. II. Hubbard

Isaac C. Vail

Wm. W. Hutehiuson

lohu L. Si'inple

JohnT. Philpot

George W. Tibbctts

Philip C. Hayes

Moses L. M. Poixotto....

George T. Brady

Lyman B. Wilcox

W. H. Garrett

Henry S. Pickands



Online LibraryWhitelaw ReidOhio in the war : her statesmen, her generals, and soldiers (Volume 2) → online text (page 98 of 165)