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work, under charge of Mr. W. A. Shaw, '88, local forecaster,
was begun in July, 1909, and the building was completed on
March 1, 1910. The plans of the building were drawn by the
Weather Bureau architect in Washington, D. C, and the building
was constructed by Mr. T. B. Robinson, contractor, of Burlington,
Vt. This is one of the most beautiful buildings on the Hill and
its construction has added much to the appearance of the grounds.
In 1908-'09 many improvements were made: Jackman Hall
was thorouglily repaired; the old Drill Hall was fitted up as a base
ball cage; and a system of alarm bells was installed in the various
buildings. In 1908, the grounds were connected with the village
water works thus giving ample fire proctection. In 1909, the Inter-
Communication Telephone System was installed, greatly facilita-
ting the work. In 1909, Mrs. James E. Ainsworth gave a liberal
donation which is known as the James E. Ainsworth Fund.
In 1910 the basement of Alumni Hall was concreted and the
ventilating system of the building completed l^y funds donated
by the alumni.

FACULTY.

The faculty in 1884-85, consisted of Col. Charles H. Lewis,
president; Col. Francis V. Randall, vice-president; Charles Dole,
A. M., secretary of the faculty and professor of Rhetoric, History,
and Political Science; William M. Rumbaugh, C. E., professor of
Military Science, Drawing and Topographical Engineering;
John B. Johnson, A. M., professor of Mathematics and Astronomy;
Louis Habel, A. M., Ph. D., professor of Chemistry, Metallurgy,
Physics, Modern Languages and the Natural Sciences; Asa Howe,
A. M., C. E., professor of Engineering Field Work; Rev. Isaac P.
Booth, A. M., professor of Latin and Greek; Philander D. Bradford,
A. M., M. D., professor of Anatomy and Phj^siology; Hiram A.
Cutting, A. M., Ph. D., lecturer on Natural Sciences and Geology;
Clarence L. Hathaway, A. M., M. D., lecturer on Hygiene; George
N. Carpenter, lecturer on Commercial Ethics.

In the summer of 1886, Professors Dole, Rumbaugh, Booth
and Lecturer Cutting resigned; and on September 8, 1886, Pro-
fessor Habel died. The loss of these membei-s of the faculty was
a severe blow to the University. Prof. C. C. Brill succeeded
Professor Habel as professor of Chemistry, Physics and Natural
Sciences. Prof. John C. Wait, C. E., succeeded Professor Rum-
baugh as professor of Military Science, Civil Engineering and
Architecture. Myron L. Chandler, A. B., of the class of 1886, was



FACULTY. 227

appointed professor of English and Classics and resident in
Barracks. Professor Howe was made professor of Engineering
and Field Work. Sergeant Henry J. Cox, A. B. U. S. Signal
Officer, was appointed lecturer and instructor in Meteorology
and Military Signalling.

In 1887-88, Lieut. Edward H. Catlin, 1st Lieut., 2d U. S.
Artillery was detailed as commandant and professor of Military
Science and Tactics. Instructor Cox was made professor of
Latin and Greek, serving until his resignation in ]\Iay, 1888.
Professor Johnson was given the French classes in addition to
his other work, serving until 1891. Lyle F. Bellinger, C. E.,
a graduate of Cornell University, was elected professor of Civil
Engineering and Architecture, succeeding Professor Wait; Cadet
Luther B. Johnson served as instructor of English during this
year; Hon. Frank Plumley, LL. B., was appointed lecturer on
Constitutional and Commercial Law and Social Ethics; Cadet
Aurin R. Shaw, served as an assistant in the Chemical laboratory
and as assistant U. S. Signal Service observer during 1887-89.

In 1888, Professor Cox was succeeded by Mr. William Line
as U. S. Signal Service observer, and was appointed instructor
of Meteorology and Militar}^ Signalling.

In 1889, Charles H. Cheney, C. E., of the class of 1886, suc-
ceeded Professor Bellinger as professor of Civil Engineering and
Architecture; Robert L. Irish, B. S., of the class of 1889, was
appointed professor of English and Histouy. Cadet Homer J.
Dane served as assistant in the chemical laboratory and Cadet
Alfred F. Booth as instructor in drawing.

In 1890, Jesse McI. Carter, 2d Lieut., 3d U. S. Cavalry,
succeeded Lieutenant Catlin as commandant and professor of
Military Science and Tactics. George F. Cole, Ph. B., was
elected professor of the ]\Iodern Languages and English, and Jesse
B. Mowry, B. S., professor of History and Political Economy:
Cadet Hiram N. Mattison served as an assistant in the chemical
laboratory and Cadet Leroy C. Hulburd as instructor in drawing.

In 1891, Lieut. Frederick C. Kimball, of the 5th U. S. In-
fantry, succeeded Lieutenant Carter as commandant and pro-
fessor of Military Science and Tactics; Professor Johnson was
made professor of Civil Engineering; Cadet Mattison continued
as assistant in the laboratory until 1892 and Cadet Hulburd as
instructor in drawing until 1893.

In 1892, Prof. Edson L. Whitney, Ph. D., LL. B., a graduate
of Harvard University and the Boston University Law School,



228 NORWICH UNIVERSITY.

was elected professor of History and the Modern Languages;
Herbert R. Roberts, A. B., a graduate of Boston University,
was elected professor of Latin, Greek and English; Cadet W. G.
Huntley served as assistant in the chemical laboratory during,
1892-94, and Cadet H. B. Wason as instructor in Drawing until
1894. Owing to advancing years Dr. P. D. Bradford, resigned
as professor of Anatomy and Physiology. Hon. George N.
Carpenter also resigned as lecturer on Commercial Ethics.

In 1893, Professor Whitney resigned and was succeeded by
Prof. George A. Arnold, A. M., a graduate of Tufts College.
Henry C. Keene, 1st Lieut. 24th U. S. Infantry, succeeded
Lieutenant Kimball as commandant and professor of Military
Science and Tactics.

In 1894, Professor Arnold resigned and was succeeded by
Charles H. Savage, A. B., a graduate of Bowdoin College. Prof.
Asa Howe, after several years of faithful service as professor of
Civil Engineering and Field Work, died on September 29, 1894.
Mr. DeWitt C. Webb, '92, was appointed instructor of Mathe-
matics, serving until January 1895; Professor Roberts was given
the French classes in addition to his other work. Cadets Fred C.
Davis, and C. S. Carleton served as instructors in Drawing;
Cadets Philo R. Hoefller and Charles E. Walker served as assistants
in the Chemical laboratory. In the spring of 1895, Instructor
Line was taken ill and died on March 28 He was succeeded as U. S.
Weather Bureau observer by John H. Clary, who was appointed
instructor in Meteorology and Military Signalling.

In 1895, Professor Savage resigned and was succeeded by
Mr. Frank A. Balch, A. B., a graduate of Dartmouth College.
Lieut. H. C. Keene, U. S. A., was succeeded by Henry W. Hovey,
1st Lieut. 24th U. S. Infantry, as commandant and professor
of Military Science and Tactics. This year an Electrical Engi-
neering course was begun with Mr. Edson M. Stevens, B. S.,
a graduate of the University of Vermont, in charge. Gen. O. 0.
Howard, U. S. A., the distinguished soldier, was appointed lecturer
on Military History; Philo R. Hoefler, B. S., was appointed
instructor in Analytical Chemistry; Mr. W. A. Shaw, '88, B. S.,
succeeded Mr. John H. Clary as U. S. Weather observer and
instructor in Meteorology. Cadet P. A. Dinsmoor served as
assistant in the chemical laboratory during 1896-98. In Decem-
ber, 1896, President Brown joined the faculty and during his term
of service had charge of some of the class work in Ethics, Moral
and Intellectual Philosophy and other subjects.



FACULTY,



229



In 1897, Professor Stevens resigned and the Electrical En-
gineering course was discontinued until 1907. E. A. Shaw,
A. M., C. E., a graduate of the class of 1891, was appointed in-
structor of Mathemetics. In the spring of 1898, Captain Hovey
was ordered to Burlington to assist in mustering the Vermont
Volunteers for the Spanish-American War, and Cadet Captain
A. E. Winslow acted as commandant during the remainder of
the academic )'ear.

In 1898, Instructor Shaw, was elected professor of Physics
and Drawing, and Capt. Charles H. Stockton, U. S. N., was ap-
pointed lecturer on International Law. During the absence of
Captain Hovey this year. Cadet Captain John P. Moseley served
as acting commandant. President Brown was ordered by the
U. S. Navy Department to duty at the Boston Navy Yard, as
equipment officer, in the summer of 1898, serving in this ca-
pacity until the close of the Spanish-American War. During
his absence Prof. C. C. Brill acted as executive officer.

Cadet Captain John P. Moseley served as commandant during
September-December, 1899, and March-May, 1900. In Decem-
ber Captain Hovey returned to his duties serving until March,
1900, when he was ordered to his regiment. Charles H. Ca-
bannis, 1st Lieut. U. S. A., (retired) succeeded" Captain Hovey
as commandant, remaining until after commencement, when he
resigned his office.

In 1900, several changes were made in the faculty. Prof,
John B. Johnson resigned after many years of faithful and effi-
cient service, much to the regret of the trustees and alumni.
Prof. Frank A. Balch, another efl5cient professor, also resigned.
Capt. C. S. Carelton, C. E., of the class of 1896, was appointed
commandant and professor of Military Science and Tactics,
and Field Engineering. Arthur E. Winslow, C. E., of the class
of 1898, was appointed assistant professor of Mathematics and
Civil Engineering. Carl V. Woodbury, A. B., a graduate of Bow-
doin College was elected assistant professor of History and Modern
Languages; Cadet William E. Robertson served as instructor in
Chemistry until 1901 and Cadet Harry G. Clark as instructor
in drawing until 1901. During 1901-02, Cadet Henry A.Chase,
served as assistant in Chemistry and Cadet Frank H. Burr, as
assistant in Drawing.

In 1902, Capt. H. W. Hovey, U. S. A., returned to the Uni-
versity as cc^mmandant and professor of Military Science and
Tactics, relieving Captain Carleton of the^duties of this office.



230



NORWICH UNIVERSITY.



Assistant Professors Winslow and Woodbury were advanced
to the full professorships in their subjects. Henry A. Chase,
B. S., of the class of 1902, was appointed instructor in Chemistry.
In 1903, Capt. Charles H. Stockton, U. S. N., resigned as
lecturer on International Law and Judge Frank Plumley was
elected in his place. E. W. Gibson, A. M., of the class of 1894,
succeeded Judge Plumley as lecturer on Constitutional and
Commercial Law. Professor Shaw became the professor of
Mathematics, and Professor Woodbury was given the professor-




View of Northfield from King Street.



ship of Ph3^sics and German. Cadet Edwin D. Huntley served
as assistant in Drawing during 1904-06.

In 1905, Professor Adrian Scott, A. M., Ph. D., a former
cadet, class of 1871, and a graudate of Brown University and a
former associate professor of the Germanic Languages at that
Institution, was elected professor of Political and Social Science
and instructor in Greek. Professor Scott died of apoplexy
on December 11, 1905. He was one of the ablest scholars in New
England and his death was a severe blow to the University.
Clarence L. Jordan, A. B., a graduate of Bates College, was elected
assistant professor of English and Economics and instructor in
Spanish. Mr. W. A. Shaw, '88, the U. S. Weather Bureau fore-
caster, was advanced to the professorship of Meteorology. Mr.
Henry A. Chase resigned as instructor in Chemistry.



FACULTY, 231

In 1906, Professor Brill resigned his professorship much to the
regret of the University officials and the alumni. Through his long
term of service as professor and superintendent^he had accom-
plished much not only for his own department, but also for ad-
vancement of the interests of the University. Major Hovey,
another long and tried friend of the University, was in July, 1906,
ordered to join his regiment. Professor Roberts succeeded Pro-
fessor Brill as Dean of the faculty. Professor Woodbury suc-
ceeded Professor Brill as professor of Chemistry. Austin E.
Spear, A. B., a graduate of Bowdoin College, was appointed as-
sistant professor of German and Spanish.

In 1906, Leslie A. I. Chapman, 1st Lieut. 1st U. S.
Cavalr}^, succeeded ^lajor Hovey as commandant and professor
of Military Science and Tactics. Professor Carleton was given a
year's leave of absence to engage in engineering work on the
Missouri Pacific Railroad. Mr. Frank E. Austin, B. S., was
elected professor of Electrical Engineering and Frank N. Tinker,
C. E., assistant professor of Civil Engineering, ^h. Kemp
R. B. Flint, B. S., of the class of 1903, was appointed instructor
in English and History and field agent.

In 1908, Professor Carleton returned to his position at the
University; Professor Austin relieved Professor Woodbury as
professor of Physics ; Instructor Flint was advanced to an assistant
professorship in his subjects; assistant Professors Jordan and
Tinker resigned. Mr. Harlow A. Whitney, M. D., a graduate
of the University of Vermont Medical School, was elected physical
director and professor of Hygiene and Sanitation. Mr. Charles
N. Barber, B. S., '08, was appointed instructor in Physics and
Drawing, and ^Ir. Sylvester M. Parker, '08, was appointed assis-
tant commandant and assistant instructor in Military Science.

In 1909, Professor Shaw was given a year's leave of absence
to take a post graduate work at Dartmouth. Assistant Professor
Flint was advanced to a professorship in his subjects. Capt.
Charles N. Barber, was appointed assistant commandant; Theo-
dore Bodde, E. E., a graduate of College Montefiore, Liege,
Belgium, was appointed assistant professor of Physics and Drawing
and Leon E. Dix, B. S., a graduate of Tufts College, assistant
professor of Mathematics. In this year the University lost the
services of Gen. 0. O. Howard, U. S. A., who died Oct. 26.

In 1910, Captain Chapman was succeeded by Captain Frank
Tompkins of the 11th U. S. Cavalry, as professor of Military
Science and Tactics. Captain Charles N. Barber resigned as



232 NORWICH UNIVERSITY.

assistant commandant. Maj. Luther P. Bayley, ''N. U./' '09,
was appointed commandant. Professor Shaw resumed his pro-
fessorship at the University.



The total attendance from 1885 to 1911 was 937. Of this
number 294 are graduates and 467 are non-graduates; 31 com-
prise the graduating class, and 145 are members of the three lower
classes. The graduating classes have increased from 3 in 1885 to
31 in 1911. The attendance from out of the state has gradually
increased to 55 percent of the student body in 191 1.

The requirements for admission, as given in the catalogue
of 1885-86, practically remained unchanged until 1904, with the
exception of the Science and Literature course .

All candidates for admission to the college must be at least
fifteen years of age, and must present satisfactory evidence of good
moral character.

For the courses in Science and Civil Engineering, Chemistry
and Physics, Science and Literature, candidates wUl be examined
in the following studies :

Mathematics. Arithmetic, Algebra to quadratics; Geo-
metry, four books of Davie's Legendre, or its equivalent.

English Language. Grammar, Composition with special
attention to punctuation and use of capitals.

Geography. Ph5'sical and Political Geography.

History. History of the United States.

Physics or Chemistry. Steel's Fourteen Weeks, or its
equivalent.

French. Grammar, translation of French at sight, the
translation of English into French, or

German. Grammar, translation of German at sight, the
translation of English into German.

Or in place of a Modern Languge, the candidate may offer:

Latin. Allen and Greenough's or Harkness' Latin Grammar
and Latin Prose Composition; Caesar's Commentaries, books 1-3,
or their equivalents.

Course in Arts.

In addition to the examinations in Mathematics, English
Language, Geography, History and Physics or Chemistry, laid
down for the courses in Science, examinations for the course in
Arts will be as follows :

Latin. Caesar's Commentaries, four books or Sallust's
Catiline; Virgil's Aeneid, six books; Cicero, four orations.



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 233

Greek. Xenophon's Anabasis, four books, or one hundred
pages Goodwin's Greek Reader; Homer's Iliad, two books.

Graduates from approved high schools will be admitted
without examination. Candidates not fully prepared in all the
requirements, will be conditioned for a limited time or placed in
a preparatory class.

Candidates for advanced standing will be examined in all
the previous studies of the course; and if they come from another
institution, will present certificates of honorable dismission.

In 1896, the Science and Literature course was greatly
strengthened and the candidate for admission was required to
pass the Latin requirements of the Arts course. In 1902 the
requirements were extended to include all of Plane Geometry.

In 1900, the age for entrance was fixed at sixteen years.
Beginning with 1904, an examination in Algebra through quad-
ratics was requirell; and English or Ancient History was added.
In 1905, the entrance requirements were further increased by
examinations in the " College Entrance Requirements in English.' '
In the same year a change was made in the Arts course, allowing
candidates presenting both French and German, without Latin
and Greek, to enter the Arts course, take these subjects from
the beginning, and, upon finishing the four years' work prescribed,
graduate in the A. B. course.

In the fall of 1909, Solid Geometry, French or German,
were added to the requirements.

In 1910, the entrance requirements were changed to admit
by points instead of subjects. For admission to any course
fourteen points were required. A point is a preparatory subject
pursued one year with five recitation periods a week. In each
course a certain number of points are required; the remainder
of the fourteen may be made up from the list of optional subjects.
In exceptional cases substitutions of equivalent work may be
offered for optional subjects listed.

In the course in Arts, twelve and one-half points are required,
one and one-half points optional as follows; Algebra, 1 point;
English, 3 points; Plane Geometry, 1 point; Solid Geometry, one-
half point; Greek, three points; Latin, four points.

In the courses in Civil Engineering, Chemistry, and Electrical
Engineering, eight and one-half points are required and five and
one-half optional, as follows: Algebra, one point; English, three
points; French two points, or German, two points; Plane Geometry,
one point; Solid Geometry, one-half point; Science, one point.



234 NORWICH UNIVERSITY.

In the course in Science and Literature, twelve and one-half
points are required, one and one-half points optional, as follows:
Algebra, one point; English, three points; French, two points or
German, two points; Plane Geometry, one point; Solid Geometry,
one-half point; Latin, four points; Science, one point.

The optional points for any course are as follows: Algebra,
Advanced, one-half point; Botany, one-half point; Chemistry,
one point; French, one or two points; German, one or two points;
American, English, Mediaeval, Modern, Greek, and Roman
History,^ each one-half point; Latin, two, three or four points;
Physics,' one point; Physiography, one-half point; Plane Trig-
onometry, one-half point; Zoology, one-half point.

The following courses of study given in the catalogues of
1886-87,]remained practicall}^ unchanged until 1895.

COURSES OF STUDY, 1886-87.

The courses in Civil Engineering, Architecture, Chemistry
and Science and Literature were the same for the first year.
The figures after each subject indicate the number of recitations
per week or its equivalent.

First Year. Fall term, Algebra, 5; French, German or
Latin, 5; Inorganic Chemistry, 3; Rhetoric, 2; Free Hand Draw-
ing, 5. Winter term, Algebra, 3; Geometry, 2; French or German
or Latin, 5; Inorganic Chemistry, 3; Rhetoric, 2; Perspective, 3;
Lettering, 2. Spring term,'^- Algebra, 2; Geometry, 3; French,
German or Latin, 5; Inorganic Chemistry, 3; Rhetoric, 2; Geo-
metrical Drafting, 3; Projection, 2.

Civil Engineering.

Second Year. Fall term. Algebra, 2; Geometry, 3; French
or German, 3; Mechanics and Heat, 5; Descriptive Geometry,
(text) 3; Descriptive Drafting, 2; Pen Topography, 2. Winter
term. Trigonometry, 5; French or German, 3; Electricity and
Magnetism, 5; Descriptive Geometry, 3; Descriptive Drafting,
2; Tinting and Shading, 2. Spring term. Analytical Geometry, 5;
French or German, 3; Acoustics and Optics, 5; Shades and Shadows,
(text) 2; Drafting, 3; Colored Topography, 2.

Third Year. Fall term. Analytical Geometry, 2; Calculus,
3; Land Surveying, 2; Leveling and Field Work, 3; Geology, 5;
Detail Drawings, 2; Graining, Tracings and Blue Prints, 2.
Winter term. Calculus, 5; Mineralogy, 3; Blow Piping, 2; Quali-
tative Analysis, 5; Graphic Solutions of Strains in Trusses and



COUSERS OF STUDY. 235

Arches, 5. Spring term, Analytic Mechanics, 5; Botany, 5;
Political Economy, 5; Architectural Drafting, 3; Stereotomy
and Stone Cutting, 2.

Fourth Year. Fall term, Analytic Mechanics, 5; R. R.
Surveying, 2; Field Work in R. R. Surveying, 3; Commercial
Law, 5; Metallurgy, 2; Hydrography, 2; Field Work, 3. Winter
term. Analytic Mechanics, 3; Spherical Astronomy, 2; Interna-
tional Law, 5; Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering, 5; Engineering
roads, canals, tunnels and materials, 5. Spring term. Spherical
Astronomy, Determination of Time, Latitude, etc., 5; Electrical
Engineering,Mights, dynamos, alarms, house wiring, etc., 5;
Contracts, Specifications, Orders for materials and forms, 5;
Preparation of Thesis, 5.

Architecture.

The first and second years of this course are identical with the
first two years of the course in Civil Engineering.

Third Year. Fall term, Anah-tical Geometry, 2; Calculus,
3; Detail of Building, o; Land Surveying, 2; Leveling and Field
Work, 3; Geology, 5. Winter term. Calculus, 5; Graphic Solution
of strains in roof trusses, arches, etc., 5; Mineralogy, 3; Blow
Pipe and Wet Analysis, 7. Spring term. Analytic Mechanics,
5; Stereotomy and Stone Cutting, 5; Political Economy, 5;
Lectures on Egyptian, Grecian and Roman Architecture, 5.

Fourth Year. Fall term, Analytic Mechanics, 5; Designing
5; Architectural Decorations, 3; Commercial Law, 5; Metallurgy, 2.
Winter term, Analytic Mechanics, 3; Constrution, 3; Blue Prints
and Tracings, 2; Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering, 5; Inter-
national Law, 5; Ventilation and Heating, 2. Spring term.
Modern Architecture and Designing, 5; Electric Wiring for
alarms, lights, etc., 5; Contracts, Specifications and Orders, 5;
Preparation of Thesis, 5.

Chemistry.

Second Year. Fall term. Algebra, 2; Geometry, 3; French,
German or Latin, 3; Mechanics and Heat, 5; Qualitative Analy-
sis, 5. Winter term, Trigometry, 5; French , German or Latin,
3; Electricity and Magnetism, 5; Blow Pipe Analysis, 5. Spring
term. Botany, 5; French, German or Latin, 3; Acoustics and
Optics, 5; Qualitative Analysis, 5.

Third Year. Fall term. Descriptive Geometry, 5; General
History, 5; Geology, 5; Organic Chemistry, 2; Qualitative Analysis



233 NORWICH UNIVERSITY.

of rare Minerals, 5. Winter term, Logic, 5; Natural History, 5;
Mineralogy, 3; Organic Chemistry, 2; Quantitative Analysis, 5.
Spring term, English Literature, 5; Industrial Chemistry, 5;
Organic Chemistry, 2; Quantitative Analysis, 7.

Fourth Year. Fall term. Land Surveying, 5; Commercial
Law, 5; Metallurgy, 2; Toxicology, 5; Medical Chemistry, 5. Winter
term. International Law, 5; Assaying, 2; Water Analysis, 5; Com-
mercial Chemistry, 3. Spring term. Political Economy, 5; Gas
Analysis, 5; Thesis, 5.

Science and Literature.

Second Year. Fall term. Algebra, 2; Geometry, 3; French,
German or Latin, 3; Mechanics and Heat, 5; Descriptive Geo-
metry, 5. Winter term, Trigonometry, 5; Descriptive Geometry,
3; French, German or Latin, 3; Electricity and Magnetism, 5;
Analytical Chemistry, 5. Spring term, French, German or Latin, 3;
Acoustics and Optics, 5; Analytical Chemistry, 5; Botany, 5.

Third Year. Fall term. Land Surveying, 5; French, Ger-
man or Latin, 5; Geology, 5; General History, 5. Winter term,
French, German or Latin, 5; Mineralogy, 3; Blow Pipe, 2; Logic,
5. Spring term, French German or Latin, 5; Astronomy, 5
Natural History, 5; English Literature, 5.

Fourth Year. Fall term, French, German or Latin, 3;
American History, 5; Commercial Law, 5; Pen Topography, 2;
Metallurgy, 2. Winter term, French, German or Latin, 3; Mental
and Moral Philosophy, 3; International Law, 5; Elements of



Online LibraryWilliam Arba EllisNorwich University, 1819-1911; her history, her graduates, her roll of honor (Volume 1) → online text (page 23 of 61)